ariane berdal

Beware of BPA: Found to Damage Tooth Enamel

January 12th, 2014

girl looking in the mirrorThere has been much talk about the dangers of ingesting BPA through plastic sippy cups and even water bottles that we bring on the go. BPA, also known as bisphenol A, is a chemical found in hard plastics of food and drink containers and acts in a similar way to estrogen, and other hormones in the body.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had originally deemed BPA to be a safe substance, but recent studies have shown that this chemical has lead to disruption of normal hormone levels, possible brain and behavior problems in infants and young children, and an increased risk of cancer and heart problems.

Recently, researchers have tied enamel damage to early exposure to BPA. A team led by Ariane Berdal of the Universite Paris-Derot showed that rats that have been treated daily with low doses of BPA resulted in damaged enamel. The rats were observed during a 30-day development window where researchers exposed the rats to the doses of BPA. The earliest observations founds on the rats were white marks found on their incisors. On a macroscopic level, the teeth with white marks were found to have fragile and brittle BPA. On a microscopic level, the enamel showed a decreased level of crucial minerals, the teeth were more susceptible to cavities.

The damage found on the teeth of these rats is comparable to damaged tooth enamel found in 18% of children between the ages of 6 and 8. These researchers believe that enamel damage is another effect of BPA damage to the body. It is important to check products for a “BPA-free” label before they are bought. While the FDA has cracked down on plastics containing, be cautious when buying baby bottles, sippy cups, baby formula cans, and other products for young children. Our pediatric dentist, Dr. Pradhan and Drs. Ali & Ali at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

Resources:

http://children.webmd.com/environmental-exposure-head2toe/bpa

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130610133246.htm

http://www.voanews.com/content/bpa-teeth-13jun13/1681088.html

Stick with Mussels: they can help strengthen and rebuild teeth!

July 19th, 2013

Good news for all you seafood lovers out there. The Journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces have found something very special about mussels’ adhesive nature. Not only does it let these creatures hold fast to rocks in the ocean, researchers have found that they also can be beneficial for teeth.

Quan-Li Li, Chun Hung Chu, and other researchers noted that there are three out of four people who have teeth sensitive to hot, cold, sweet or sour foods and drinks. These scientists were determined to look for ways to rebuild enamel and dentin, which are important factors that determine tooth sensitivity. They found that mussel’s natural adhesive, which allows them to attach to rocks, can be a synthetic substance used to reform the eroded enamel and dentin. They worked under the hypothesis that the sticky substance in mussels would have the ability to keep essential minerals in contact with dentin long enough for reformation to occur.

In 2011, an international team of scientists that mussel’s adhesive proved to be a successful alternative to other coatings used in teeth. While most coatings tend to make teeth weak and brittle over time, the synthetic coating created from mussel adhesive had the ability to heal itself when damaged. The researchers also found that minerals in other coatings were only able to reform enamel while the synthetic adhesive was able to reform both enamel and dentin. Phil Messersmith of Northwestern University have taken into account mussels’ incredible adhesive properties and have created a polymer used in coating that can mend tears in just a matter of minutes!

While these scientists continue to incorporate this newfound adhesive to the clinical setting, there are still ways to battle sensitive teeth. Doctors continue to recommend that individuals practice good oral hygiene (brushing twice a day and making sure to floss carefully). Those with sensitive teeth can also be extra careful when consuming acidic foods such as juices, vinegar in salad dressings and soft drinks. A good way to protect teeth is to rinse the mouth with water after consuming these foods. Teeth grinding can also leave teeth susceptible to sensitivity; ask the dentist about a mouth guard for nighttime use to prevent teeth grinding.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

Sensodyne on sensitive teeth
ACS journal website
Science Daily website
Yahoo Health
http://www.empowher.com/dental-amp-oral-health/content/sticking-mussels-beneficial-sensitive-teeth

General and Oral Health Benefits of Breastfeeding

July 16th, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement back in 2012 stating that breastfeeding and the use of human milk have show to reduce health risks for infants, children, and mothers, also including advantages such as developmental, nutritional, immunological, and psychological benefits. The APP exclaims that breast milk is the best nutrient source for babies. It contains immunological agents, including secretory immunoglobulin (g) A and IgG, along with anti-inflammatory properties that act as protection for the infant’s immune system.

Researchers found that compared to formula-fed children, children who were breast-fed had a lower risk of diarrhea by coating intestinal lining and killing dangerous pathogens that leave babies prone to infection. Breast milk also combats severe lower respiratory infections, including pneumonia and virus bronchiolitis; a child’s risk of developing asthma is also reduced. The immunological and anti-inflammatory properties of breast milk controls to onset of infection and illnesses, reducing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Breastfed-children are also less likely to develop obesity, which is a prevalent disease that 12.5 million children and teens suffer from today. Breastfeeding helps protect against obesity by improving self-regulation of energy intake and recognizing when one is full. On top of these general health benefits, breast-fed children showed better occlusion, where their top and bottom teeth came together more favorably.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) suggests that parents should clean infants’ gums even if they do not have teeth. Parents can use a soft washcloth to clean the gums. The AAPD also recommends that breastfeeding should be exclusive for about the first six months of life; this should continue past six months with the gradual introduction of foods fit for the baby. If you have any concerns our pediatric dentist Dr. Pradhan, and Drs. Ali & Ali at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/2/143.full.pdf+html

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/2/143.short?rss=1&%3bssource=mfr

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gina-ciagne/how-to-become-a-healthier_b_697162.html

Request an
Appointment

patient
forms

read
our blog

Top