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How Can Vitamin K2 Help My Health?

December 11th, 2019

As we approach the holidays, our hearts and tummies begin to prepare for the tasty meals enjoyed with loved ones. There are a lot of vitamins and minerals that exist in the foods we eat that are beneficial, and sometimes even essential for our body to function properly. Many of us have been told that milk builds strong bones due to calcium and vitamin D, which work together to help maintain your teeth and bones. But what about the less popular vitamins, such as vitamin K2? Check out how vitamin K2 may provide benefits for your general and dental health:

First, what exactly is Vitamin K? Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that is considered an essential nutrient necessary for blood clotting, calcium metabolism, bone health, and cardiovascular health. If your body is lacking vitamin K, your body's normal healing process may be impaired and you may be more likely to bleed.

Vitamin K has two main forms, K1 and K2. Vitamin K1 can be found in plant foods such as leafy greens and is made from the compound phylloquinone. On the other hand, vitamin K2 is found in animal and fermented foods, and from the normal bacteria within our human digestive system. Vitamin K2 is made from menaquinones. Not as popular in the Western diet, vitamin K2 can be found in Natto, a fermented soybean paste that is common in Japan, and in some cheeses. However, there is no recommendation for supplementation or daily intake of vitamin K2. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) describes vitamin K1 as the preferred form of the vitamin since it is less toxic, works faster, is stronger. However, vitamin K2 is also beneficial for our health for the reasons stated below.

Research suggests that vitamin K2 may protect your bones from osteoporosis and lower your risk of bone fractures. In addition, a research study published in Integrative Medicine: A Clinician's Journal found that vitamin K2 may contribute to keeping your blood vessel walls clear of calcium accumulation. Calcium deposits within blood vessels can lead to an increased risk of heart disease. Although more research needs to be conducted regarding vitamin K2 and its role in the oral cavity, some animal studies have suggested that it may play a role in lowering your risk of developing tooth decay. Vitamin K2 has been found to activate the protein osteocalcin, which is necessary for bone metabolism and the growth of new dentin within your teeth. it works together with vitamin D3 to carry calcium to your teeth and bones for normal absorption. It is also believed that vitamin K2 slows down the rate of tooth loss with age. Some studies have also suggested that vitamin K3 can help lower risk of developing diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, kidney disease, and lower oxidative stress in the brain related to Alzheimer's disease.

Ultimately, it is important to have a balanced diet, and keep up with a regular oral care routine, by brushing with fluoride toothpaste at least twice a day for two minutes each time, flossing, and keeping regular dental appointments.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/what-to-know-about-vitamin-k2-benefits-for-teeth

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-k2#bottom-line

https://askthedentist.com/vitamin-k2-benefits/

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Drinking from a Can? Think Again!

December 4th, 2019

Ever wonder if drinking from a can, a glass, or using straw could make a difference to your teeth? We all know that foods and drinks can play a role on the health of your teeth, but many would not have thought that the way you consume your drink can also be an important factor. Well, as it turns out, your drinking method does matter when consuming sugary beverages!

Sugary drinks can cause a lot of damage to your teeth, and your body too. According to a study published in the Academy of General Dentistry people in the United States consume about one and a half cans of soda a day, and a total of 576 each year! The study found that people who drink soft drinks straight from the can are more likely to get tooth decay on their back molar teeth. Consuming sugary drinks like sodas and energy drinks increase your risk of weight gain, and developing several medical conditions including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and gout -and kids are not exempt! Children are 60% more likely to become obese with each sugary beverage consumed per day and are 2 times more susceptible to tooth decay.

Sugar as we know is what bacteria love to eat, and as a result the bacteria within your mouth produce acids that ultimately lead to tooth decay and breakdown your tooth enamel. But, we all have that craving for a soda every once and a while. That's why it is important to learn about preventative measures to take when consuming sugary beverages. Research shows that holding a drink in your mouth and taking long sips is detrimental to your teeth because it increases the acidity within your mouth. A smaller drop in the pH occurs when you drink the beverage straight down quickly and in one sitting. Sipping on a soda can throughout the day leads right to decay due to the constant exposure of your teeth to the sugars. The American Dental Association (ADA) also recommends using a straw positioned towards the back of your mouth when consuming beverages to avoid contact of the drink with your teeth. This of course does not prevent you from developing cavities, but it will help reduce your risk.

Not to mention, when you consume your sugary beverages also matters. It is best to do so during mealtime as opposed to by itself. Rinsing with water is also important to help wash away the sugars. In addition, avoid brushing immediately after consuming sugary drinks, because your tooth enamel is in a weakened state and can be harmed from brushing.

Remember, everything in moderation is key. Always try to be mindful of what drinks you are consuming and how you are consuming them.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.bphc.org/whatwedo/healthy-eating-active-living/sugar-smarts/be-sugar-smart/Pages/Health-Effects-of-Sugary-Drinks.aspx

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050616060426.htm

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/does-drinking-out-of-cans-affect-your-risk-for-tooth-decay

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Give Thanks for your Teeth!

November 28th, 2019

Our caring team at Wellesley Dental Group wishes you and your family a Happy Thanksgiving! We hope that you have a day filled with great food and are surrounded by loved ones. Today there are lots of traditional Thanksgiving foods filled with vitamins and nutrients that may be present on your table, in addition to some that may not be the most tooth-friendly. If your looking for vitamins and nutrients to help keep your smile healthy, take a look at our breakdown of some of the hidden gems that you may be having in your Thanksgiving spread this year:

Need a Healthy Appetizer While the Food Cooks?

While the food is cooking, cheese, mixed nuts, and raw vegetables make a great snack! Cheese is is rich in calcium which is important for keeping your teeth strong. Casein, a protein within milk products, helps to prevent cavities. Nuts also contain calcium and minerals that help strengthen and remineralize your tooth enamel. Your saliva production is also at a high rate by chewing nuts and raw vegetables , which helps neutralize harmful acids and protect your teeth. Vegetables like celery and carrots also can help clean between teeth by acting like mini toothbrushes. Not to mention they contain the tooth-friendly Vitamin A.

The All-Star Turkey

The star of this holiday is thankfully packed with protein. Your mucosal tissues are also positively impacted by the iron and zinc within turkey. In addition, turkey is rich in phosphorous which is important for the health of your bones and teeth. Just keep some floss handy as turkey strands can easily find its way in-between your teeth.

The Accompanying Sides

Cranberry sauce can be the turkey's best companion. Unfortunately, lots of sugar is often added to many cranberry sauce recipes and in canned cranberries. However, try having fresh cranberries with your turkey this year. Cranberries are known to protect your teeth by blocking the harmful bacteria from their process in making cavities. They are loaded with many antioxidants which help your immune system fight against diseases.

Green beans make a great tasty side dish as they are rich in vitamins A, C, and K, which are great for gum health.

Yams and sweet potatoes also make a great side. If prepared without sugar additives, yams and sweet potatoes can be tooth-friendly as they are packed with Vitamin C, Thiamine, Niacin, Vitamin A, Fiber, and Potassium. They contain anti-inflammatory properties which can help fight periodontal disease. If your recipe does call for sugar, just be sure to rinse with water afterwards and keep up with brushing and flossing habits.

Saving the Best for Last: Dessert!


The smell of dessert alone can be the sweetest part of Thanksgiving! There's nothing like a home-made pumpkin pie, which is full of Vitamin A that strengthens tooth enamel and promotes gum health. Plus, pumpkin pie doesn't necessary need the added sugars due to its naturally sweet taste.

Another tooth-friendly dessert to try is fresh pear slices with honey yogurt dip. This recipe calls for about 2 tablespoons of honey with a sprinkle of ground cinnamon and fresh pear slices served on a platter. Pears are great for neutralizing harmful acids on tooth surfaces. Yogurt is also tooth-friendly as it contains calcium and phosphates.

Be sure to drink plenty of water throughout your meal to help wash away any leftover food particles from clinging to your teeth. Tap water contains fluoride which helps remineralize teeth and protect against cavities. Black and green tea have also been found to help kill harmful bacteria and fight against tooth decay. After a well-deserve Thanksgiving meal don't forget to brush and floss.

Moderation and healthy eating choices are key. We hope that you enjoy your Thanksgiving feast and have a great holiday!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/thanksgiving-slideshow

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/healthy-thanksgiving-tips-for-a-tooth-friendly-holiday-1113

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What's a Dental Crown?

November 25th, 2019

Has your dentist told you that you need a crown? Of course you are royalty, but a dental crown is slightly different than the crowns we are used to hearing about. A dental crown is like a cap that your dentist places over your tooth to restore it to its normal appearance and function. You may need a crown depending on the amount of tooth structure that you have left remaining. For instance, if you have a cavity that becomes too big to be replaced by a filing. Or if your tooth is chipped or worn down. Also, a crown may be indicated if you are in need of a root canal. Crowns can be made from several types of materials, including  metal alloys, ceramics, porcelain, or porcelain fused to metal (PFM) for example. The best pick of material for your crown is decided taking into consideration the location of the tooth in need of the crown, the shade of the tooth, and the position of your gum tissue just to name a few factors.

The process of getting a crown include the dentist first preparing the tooth by removing the outer surface of the tooth and any decay that is present. Sometimes your tooth may require an additional filling, also known as a core buildup, to support the crown. Then, an impression is taken of the prepared tooth in order to get a model of the tooth. While the crown is being made a temporary crown will be placed on the tooth. While having a temporary crown it is important to avoid chewing gum and eating sticky foods to prevent the temporary crown from dislodging. Also, when flossing be sure to slide the floss through rather than lifting it out to avoid pulling off the temporary crown. The last step is the cementation of the crown within the mouth along with any necessary adjustments.

What's important to know is that your crown needs to be taken care of just like your natural teeth. Crowned teeth can still be subject to tooth decay and gum disease.  Like always, you still want to brush your teeth for twice a day for two minutes each time, floss at least once a day, and avoid hard candies and an excess of sugary/acidic substances. You also want to make sure you are seeing your dentist regularly to ensure that your crown is sealed properly and doing well.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

 

References:

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-crowns

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/cosmetic-dentistry/bridges-and-crowns/your-dental-crown-procedure-what-to-expect-0113

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