acidic foods

What's the Deal with Canker Sores?

April 29th, 2020

With the summer season around the corner, citrus fruits and fresh vegetables are aplenty. However, acidic foods such as oranges or tomatoes often trigger the appearance of canker sores. Additionally, salty and spicy foods or lack of vitamins and minerals can also lead to canker sores. According to the American Academy of Oral Medicine, canker sores (also known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis) are experienced by over half the population and typically first emerges in young teens. The oral condition affects the softer tissues of the mouth, such as the lips, cheeks, tongue, or soft palate. Sores are typically less than 1 centimeter in diameter and disappear without treatment, but it is not uncommon for sores to reappear in the same location. 

While the exact cause of a canker sore is not known, canker sores are thought to arise due to an accumulation of white blood cells in the mucosal tissue. Diet, stress, or hormonal changes are all considered possible triggers. If the canker sore is accompanied by a fever, abdominal pain, or fatigue, the sores could be a function of a systemic issue such as Crohn's, Bechet’s, or Celiac disease, and you should seek immediate medical attention. It is fairly common for canker sores to be a result of orthodontic treatment such as braces. If that is the case, ask your dentist for wax to cover any intrusive wires. 

 

To subside the pain and minimize the reoccurrence of canker sores, avoid any toothpaste or mouthwash that contains sodium lauryl sulfates and refrain from acidic, salty, or spicy foods that appear to irritate your mouth. Ask your dentist about over the counter gels available that can be applied to the sore to further ease the pain. Rinsing with warm salt water can also help. If the canker sores cause difficulty with eating, extreme pain, or the sores persist for more than two weeks you should immediately speak with your dentist to be further evaluated. 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.aaom.com/

https://wa.kaiserpermanente.org/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/canker-sore/

Image

5025_image.png

My Tooth Hurts, Now What Do I Do? 

April 7th, 2020

We all know the uncomfortable feeling of a toothache. Yet, it turns out that there could be several possible culprits behind the pain.

If you are experiencing sharp pain after the consumption of hot or cold beverages, you may have sensitive teeth. Tooth sensitivity can be a result of worn tooth enamel, a fractured tooth, deteriorated fillings, tooth decay, or receding gums. You should see your dentist to confirm a diagnosis and discuss possible treatment options, but until then try using a tooth sensitivity toothpaste with a soft bristle brush to help with the pain. Excessive teeth whitening and acidic foods should also be avoided. If instead you are experiencing a more constant throbbing pain, you may have an infected or abscessed tooth.

If the pain feels like it's radiating from the jaw, it could be a result of an impacted tooth, a temporomandibular disorder, arthritis, excessive teeth grinding or clenching. Sinusitis could be the underlying cause of the pain if you are experiencing discomfort on both sides of your face or in your upper teeth.

Regardless of the current level of pain you are experiencing, you should always make an appointment with your dentist so an exact diagnosis can be determined and to prevent the pain from developing further. What feels like a slight discomfort now, can quickly develop into acute pain down the line.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/tooth-sensitivity/potential-causes-of-toothaches-its-not-always-a-cavity-0213

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/tooth-sensitivity/how-to-relieve-sensitive-teeth-naturally-1214

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/top-dental-symptoms

ToothPainCausesRemediesandRelieftoStopToothPain700x250.jpg
toothachefinal-01-10c405795ca848d2954926164536cd5a.png

Each Bite Counts: National Nutrition Month

March 10th, 2019

The popular saying, "You are what you eat," reminds us that a healthy diet is important in order to keep our bodies healthy, vibrant, and energized. National Nutrition Month is a yearly initiative each March created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to educate individuals on healthy food choices. What we eat on a daily basis not only effects our general health, but also the health of our teeth and gums. In fact, the initial signs of poor nutrition can often first be seen in the mouth.

Healthy teeth aren't just a result of daily toothbrushing and flossing...nutrition plays a major role, too! It is important to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups.

Here are some tips to help you make informed choices on foods and beverages that are tooth-friendly and heart-healthy:

  • Be sure to educate your children about the benefits of eating smart and keeping hydrated with milk and water over sugary sodas and sports drinks. If consuming acidic foods or beverages, it is best to drink water immediately, but wait 30 minutes before brushing your teeth to avoid damaging your enamel since it is at a weakened state during this period. If you have an infant, only send them to sleep with water, as milk or juice can lead to baby bottle tooth decay.
  • Find out your nutritional and calorie needs, based on your age, gender, amount of physical activity, and other health factors. A balanced diet should include:
    • Fruits and Vegetables
      • Fruits and vegetables contain a high water and fiber content, which is beneficial for your teeth and body.
    • Whole Grains
      • Whole wheat bread
      • Brown rice
      • Oatmeal
    • Dairy (low-fat or fat-free)
      • Cheese, milk, and plain yogurt help keep your pearly whites strong!
    • Protein
      • Lean beef
      • Skinless poultry and fish
      • Eggs
      • Beans
      • Peas
      • Legumes

  • Avoid foods that harm your dental health, including empty calorie foods like candy, sweet desserts and non-nutritional snacks. Foods and drinks high in sugar, starch, and carbohydrates, stick to tooth enamel and the bacteria within your mouth consume the sugar. In return the bacteria then release harmful acid that breaks down tooth enamel. It is best to limit your consumption of soda, juice, and sweetened coffee or tea, as these choices promote tooth decay. Not to mention, coffee, tea, and wine are big culprits of causing tooth staining.
  • Nutrients including phosphorus, calcium, Vitamin D, and probiotics, help strengthen enamel and fight against tooth decay. Also, Vitamin C , found in citrus fruits, tomatoes, peppers, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes to name a few, helps promote gum health.
  • Snacking between meals can expose your teeth to more sugar and acids, so it is best to limit snacking. If you do snack, make a conscious nutritious choice, such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables, or nuts.
  • In addition to eating healthy, make sure you are staying physically active for at least 1 hour a day.
  • If you have medical conditions including gastrointestinal reflux or an eating disorder, your risk of cavities and enamel erosion may be higher.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/national-nutrition-month

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/ada-march-is-national-nutrition-month

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=nutrition-month

8a6beebf4f78ebf525407f965f0a5ac8.png

Food_pyramid_transp_landscape_640.gif

Bright and Healthy Smiles for the Summer!

June 28th, 2017

It is summertime and you are finally ready to take on a good well-deserved vacation. You have finally freed up some space on your phone and are probably just ready for the limitless photo opportunities. But, is your smile also ready to steal the show?

Wherever you go this summer, remember that your smile is one of the first things that people notice about you. That is why the state of your teeth is a big contributor to your overall confidence.

Any diet that is high in acidic food or drinks leads to a weakening of the enamel which makes it more more likely to get stained and discolored. In addition, acid leads to the wearing away of your tooth enamel. The worn areas of your tooth expose the dentin, which is also yellow in color and adds to the dullness of your smile.

Here are a few things you can do yourself to keep a bright and healthy smile and prevent dental diseases and discoloration.

 

  • One of the easiest things you can do to have good oral health is to brush your teeth regularly, meaning at least twice a day, preferably after each meal; the mechanical motion of brushing your teeth helps you remove plaque.
  • Flossing and brushing go hand-in-hand. This helps you keep your teeth and gums healthy. Using a rubbing motion, go gently between each tooth and make sure that you also go under the gum line. So, floss after every meal, and snack, to prevent build-ups.
  • Rinsing with a good mouthwash also goes hand-in-hand with brushing your teeth and flossing. Rinsing with a mouthwash that could be either diluted hydrogen peroxide or fluoride based gives you an extra support when trying to remove bacteria, or strengthen your teeth and prevent cavities.
  • Healthy eating also plays a major role when it comes to your smile. Avoid consuming foods and beverages that cause stain. Blueberries, cherries, blackberries are popular fruits during the summer, but try rinsing your mouth with water after you snack on them. The same goes for coffee, iced tea, red or white wine, and fruity juices. One way you can consume those drinks is either by using a straw, or by having a glass of water and rinsing your mouth regularly.
  • The best help you can get for a healthy and white smile would be to visit a dental specialist for professional cleaning and whitening treatments.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

Soothe a Burnt Tongue!

September 13th, 2014

At some point or another, it has happened to the best of us! Taking a mouthful of our morning hot coffee or biting into a meal straight from the oven, resulting in a burnt tongue. A burnt tongue can be a rough way to start the day. Burning your tongue can destroy taste buds, which is why often other meals taste strange after the incident. No need to worry, taste buds regenerate about every two weeks!

Fortunately, a few home remedies can relieve the temporary discomfort:

  • Grab something cold! Placing an ice cube or Popsicle on your tongue can help soothe the pain. Even a cold drink will eliminate the warm sensation on your tongue. Applying something cold for simply a minute can help reduce inflammation.
  • Have a cup of yogurt. Letting yogurt sit on your tongue for a few seconds before swallowing can help cool off your tongue.
  • Sugar will do the trick! Interestingly, sprinkling a pinch of white sugar on a burnt tongue and letting it dissolve can have a soothing effect on your tongue’s nerves.
  • Eat a spoonful of honey. Honey is a naturally substance that will have your tongue feeling better in no time.
  • Vitamin E oil can help make your experience better by allowing the tongue tissue to regenerate quickly.
  • Apply aloe vera! If the taste doesn’t bother you, try using aloe vera gel from the plant, rather than from store-bought cream. Unless specified for oral use, burn creams should not be used in the mouth, as they may be toxic if ingested.
  • Suck on a cough drop that contains benzocaine, menthol or phenol. These ingredients, which can also be found in some mouthwashes, can help numb your tongue and relive pain.

Avoid citrus fruits, sodas, and other acidic items, as well as salty foods such as potato chips. These foods and drinks tend to irritate the affected area and aren't good for teeth! If the pain is very bad, try taking over-the-counter medicine, such as  acetaminophen or ibuprofen to reduce inflammation. Most importantly, be careful! Don’t underestimate the temperature of foods and beverages, as they can cause a burn on your tongue, mouth, or even your lips. Luckily, even though a mild burn of the tongue can be annoying, the burning sensation will eventually go away. However, if you are experiencing a severe burn, seek a medical professional. In addition, if the burning sensation on your tongue occurs without having burnt it on hot foods or drinks or by any other means, you may have burning mouth syndrome.

Burning mouth syndrome is a relatively common problem that is linked to many factors. Symptoms include experiencing a daily burning sensation in the mouth and dry mouth. Although the causes and prevention methods for burning mouth syndrome are not entirely known, possible causes include:

  • Damage to nerves
  • Hormonal changes, such as during menopause
  • Dry mouth
  • Allergies
  • Vitamin deficiencies
  • Acid reflux
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Poorly-fitting dentures
  • Certain medications
  • Diabetes
  • Teeth grinding

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.healthline.com/health/tongue-burn#Prevention9

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/picture-of-the-tongue

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/oralhealth/Topics/Burning/BurningMouthSyndrome.htm

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2007/04_03/soupgirl0905_228x342.jpg

 

 

Consuming Cheese Can Prevent Cavities

January 20th, 2014

Happy National Cheese Lover's Day!

Dairy has been long known to be packed with a great amount of calcium, protein, and vitamin D in every serving. It has always been said that drinking milk and other dairy products will keep bones healthy and strong, but there has not been much research done on how beneficial dairy products are to oral health until recently. General Dentistry just published in their most recent journal issue that cheese and other dairy products have the potential of keeping cavities at bay.

Researchers that conducted the study looked at 68 participants between the ages of 12 and 15. The subjects had their dental plaque pH checked before eating cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. Previous studies indicate that a pH level below 5.5 makes an individual more susceptible to the wearing down of enamel, resulting in tooth erosion. The higher the pH level, the lower the chance an individual has of getting cavities.

The subjects were randomly split into three groups: one that ate cheddar cheese, another that drank milk, and a final group that ate sugar-free yogurt. After eating their chosen type of dairy for 3 minutes, the subjects were asked to rinse their mouth with water. The pH level of each subject’s mouth was then measured 10, 20, and 30 minutes the dairy product was consumed. The researchers found that the individuals who drank milk and ate sugar-free yogurt did not have a significant change in pH level; however, those who ate cheese showed a great increase in pH levels after each time interval, indicating that this particular dairy product may be the key to preventing cavities. The results suggest that because there is more of a need to chew when consuming cheese, there is an increase in saliva production, which also leads to an increase of pH levels. The researchers also found compounds inherent in cheese binds to tooth enamel, preventing acid from causing further damage.

This new finding gives us more of a reason to add a slice of cheese to a sandwich. Continue to make sure daily that your diet increases and strengthens oral health!

If you have any questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605130118.htm

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/6-reasons-to-get-your-diary

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57587876/cheesy-grins-may-protect-teeth-from-cavities/

Picture Credit: http://dailym.ai/17rk9ET

Local recommendation: Wasik Cheeseshop 

Request an
Appointment

patient
forms

read
our blog

Top