acid reflux

Noticing Bad Breath in your Mask?

August 20th, 2020

Halitosis, also known as bad breath, is an oral health problem that leads to your breath being less than socially acceptable. Up to one-third of the population experiences this. According to the Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry, 90% of the causes of halitosis start within the mouth. The bacteria within the mouth can cause unpleasant odors and tastes.

Many states have issued face covering mandates as the cases of COVID-19 have risen around the United States. Wearing face coverings may have you wondering, “hmmm, is that my breath?” A lot of factors could play a role in causing bad breath, for instance poor oral health, uncontrolled diabetes or other medical conditions, smoking, and certain foods, just to name a few! Below are some surprising foods that may be leading to your bad breath and some tips to help combat it:

Alcohol

A study by Microbiome has shown that alcohol consumption reduces the amount of “good bacteria” in your mouth leading to the increase in favorable conditions for the growth of odor producing bacteria. If you choose to consume alcohol, follow it up with water. Not only does it remove alcohol from remaining on the structures within the mouth, it also replenishes saliva and reduces the dry mouth effect created by alcohol.

Sulfur Producing Foods

Certain foods like garlic and onions are part of the allium family which are made of sulfur compounds. These foods are absorbed by the blood stream where their particles are taken to the lungs and released when you exhale. To combat their sulfuric odor, brush and floss after each meal. This removes food residue as well as reduces the amount of odor producing bacteria. Studies have also shown that eating raw apples, mint and drinking green tea can help deodorize breath after the consumption of garlic.

Citrus Fruits

They’re refreshing but very acidic. Do you know what odor producing bacteria love? An acidic environment. Consuming large quantities of citrus creates the perfect home for the unwanted bacteria. If you have acid reflux, the citrus can cause a flare up leading to the production of unwanted, smelly gas.

Coffee

Coffee and Diabetes - Benefits of Coffee & Effect on Blood Sugar

Coffee, especially when had with cream or sugar contributes to bad breath. The caffeine in coffee dries out the mouth and reduces the production of saliva. This allows for odor producing bacteria to feed on any remnants of food that remain in the mouth. The sugars found in milk and cream also feed the odor producing bacteria, causing for rapid growth of the bacteria.  Brushing your teeth and rinsing with water can help alleviate the unwanted “coffee breath”.

High Protein Diet

Bulking up for the summer on protein? This could be contributing to your bad breath. Ammonia is created as the body breaks down protein. This creates a “rotten egg” smell. Consuming foods with zinc helps destroy bacteria and aids in the reduction of bad breath.

Peanut Butter

It’s thick, creamy and delicious. It is also very sticky. So sticky that it is hard for water to wash it away. Peanut butter sticks to the structures in the mouth which allows for the feeding and overproduction of bad bacteria. To help reduce peanut butter from lingering on teeth and other structures, brush and floss after consumption.

Skipping Meals

Has the “Quarantine 15” caused weight gain and you’ve found yourself skipping meals? Don’t! Bad breath is common in those who are dieting or skipping meals. Chewing food produces saliva which washes away bacteria; skipping meals causes a reduction in saliva which allows for the growth of bacteria that cause bad odors.

You will need to visit your oral health provider if you notice that your bad breath is persistent. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References

https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/sig258649spec

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/alcoholic-drinks-kill-good-mouth-bacteria-but-leave-the-bad#3

https://www.healthline.com/health/get-rid-of-garlic-onion-breath#1

https://smartmouth.com/articles/blog/coffee-breath-mouthwash/

http://home.bt.com/lifestyle/health/wellness/unlikely-causes-of-bad-breath-4-foods-that-encourage-halitosis-11363921489068

https://www.glendale.edu/home/showdocument?id=23931

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQAQ56THE9AgiaMcv7vVr9jUMeQmNq68ax_SQ&usqp=CAU

https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/alcohol

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRQDlkjkrUZqxM9OOYTL4i5_V9zexczBTTRLQ&usqp=CAU

https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/7-citrus-fruits-you-must-try-this-summer-from-blood-orange-to-buddhas-hand-1682443

https://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/coffee-and-diabetes.html

https://www.pamperedchef.ca/recipe/Side+Dishes/Deluxe+Cooking+Blender/Peanut+Butter/1564381

https://www.mynetdiary.com/can-a-high-protein-meal-plan-help-you-lose-weight.html

https://images.everydayhealth.com/images/diabetes/type-2-diabetes/diabetes-diet-no-no-skip-meals-01-1440x180.jpg?w=720

New Research: COVID-19 and Heartburn Medications

July 23rd, 2020

 

Research has become a significantly important part of our lives, particularly as we all hope to gain knowledge about COVID-19 and how to conquer the pandemic. Researchers across the globe are trying to piece together any answers to these puzzling times. The Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has found numerous risk factors that are linked to COVID-19. For instance, individuals of any age with particular medical conditions are considered high risk for contracting coronavirus. Now, there may be another possible risk factor to add to the already long list that could make you more susceptible to get COVID-19.

A new study published in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, reports that taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs), a common medication to treat heartburn, acid reflux, and stomach ulcers, may place individuals at a higher risk of developing COVID-19. PPIs work by blocking an acid-producing stomach enzyme to lower the amount of acid made in the stomach. Although stomach acid is natural and a part of the body’s defense mechanism, having a surplus or if it’s found in the wrong place can be a real pain and harmful to the body. PPIs can be prescribed by your physician or found over-the-counter. Some brand name over-the-counter PPIs that you may have heard of include Prilosec (omeprazole), Nexium (esomeprazole), and Prevacid (lansoprazole).

The researchers of this study, guided by Dr. Brennan Spiegel at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, created an online survey which was emailed to a total of 264,058 adults in the United States from May 3 to June 24, 2020. 86,602 individuals were eligible participants and of these individuals more than 53,000 reported heartburn, abdominal pain, and acid reflux and were asked to disclose what medications, if any, they used for relief. Among them, greater than 3,300 tested positive for COVID-19. After data collection and analysis, researchers found that people who reported use of PPI medications were 2-4 times more likely to have COVID-19 compared to those not taking PPIs. In addition, the frequency of intake of PPIs also played a role in the results. They found that individuals taking PPIs twice a day were at a higher risk than individuals taking the medication once a day. Interestingly, those who reported taking histamine-2 receptor antagonists medication (H2 Blockers), which also treat heartburn and gastric ulcers, were not found to be associated with an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 in the study.

The researchers believe that the change in the stomach environment as a result of PPIs could create an environment where pathogens and viruses like COVID-19 can thrive. These results also mirror some common side effects of longterm PPI use in other research studies. For instance, PPIs have been linked to the bacterial infection C. difficile, which researchers believe also thrives due to less stomach acid being present to fight against pathogens.

Although this research is a step toward a possible association between PPIs and COVID-19, more research has to be done to determine a cause and effect relationship. Dr. Christopher Almario, one of the study authors, stated “By no means do we say that people need to stop their PPIs…We found an association here; This needs to be confirmed. Many U.S. residents take PPIs for severe acid reflux, heartburn or peptic ulcers, and these people should not lower their dose or switch medications without first consulting a health care provider.”

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.uspharmacist.com/article/proton-pump-inhibitors-considerations-with-longterm-use

https://decisionsindentistry.com/2020/07/possible-link-between-heartburn-medications-and-covid-19-risk/?inf_contact_key=c1aff9e57306be06b8e82905e898e2fbb7af0999dac2af6212784c39e05d2aef

https://time.com/5863532/covid-19-heartburn/

https://www.livescience.com/ppi-heartburn.medication.covid19-risk.html

https://www.drugwatch.com/proton-pump-inhibitors/

https://parenting.firstcry.com/articles/foods-to-avoid-with-acid-reflux-or-heartburn/

Acid Reflux: A Dental Threat

January 17th, 2020

An upset stomach can ruin your whole day! Individuals who experience acid reflux, a chronic digestive disease in which stomach acid travels into the esophagus, often experience a range of uncomfortable symptoms. Some symptoms of acid reflux include heartburn, chest pain, and regurgitation, leaving a sour or bitter taste in the mouth. Acid reflux is commonly referred to as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and this disease particularly impacts your oral health. This is because during those uncomfortable times of stomach acid entering your oral cavity, your tooth enamel is being surrounded by acid, which in turn can cause enamel erosion. Underneath the tooth enamel, the outer layer of the tooth, is dentin, which can then become exposed once the enamel is worn down. In addition, the lining of your esophagus can also become damaged as a result of acid reflux.

Not to mention, what you eat plays a huge role in this condition as well! Acid reflux can be exacerbated by certain foods, including tomatoes, citrus fruits, mint, chocolate, coffee, tea, sodas, spicy foods, garlic, onions, or fatty foods.

Your dentist may notice signs of acid reflux during your oral exam. This condition can affect all ages, even children! A study done at the University of California at San Francisco reported that children with acid reflux are six times more likely to experience damage to their tooth enamel than children without this condition. Your child may not recognize that they have acid reflux, but once diagnosed the proper steps can be taken to help protect their teeth.

Remember, prevention is key, so it is important to see your dentist regularly to ensure the proper diagnoses and treatment. Fluoride can add an extra layer of protection to teeth exposed to acid by helping to add important minerals to the tooth enamel. It is important to consume fluoridated water and use toothpaste containing fluoride. Your Doctor may prescribe medication to help with acid reflux depending on the severity. In addition, avoiding foods that typically trigger acid reflux is necessary to help keep acid reflux under control.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/gastrointestinal-disorders/acid-reflux-a-dental-disaster-in-the-making-1013

Best-and-Worst-Foods-for-Acid-Reflux-720x450.jpg

whatyouneedtoknowaboutgerd.jpg

Sipping Soft Drinks Associated with Obesity and Tooth Wear

November 17th, 2019

We all have certain food and drink cravings. For many, sodas may be one of them. We all know soda isn't the healthiest drink choice, however, you may not have known that sodas have been associated with both tooth decay and obesity, according to new research. According to the study published in ‘Clinical Oral Investigations,’ researchers found a direct link between the amount of sugary soft drinks and the breakdown of tooth enamel. In adult study participants who had tooth wear, researchers found that the number of surfaces affected was 1.4 times higher for each additional sugary/acidic beverage per day. They also found that the number of surfaces with moderate-to-severe tooth wear was 17% lower for each additional non-sugar/non-acidic beverage the adult drank each day.

Carbonated and acidic drinks can lead to enamel erosion, or tooth wear, which can have a negative impact on your oral health. Once the tooth enamel becomes worn down, the shape and appearance of the teeth can begin to change. The layer beneath tooth enamel, known as dentin, also begins to show and you may begin experiencing tooth sensitivity to  cold or hot foods and beverages. This can lead to many extra costly dental procedures down the road. Plus, acidic beverages are also known to increase the risk of gastric reflux disease in people who are overweight. So, not only are these drinks causing harm to your teeth, they are also damaging your body. The good news is, tooth wear can be preventable!

Diet is important for your overall health and pearly whites. Be sure to choose healthier drink alternatives. If you are to indulge in soda, do so in moderation and be sure to drink plenty of water afterwards to dilute the acid and sugar. Using a straw when consuming acidic beverages is also helpful to keep the sugar away from sitting on your teeth. Not to mention, ever heard of the slogan, "sip all day, get decay?" The statement is true! Sipping on soda throughout the day for long p periods of time can quickly breakdown your teeth, as the acid attacks your enamel with each sip of soda you take. Be sure to engage in physical activity each day and keep up with good oral hygiene practices.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028075946.htm

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Is Your Mouth Feeling Sizzling Hot?

October 20th, 2018

Being in pain is one of the worst feelings, especially when you don't know the cause. Thanks to new research, knowledge is increasing about chronic oral pain, also called Burning Mouth Syndrome. This condition commonly impacts middle-aged women and can be very debilitating for most people. In past years this condition has been quite ambiguous, but new discoveries are currently being made.

People experiencing Burning Mouth Syndrome often report a sensation of stinging on their tongue, palate, lips and/or gums. This condition can also cause dry mouth, and bitter or metallic taste sensation in the oral cavity. These symptoms can occur gradually overtime or appear suddenly. For many people, it can lead to difficulty eating, sleeping, and cause anxiety or depression.

A dissertation at Sahlgrenska Academy reported that when 56 women with Burning Mouth Syndrome were asked to rate the condition from 0 (not difficult at all) to 100 (unbearable), the average response was 66. It was also found that 45% of the patients experienced altered taste, and 73% had a burning, stinging, numbness, or combination of the three sensations. Burning Mouth Syndrome was strongly correlated with self reports of teeth grinding, multiple medication use, allergies, and skin diseases. Not to mention, mucin proteins detected in the patients were altered and contained less carbohydrate structures that normally impact the immune system. These patients were found to have higher inflammatory levels than the control group of individuals without Burning Mouth Syndrome. With this information, researchers are looking for methods to help with diagnosis and treatment options.

If you're experiencing some of the symptoms mentioned, this can be evaluated during your dental visit. Burning Mouth Syndrome can be secondary to dry mouth from several factors including multiple medications, fungal infections such as oral thrush, nutritional deficiencies (B1, B2, B6, B9, B12, Iron, Zinc), ill-fitting dentures, stomach acid reflux (GERD), diabetes, or consumption acidic beverages.

In the meantime, to help ease the pain, avoid irritants such as tobacco smoking, hot spicy foods, alcoholic beverages or mouth rinses with alcohol, and acidic foods and beverages.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180921151427.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/burning-mouth-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20350911

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When Life Gives You Lemons, Protect Your Enamel

August 30th, 2015

lemon water

Lemon water has recently been all the rage for several celebrities, and health and fitness lovers. Many individuals reportedly start their morning off with a glass of hot lemon water to cleanse their systems.

It's true, lemon water does have its own perks, including its ability to help with digestion, the immune system, and even with weight loss. Also, lemons are loaded with important nutrients, including vitamin C, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and fiber. However, as refreshing as it may sound, drinking lemon water daily could cause enamel erosionUnfortunately, lemons are highly acidic, containing a pH between 2 and 3, which ultimately can lead to wear and tear on your enamel and eventually result in tooth decay. When the enamel erodes, the underlying dentin becomes exposed, which may result in painful sensitivity to hot and cold foods. Enamel erosion also makes the teeth appear hollowed and yellow. Although diluted, a daily habit of drinking lemon water can cause enamel erosion just like many other acidic foods and beverages.

Sipping on acidic beverages throughout the day should be avoided at all costs. If you do happen to find yourself drinking an acidic beverage, using a straw can help lower the chance of the liquid coming in contact with your teeth. In addition to brushing, rinsing, and flossing, chewing a piece of sugarless gum can also help get rid of the acidic residue from your teeth. Consuming dairy products and drinking water throughout the day can also help wash away acid and prevent dry mouth.

It is important not to brush your teeth immediately after drinking wine, lemon juice, or other acidic beverages due to the harmful combination of the acid and toothpaste that can soften enamel. It is recommended to rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic liquids and to wait approximately one hour before brushing your teeth.

While hot water with lemon may be a fashionable way to start the day, dentists are warning it can ruin teeth

Individuals who suffer from bulimia or acid reflux are also at a high risk of developing enamel erosion. When the stomach acid travels to the mouth, it is powerful enough to wear down the enamel on your teeth. It is necessary to get help right away.

Take your dental health into consideration when choosing what foods and beverages to include in your diet. Remember, once enamel is gone, you can't get it back! Make sure that you follow good oral health habits in order to preserve your enamel for a lifetime of healthy teeth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.foodworldnews.com/articles/33583/20150824/drinking-a-glass-of-water-with-lemon-every-morning-could-ruin-teeth.htm

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/11-benefits-lemon-water-you-didnt-know-about.html

http://healthnbodytips.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Benefits-of-drinking-hot-water-with-lemons.png?b0bc0c

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