alcohol

Lowering Liver Cancer Risk with Good Oral Hygiene

August 3rd, 2019

Why is it important to take care of your teeth? Some people may be wondering how their oral hygiene habits affect their overall well-being. There’s increasing awareness that poor oral health is linked to more than just issues found within the mouth. Research has consistently shown us that poor oral health can be linked to heart disease, diabetes, and stroke, just to name a few associations. Now, a recent study conducted at Queen's University Belfast in the United Kingdom has found another possible link between oral health and gastrointestinal cancers, for instance, liver, colon, rectum and pancreatic cancer.

Just about 60,000 people each year in the European Union are killed by liver cancer. This is ranked as the 6thmost common cancer related death, with only an 11% five-year survival rate! The study looked at the oral health of about 469,000 people in the United Kingdom, noting conditions such as loose teeth, gingival and periodontal diseases, missing teeth, and tooth decay. Although the study did not find significant evidence between gastrointestinal cancers and poor oral hygiene, people with poor oral health may have a 75% increase in developing liver cancer according to the study. However, more research is needed to better establish the mechanisms behind this connection. Researchers are interested in investigating the role certain microbes found originally within the mouth, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, may have in liver cancer.

The good news is, with healthy lifestyle habits including diet, exercise, oral hygiene, and avoidance of behaviors including smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, you can lower this risk!

It is important to schedule regular dental visits, and keep up with brushing at least twice a day, and flossing at least once a day to keep your mouth healthy. Keeping your oral health and liver in check also includes eating well and maintaining a nutritious and balanced diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190617125124.htm

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2050640619858043

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Stop Oral Cancer- Be Aware!

April 24th, 2019

You may have noticed that your dentist checks for more than just cavities during your dental exam. This includes an oral cancer screening. In 2019, about 53,000 people in America will be diagnosed with oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Sadly, approximately one person every hour each day dies due to these cancers, and 40% of the individuals newly diagnosed with oral and oropharyngeal cancer do not survive longer than 5 years.  This notably high death rate is is mainly caused by late diagnoses of these cancer! Fortunately, when these cancers are found and treated early, the death rate and other health complications become less common.That's why this Oral Cancer Awareness month we are spreading the word that early detection saves lives! Luckily, maintaining your regular dental visits can help inform you of any harmful developments and cancers early, and keep your oral and overall health in check. Take a look at the common risk factors of oral and oropharyngeal factors and how you can lower your risk:

There are several factors that may influence the development of oral cancer. There has been a lot of research showing that heavy alcohol and tobacco users who are middle aged often present with oral cancers, but there is a current shift to younger individuals who are developing oral cancers due to the rise of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus 16 (HPV).

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

The CDC reports that there have been approximately 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer associated with HPV each year in America. Most of the cancers associated with this sexually transmitted disease occur at the back of the tongue or around the tonsils, with a majority of the cases being found in younger nonsmoking individuals. The death rate and chance of it reoccuring is often low, but detection is often late.

The signs of HPV-realted cancers often present as a painless swelling in the neck area, sore throat, trouble or pain when swallowing, ulcerations, and/or swelling in the tonsillar area that last for longer than 2-3 weeks.

Gender

Oral cancers are two times more prevalent in men than women.

Age

HPV related oral and oropharyngeal cancers are often seen in younger individuals, while a majority of cancers associated with other factors tend to be found in individuals aged 50 years or older.

Smoking

Tobacco in any form creates a higher risk for developing oral cancers, in addition to cancers found throughout the body. Individuals who use a pipe to smoke often develop cancer of the lips. Chewing tobacco can cause several problems in the oral cavity even in addition to cancer.

Alcohol

Alcohol is a significant risk factor for the development of oral cancer. The American Cancer Society states that 7 out of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers (An average of two drinks a day for men, and more than one drink a day for women). Smoking in combination with drinking also increases your risk significantly higher.

Be attentive to any signs or symptoms that appear abnormal to you and make sure you are regularly visiting your dentist and health care professional. 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.aaom.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=140:april-is-oral-cancer-awareness-month

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/Oral-Cancer-Slideshow?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=oral-cancer-awareness

https://oralcancerfoundation.org/events/oral-head-neck-cancer-awareness-month/

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Oral Cancer
Awareness

Tips For Cavity-Free Holidays!

December 29th, 2015

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The holiday break is in full swing as we closely approach New Years! With time off from work, school, and other obligations, there's more time to relax and enjoy the company of family and friends. During this time, however, it's easy to develop a sweet-tooth. From wines to chocolates to decorated cookies and cakes, there's a lot of holiday treats that can harm your smile if you're not careful. Here are some things to keep in mind this holiday season:

1. Timing is important

It can be fine to indulge in sweets every now and then, but it's important to practice proper dental habits. Timing is also important. It helps to eat sweets and other sugary foods with meals because more saliva is produced. Saliva production is essential for washing away food particles and neutralizing acids produced by oral bacteria.

2. Avoid sticky foods

It's okay to be picky this holiday and choose foods that don't cling to teeth. Dried fruits are often a holiday favorite, but tend to stay on teeth longer than other foods. When eating sticky items, make sure to rinse and brush carefully.

3. Limit alcohol intake

Many of us are soon going to toast to the New Year! Be sure to limit your alcohol intake. Red wines can easily stain teeth. Also, too much alcohol can dry out your mouth.

4. Go easy on the hard candies

Hard candies can be more harmful for your teeth than other candies. In addition to containing a high amount of sugar, consuming hard candies puts your teeth at a higher risk for chipping or breaking.

5. Starchy foods may not be the best

Starchy foods often get trapped in your teeth. Take extra care of your teeth if you indulge in chips, cakes, and other starchy foods by flossing to remove all the food particles that can lead to plaque accumulation.

6. You can still have fun

Keep these hints in mind as you enjoy the holidays. Make conscious and tooth-friendly food choices, such as lean beef, fish, and whole grains. The holidays and the New Year are a great times to start planning healthier habits.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/holiday-foods?source=facebook&content=6_tips_cavity_free_holidays

http://cwspi3qoj94m3t5a1dwwupr6z.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/holiday-sweets-620x350.jpg

Why Does Even Alcohol-free Mouthwash Burn?

August 14th, 2014

Mouthwash can be a great addition to a daily oral health regimen to accompany frequent brushing and flossing.  By using a mouthwash, you decrease the likelihood of developing cavities, fight gum disease, and can freshen your breath.  However, if you've ever used a mouthwash product, you may be familiar with the harsh burning sensation that comes with gargling this minty liquid.  Some types of mouthwash burn more than others depending on the specific ingredients each mouthwash brand contains.  What causes this burning sensation?

Most mouthwashes contain alcohol, because alcohol can effectively kill the germs and bacteria that lead to tooth decay and gum disease.  A build-up of bad bacteria can lead to swollen and bleeding gums, also known as gingivitis.  This is why many mouthwashes are advertised as treatment for gingivitis.  Although alcohol is effective, this ingredient is the reason popular mouthwashes like Listerine leave many of us thinking "ouch!" while we struggle to gargle for the full 60 seconds.

For some people with especially sensitive gums, harsh mouthwashes can cause painful mouth ulcers.  Another annoying side effect of frequent mouthwash use is a dry mouth.  Alcohol has drying properties and this can cause discomfort immediately after using the product in addition to leaving an unusual taste in the mouth.  Luckily, there are many mouthwashes that are advertised as being "alcohol-free" or "less intense" and these products are a lot less painful and do not have the characteristic burn of other mouthwashes.

Mouthwashes come in a huge range of flavors and can address a variety of oral health issues ranging from teeth whitening to plaque reduction.  Since most are relatively cheap, they can be easily incorporated into an oral health regimen.  However, mouthwash is not as effective as simply brushing your teeth.  “Mouthwashes should not be used as a substitute for toothbrushing,” says John Ictech-Cassis, DDS, DMD, a clinical professor at Boston University’s School of Dental Medicine.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Sources:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/to-mouthwash-or-not-to-mouthwash.aspx

http://www.wisegeek.com/what-are-the-pros-and-cons-of-using-a-mouthwash-with-alcohol.htm

http://www.breathmd.com/mouthwash.php

Image credit: http://www.123dentist.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/mouthwash.jpg

A Glass of Wine a Day Keeps the Dentist Away

June 25th, 2014

Many adults occasionally indulge in a glass of red wine at dinner.  Substantial research has supported the amazing health benefits of red wine including improving heart health and containing beneficial, cancer-fighting antioxidants.  A recent study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests that red wine could also have benefits for teeth by preventing harmful bacteria from building up inside the mouth.

The "magic" ingredient responsible for combating the bacteria is phenolic extracts found in wine and grapes.  Similarly, polyphenols found in tea and cranberries also play a similar role.  Streptoccus is the name of the bad bacteria that cause cavities.  Both phenolic extracts in wine and polyphenols in tea and cranberries were found to inhibit the growth of the bad bacteria.  Non-alcoholic red wine and grape seed extract were also effecting in warding off the harmful bacteria in the mouth.

"This study is about applying something to the teeth that decreases bacteria. The effectiveness of [red wine] depends on how long it stays on the tooth, known as its 'substantivity,' " says Dr. Glasband, DDS, a dentist in private practice in Long Beach, California (who was not involved in this study), "Wine has a high substantivity, which you can see as it stains the teeth when you drink it."  

It is important to note that drinking red wine can cause teeth staining.  One way to prevent teeth staining while still obtaining the health benefits of red wine is to drink water to wash away any wine left on your teeth between sips.  Another way is to brush your teeth before drinking since wine likes to stick onto any plaque that has built up onto your teeth.  Red wine should only be incorporated into a balanced and nutritious diet in moderate amounts.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Sources:

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/4-health-benefits-of-red-wine.html#b

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/277305.php

http://www.castledental.com/our-blog/preventing-red-wine-stains-your-teeth

http://www.prevention.com/health/health-concerns/weird-way-red-wine-fights-cavities

Image credit: http://img2.timeinc.net/health/images/gallery/living/wine-stain-teeth-health-400x400.jpg

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