Alzheimer's

Health Problems Linked To Gum Disease

November 17th, 2016

gum-disease

Did you know that gum disease, or periodontitis, is linked to many other health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's? Recently, researchers have found even more connections between periodontitis and health issues, including the following

1. Erectile Dysfunction

  • Connected by inflammation
  • Untreated bleeding gums and teeth can lead to tooth decay and loss
  • Bacteria can travel through the bloodstream and damage blood vessels
  • ED is caused by impaired blood flow in the penis
  • Gum disease is a causative clinical condition of ED
  • 53% of males with ED had severe periodontal disease, compared to the 23% of those who did not have ED

2. Low Testosterone Levels

  • Chronic periodontitis could have an impact on the reproductive health of men
  • Higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increase in osteoclastic activity result in lower testosterone
  • Gum disease causes increased immune-endocrine interactions
  • 65% of studies reported a positive correlation between chronic periodontitis and testosterone levels
  • More studies need to be done to confirm relationship

3. Obesity

  • Obesity increases inflammation levels
  • Gum disease is a chronic inflammatory disease
  • A family of cytokines (Interleukin-1 or IL-1) exacerbates the effect of obesity on the development periodontal disease
  • Obese patients who tested positive for IL-1 have a 70% higher chance of developing gum disease

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://healthland.time.com/2012/12/05/what-does-gum-disease-have-to-do-with-erectile-dysfunction/

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/todays-dental-news/item/1250-link-between-low-testosterone-and-periodontitis-bears-research?hq_e=el&hq_m=1085571&hq_l=4&hq_v=7c40e2efa1

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/todays-dental-news/item/1290-cytokines-may-tie-obesity-to-periodontal-disease?hq_e=el&hq_m=1090817&hq_l=2&hq_v=7c40e2efa1

Want To Prevent Cancer? Brush Your Teeth!

September 13th, 2016

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Did you know that the simple act of brushing your teeth can help decrease your risk for bowel cancer?

You may think that your oral health only affects your mouth, but it's also linked to your overall health. Why, you ask? The bacteria in your mouth that causes your gums to bleed can travel through the bloodstream to areas of the body, which could increase the risk for heart disease, stroke, and even Alzheimer's. Having plaque on the surface of your teeth increases your risk for premature death as well.

One of the areas that bacteria can affect is the bowel. Since this specific type of bacteria, fusobacteria (a kind of bacteria that is very commonly found in patients with unhealthy guts), are anaerobic (without oxygen), the bowel is a suitable environment. Due to a protein they have, the fusobacteria can bond to sugar molecules polyps (benign growths) and cancer tumors. When they stick to the polyps, they enhance the growth of tumors.

In the bowel, the bacteria could exacerbate tumors by turning pre-cancerous cells into cancerous cells or enlarging tumorous cells. Therefore, the microbes could spark the development of cancer.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3733276/How-brushing-teeth-prevent-cancer-Twice-daily-scrub-reduces-bacteria-linked-bowel-tumours.html

Happy National Wine Day!

May 25th, 2016

wine-1000x700

 

Happy National Wine Day! Did you know that moderate wine consumption (no more than one drink per day for women and two per day for men according to the US Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010") can lead to many health benefits?

1. Reduced Risk for Certain Cancers and Diseases

Moderate red wine consumption has the potential to prevent both breast and colon cancer. According to an article in the Journal of Women's Health, red grape skin and seed chemicals decrease estrogen levels and increase testosterone in women in the premenopausal stage, which leads to a reduced risk for breast cancer. A study conducted by scientists from the University of Leicester, UK also showed that drinking red wine decreased bowel tumor growth rate by about 50%. Other problems that red wine helps prevent include: blinding diseases, brain damages following strokes, severe sunburns, lung cancer, prostate cancer, type two diabetes, and liver disease.

2. Improved Mental Health

According to research conducted by a team of universities in Spain and published in BMC Medicine, drinking wine in moderation (two to seven glasses per week) can significantly decrease the risk for developing depression. Furthermore, scientists reported in The Journal of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment that moderate wine drinking decreases dementia risk by 23%. Red wine can also reduce the risk for Alzheimer's.

3. Healthier Heart

By raising omega-3 fatty acid levels in red blood cells, red wine prevents coronary heart disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

4. Longer Lifespan

Research from Harvard Medical School published in Cell Metabolismoffer showed that red wine has anti-aging properties that come from the compound resveratrol (from the skins of red grapes) in wine. Testing on mice demonstrated that the compound benefited the health of mice undergoing a high-fat diet and allowed them to live longer.

Another study conducted by the University of London discovered that another compound, procyanidin, maintains blood vessel health.

However...red wine can also stain your teeth!

Chromogens, which are strong pigments in red wine, can instantly stain your teeth after a little sip because of the cracks and irregularities of enamel. Additionally, acid and tannins in red wine encourage the erosion of enamel because they allow chromogens to bind and dry your mouth. While red wine can reduce gum disease risk and the potential for tooth decay, it is important to consider these options to maintain your pearly whites:

1. Thoroughly Brush and Floss Before Drinking

By eliminating plaque that stains bind to, you can lower the risk for staining. Proper oral hygiene also decreases tooth decay and gum disease risk.

2. Rinse!

Rinse immediately after consuming red wine to prevent the wine from clinging to your teeth for too long and to avoid having a dry mouth. Don't brush right afterwards - wait at least 30 minutes, because your enamel is the most sensitive after eating! When you brush later, use a whitening toothpaste.

3. Drink and Dine

Even if it's just cheese and crackers, a little food can prevent the acid from sticking to your teeth. Fibrous foods such as broccoli, celery, and hard cheeses are the best options to help remove stains and promote the flow of saliva.

4. Get Whitening Treatment (offered here at WDG)!

Here at Wellesley Dental Group (where one of our specialties is cosmetic dentistry), we offer four types of whitening treatment:

  1. Custom Take Home (tray whitening, paint-on teeth whiteners, teeth-whitening strips, whitening toothpaste and mouthwash)
  2. Sinsational Smile
  3. Philips Zoom!
  4. KöR

Please visit our website or contact our office for more details on whitening treatment! We would be happy to answer any questions.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265635.php

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/244905.php

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/cosmetic-dentistry/teeth-whitening/article/how-to-avoid-red-wine-teeth-this-holiday-season-1215

A Healthy Smile = A Healthy Start to 2016

January 13th, 2016

 

It's the beginning of 2016 and a great time to make some resolutions for the new year! If staying healthy is one of your resolutions this year, make sure to add "excellent oral health" to the list as well. Dr. Nathan Pfister, a biological dentist in Alabama, claims that dental health and overall health influence each other in many ways.

Dr. Pfister recognizes the fact that dental bacteria and oral inflammation are connected to many medical conditions such as memory disorders, Alzheimer's, heart problems, diabetes, and stroke. Therefore, he connects the diet and oral health habits of his patients by observing plaque samples with a microscope. This way, Dr.Pfister can determine whether dental issues are caused by poor oral hygiene habits, an unbalanced diet, or a medical problem.

There is even further evidence of the strong connection between dentistry and medicine in a study published in the journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention. According to this study, there is also a link between periodontal or chronic inflammatory gum disease (which can vary based on smoking habits) and an increased risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Professor Jo L. Freudenheim, PhD, of the University at Buffalo's School of Public Health and Health Professions adds that this common disease is associated with heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and other cancers.

Out of the 73,737 postmenopausal women (none of whom were previously diagnosed with cancer) who participated in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study led by Professor Freudenheim, 26.1% had periodontal disease. 6.7 years later, the women with this disease had a 14% higher risk of breast cancer.

Possible explanations for the connection between breast cancer and periodontal disease include the effect of inflammation on breast tissues and oral bacteria entering the circulatory system. Professor Freudenheim claims that more studies need to be conducted in other populations in order to determine if there is a causal relationship between oral bacteria and breast cancer.

Feel free to contact Dr. Zarah Ali and Drs. Ali & Ali if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

https://www.sweet-cures.com/naturalhealth/images/healthy-teeth.jpg (photo credit)

http://www.aacr.org/Newsroom/Pages/News-Release-Detail.aspx?ItemID=823#.VosbDPkrLIV

http://www.dothaneagle.com/news/local/biological-dentist-takes-unconventional-approach-to-oral-health/article_d7c75fcc-a8e0-11e5-808c-3feb679bfe4c.html

Unhealthy Teeth Linked to Early Stages of Dementia

November 14th, 2015

 

Poor oral health may be more than just a sign of improper brushing techniques: it may be an indication of early stages of dementia.

As reported by the Alzheimer's Society, more than 850,000 people are diagnosed with dementia in the United Kingdom, and this number is likely to increase to one million by 2025. In America, there are at least 5.3 million Alzheimer's patients and an estimated number of 7.1 million by 2025. The prevalence of Alzheimer's disease is a serious issue around the world, and now there is a way that dentists can help decrease it.

According to the British Dental Health Foundation, if dentists notice unhealthy dental health habits, they may be seeing signs of the development of dementia, because many people who are diagnosed with dementia have trouble maintaining a clean mouth. Furthermore, dementia patients should depend on dentists to identify hints of mental health issues because these patients often struggle to communicate their problems in keeping up with their oral health.

People who battle dementia generally have worse oral hygiene because their cognitive skills are impaired. Therefore, they need to depend on caretakers. The British Dental Health Foundation recommends that patients try to take care of themselves with reminders from care providers for as long as possible. However, as the disease becomes worse and patients are no longer capable of properly caring for themselves, caretakers may need to assume more active roles.

Detecting signs early on can lead to many other health benefits in self esteem, dignity, and nutrition. Because dementia is progressive disease, resolving issues immediately by coming up with treatment plans can also prevent other wide-range and painful dental health problems. The Alzheimer's Society anticipates working with the dental field to observe signs more quickly so that patients can be referred to their GP, or general practitioner, to be examined further.

The link between poor oral health and dementia demonstrates that there is a clear connection between the fields of dentistry and medicine and that collaboration between practitioners of these fields is crucial.

Resources:

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/industrynews/item/437-poor-oral-health-may-indicate-early-dementia?hq_e=el&hq_m=908519&hq_l=5&hq_v=7c40e2efa1

https://depts.washington.edu/fammed/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/canstockphoto11034193.jpg

 

Link Between Alzheimer's Disease and Poor Oral Health

February 8th, 2014

cellsPorphyromonas gingivalis is a type of bacterium that is found in the brains of dementia patients.  Interestingly, this same strain of bacteria is usually found to cause chronic periodontal disease.  Chronic periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease that presents in both the soft and hard structures of a patient's oral cavity.  The inflammation occurs as a result of a chronic bacterial infection.  There are many risk factors for developing the disease including: genetics, smoking, age, and diet.  

Researchers from the University of Central Lancashire discovered this link between the two diseases by studying 10 dementia brain tissue samples and 10 non-dementia brain tissue samples.  The results of the study indeed confirmed the presence of porphyromonas gingivalis in the dementia brain tissue samples.

Often times, it is difficult to conceptualize the relationship between oral health and systemic health.  As the bacteria found in the oral cavity enters the blood stream, it can easily travel to the brain.  When the porphyromonas gingivalis bacteria reach the brain, the brain responds to the foreign body by releasing chemicals that could potentially destroy neurons.  The researchers hypothesize that this immune response may ultimately manifest in symptoms of confusion and loss of memory characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. 

References:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264164.php
http://www.perio.org/newsroom/periodontal-disease-fact-sheet
http://www.computationalbioenergy.org/QSpec/MetaRef%20clade%20%20flavescens_files/relatedimg/Porphyromonas%20gingivalis%20W83%20%20%20(100mW%20500mW)/introduction.jpg

 

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