bacteria

Is Harmful Oral Bacteria Contributing to Alzheimer's Disease?

July 7th, 2021

 

Just last month, nationwide awareness campaigns for Alzheimer's and Brain Awareness took place to shed light on this major public health issue. Alzheimer’s disease is a common type of dementia that impacts the brain. Recently, researchers at the New York University (NYU) College of Dentistry and Weill Cornell Medicine found that older individuals with harmful oral bacteria associated with periodontal disease are more at risk for having an Alzheimer’s disease biomarker, amyloid beta, present in their cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Amyloid beta is a protein that forms plaques within the brain and is noted to be the first protein present as Alzheimer's disease develops. The researchers found that individuals with amyloid beta had more harmful oral bacteria and less beneficial bacteria present in their oral cavity. Another protein that is present in individuals with Alzheimer's disease is tau, which is found to clump together in nerve cells. However, the tau protein was not found in this study to be linked to harmful oral bacteria.

Periodontal disease, a severe form of gum disease, impacts approximately 70% of adults over the age of 65 years, as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). When your gums are infected, bad bacteria can begin to create pockets within your gums that host more bacteria and damage the bone surrounding your teeth. This can eventually result in tooth loss along with many other oral health issues. In addition, the bacteria influence inflammation, which can affect not just your mouth but the rest of your body systemically.

More research is needed to be done regarding this complex disease and its association to periodontal disease. Senior author Mony J. de Leon stated, “the present study adds support to the understanding that proinflammatory diseases disrupt the clearance of amyloid from the brain, as retention of amyloid in the brain can be estimated from CSF levels,”

The researchers of this study determined the harmful oral bacteria to be PrevotellaPorphyromonas, and Fretibacterium. Whereas, the healthy oral bacteria included CorynebacteriumActinomyces, and Capnocytophaga. The researchers believe that the presence of healthy bacteria and less inflammation in the oral cavity may help protect against developing Alzheimer's disease. They are interested in future research to test if improving gum health by reducing plaque build-up and harmful bacteria will help protect against Alzheimer’s disease.

Check out these quick facts about Alzheimer's disease from the Alzheimer's Association:

June is Alzheimer's & Brain Awareness Month

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://act.alz.org/site/Donation2?df_id=32112&32112.donation=form1&utm_source=google&utm_medium=paidsearch&utm_campaign=google_giving&set.custom.wt=giving&gclid=CjwKCAjww-CGBhALEiwAQzWxOmBPlwCaakm3ybowHLB1zV3MGX5bR0ZlVN0sShkR772_wAhDt5WXrRoCa5YQAvD_BwE

https://engage.healthtrustjobs.com/june-is-alzheimers-brain-awareness-month

https://www.alz.org/alzheimer_s_dementia

https://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/industrynews/item/8113-gum-bacteria-imbalance-linked-to-alzheimer-s-disease-biomarker

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.aarp.org%2Fhealth%2Fdementia%2Finfo-2018%2Falzheimers-what-we-know.html&psig=AOvVaw1gCp9_qLzp0XExJVkgXtyS&ust=1625772585309000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAoQjRxqFwoTCODA24DZ0fECFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fengage.healthtrustjobs.com%2Fjune-is-alzheimers-brain-awareness-month&psig=AOvVaw1U_a8-C6iv629VpEIQXdRD&ust=1624925544123000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAoQjRxqFwoTCNiLq7GHufECFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fspringhillhomecare.com%2Falzheimers-and-brain-awareness-month%2F&psig=AOvVaw1U_a8-C6iv629VpEIQXdRD&ust=1624925544123000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAoQjRxqFwoTCNiLq7GHufECFQAAAAAdAAAAABAR

Could Oral Bacteria be a Cause of Migraines?

February 26th, 2021

Migraines can be a nuisance! If you've ever suffered a migraine, you know how significant an attack can feel. Could your dentist help relieve your migraines? In some cases, yes! A study published by the American Society for Microbiology suggests that certain oral bacteria known to increase nitric oxide in the bloodstream can cause the blood vessels in the brain to widen, which consequently can trigger the onset of a migraine.

As you may know, there are many factors that could be the cause of your headaches or migraine, and treatment requires a correct diagnosis. Migraines are commonly known to be triggered by foods high in nitrates and nitrites, which are often found in processed meats like hot dogs, ham and bacon, alcohol, and even chocolate.

In addition, migraines may be triggered by other certain factors, including:

  • Stress
  • Anxiety
  • Female hormonal changes
  • Bright or flashing lights
  • Loud noises
  • Strong smells
  • Medications
  • Excess or lack of sleep
  • Sudden changes in weather or environment
  • Increased physical activity
  • Tobacco
  • Caffeine or caffeine withdrawal
  • Skipped meals
  • Medication overuse

What exactly does a migraine entail?

A migraine often presents with severe throbbing or pulsating pain that typically occurs on one side of the head. According to MedlinePlus, approximately 12% of Americans experience migraines. Females, individuals with a family history of migraines, and individuals with certain medical conditions including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, sleep disorders, and epilepsy, are at an increased risk of having migraines.

Migraines often involve 4 different stages:

  • Stage 1: Prodrome

This stage is the first stage that occurs before you actually experience the migraine. Early signs may be food cravings, unexplained mood swings, fluid retention, frequent urination, and uncontrollable yawning.

  • Stage 2: Aura

During the aura phase which occurs often right before the start of a migraine, individuals may see bright lights or zig-zag lines. Individuals may also experience muscle weakness.

  • Stage 3: Headache

The severity of migraines often occurs gradually. Some individuals may experience a migraine without a headache, but instead experience sensitivity to light, sound, and smell, nausea and vomiting, and pain when moving.

  • Stage 4: Postdrome

The final stage of a migraine is the postdrome stage, in which individuals often experience fatigue, weakness, and potential confusion lasting sometimes around 1 day after the migraine.

Our body's are full of bacteria that naturally and harmlessly live within us. However, some bacteria can be harmful and lead to cavities, gum disease, and even migraines. This is one of the many reasons why regular dental visits and proper oral care at home is essential. It is important to brush at least twice a day for two minutes each time to help remove dental plaque and prevent it from causing tooth decay. Flossing is also necessary to remove dental plaque that is stuck in hard-to-reach places like in-between teeth, which is where cavities commonly are initiated. Rinsing with an anti-microbial and fluoride containing mouth rinse can also help kill bacteria and strengthen your teeth.

Your dentist can check to see if your headaches or migraines are caused by other oral conditions such as temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) or oral habits such as clenching/bruxism. Toothaches from dental infection by oral bacteria can also cause significant pain in the head and jaw area.

Speak with your doctor and dentist if you feel that you are experiencing chronic migraines.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/migraines-oral-bacteria.html

https://drania.com/why-your-migraines-might-be-caused-by-oral-bacteria/

https://blog.themigrainereliefcenter.com/connection-between-migraines-and-tooth-pain

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.infinitydentalfoxlake.com%2Fdental-concerns%2Ffrequent-headaches%2F&psig=AOvVaw37hxjRFQJvc6UPujGNOF7b&ust=1613951004832000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCIjc9f_S-e4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAm

https://medlineplus.gov/migraine.html

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fgenesisresearchservices.com%2Fmigraine-symptoms-treatment-clinical-trials%2F&psig=AOvVaw2YMfuEAnZGCULPV5PlPlxP&ust=1613957134912000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCND76oDp-e4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAJ

All About the Bacteria Living Inside of Us

January 15th, 2021

Believe it or not, bacteria living inside of our bodies is a natural part of our lives. Even within our mouths there are tons of bacteria living harmoniously. A new study performed by researchers at Harvard University in the Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology assessed the oral microbiome to learn more about why certain bacteria tend to be abundant in particular places of the mouth while not present in other places. The study, which was published in Genome Biology this past December, found numerous genes that may explain why this phenomenon occurs.

Lead author of the study Daniel R. Utter noted, "As microbial ecologists, we are fascinated by how bacteria can seemingly divide up any habitat into various niches, but as humans ourselves, we also have this innate curiosity about how microbes pattern themselves within our bodies." The study authors also questioned how bacteria may end up in the wrong place within our bodies, and how might we add the correct bacteria into its normal place when necessary? New technology in the field has helped researchers tackle these questions and some of the major challenges in analyzing the diverse groups of bacteria and their scientific properties.

According to the study, the mouth carries an astonishing amount of site-specific microbes in different areas. For example, the microbes found on the tongue are unique to the microbes found in the plaque on the surfaces of your teeth.  Co-author A. Murat Eren, assistant professor in the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago, stated, "Your tongue microbes are more similar to those living on someone else's tongue than they are to those living in your throat or on your gums!"

The researchers first looked at 100 genomes representing four common oral bacterial species as references, and then compared them to the oral bacteria sampled in the mouths of hundreds of volunteer research participants from the Human Microbiome Project (HMP). They found a significant amount of variability of bacteria between different parts of the mouth, in particular on the tongue, cheeks, and tooth surfaces.  In several instances the researchers identified a specific group of genes that may play a role in the bacterial group's specific location within the mouth.

The researchers hope that these findings could help the future of targeted probiotics to help manipulate beneficial microbes to a specific location. They are looking forward to further research that could offer new knowledge on oral microbes and our health.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201218165105.htm

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fdrania.com%2Fwhy-your-migraines-might-be-caused-by-oral-bacteria%2F&psig=AOvVaw0oGXkMwn-7bAtEvxTfSlml&ust=1610819537876000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLj5kcbAnu4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAJ

Tackling the Myths about Fluoride

November 17th, 2020

You’ve come in for your routine checkup and your hygienist has suggested that you apply fluoride to your teeth. You know that fluoride is in some toothpastes, so you may wonder why do you need extra? In today’s post we will tackle the myths about fluoride:

What is fluoride?

Fluoride is a mineral found in your food and water. This mineral is lost when acid from the plaque on your teeth performs a process called demineralization. If too much demineralization occurs, this results in a weakened tooth structure.  When this happens, the tooth has a higher chance of developing a cavity.

Myth #1

Fluoride should not be in drinking water

Truth: Fluoride is found naturally in almost all water supplies.  Even though it is found naturally in water, this is not enough to protect our teeth. It is recommended that your water’s fluoride  levels be at 0.7 parts per million of water to be the most effective.

Myth #2

Fluoride is a medication

Truth: Fluoride is not medicine. It is a mineral. When proper amounts are consumed, decay is less rampant and teeth are healthier and stronger.

Myth #3

Fluoride causes cancer

Fact: There is no scientific evidence to prove this. In fact, The National Cancer Institute has performed decades of studies that debunk this. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) states that fluoridation is one of the top 10 public health achievements within the last 20 years.

Myth #4

Fluoride is not good for young children

Fact: When children drink fluoridated water, the enamel of their teeth becomes strengthened at an early age.

Myth #5

Fluoride can damage my teeth

Fact: This is partially true. While decay is much more damaging, high levels of fluoride can cause a condition called fluorosis. According to the American Dental Association (ADA), fluorosis is the appearance of faint, white lines on teeth in children who have consumed too much fluoride. In most cases, the appearance is mild.  After the age of 8, the chances of fluorosis decreases.  For children younger 3, it is recommended that parents brush their teeth with toothpaste equivalent to the size of a grain of rice. For children 3-6, a parent should use a pea sized amount.

Types of Fluoride

Topical Fluoride: aids in the remineralization of teeth and stops bacteria from growing. This reduces the amount of plaque on teeth.

  • Toothpaste: is the most commonly used self-applied fluoride. When used, the fluoride concentration in your saliva increases 100-1000 fold. However this is short term as the fluoride baseline returns to normal in 1-2 hours. Most over the counter toothpastes have a concentration of 1,000-1,500 ppm.

  • Mouth rinses or gels are to be used daily or weekly. These are meant to be rinsed out of the mouth. Use in children under the age of 6 is not recommended. These mouth washes have 230 ppm of fluoride.

  • Fluoride varnish is applied professionally by a health care professional. This allows for high concentrations of fluoride to come in contact with teeth for several hours. It is recommended that fluoride is applied twice a year for the best benefits. According to the CDC, there is no evidence that professionally applied fluoride leads to fluorosis in children under the age of 6.

Systemic Fluoride: fluoride that is consumed

  • Water fluoridation is the most inexpensive way to receive fluoride to prevent tooth decay. Studies have shown that it is effective in reducing tooth decay in children and adults by up to 20-40%.
  • Dietary fluoride can be prescribed for children who are 6 months and older that are high risk for tooth decay. Tablets or lozenges are prescribed in the concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 mg. These are meant to be sucked on for 1-2 minutes before swallowing. The following guidelines are recommended by the ADA. All prescriptions should follow this guideline.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/f/fluorosis

https://www.ada.org/en/science-research/ada-seal-of-acceptance/ada-seal-products?source=promospots&medium=button&content=adasealproducts

https://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/fluoride-topical-and-systemic-supplements

https://www.colgateprofessional.com/hygienists/articles/debunking-fluoride-myths-how-to-educate-patients-about-its-benef

https://cdn-prod.medicalnewstoday.com/content/images/articles/154/154164/fluoride-in-dental-products.jpg

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.medicalnewstoday.com%2Farticles%2F154164&psig=AOvVaw2NJejBfB1Ydoy65OFZ2CyZ&ust=1605729126520000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCNCLw6Wtiu0CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

What's the Scoop on Chewing Gum?

October 20th, 2020

Chewing gum, it’s used to freshen breath but is it good for you? The average American consumes 1.8 pounds of it a year. We’ve heard the age-old tale that candy is bad for your teeth. Well, there is good news when it comes to gum. Using sugar free chewing gum can help to prevent tooth decay, cause the production of more saliva, and ultimately help to strengthen teeth.

The Oral Health Foundation recommends sugar free gum in between meals when brushing is not possible. When you eat, acid is made by the bacteria in your mouth and the sugar in your food and drinks. The acid created dissolves your tooth enamel, creating a cavity. When sugar free gum is chewed, saliva is created. This washes away the acid and reduces the chance of developing tooth decay. The increased saliva can also help clear away acid in the esophagus as well as reduce the effects of dry mouth.

Chewing sugar free gum can help to increase pH within the mouth after eating. This is important because pH drops each time that you consume food or drinks. The critical pH that causes enamel to dissolve is 5.5. Sugar free gum helps to buffer the lowering of pH after eating.

Sugar free gum contains less than 0.5 grams of sugar per serving. Sweeteners such as aspartame, sucrose, or stevia and sugar alcohols such as xylitol, mannitol, and sorbitol are used in place of sugar. These sweeteners have less calories than sugar. Out of all of these sweeteners, xylitol has been proven to be the most effective in preventing cavities. Studies have shown that chewing gum that contains xylitol has a long- and short-term effect of reducing the production of plaque and bacteria that causes tooth decay. Bacteria cannot feed off of xylitol which reduces their amount within the oral cavity.

So, you may be wondering, which gum to chew? When choosing gum, look for the American Dental Association (ADA) seal of approval. The following have been evaluated and have met the ADA’s criteria for safety and efficiency.

Bazooka Sugar Free Bubble Gum:

Eclipse Sugar Free Gum:

Ice Breakers Ice Cubes Sugar Free Chewing Gum:

Orbit Sugar Free Gum:

Trident Sugar free Gum:

Yes, sugar free gum can be beneficial, but that does not mean that it can replace brushing and flossing. The ADA recommends brushing twice a day and flossing at least once a day.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/chewing-gum

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/c/chewing-gum

https://oralb.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adults/effects-chewing-gum-on-teeth/

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/gum-that-is-good-for-your-teeth-too-good-to-be-true-0213

https://www.dentalhealth.org/sugar-free-chewing-gum?_ga=2.254167688.10820751.1600308545-1646793870.1600308545

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4232036/

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Will a Healthy Mouth Help?

September 28th, 2020

Believe it or not, bacteria found normally in your mouth may be involved with gut diseases and digestion issues. Digestive tract diseases, such as Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be a real pain! The most common types of IBD include ulcerative colitis and Chron’s disease, which both involve chronic inflammation, and sometimes even painful sores (ulcers). Some common signs and symptoms of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease include severe diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue and weight loss. As these conditions take a toll on the digestive tract, it can be easy to forget that the mouth is a part of this system, too! Your dentist may even be the first to notice common oral signs of these gastrointestinal diseases that could lead to early diagnosis, such as cobblestoning of the oral mucosa, canker sores (aphthous ulcers), pyostomatitis vegetans, inflammation at the corners of the mouth (angular cheilitis), redness around the mouth, and inflammation of the tongue (glossitis), just to name a few! Here are some common oral conditions that may manifest as a result of Chron's disease and ulcerative colitis:

Several research studies in the past investigating the guts of individuals diagnosed with IBD have found an overgrowth of common oral bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tracts of studied participants. Now, a recent study at the University of Michigan School of Medicine and School of Dentistry has also uncovered further discoveries on the topic, and suggests that poor oral health may make IBD symptoms more severe. Researchers are warning that neglecting your oral health may lead to trouble beyond tooth decay- extending to other systemic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and potentially IBD. According to the study, IBD affects an estimated 3 million adults in the United States, and may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health.

The study, published in the journal Cell, investigated mice and showed two pathways that involved oral bacteria appearing to exacerbate gut inflammation. In the first pathway, researchers looked at the gut microbes in mice with inflamed colons and periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease. They found that periodontitis led to an increase in oral bacteria, which were also found to be present within the guts of the mice by traveling through the digestive tract. They believe that the disease-causing oral bacteria may aggravate gut inflammation by disrupting the normal healthy gut bacteria. They also observed that these mice were found to have both greater weight loss and disease activity.

The second pathway involved the initiation of T cells (a main component of the immune system). The researchers believe that the inflammation resulting from periodontal disease triggers T cells, which can travel from the mouth to the gut where they may aggravate inflammation and prompt an immune response within the gut. Co-author Dr. William Giannobile, Professor of dentistry and chair of the department of periodontics and oral medicine at the U-M School of Dentistry, mentioned, "This exacerbation of gut inflammation driven by oral organisms that migrate to the gut has important ramifications in emphasizing to patients the critical need to promote oral health as a part of total body health and wellbeing,"

More research is necessary to determine the association between IBD and oral health, and exciting new research may provide more clues to how monitoring oral inflammation relates to improving systemic diseases like IBD. Practicing proper oral hygiene and attending regular dental visits to keep your oral care and inflammation under control is extremely important for keeping the rest of your body healthy!

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/06/200616113927.htm

https://labblog.uofmhealth.org/lab-report/could-cure-for-ibd-be-inside-your-mouth

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/inflammatory-bowel-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20353315

https://images.everydayhealth.com/images/digestive-health/crohns-disease/crohns-management-tips-for-seniors-1440x810.jpg?sfvrsn=2cf1348e_0

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851452/#:~:text=Among%20the%20main%20oral%20manifestations,%2C%20perioral%20erythema%2C%20and%20glossitis.

https://decisionsindentistry.com/article/oral-manifestations-crohns-disease/

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(20)30681-4

https://image.slidesharecdn.com/oralpathology-en-lecture-6-170820102334/95/oral-pathology-enlecture6-31-638.jpg?cb=1503224626

 

Smart High-Tech Toothbrushes, What's Best For you?

August 24th, 2020

From an early age, we all hear how important it is to take care of our teeth to keep us healthy. Even so, as time progresses we are learning more about how the condition of our mouth relates to our overall health and other systemic diseases. When it comes to keeping our pearly whites shining and our gums healthy, we all have an important decision to make when it comes choosing the right toothbrush. There’s a plethora toothbrush types, ranging from different shapes, sizes, colors, and technology.

No matter whether you go with a manual or an electric toothbrush, there are certain characteristics that the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends be incorporated:

  • Make sure to use a soft-bristled toothbrush: If you check the store isles, you may notice that toothbrushes come in soft, medium, or hard nylon bristles. It is recommended to use a soft-bristled toothbrush, as medium-hard bristles can harm your tooth enamel, gums, and root surfaces due to abrasive forces. You will want to confirm that the toothbrush you choose has the American Dental Association (ADA) Seal of Approval to ensure that the toothbrush has been researched and tested to be safe and effective in removing bacterial dental plaque and food particles.
  • The ADA also recommends that manual toothbrushes/electric toothbrush heads should be changed approximately every three to four months, or sooner if the bristles become frayed.
  • A comfortable toothbrush is necessary: Be sure to pick a toothbrush that is the right size and shape to best fit your mouth so that you can easily access all of your teeth when brushing.
  • Electric versus manual toothbrush, which is better? The ADA notes that both electric and manual toothbrushes can both be effective at removing dental bacterial plaque with proper toothbrushing techniques. Some studies have revealed that electric toothbrushes may remove more plaque than manual brushes, and can be especially effective for individuals with hand dexterity problems or people with oral appliances such as braces. In addition, many of the electric toothbrushes now have smart Bluetooth technology and built-in timers and app suggestions to make sure your brushing experience is excellent!
  • Take a look at the ADA's method on proper brushing technique:

 

Here are some of the cool top rated electric toothbrushes out that are ADA-approved:

Oral-B, which is the first electric toothbrush brand to be accepted by the ADA, is well known for its effective and cost-friendly electric toothbrushes. On Amazon, this brush has over 10,549 5-star reviews! This brush comes with a pressure sensor that will tell you if you’re brushing too hard, in addition to a minute timer, and tooth brushing heads such as the CrossAction, FlossAction, and 3D White to choose from.

Phillips Sonicare is another dentist and ADA recommended brand for electric toothbrushes with a lot to offer! This brush can sync to your smart phone along with the Sonicare app to guide you with your brushing techniques. Plus it has different tooth brushing modes and bristle heads to fit your needs.

This Oral-B smart toothbrush has standard features such as pressure sensor, a timer, and brushing modes, but also connects to your smart phone using the Oral-B app.  The app will give you feedback on your brushing methods and help give you tips to keep your gums and teeth healthy. 

Waterpik offers a built-in water flosser to their electric toothbrush with different modes to choose from: brush, water floss, or brush + water floss. This toothbrush is great for individuals who may forget to floss. It can also be used with mouthwash through the toothbrush.

This toothbrush is another Sonicare product that connects with the Sonicare app for personalized brushing feedback, pressure sensor, and even comes with a UV brush head sanitizer that can help kill bacteria and viruses.

Quip offers a cute, affordable, and easy to use electric toothbrush. It is battery operated, waterproof, and contains a compact travel tube. It operates via silent sonic vibrations and also has a built-in two minute timer.

Sonicare offers a toothbrush geared to get children excited about brushing their teeth. This brush includes bluetooth and app connection capability, fun stickers, and multiple brushing modes. The interactive app also has fun oral health games and is perfect for children around the age of 7 years or older.

Recently, Candibell Inc. launched a fundraiser campaign on Indiegogo for its Truthbrush that is the first to allow parents to monitor their family’s toothbrushing habits. This way families can keep each other on track with developing great oral hygiene practices. We will be on the lookout for more awesome and effective toothbrushing technology!

Also, remember, when picking a toothbrush for your child make sure to show them all of the awesome colors and designs available to peak their interest! Plus Colgate and some other brands offer interactive talking electric toothbrushes with timers to help children brush for two minutes. Check to make sure that it is the appropriate size for your child, and that it is soft-bristled with the ADA Seal of Approval.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.goodhousekeeping.com/health-products/g28818208/best-electric-toothbrush/

https://www.ada.org/en/science-research/ada-seal-of-acceptance/ada-seal-products/product-category?category=Toothbrush+-+Powered

https://www.ada.org/en/member-center/oral-health-topics/toothbrushes

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/selecting-dental-products/choosing-the-right-toothbrush

https://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Science%20and%20Research/Files/watch_materials_brush.pdf?la=en

https://oralb.com/en-us/oral-b-pro-1000-rechargeable-electric-toothbrush/

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/choosing-a-toothbrush-the-pros-and-cons-of-electric-and-disposable#1

https://www.waterpik.com/oral-health/products/flossing-toothbrush/SF-02CD010-1/

https://www.getquip.com/?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=%5BBrand%5D+-+Quip+General+Terms&utm_content=Quip+Toothbrush+-+Exact&utm_term=quip+toothbrush&gclid=CjwKCAjwsan5BRAOEiwALzomXyd9xZGZ3QMn02PK4dpY0n5uxUzt438RCCtWUmPEVYizIDfI1G8QgRoCVtIQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds

https://www.usa.philips.com/c-p/HX9192_02/sonicare-flexcare-platinum-connected-sonic-electric-toothbrush-with-app

https://images.philips.com/is/image/PhilipsConsumer/HX9194_53-IMS-en_US?$jpglarge$&wid=1250

https://www.usa.philips.com/c-m-pe/electric-toothbrushes?origin=7_700000001603708_71700000062950648_58700005638898501_43700051420604490&gclid=CjwKCAjwmrn5BRB2EiwAZgL9osgqbdal6nmcrf-yIM0_80LZew0MA7YneAeLZH98Qh-6E1TjqAsjWxoCgcEQAvD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds#triggername=color_white

https://oralb.com/en-us/products/electric-toothbrushes/genius-9600-rechargeable-electric-toothbrush/

https://www.wfmz.com/news/pr_newswire/pr_newswire_technology/candibell-launches-first-ever-device-that-monitors-family-toothbrushing-habits/article_9a50c7e5-08fa-5720-8a41-3f04e70d952c.html

https://www.usa.philips.com/c-p/HX6321_02/sonicare-for-kids-sonic-electric-toothbrush

https://www.nbcnews.com/shopping/wellness/best-electric-toothbrushes-n1193846

Noticing Bad Breath in your Mask?

August 20th, 2020

Halitosis, also known as bad breath, is an oral health problem that leads to your breath being less than socially acceptable. Up to one-third of the population experiences this. According to the Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry, 90% of the causes of halitosis start within the mouth. The bacteria within the mouth can cause unpleasant odors and tastes.

Many states have issued face covering mandates as the cases of COVID-19 have risen around the United States. Wearing face coverings may have you wondering, “hmmm, is that my breath?” A lot of factors could play a role in causing bad breath, for instance poor oral health, uncontrolled diabetes or other medical conditions, smoking, and certain foods, just to name a few! Below are some surprising foods that may be leading to your bad breath and some tips to help combat it:

Alcohol

A study by Microbiome has shown that alcohol consumption reduces the amount of “good bacteria” in your mouth leading to the increase in favorable conditions for the growth of odor producing bacteria. If you choose to consume alcohol, follow it up with water. Not only does it remove alcohol from remaining on the structures within the mouth, it also replenishes saliva and reduces the dry mouth effect created by alcohol.

Sulfur Producing Foods

Certain foods like garlic and onions are part of the allium family which are made of sulfur compounds. These foods are absorbed by the blood stream where their particles are taken to the lungs and released when you exhale. To combat their sulfuric odor, brush and floss after each meal. This removes food residue as well as reduces the amount of odor producing bacteria. Studies have also shown that eating raw apples, mint and drinking green tea can help deodorize breath after the consumption of garlic.

Citrus Fruits

They’re refreshing but very acidic. Do you know what odor producing bacteria love? An acidic environment. Consuming large quantities of citrus creates the perfect home for the unwanted bacteria. If you have acid reflux, the citrus can cause a flare up leading to the production of unwanted, smelly gas.

Coffee

Coffee and Diabetes - Benefits of Coffee & Effect on Blood Sugar

Coffee, especially when had with cream or sugar contributes to bad breath. The caffeine in coffee dries out the mouth and reduces the production of saliva. This allows for odor producing bacteria to feed on any remnants of food that remain in the mouth. The sugars found in milk and cream also feed the odor producing bacteria, causing for rapid growth of the bacteria.  Brushing your teeth and rinsing with water can help alleviate the unwanted “coffee breath”.

High Protein Diet

Bulking up for the summer on protein? This could be contributing to your bad breath. Ammonia is created as the body breaks down protein. This creates a “rotten egg” smell. Consuming foods with zinc helps destroy bacteria and aids in the reduction of bad breath.

Peanut Butter

It’s thick, creamy and delicious. It is also very sticky. So sticky that it is hard for water to wash it away. Peanut butter sticks to the structures in the mouth which allows for the feeding and overproduction of bad bacteria. To help reduce peanut butter from lingering on teeth and other structures, brush and floss after consumption.

Skipping Meals

Has the “Quarantine 15” caused weight gain and you’ve found yourself skipping meals? Don’t! Bad breath is common in those who are dieting or skipping meals. Chewing food produces saliva which washes away bacteria; skipping meals causes a reduction in saliva which allows for the growth of bacteria that cause bad odors.

You will need to visit your oral health provider if you notice that your bad breath is persistent. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References

https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/sig258649spec

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/alcoholic-drinks-kill-good-mouth-bacteria-but-leave-the-bad#3

https://www.healthline.com/health/get-rid-of-garlic-onion-breath#1

https://smartmouth.com/articles/blog/coffee-breath-mouthwash/

http://home.bt.com/lifestyle/health/wellness/unlikely-causes-of-bad-breath-4-foods-that-encourage-halitosis-11363921489068

https://www.glendale.edu/home/showdocument?id=23931

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQAQ56THE9AgiaMcv7vVr9jUMeQmNq68ax_SQ&usqp=CAU

https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/alcohol

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRQDlkjkrUZqxM9OOYTL4i5_V9zexczBTTRLQ&usqp=CAU

https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/7-citrus-fruits-you-must-try-this-summer-from-blood-orange-to-buddhas-hand-1682443

https://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/coffee-and-diabetes.html

https://www.pamperedchef.ca/recipe/Side+Dishes/Deluxe+Cooking+Blender/Peanut+Butter/1564381

https://www.mynetdiary.com/can-a-high-protein-meal-plan-help-you-lose-weight.html

https://images.everydayhealth.com/images/diabetes/type-2-diabetes/diabetes-diet-no-no-skip-meals-01-1440x180.jpg?w=720

COVID-19 and Gum Disease: A Link?

August 16th, 2020

As more research is being done on COVID-19, there has been a new link to gum disease and severe complications from this worrisome virus. Gum disease is caused by bacteria that causes persistent inflammation of the gums and surrounding structures. Gum disease includes an early stage, gingivitis, and a later stage with progression called periodontitis, which is more severe.

COVID-19 is a disease that is caused by the novel coronavirus named SARS-COV-2. This virus causes damage to the lungs and other organs. The Journal of  the California Dental Association has associated inflammation in the gums with the release of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 protein. These proteins cause systemic inflammation as they travel throughout the body. This occurs when fibroblasts within inflamed gingiva produce IL-6, causing an elevation in levels. The elevated levels of IL-6 then leads to bone loss and tissue destruction. Additionally, high levels of IL-6 within the body can hinder oxygen exchange between the blood and lungs.  This can cause severe breathing problems. The latest study from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology found that high levels of IL-6 are predictors for respiratory failure. Patients with high levels of IL-6 h are 22 times higher risk for respiratory complications.

So, you’re probably wondering what does this mean for you? Risk factors associated with gum disease include: smoking, diabetes, poor oral hygiene, medication, age, and obesity.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA) warning signs of gum disease are as follows:

  • Gums that are red a bleed easily
  • Gums that have pulled away from teeth
  • Loose teeth
  • Consistent bad breath or bad taste in mouth

How to prevent gum disease:

  • Brush twice a day
  • Floss daily
  • Visit your dentist for regular checkups and cleanings
  • Avoid smoking and or using tobacco products

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.dentalproductsreport.com/view/cdc-updates-infection-control-guidelines-for-dental-practices

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7303044/

https://ca.crest.com/en-ca/oral-care-topics/general-oral-hygiene/gum-disease-symptoms-causes-treatments

https://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(20)30685-0/fulltext

https://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Publications/Files/for_the_dental_patient_jan_2011.pdf

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8600401/Could-gum-disease-make-coronavirus-deadly.html

Proper Oral Hygiene Can Boost Your Immune System

June 22nd, 2020

Being sick...none of us have time for that. Luckily, our body's immune system is our defense mechanism against harmful bacteria, germs, allergens, and foreign particles that enter our body. That’s why keeping a strong and healthy immune system is key to fighting infectious diseases like COVID-19. Your immune system is a complex system made up of many cells, organs, and tissues that span throughout your entire body, including your oral cavity. In fact, your mouth is generally the first entry point to the rest of your body. Therefore, it’s important to maintain good oral health to help keep your immune system and overall health strong, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

When your immune system is functioning properly, normal oral bacteria and your natural microbiome aren’t typically a dangerous threat. However, when your oral health is not being maintained, bacteria can breakdown your pearly whites and lead to gum disease and inflammation, which can ultimately weaken your immune system. The early stages of gum disease is also known as gingivitis, which can be reversed with proper oral hygiene habits such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, healthy diet and stress maintenance, and regular dental visits for comprehensive care. Some signs of gingivitis include inflamed gums, presenting with swelling, redness, and possible bleeding. A more severe form of gum disease is known as periodontitis, and the damage is typically irreversible. In periodontal disease, the inflammatory response triggered by bacteria not only impacts your teeth and gums, but also attacks your surrounding oral tissues and bone that hold your teeth in place. If untreated, periodontal disease can lead to both bone and tooth loss. Consequently, your immune system begins to work extra hard to help fight gum disease, and may promote inflammation within other parts of your body. Sadly, an unhealthy mouth has been linked to many systemic health conditions and inflammatory diseases, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, preterm birth, and more! The case for having good oral hygiene undeniably keeps getting stronger. It’s important to keep your mouth healthy to help allow your immune system to be strong for taking care of the rest of your body!

During a pandemic, it’s important to do everything you can to strengthen your immune system. Here are some ways you can help your body stay healthy during these unprecedented times:

  • Minimize stress: Some research suggests that stress can exacerbate inflammatory disease such as gum disease. Try to stay active and keep a healthy diet to help relieve stress.
  • Exercise regularly and stay hydrated
  • Get adequate sleep: It is recommended that most adults need between 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best. Children and teens might need more sleep for their growing bodies.
  • Brush your teeth daily
  • Floss daily to remove bacteria between your teeth
  • Wash hands regularly
  • Disinfect high-touch surfaces including bathroom surfaces, toilets, faucets, sinks, tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones and keyboards
  • Wear a mask and practice social distancing
  • Eat a healthy diet heavy with fruits, vegetables, lean meats and healthy fat
  • Visit your dentist regularly for check-ups/professional cleanings/outstanding treatments

It's also important to avoid practices that are harmful to your teeth and body:

  • Avoid smoking
  • Avoid high sugar diets
  • Avoid acidic drinks like soda and energy drinks
  • Drink alcohol in moderation
  • Avoid nail biting, chewing on ice, and using your teeth to open bottles or objects

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19.  Our office follows the recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group. We look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors, and friends.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.guardiandirect.com/resources/articles/how-good-oral-health-may-help-you-keep-your-immune-system-strong

https://www.colgateprofessional.com/education/patient-education/topics/systemic/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body

living-with-an-immunocompromised-system-and-covid-19-722x406.jpg

WMJ_picture_file_for_Dental_Health_blog_post_6.5.png

Taking Care of your Teeth During COVID-19

June 19th, 2020

As we continue to fight against COVID-19 and face the many changes that come with these unprecedented times, it can be easy to get out of our normal daily routines. However, caring for your teeth during the coronavirus pandemic shouldn't be on the back burner!

It is important to take care of your body, both mentally and physically, including your pearly whites. Keeping your immune system healthy is particularly important during the COVID-19 outbreak, and the health of your oral cavity is a key part of your immune system.

Here are some helpful tips to remember during this time:

1. Protect Your Toothbrush

Keeping your toothbrush clean is important for your keeping your teeth healthy. Be sure to brush at least twice a day for 2 minutes, and rinse it well each afterwards each time.

Store your toothbrush in an open area to allow the brush to dry. Bacteria love moist and dark areas, and can grow on your toothbrush if left in these conditions. Avoid storing your toothbrush on counters near the toilet, or try closing the lid before flushing, as aerosols are generated when flushing. Also, keep your floss and tongue cleaners covered.

 The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends replacing your toothbrush every 3-4 months, or more often if the bristles become frayed. If you are recovering from an illness, including COVID-19, replace your toothbrush.
Also, make sure that you are brushing properly, technique matters for effective plaque removal:
Bacteria thrive on leftover bits of food and consequently produce acids that damage your tooth enamel. When plaque is left on teeth overtime it becomes calcified on the teeth, forming dental calculus. Calculus leaves your enamel discolored and makes the bacteria harder to remove.

2. Don't Forget About Your Tongue!

Brushing your tongue is also important to help combat oral bacteria. Not to mention, it also helps to stop bad breath. Both tongue scrapers and toothbrushes can be used to remove bacterial plaque on your tongue, however, many studies have found tongue scrapers to be the most effective.

3. Flossing Is Also A Priority

Flossing might be far down your to-do list, but try not to let it be! Flossing daily is necessary to remove lodged food particles between your teeth, which your toothbrush cannot access. Without flossing, bacteria and plaque may still be present in these spaces, which can lead to tooth decay and gum disease. Flossing also helps fight bad breath by removing odor-causing bacteria.

4. Gum Disease Poses Many Health Risks

Gum disease has been linked with increased risks of a host of health problems, including heart disease, arthritis, strokes, and diabetes. Your mouth is truly a window to the rest of your body, and oral bacteria can impact other systems within your body. The good news is that gum disease is preventable! Taking care of your teeth is extremely important for the long term.

5. Diet Matters

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19.  Our office follows the recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group. We look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors, and friends.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/how-to-keep-your-teeth-healthy-if-your-dentist-office-is-closed

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/threats-to-dental-health/dental-care-during-coronavirus

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Snap, Crackle, Pop! How Rheumatoid Arthritis & Gum Disease are Related

June 15th, 2020

Snap, crackle, pop! Creaky joints can be a real pain, but who would have thought that it would have any connection to your mouth? Surprisingly, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis have a lot in common, as they both are chronic inflammatory diseases that involve the breakdown of bone and soft tissue.

What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? 

RA is both a chronic inflammatory and an autoimmune disease, and is often characterized by pain and stiffness. RA typically affects the joints, but can also affect the body's organs.

Periodontitis...What's that?

On the other hand, periodontitis is an advanced form of gum disease. Without  treatment, periodontitis can lead to loss of tooth-supporting bone, tissue, and even your actual teeth!  Periodontitis can impact anyone at any age, but can be preventable. Unfortunately, 47.2% of adults over the age of 30 have periodontitis in the United States. A major cause of periodontal disease is poor oral hygiene, which leads to bacterial plaque attacking your tooth enamel. Other risk factors of periodontitis include tobacco use, diabetes, certain medications, older age, genetics, poor nutrition and obesity, tooth grinding, and misaligned teeth, just to name a few.

Gum disease can be harder to recognize because of its typical pain-free nature. However, there are some common signs and symptoms of periodontitis to look for:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Loose permanent teeth/tooth loss
  • Changes in your bite
  • Receding gums
  • Changes in the fit of oral appliances (ex: partial dentures)

Yet, It is still possible to experience no signs or symptoms of gum disease. That's just one of many reasons why visiting your dentist regularly is essential to your oral and overall health, in addition to eating healthy, brushing at least twice a day, flossing daily, and practicing good oral hygiene habits at home. It is important to catch gum disease in the early stages to avoid irreversible damage to your pearly whites. Remember, prevention is key!

How are the two diseases linked?

Recent studies have supported the link between RA and periodontal disease. According to the Arthritis Foundation, researchers found that tooth loss, a common indicator of periodontal disease, may predict rheumatoid arthritis and its severity. Within the study, they found that the more teeth lost due to periodontal disease, the higher the risk of developing RA. Other research has also suggested that the bacteria commonly associated with periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), may play a role in onsetting RA.

Treating one disease may help improve the other!

Researchers at Case Western University found that individuals with both severe rheumatoid arthritis and gum disease experienced an improvement in their RA symptoms after successfully treating their gum disease.

Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis may face certain challenges in taking care of their oral health. It is important to inform your health care providers, who will help provide recommendations that will work best for you. To make brushing and flossing a little easier,  American Dental Association (ADA) recommendations include:

  • Make your toothbrush unique: To get a better grip of your toothbrush, add a tennis ball or bicycle grip to the handle.

  • Try different types of floss: Try floss holders, floss picks, or threaders.

  • Pump out your toothpaste: Toothpaste in a pump may be more comfortable than squeezing out of the tube.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/living-with/the-link-between-gum-disease-and-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.hopkinsrheumatology.org/2017/01/gum-disease-linked-to-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/g/gum-disease

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Will Eating Yogurt Help Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer?

March 27th, 2020

Inflammation has been a common link to many systemic diseases. Inflammation is our body's way of fighting against potentially harmful pathogens. Gum disease, which includes periodontitis, is one of the most common inflammatory diseases and has been linked to several inflammatory conditions and cancers. Now, new research published in the journal Medical Hypotheses by Lancaster University is suggesting that one of causes of breast cancer may be due to inflammation in response to harmful bacteria. Although our body consists of more than10 billion bacterial cells, most of which are nontoxic, some can produce toxins that can initiate the inflammatory response within the body. But there is good news: The researchers recommend eating natural yogurt, as it contains the "good bacteria," also known as probiotics, that can help lessen the inflammatory response. It was found that the lactose fermenting bacteria within yogurt is remarkably similar to the bacteria /microflora found in a mother's breastmilk during lactation. They found that for each year of breast feeding, the risk of developing breast cancer is reduced by 4.3%!  Not to mention, the probiotics may also help to slow the growth of dental cavity causing bacteria.

Other studies have also suggested a positive link between consuming yogurt and a reduction in breast cancer risk, which researchers believe is because of the beneficial bacteria disrupting the harmful bacteria.

So, consuming yogurt may help lower your risk of breast cancer and help your gums. Plain yogurt is definitely tooth-friendly because of its high protein and calcium content, which help to keep your tooth enamel strong. Plus, yogurt helps make your mouth less acidic, which makes your oral environment one that bacteria have a hard time surviving in. By eliminating harmful bacteria that can produce smelly odors, this also can help to combat bad breath!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200124073857.htm

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Tooth Decay -Genetic or Environmental?

September 4th, 2019

It’s easy to blame somethings on our parents, but recent research shows that you shouldn’t blame tooth decay on genetics. In the past it has been thought that our risk of developing cavities is similar to our family members. However, more research is showing that tooth decay boils down mainly to environmental factors rather than genetics. Although we can’t just easily point to our parents when we develop a cavity, this can be a good thing because tooth decay is largely preventable! Take a look at what influences your risk of tooth decay and how you can prevent it:

Interestingly enough, we are made up of good bacteria that help us survive. However, some of the bacteria found within the mouth can feed on sugars within the foods we eat and lead to tooth decay. These bacteria produce acids that wear down our tooth enamel and create what we all dread and know to be cavities. These bacteria often come after birth, and with more research specific bacteria are being found to play a role in creating cavities. While some bacteria we do inherit from our parents, others that have been linked to causing dental cavities are not found to be associated with genetics, including Streptococcus mutants, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The study conducted by the J. Craig Venter Institute in Maryland evaluated 485 pairs of identical and fraternal twins within the age range of 5 to 11 years old. When analyzing the study participants’ dental plaque and bacteria present within the mouth, they found that environmental factors played a significant role in the type of bacteria present that were associated with causing tooth decay. The bacteria responsible for causing tooth decay were mainly due to factors including diet and home care dental habits such as brushing and flossing. However, family history is important when looking at risks of tooth decay, for instance similar food diets shared between family members could increase or lower the risk of tooth decay.

What you may be able to blame genes for is the development of teeth. Such as the relationship between your teeth when biting together, the timing in which your teeth first appear, or even the size of teeth (macrodontia or microdontia).

So, while somethings you may get away with being able to blame your parents for, tooth decay is largely in part influenced by environmental factors. This is why it’s extremely important to get regular dental check-ups, and practice good oral hygiene care to ensure that your teeth are healthy and lasting lifetime!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.ameritasinsight.com/wellness/dental/mouth-bacteria-bad-teeth

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My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

April 17th, 2019

It's that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that's not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children's teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here's how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

A recent study analyzing 40 children with asthma looked at the prevalence of dental cavities, gingival bleeding, the pH of saliva, composition of bacteria within the mouth, in addition to assessing their oral hygiene habits. It was found that the children with asthma experienced dry mouth, had at least 5-8 cavities, and a rapid formation of plaque. The children also had an increased acidity of pH within the mouth, which puts them at a higher risk of cavities and the fungal infection, candidiasis. Another study reported that individuals with asthma had approximately a 19% increased risk of suffering from periodontitis.

Fortunately, avoiding gum disease can be achieved by practicing proper oral hygiene techniques, including using a fluoride toothpaste, mouth rinse, brushing and flossing regularly, and making regular visits to the dentist. If you notice red puffy gums, bleeding with brushing or flossing, or persistent bad breath, these can be early signs of gum disease.  It is also important to always bring your inhaler to dental and medical appointments to ensure your safety in the case of an acute asthma attack.

The Effect of Asthma Medications

The medications taken to combat asthma also play a role in negatively impacting the oral cavity. This is because the protective mucous membrane within the mouth is less effective/reduced in individuals with asthma, lowering the body's immune system. Dry mouth is a major consequence of many medications, which allows for plaque build-up and bacteria accumulation that contribute to dental cavities, bad breath, and gum disease.

Inhaled corticosteroids, including Advair and Azmacort, may cause oral thrush, dental cavities, oral ulcers, and hoarseness. In addition, Albuterol, a medication used to treat bronchospasm, can have side effects including oral thrush, dry mouth, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, throat irritation, and nausea.

Tips for Managing Oral Health with Asthma

  • Rinsing with water after you using your inhaler can help avoid developing an oral fungal infection.
  • Stay hydrated in order to help combat dry mouth.
  • Keep your dentist informed about your medications and medical conditions. Make sure your dentist knows if you have asthma and what medications you are taking so that your health can be managed properly.
  • Manage allergies. Both asthma and allergies typically flare-up together. Managing both properly can help prevent mouth-breathing and dry mouth.
  • Practice good dental hygiene.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/asthma-found-to-increase-the-likelihood-of-gum-disease-by-a-fifth

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/asthma.html

http://www.thetotaldentistry.com/2018-07-dental-caries-in-asthmatic-children/

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Should you be Tongue Scraping?

March 28th, 2019

As you walk down the oral hygiene isle at your local drug store and see the limitless brands of toothpastes, mouthwashes, and toothbrushes, you may have noticed an item labeled tongue scraper. You may be wondering, “Is it really necessary to brush my tongue?” According to evidence based research, yes it's necessary! Bacteria, dead cells, leftover food debris, and toxins can accumulate on your tongue overtime, which can contribute to bad breath, also known as halitosis. By the end of the day you may notice a thick film coating on your tongue that often ranges in color from clear, white, yellow, or green. According to research, around 85% of all halitosis cases originate from bacteria within the mouth, and a surprising 50% are caused by the debris leftover on the tongue.

Read on to learn about the benefits of tongue scraping for maintaining your oral health:

The good news is, tongue scrapers can quickly and efficiently remove extra particles from the surface of your tongue. They are inexpensive and can be found at many drug stores or online sites. They can be made of plastic or different metals (copper, stainless steel), both effective in removing debris from the tongue. However, plastic tongue scrapers are typically cheaper but may not last as long.

Your tongue can also be cleaned with a regular toothbrush, however, research has reported that a tongue scraper is more effective at removing volatile sulfur compounds, the common culprits of causing bad breath, from the tongue than using just a soft-bristled toothbrush on the tongue. So, after brushing the surfaces of your teeth with a toothbrush and flossing, add a tongue scraper to your morning and evening oral hygiene routine to help enhance your dental health.

Here's how tongue scraping can positively impact your oral health:

  1. Tongue scraping can help eliminate bad breath

  • Bad breath is never fun to deal with, and can take a toll on a person’s relationships and self-esteem. In addition to brushing your teeth, tongue scraping has been found to remove the oral bacteria that typically causes bad breath.
  1. Tongue scraping benefits your taste buds

  • The build up of debris often leads to taste buds becoming less effective. By removing the debris from the tongue, you are better able to taste bitter, sweet, salty, and sour sensations.
  1. Help boost your immunity

  • Tongue scraping can help prevent toxins from being reabsorbed into your body and help improve your immune system. It has been found to lower the presence of Strep. Mutans and Lactobacilli bacteria, which are known to cause tooth decay and bad breath.
  1. Improve the appearance of your tongue

  • Sometimes the buildup of debris can cause your tongue to have a white coating, which tongue scraping can help remove and restore your tongue back to its normal pink color.

 

To perform tongue scraping, stick your tongue out and place the tongue scraper at the back of your tongue and gently scrape forward along the surfaces of your tongue as often as needed. One to two scrapes in the same area typically suffices. After each scrape, you can use a water or tissue to remove the debris from the scraper. Try to avoid placing the tongue scraper too far back to prevent stimulating a gag reflex. Also be mindful of how much pressure you are applying when tongue scraping. Be sure to use gentle strokes to avoid causing any harm. The entire process typically takes less than 2 minutes and can be done throughout the day, especially after meals is a great time.

Be sure you are keeping up with brushing at least twice a day for at least two minutes, flossing at least once a day to remove plaque and food particles from hard to reach areas in-between teeth, and keeping up with regular dental visits. It is important to drink a lot of water, which will not only help prevent dry mouth, but also help eliminate bad breath.

If you notice any white patches in your mouth or unusual discoloration, bumps, or sores, be sure to let your dentist know so that it can be evaluated. This may be a sign of oral thrush or other conditions such as those pictured below, which can be managed under your dentist’s supervision.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/tongue-scrapers

https://www.healthline.com/health/dental-and-oral-health/tongue-scraping

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15341360

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bad-breath/expert-answers/tongue-scraper/faq-20057795

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The Perfect Smile for Valentine's Day

February 14th, 2019

Today on Valentine's Day we are reminded of all of the love that surrounds us. Pink and red flowers, cards, and treats may also make an appearance on this holiday. As we celebrate, make sure you're showing your smile some love too! Here's some tips on how you can keep your pearly whites glistening on your special date or day with loved ones:

Cavities and Kissing:

Did you know cavities can be contagious? Bacteria that cause tooth decay can transmit from one mouth to another through kissing or sharing utensils. The good news is, kissing helps stimulate saliva, which is necessary to wash away leftover foods and fight cavities. But, to prevent swapping germs, it is important to brush your teeth 2x a day for at least 2 minutes and floss for a healthy and cavity-free smile.

Bad Breath Be Gone!

Bad breath can be a burden, but there are a lot of things that can be done to help prevent it.  Bad breath is often a result of bacteria, so good hygiene habits like brushing and flossing are the easiest things to do to keep your breath smelling fresh. A lot of plaque and bacteria are hiding between teeth and on the surface of your tongue so don't forget these areas! There are also a variety of mouth rinses available in the store that are anti-microbial and help get rid of bacteria and bad breath. Not to mention, chewing xylitol gum can help stimulate saliva and keep your breath fresh.

Brighten Smiles with Whitening

Looking to get rid of stains or not as confident with the color of your teeth? If you'd like to brighten your smile, our in-office ZOOM! Whitening is the way to go, and also could be a great gift to surprise your loved one with.

Avoid Smoking

Smoking is not only bad for your lungs, it also has a negative impact on your mouth. It can cause oral cancer, bad breath, and stain your pearly whites.

Sweet Treats

One of the fun aspects of Valentine's Day is the sweet treats and desserts that you may indulge in. If you happen to have some goodies, just be sure to keep your teeth in mind. Avoid hard candies, or candies that are sticky such as caramels or gummies as they can be damaging to your enamel. Also be sure to rinse with water and try eating the sweets with a meal so that your saliva flow can help wash away the sugars that cause tooth decay.

We wish you a Happy Valentine's Day!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/adults-under-40/healthy-habits/valentines-day

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Everything You Need to Know about Fluoride Varnish

September 29th, 2018

"My child's baby teeth are going to fall out eventually anyway, so what's the point in taking care of them?" This is a common question that many parents face. Baby teeth are necessary for a variety of reasons, including guiding permanent teeth into their proper positions. You also want to make sure that they remain healthy in order to prevent your child from developing a systemic infection, an abscess, or from experiencing pain. As soon as your child's baby teeth appear, make sure that you are brushing them and scheduling regular dental visits. As they become older, make learning how to brush fun through singing songs, brushing alongside your child, or even using toothbrushes and cool flavors of toothpaste that they pick out themselves.

Fluoride varnish is an important part of dental treatment as research shows that it helps prevent and stop the progression of cavities in baby teeth. It does this by remineralizing tooth enamel. Cavities form when bacteria found within dental plaque produce acid that eats away teeth. Since enamel is more sensitive in baby teeth than in permanent teeth, children are especially susceptible to developing cavities.

Applying fluoride varnish on your child is safe, quick, and painless! Fluoride varnish is brushed around the surfaces of each tooth and becomes a hard layer once saliva interacts with it. Once applied, food and beverages can be consumed with the exception of extremely hot or cold items. For 4-6 hours avoid brushing or flossing.

It's also important to note that fluoride treatments are not just for children. Individuals at a high risk for developing cavities should have fluoride! Fluoride is found in many toothpastes, most community water supply's, and several other products.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180426102840.htm

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Your House and Your Saliva: How on Earth Could they be Related?

August 12th, 2018

Normally, we may not be thinking about what saliva is doing for us in our mouths. But, saliva has an important role in helping us breakdown food and protect our teeth due to the proteins and minerals found within it. Turns out, according to new research, the combination of microorganisms in your saliva are mainly determined by your home environment rather than genetics. These organisms within saliva are found to have a great influence on our oral and overall health.

More research is showing that our microbiomes are related to our health. These microbes are perfectly normal to our bodies and help outside pathogens from establishing oral disease. Researchers at  UCL Genetics Institute looked at DNA and saliva extracted from an Ashkenazi Jewish family that lived in several different households across the world so that they could determine how the saliva microbiome varied in terms of environment versus genetics. In each of the DNA and saliva samples, they found that the majority of the salivary microbiome was composed of bacteria from the Streptococcus, Rothia, Neisseria, and Prevotella genera.

When analyzing the results, they also found that between factors including shared household, city, age, and genetics, the factor that determined who shared the most similar saliva microbes was household environment. Therefore, people in the same house share the most similar organisms within their saliva.

So, looks like genetics isn't the biggest factor in determining the makeup of our saliva as once thought according to recent research. This study concluded that a child's home environment plays a significant role in the community of bacteria found within their saliva. Since microbes can be transferred from one person to another, for instance via kissing or sharing utensils, it is important to maintain good oral hygiene, keep regular dental visits, and avoid being in close contact with others when having an active infection.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170912102810.htm

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It's not you, it's your morning breath!

June 15th, 2017

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Have you ever wondered why despite keeping good oral hygiene, brushing your teeth and tongue regularly, using a mouthwash and flossing before bed, you still wake up with an unpleasant odor coming from your mouth? Well, it's not you; bad breath in the morning is very common. The condition is also known as halitosis. It happens because during the supposed 8-hours of sleep at night, our mouth goes through a period of reduced salivary flow and no access to food and water. The main function of saliva is to 'rinse' and remove solid food particles which if not removed cause bad breath. And when there is no source of carbohydrates at night, your body ends up breaking down the proteins, the byproducts of which feed bacteria and lead to their growth in the mouth. But as you may have noticed, bad breath disappears after having breakfast and going through our morning dental routine, as most bacteria are removed.

Here are some things that you can do to help yourself and minimize the odor of your ‘morning breath’! Regular dental cleanings and check-ups should go without saying. Professional cleaning helps remove plaque from above and below the gum and places that are hard to reach, or we often neglect. Also, pay attention to the instructions and recommendations your dentist gives you for brushing, flossing, and rinsing. And your overall health matters as well! Try improving your diet, physical activity, and reduce work-load and stress. Remember that everything is interconnected.

morning breath tips

There are also conditions which cause oral malodor. Chronic oral malodor is a condition resulting from chronic dry mouth. Other medical conditions such as diabetes, GI disturbance and respiratory infections can also contribute to chronic malodor. It is important to consult your dentist if you experience dry mouth and they will refer you to a primary care physician in the case of medical conditions.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

Source: https://www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-education/articles/oral-malodor

Goodbye 2016, Hello 2017!

January 12th, 2017

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Some common new year's resolutions are exercising more or trying a new activity, but did you know that improving your oral health should also be one of your priorities for 2017? Healthy teeth is the key to your overall well-being! A few small improvements could lead to great rewards.

The first step to a healthier mouth is to have better brushing and flossing habits.

  • If you've had your toothbrush for more than three or four months, replace it! Worn bristles don't clean your teeth as well as a brand new toothbrush!
  • Brush at least two times a day with a fluoride toothpaste for two minutes every day. This is the best way to avoid bad breath, cavities, and infection!
  • Don't forget to floss at least once a day to get rid of the bacteria and food particles stuck between your teeth.
  • Use a fluoride mouthwash.

Another important part of maintaining your oral health is your diet.

  • Avoid acidic and sugary drinks to prevent tooth decay!
  • Try to limit snacking in between meals
  • Chew sugar-free gum or brush after meals
  • Drink water with fluoride

And last but not least, make sure to schedule regular appointments with your dentist!

  • You could prevent oral diseases or fix them at an early stage
  • You may need braces to fix abnormal bites, straighten your teeth, or enhance your smile
  • You could get whitening treatment to have a whiter smile
  • It's important for your overall health!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

https://www.smartpractice.com/Images/Products/PC/PhotoLg/LC03266.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/life-stages/adult-oral-care/article/a-new-years-you-dental-health-resolutions-0114

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/h/holiday-ideas

Sensational Sealants

November 15th, 2016

Sealants, or plastic coatings that cover the surface of teeth (particularly molars and premolars), help prevent tooth decay by smoothing out uneven surfaces where bacteria and acids could get trapped. There are many different types of sealants, including: resin-based, glass ionomer, etc.

This treatment is especially recommended for children, but is also an option for adults who are prone to cavities. Even though brushing, flossing, and fluoride mouthwashes can remove plaque from your teeth, sealants add an extra layer of protection.

According to a systematic review of sealants published by the Cochrane Collaboration in 2013, scientists concluded that getting sealant treatment effectively reduces cavities for at least four years and that children without sealants were twice as likely to get cavities as those with sealants. Additionally, both the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend the application of sealants.

Sealants are also cost-effective compared to fillings. Although the cost depends on your insurance, fillings cost about $100 per cavity, while sealants only cost about $30 to $40 per tooth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/20/upshot/defending-your-childrens-teeth-and-dentists-the-value-of-sealants.html?_r=2

http://www.cochrane.org/CD001830/ORAL_sealants-for-preventing-dental-decay-in-the-permanent-teeth

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/procedures/sealants/article/dental-sealants

http://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Science%20and%20Research/Files/ADA_sealants_work_facebook.jpg?la=en

http://jada.ada.org/article/S0002-8177(16)30473-1/pdf

Transfer of Oral Microbes From Children To Children

October 25th, 2016

Microbes don't just get passed on within the family from mother to children. A recent study at the University Of Alabama at Birmingham Department of Biology and School of Dentistry found that children may acquire microbes from other unrelated children as well.

Despite the fact that data has shown that one particular strain of the bacteria Streptococcus mutans, which is  known to cause tooth decay, is only transferred from mother to children, this microbe was found in 72 percent of children whose family members living with them were unaffected. This high percentage shows that children can contract microbes from other children at schools and nurseries as well as opposed to just from their family members.

Stephanie Momeni, author of the study, claims that interactions involving saliva such as sharing a drinking cup or ice cream cone can lead to the transfer of microbes. Therefore, make sure your kids have their own set of containers and cups before heading to school or daycare!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.raisehealthyeaters.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/dreamstime_10469309.jpg

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/07/160725105219.htm

Want To Prevent Cancer? Brush Your Teeth!

September 13th, 2016

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Did you know that the simple act of brushing your teeth can help decrease your risk for bowel cancer?

You may think that your oral health only affects your mouth, but it's also linked to your overall health. Why, you ask? The bacteria in your mouth that causes your gums to bleed can travel through the bloodstream to areas of the body, which could increase the risk for heart disease, stroke, and even Alzheimer's. Having plaque on the surface of your teeth increases your risk for premature death as well.

One of the areas that bacteria can affect is the bowel. Since this specific type of bacteria, fusobacteria (a kind of bacteria that is very commonly found in patients with unhealthy guts), are anaerobic (without oxygen), the bowel is a suitable environment. Due to a protein they have, the fusobacteria can bond to sugar molecules polyps (benign growths) and cancer tumors. When they stick to the polyps, they enhance the growth of tumors.

In the bowel, the bacteria could exacerbate tumors by turning pre-cancerous cells into cancerous cells or enlarging tumorous cells. Therefore, the microbes could spark the development of cancer.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-3733276/How-brushing-teeth-prevent-cancer-Twice-daily-scrub-reduces-bacteria-linked-bowel-tumours.html

Gum Disease Doesn't Just Affect Your Gums!

August 3rd, 2016

What do Arthritis, Alzheimer's, cancer, and diabetes have in common? If you have periodontal (gum) disease, your risk for all these diseases could increase.

People once thought that the mouth and the body had no relation each other, and dental care used to be the job of barbers in the Middle Ages! It wasn't until the 1700's that dentistry was finally recognized as its own science and the late 1990's that the connection between oral bacteria and heart disease was studied in animals.

When you don't brush or floss thoroughly, bacteria can become trapped between your teeth and your gums. This can cause plaque to accumulate, which can eventually lead to the break down of the gums and oral tissue and make other parts of the body prone to infection.

Preventing the buildup of plaque from reaching oxygen will cause it to favor anaerobic (without oxygen) bacteria, which can travel all throughout the body through the bloodstream.

When neutrophils (white blood cells) attempt to destroy the bacteria on the gums, they not only don't succeed in controlling the infection, but they also release enzymes that further deteriorate oral tissue.

Therefore, periodontal disease affects more than just your oral health; it could also affect the heart, the liver, the gut, and even your child if you're pregnant. Some studies have also shown a link between gum disease and increased bacteria in the brain and increased risk for tumors.

Make sure to take proper care of your teeth. Your body will thank you later!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/gum-disease-opens-body-host-infections

https://www.sciencenews.org/sites/default/files/2016/04/041616_gum_flowchart_730.png

http://newteethforme.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/gum-disease.jpg

Probiotic pills could prevent tooth decay!

June 28th, 2016

advanced-acidophilus-plus-review

Did you know that a supplement pill could be the answer to preventing tooth decay?

According to research done by scientists at the University of Florida (UF) College of Dentistry published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a probiotic treatment featuring a new strain of Streptococcus bacteria (A12) could prevent cavities by limiting the growth of bad bacteria and keeping a balanced pH in the mouth.

Robert Burne, PhD, one of the leaders of the study, explains that by implanting the A12 probiotic into a healthy child or adult who could develop cavities, one could limit the issue of poor oral health.

A12 maintains oral pH by neutralizing acid through arginine metabolism. Furthermore, it frequently kills or hinders an extremely harmful strain of bacteria, Streptococcus mutans.  Burne adds that when A12 and S. mutans are grown together, there is a decrease in the formation of dental plaque.

Imagine being able to avoid cavities with such a simple treatment!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://nootriment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/advanced-acidophilus-plus-review.jpg

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/307810.php

More Pets = Less Stress = Healthy Teeth!

February 2nd, 2016

blogg

Do you have a pet? Well, good news! Research published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that pet dogs can decrease stress levels in children, which can have a positive impact on oral health as well. If you're looking for something to add to your family wishlist, make sure to include "cute puppies!"

How can dogs can improve our health?

They may help reduce social anxiety

Pets such as dogs follow human communication cues and help spark conversation. They also provide comfort and self-esteem to children, which can lead to emotional development. Through animal-assisted therapy (AAT), dogs improve attachment and decrease separation anxiety in children. This can result in improved mental health and decreased risk of developmental disorders (emotional, behavioral, and mental) during adolescence and later on.

They may decrease stress

According to a study conducted by researchers from Bassett Medical Center in New York, 21% of children who did not have pet dogs had anxiety, while only 12% of the children who interacted with dogs at home were tested positive for anxiety. Playing with dogs can reduce cortisol levels and release oxytocin, which helps decrease physiologic responses to stress.

How does stress affect oral health, you ask?

  1. Stress is linked to canker sores, grinding of teeth, poor hygiene, dryness, TMJ, gum disease, and burning mouth syndrome.
  2. It can result in chronically high cortisol levels, which can lead to a weaker immune system. This can make it more likely for plaque bacteria to attack the gums.
  3. There is a strong connection between stress and periodontal or gum disease, which can cause tooth loss.
  4. You may not brush or floss as frequently!

Make sure to take care of your teeth properly and don't get too stressed out. Get a pet dog for bonus points!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/303276.php

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17668968

http://awomanshealth.com/stress-and-oral-health/

https://blog-photos.dogvacay.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/baby-flash-games-211.jpg

Are Summer Foods Ruining Your Smile?

July 14th, 2015

fresh-summer-drink-wallpaper-hd

From sunny afternoons by the poolside to perfect evenings under the stars, summer is the best time to relax, be adventurous, and most importantly, to smile. Many of us also enjoy summer for the delicious foods, fruit juices, and tropical cocktails. Although a summer diet may appear healthy, there are some cravings that are harmful to your teeth that may take you by surprise.

Here are some treats that can damage your teeth and gums:

Juices sometimes contain a higher amount of sugar than soda.

Many people are aware that candy and soda can erode tooth enamel, but how about fruit drinks? Although some juices, smoothies, and cocktails contain many good nutrients, many of the drinks we consume during the summer are acidic and contain a high amount of sugar per serving. Sugars can cling to teeth and harm your pearly whites by feeding the bacteria in your mouth. This process produces acids that can sometimes irreversibly damage teeth.

As it becomes hotter, make sure to keep a glass of water by your side. Also, it is best to drink juice through a straw so that the juice has a harder time sticking to the surface of your teeth. Wait to brush your teeth at least 45-minutes after consuming sugary or acidic foods/drinks, as brushing them immediately after can leave them more susceptible to damage.

Dried Fruit

Dried fruit is often sticky and packed with sugar that can harm teeth the same way that candies do. Instead, opt for crisp apples or pears.

Chewable Vitamins

Gummy vitamins are not much better for our mouths than regular gummy candies. They often stick to the surfaces of teeth and can hide in hard-to-reach places, leading to tooth decay. It is best to take vitamins in pill form.

Popcorn

We often turn to popcorn as a snack choice, especially at the movies. Yet, popcorn is famous for getting stuck in your teeth and in areas that are hard to reach with a toothbrush. Make sure to brush and floss after consuming popcorn.

Peanut Butter and Jelly

Although a delicious and easy-to-make sandwich, peanut butter and Jelly is sticky and high in sugar content. Make sure to check nutrition labels and look for natural peanut butters and sugar-free jelly.

Salad Dressing

Salad dressings often give a nice taste to salad, but the vinegar and sugar inside the dressings can harm your smile. Avoid drenching your healthy salad with too much dressing.

Barbecue sauce

Barbecues are a great part of summer, however, the sweet barbecue sauce can cause tooth discoloration and even lead to cavities if proper oral habits are not implemented.

Vinegar with Vegetables

While the vegetables are healthy, adding vinegar, which is acidic, can harm your teeth and smile.

Wine

While red and white wine has its benefits, they also can cause trouble for your teeth. Red wine can cause staining, and the acids in white wine can damage your enamel. When consuming wine, accompany it with cheese, which is rich in nutrients including protein, calcium and phosphorus, to help fight the acids.

 

Don't fall into the sweet summer temptations that can harm your smile! There are many products sold that brand themselves as healthy products, however, sometimes the ingredients can cause damage to your teeth. It is important to remember that along with brushing, flossing, visiting the dentist, and practicing other good oral health habits, your diet plays a significant role in the health of your teeth. Make sure that your smile sparkles by monitoring the foods and drinks you consume this summer.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://time.com/3907886/teeth-damage-causes/

http://summertomato.com/10-foods-you-didnt-know-were-damaging-your-teeth/

http://wallhornet.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/fresh-summer-drink-wallpaper-hd.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nail Biting: A Habit Worse for Teeth Than for Nails

June 7th, 2015

how-to-stop-nail-biting

We rely on our teeth to help us speak, chew, and to spread a smile. But, what our teeth shouldn’t be used for is biting nails. Nail biting is a common habit for many, and it’s approximated that half of all humans bite their nails. There are several beliefs as to why people bite their nails, but many come to the conclusion that the bad habit is stress related or is a behavior that’s learned during childhood.

For some, it can be hard not to resort to nail biting. However, it is important to understand that your dental health is at a much greater risk than just your manicure.

Here is a list of some of the many negative effects that nail biting can have on your oral health:

Biting your nails can lead to chipped or cracked teeth. Chewing on tough and sharp fingernails can have a heavy impact on your teeth. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, nail biting can crack, chip, or wear down front teeth as a result of the pressure applied from continuously biting.

Nail biting can create a gap between your two front teeth (known as diastama). Nail biting from a very early age is believed to cause a gap between two teeth.

Nail biting can weaken the roots of your teeth. Individuals with braces are particularly at risk for root resorption, or shortening of the roots, which can weaken the roots of teeth and can lead to tooth loss.

Nail biting is germy! Fingernails can be full of germs and bacteria, especially since they are hard to reach and clean. They're almost twice as germy as hands! This makes nail biters at an increased risk for transferring germs and bacteria into the body. Biting your nails is an easy way to transfer a virus, cold, or other illness. It can also cause paronychia, which is a skin infection that surrounds the nail.

Biting your nails can cause TMJ Disorder. Nail biting can be damaging to your jaw. The constant biting can cause TMJ Disorder, which can also cause pain, headaches, and jaw alignment issues.

Nail biting can damage gums.

Jagged and sharp fingernails can damage gums tissue and cause gingivitis. When the gum tissue becomes torn, bacteria from fingernails can spread into the bloodstream and throughout the body.

Biting your fingernails can cause you to spend a lot of money. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, individuals who bite their nails spend approximately $4,000 more on dental expenses in their lifetime than those who don't bite their nails.

 

Teeth should also not be used as tools, such as to open a bottle or chew on a pencil. These poor habits can put you at greater risk for bruxism (teeth-grinding), which can cause tooth sensitivity, tooth loss, recessed gums, and many more oral problems.

Wearing a mouth guard may be a great way to avoid nail biting and thus help prevent further damage to your teeth. Also, try keeping your nails trimmed short to prevent the urge to bite them.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.oralanswers.com/biting-finger-nails-teeth/

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2008/article/ADA-06-Nail-Biting-Can-Be-Harmful-To-Teeth.cvsp

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/18/nail-biting-bad-for-you_n_5675467.html

http://www.whiteheadortho.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/how-to-stop-nail-biting.jpg

Summertime in the City: What's Healthy and What's Not

June 2nd, 2015

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June is finally here and it will be hard for many of us to resist a cold drink on a hot summer day. With the many family barbecues and outings, you're sure to be in for a treat this summer. During the warmer months, there are many tasty foods and drinks at our convenience. However, some of these items aren’t so tooth-friendly. As we all know, it is important to limit the amount of sugary foods and drinks we intake to ensure a healthy smile. For the health of your mouth, which links to your overall health, try adding these healthy options to your plate and glass this summer:

Drink, Drink, and Drink more water:

A nice glass of water can be a refreshing drink as you relax by the poolside. Water is important for staying hydrated, especially when your active and the sun is shining. Your smile will also thank you if you rinse your mouth with water after meals. Water, particularly tap water, even has the benefit of containing fluoride.

Watermelon:

Watermelon, made of 92% water, is another tasty  and healthy snack that will keep you hydrated this summer. It contains  lycopene, which helps keep skin protected. Also, many foods that are mainly composed of water have fewer calories. Your kids may even enjoy making watermelon popsicles!

Milk:

Milk is a great alternative to sugary drinks because it has been found to reduce levels of acid produced by plaque bacteria. Milk helps remineralize teeth by providing calcium to keep your teeth strong.

Sugar-Free Gum:

Chewing sugar-free gum can help to stimulate saliva flow and ultimately help to wash away left behind foods. However, it is not clear whether or not xylitol, commonly found in sugar-free gum, actually lowers the risk of developing dental cavities.

Strawberries:

Strawberries are in season and packed with healthy ingredients. Strawberries contain malic acid, which is known to whiten enamel. They also contain many antioxidants and vitamin C, which can help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, and promote eye health.

Cheese:

Cheese is full of calcium, the protein casein, and vitamin D, all good for the health of your teeth. Researchers have discovered that cheese helps increases the pH levels of dental plaque, helping to reduce tooth decay.

Pears:

Pears contain a wealth of fiber that will benefit your teeth. They help to produce saliva and lower plaque levels in the mouth.

Apples:

Crispy apples are full of vitamins and nutrients. Full of water and lots of fiber, apples help to scrub and clean the surface of your teeth.

Vegetables:

Veggies ranging from carrots rich in Vitamin A to dark leafy greens rich in iron, can make a great snack to chew on. Including vegetables in your diet is essential for the health of your teeth and body.

Cranberries:

Research has suggested that cranberries help lower the risk of cavities by helping to keep plaque from sticking to teeth. But, you may want to pay attention to the labels on cranberry products, as many of them can contain added sugars to compensate for their naturally tart flavor.

 

Some foods and drinks that are hard-to-resist, but should be avoided to keep strong and healthy teeth, include:

 

Soft Drinks, Sports Drinks, Sweet Tea, and Juice: Drinking a cold soda may sound refreshing, but it is damaging to tooth enamel. It can also dehydrate your body and make you feel more thirsty. Even sports drinks, artificially sweetened drinks, and concentrated fruit juice contain sugars for the bacteria in dental plaque to feed on and produce harmful acids. The acid then tears away at tooth enamel and can eventually lead to tooth decay. Highly acidic drinks can even cause heartburn and stomach pain. Sipping on these drinks throughout the day rather than at meal times should also be avoided because saliva production is not at its peak. Saliva is important for washing away bacteria and food particles.

Ice Cream:

The many flavors of ice cream are delicious, but unfortunately is full of sugar. Some individuals may also experience tooth sensitivity. Sensitive teeth results when the dentin underneath tooth enamel becomes exposed. This can cause pain, but can be treated. If you do have a taste for ice cream, try and select ice cream with less sugar.

Citrus Fruits:

As we all know, limes, lemons, oranges, and grapefruits are very acidic. These fruits contain citric acid and can be damaging to teeth if consumed frequently.

Vinegar:

A common practice, but an unhealthy one, is to mix vegetables with vinegar. This acidic combination can erode tooth enamel. Pickles are also very acidic.

Granola and Energy Bars:

These items may appear to be good for teeth, but often the dried fruit and other ingredients can be sticky, chewy, and hard to get off of teeth.

Candy: 

We all know that candy contains a lot of sugar, and should be avoided for the protection of your smile.

 

It is important to remember that if you do choose some of the not-so-healthy foods and beverages, consume them in moderation. Also, avoid snacking between meals, as acids can stick around for up to 20 minutes after eating. Not to mention, be mindful of the dyes used in many foods and beverages that can cause tooth discoloration. Practice good oral health habits and lean more towards a tooth-friendly diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/blog/fresh-breath-happenings/teeth-friendly-summer-food-ideas-34659.asp

http://greatist.com/health/healthy-teeth-foods

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-watermelon-popsicles-10713

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dwBqWs6_udQ/UBYvQhjW5TI/AAAAAAAACBY/YdNg1weBEVk/s1600/watermelon+popsicles.JPG

Is Your Mouthpiece Making You Sick?

April 12th, 2015

mouth-guards

 

Whether your little one is signing up for little league or soccer camp, the season for sports is coming up. April marks National Facial Protection Month, which is a great time to remind children and adults about the importance of being safe by wearing a mouth guard during recreational and school sports this spring.  There are quite a few items of equipment you’ll need to get, but never forget to protect those teeth! All contact sports require mouthguards, and for good reason. To read some more about why using a mouthpiece is so important, visit “Sports Mouthguards: Necessary Protection for Your Child.” After learning a bit about what type of mouthguard you’d be best off with, you need to ensure that you know the necessary upkeep. Washing your mouthguard is as essential as washing your hands and needs it about as often. The importance of this cleanliness cannot be stressed enough.

Recently, there have been several extreme cases of viral infection stemming from unsanitized mouthguards. The bacteria on your mouthguard is in direct contact to your bloodstream via your gums. This leaves you even further susceptible to extremely dangerous internal infections. According to Thomas Glass, DDS, PHD, "While mouthguards appear solid, they are very porous, like a sponge, and with use, microorganisms invade these porosities...There are warning signs that can alert athletes that he or she may be suffering from a contaminated mouthguard.  Those include difficulty breathing, wheezing, diarrhea and nausea to the point of vomiting.”

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You can protect yourself and your child very easily with these maintenance tips:

  • Never share a mouthguard. Think of it as similar to sharing a toothbrush! Sharing oral appliances with others can expose you to germs and gum diseases, which often shows halitosis.
  • Make sure to brush your teeth and mouthguard before and after wearing it. Practicing good oral health habits will save your teeth in the long run!
  • If using a disposable mouthguards, ensure that you throw them out after the recommended amount of time.
  • Bring a backup mouthguard to games so that you have one in case your primary mouthguard gets dirty.
  • Store your mouthguard in a clean plastic case during half times to minimize handling.


If an athlete ever experiences a mouth injury, even as small as a scrape, the mouth should be sanitized with the necessary antiseptics and mouthwash.
The mouthguard should, then, be replaced immediately. As important as it is to wear your proper gear, make sure your gear isn't able to hurt you, too.

Wellesley Dental Group has worked with a number of schools around the Metro-west region, providing custom made mouthguards to our young athletes. If your children are involved in any sports this season, it might be a good idea to get custom mouthguards for them, to keep them safe from oral and facial injuries!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/newsroom/?news=article&pid=89&iid=816&aid=4128

http://www.momsteam.com/health-safety/mouth-guards-prevent-dental-injuries-but-need-to-be-replaced-frequently

http://www.defensesport.com/reports/Sports-Dentistry-Article.pdf

http://www.massdental.org/content.aspx?id=2550

http://www.pearldentalclinic.co.uk/files/images/services/header_img/mouth-guards.jpg

Does the Word "Diet" Make Soda Any Healthier?

April 2nd, 2015

You know what they all say, “Sip All Day, Get Decay!” It's not only a catchy phrase, it's the truth! There is a clear correlation between soda consumption and tooth decay, as well as to other health complications including diabetes, kidney problems, and obesity. We all are familiar with the fact that bacteria in the mouth convert sugars and carbohydrates from the foods and beverages you consume to acids, which decays tooth enamel. What's even scarier is that the acids can remain in the mouth for 20 minutes after snacking or drinking.

To avoid this reality, many turn to diet soda thinking that there will be no consequences for their teeth. You may have even been asked at one point or another, "Which is better, Diet Coke or regular Coke?" It turns out that their damaging effects on teeth are roughly the same!

What many individuals may not realize is that diet soda is still acidic, which negatively impact the health of your teeth.  Research from the Minnesota Dental Association, the Missouri Dental Association, and the University of Cincinnati Biology Department shows the pH of a regular Coke is around 2.6, which is highly acidic. On the other hand, the pH of diet coke is about 3.2. For comparison, the pH of battery acid is 1, which isn't too far off from the pH values of soda! While diet soda may not be as bad as regular soda, they do contain acids, which can cause serious damage to teeth. Phosphoric acid and citric acid is often present in many diet sodas to add flavor to the drink. These acids can demineralize and decalcify teeth. Sometimes the damage may require fillings, root canals, dental crowns, dental implantsdentures or other dental procedures.

Not to mention, many beverages use artificial flavorers and sweeteners in place of sugar for the purpose of maintaining the flavor. Although they may not contain sugar, they can make beverages acidic and can cause many problems for your teeth.

In addition to having negative oral health effects, diet soda can have a significant impact on your kidneys. According to an 11-year study at Harvard Medical School with 3,000 women participants, researchers discovered that diet cola is linked with a two-fold increased risk for kidney failure. Kidney function began to decline as women drank two or more sodas a day.

A consistent consumption of both regular and diet soda is one of the leading causes of tooth decay. Children and young adults are most prone to tooth decay because their tooth enamel is not yet fully developed. Unfortunately, many children and young adults in the United States  have decreased their intake of milk  and increased their intake of soda. In fact, according to research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, children are consuming it more than double the rate of the last 10 years. Soda consumption among adults has grown approximately 25 percent!

A healthy diet plays an important role in your overall health. It is essential to choose foods and beverages that provide vitamins and minerals for not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mouth. Avoid giving the label, "diet or sugar-free" the same meaning as, "healthy for teeth!" You can prevent tooth decay and other health problems by staying hydrated with water and implementing good oral health habits. If you are a soda-lover, make sure to drink in moderation. Also, limit your intake of carbonated beverages, including sports drinks and juice. Most importantly, make sure that you are not substituting acidic beverages for water.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/diet/Sugar-free-drinks-Are-they-safe-for-teeth/articleshow/46515368.cms

http://www.wda.org/your-oral-health/sip-all-day

http://www.myhousecallmd.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/diet-soda.jpg

Xylitol's Not as Sweet as You Think

March 29th, 2015

Popular among the vast array of sugar substitutes, xylitol is one of the more popular natural sweeteners commonly found in sugar-free gum, toothpaste, cosmetic gels, and sweets.

Although xylitol is not dangerous and is found to cause less damage to teeth than sugar, it isn't exactly perfect. Previously, xylitol was suggested  to reduce tooth decay by preventing the growth of acid-producing bacteria. Yet, according to the Cochrane Library,  researchers suggests that there is little evidence that xylitol is actually beneficial in reducing the prevalence of tooth decay.Many individuals turn to sugar substitutes to satisfy a "sweet tooth," even in processed foods, which can worsen the risk of heart disease, stroke, or diabetes. While it is true that Xylitol is found in nature in many plants, xylitol is also manufactured for commercial use by the process of sugar hydrogenation, which involves the compound Raney nickel. The long term effects of are not currently known.

On the negative side, xylitol is only partially broken down in the stomach, and instead remains relatively intact in the intestines. The undigested portion ferments, and can lead to stomach cramps, acid reflux, or diarrhea. No need to worry, xylitol is FDA approved and is not considered hazardous.

Researchers in a study using 5,903 participants over ten different studies were unable to prove any benefit in the natural sweetener for preventing tooth decay in children and adults. For xylitol-containing products, including sugar-free gum, researchers did not find any significant evidence. According to two Costa Rican studies involving 4,216 school children, there was low quality evidence that levels of tooth decay were 13% lower in children who used a fluoride toothpaste with xylitol for three years versus those who used a fluoride-only toothpaste.

Philip Riley, a head researcher at the School of Dentistry at The University of Manchester, said, "Several of the studies included in the Cochrane review did not report sufficient information on the side effects of xylitol, which can include bloating, diarrhea and laxative effects. Sugar-free gums, sweets, mints and other products are well-known for their gastrointestinal effects and these should be clearly reported in future studies."

So, maybe xylitol isn't all it has cracked up to be! It is important to practice good oral health habits, and only chew sugar-free gum in moderation.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150325210320.htm

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/xylitol-not-as-sweet-as-its-cracked-up-to-be/

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ImYmiIEwXgA/U-KUWNlaxtI/AAAAAAAARMU/uKF08QOF0kQ/s1600/chewing+gum.png

Do Love Bugs Exist?

January 22nd, 2015

With Valentine's Day quickly approaching, love is definitely in the air! Many may not realize the role kissing plays in oral health. Kissing increases saliva production in your mouth, which helps to neutralize acids and wash away plaque that can lead to tooth decay. Kissing is also beneficial for your overall health, as it can reduce blood pressure, relieve cramps and headaches, boost self-esteem, and even help you burn calories! However, kissing has consequences too. Did you know that a single ten-second French kiss can transfer an average of 80 million bacteria from one mouth to another? 

According to a study conducted by researchers at Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, it's true! The study examined tongue-swabs from 21 couples in Amsterdam. Some volunteers were also given a probiotic yogurt drink that contained a marker bacteria, and then asked to kiss their partners. Researchers found that a quick peck transferred an average of 1,000 bacteria, and a more intimate kiss transferred an average of 80 million bacteria from one mouth to another. It was also found that the more often a couple kissed, the more similar their saliva was in comparison to strangers.

Other studies have shown that cavity-causing bacteria can even be transmitted from a mother’s mouth to her baby.

According to the Micropia Museum, there are more than 700 different kinds of bacteria in the mouth. Although not all bacteria is bad, bacteria can produce acids and increase your risks of developing cavities. kissing is often a common way to spread cavity-causing bacteria, colds, cold sores, and the flu, especially if good oral health habits aren't regularly practiced by you and your partner! It is important to brush, rinse, and floss daily. Don't forget to brush your tongue and the roof of your mouth!

To reduce the risk of transferring or catching an infection while kissing, avoid kissing when you or your partner are sick or have active cold sores. Maintain good oral hygiene and schedule regular visits to the dentist.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-kissing-bacteria-exchange-20141118-story.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/17/bacteria-kiss-how-many-transfer_n_6171034.html

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/01/30/8-kissing-benefits.aspx

http://www.national-awareness-days.com/images/international-kissing-day.jpg

What's a Kid with Smelly Breath to Do?

August 14th, 2014

Bad breath, also referred to as halitosis, is often a condition that adults are conscious of, but did you know that even healthy children can experience halitosis? Surprisingly, even toddlers can have smelly breath! If you’ve noticed that your child’s breath is not so pleasant, there’s no need to worry! Although the main culprit is typically not brushing enough, there are also other conditions that could be causing your child to have bad breath.

It is important to inform your child of the importance of brushing, flossing, and rinsing after meals. Missing this routine can cause plaque buildup and bacteria in the mouth to multiply, thus resulting in oral odor. The main odor causing areas in the mouth are between teeth, under the gum line, and on the tongue. However, it is not abnormal for your child to experience morning breath. The unwanted bacteria eventually becomes washed away by your child's saliva as the day continues.

Here are some common causes of bad breath in children:

  • Dry mouth. When saliva production in your child's mouth is lower than normal, dry mouth can occur, which typically produces smelly odors. It is crucial to remind your child to stay hydrated, especially when participating sports or other physical activities, to avoid risk of dry mouth and bad breath. In addition, saliva also protects the mouth from tooth decay, cavities, and other oral health problems.
  • Mouth breathing. It is hard for saliva to wash away odor-producing bacteria when a child breathes through their mouth rather than through their nose. Mouth breathing dries out the mouth and can lead to other oral health problems for children.
  • Bacteria on the tongue. Remind your child when brushing to brush their tongue too! A lot of smelly bacteria reside on the tongue, which can be easily removed using a soft bristled brush!
  • Allergies or a sinus infection. Your child's sore throat or stuffy nose could be the cause of bad breath, due to bacteria within the nasal passages and throat.
  • Swollen tonsils. When tonsils become infected and inflamed, they often carry an unpleasant smell. Bacteria can gather on the swollen tonsils and cause bad breath.
  • A foreign object. As strange as it may sound, your child's bad breath could be the result of a small object stuck in their nasal passages. Sometimes a baby may place small items such as beads, food particles, tiny toys, or beans in his or her nose, which can lead to bad breath.
  • Your child's diet. Bad breath can be simply caused by what your child consumed for lunch. Foods with strong odors, including garlic or onions may be influencing the odor of your child's breath.
  • Medications. If your child is taking certain medications, the chemicals released within their bodies may result in bad breath.

Despite the cause of bad breath, it is important to teach children the importance of forming good oral health care habits at an early age. Consider obtaining flavored floss and a toothbrush with your child’s favorite television character on it, which can make brushing more fun. Also, try to avoid breath mints, which typically contain sugar that can lead to more oral bacteria!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Family/2014/May/article/SW-281474979302506.cvsp

http://kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/body/bad_breath.html#

Image credit: http://parentingmojo.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/child-hands-over-mouth-.jpg

 

Can Seaweed Help Fight Tooth Decay?

June 27th, 2014

 

Are your taste buds a fan of seaweed? It turns out that your teeth may love it too! According to studies conducted at Newcastle University's School of Dental Sciences, researchers have found a correlation between seaweed and tooth decay prevention.

Tooth decay is a common oral health problem that typically arises from a buildup of dental plaque on the surface of teeth. Dental plaque is a slimy layer of biofilm that contains many types of bacteria, which release acids that damage tooth enamel. The Newcastle University researchers discovered that an enzyme extracted from Bacillus licheniformis, a bacterium found on the surface of seaweed in marine ecosystems, attacks and removes plaque. The researchers initially began researching the bacterium to see if it could remove bacteria from ship hulls. Soon, they discovered that the enzyme from this bacterium could be a potential weapon in the fight against tooth decay!

The researchers believe that this discovery could lead to more effective oral hygiene products. Although toothpastes are effective, there are still spaces between teeth where the bacteria in plaque can hide, leading to cavities. Further research is being done to see if the enzyme found in seaweed could be used in toothpaste to help reduce such oral health problems. Researchers believe that seaweed-derived toothpaste may protect teeth in the spaces that are hard to reach with toothbrushes. More tests are being planned to verify if this product would be both effective and safe. Scientists have discovered that eating seaweed may even be effective in whitening teeth.

Not only is seaweed good for your oral health, but it also contains a wealth of nutrients that will improve your overall health. Seaweed is rich in iodine, calcium, iron, magnesium and vitamin C. It helps with digestive health and has cholesteral-lowering effects. Seaweed even contains anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, eating seaweed can improve liver function, and stabilize blood sugar. Try adding seaweed to your diet! Seaweed leaves as well as seaweed sheets that are commonly used in sushi rolls are sold at many grocery stores, and can taste nicely in a sandwich, salad, or soup.

Ultimately, seaweed could have a variety of medical and dental applications. Yet, it is important not to forget that regularly brushing, rinsing, and flossing are also essential in the fight against tooth decay!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/seaweed-could-fight-toothdecay-7907620.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-18686179

http://www.thebestofrawfood.com/seaweed-health-benefits.html

http://en.es-static.us/upl/2012/03/seaweed.jpeg 

A Glass of Wine a Day Keeps the Dentist Away

June 25th, 2014

Many adults occasionally indulge in a glass of red wine at dinner.  Substantial research has supported the amazing health benefits of red wine including improving heart health and containing beneficial, cancer-fighting antioxidants.  A recent study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry suggests that red wine could also have benefits for teeth by preventing harmful bacteria from building up inside the mouth.

The "magic" ingredient responsible for combating the bacteria is phenolic extracts found in wine and grapes.  Similarly, polyphenols found in tea and cranberries also play a similar role.  Streptoccus is the name of the bad bacteria that cause cavities.  Both phenolic extracts in wine and polyphenols in tea and cranberries were found to inhibit the growth of the bad bacteria.  Non-alcoholic red wine and grape seed extract were also effecting in warding off the harmful bacteria in the mouth.

"This study is about applying something to the teeth that decreases bacteria. The effectiveness of [red wine] depends on how long it stays on the tooth, known as its 'substantivity,' " says Dr. Glasband, DDS, a dentist in private practice in Long Beach, California (who was not involved in this study), "Wine has a high substantivity, which you can see as it stains the teeth when you drink it."  

It is important to note that drinking red wine can cause teeth staining.  One way to prevent teeth staining while still obtaining the health benefits of red wine is to drink water to wash away any wine left on your teeth between sips.  Another way is to brush your teeth before drinking since wine likes to stick onto any plaque that has built up onto your teeth.  Red wine should only be incorporated into a balanced and nutritious diet in moderate amounts.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Sources:

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/4-health-benefits-of-red-wine.html#b

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/277305.php

http://www.castledental.com/our-blog/preventing-red-wine-stains-your-teeth

http://www.prevention.com/health/health-concerns/weird-way-red-wine-fights-cavities

Image credit: http://img2.timeinc.net/health/images/gallery/living/wine-stain-teeth-health-400x400.jpg

Shy Away from Morning Breath!

May 26th, 2014

bluenessDo you wake up in the morning with an unpleasant taste in your mouth? You may be experiencing a case of bad breath, also known as halitosis. Bad breath can not only harm relationships, but more importantly your oral health! Morning breath is typically a result of plaque buildup in the mouth that causes inflammation and a release of bad odors. However, common medical problems including diabetes, bronchitis, liver disease, acid reflux, and respiratory tract infections can also cause bad breath.

Saliva plays a key role in preventing bad breath by killing bacteria in the mouth and washing away food particles. As you are asleep, the production of saliva steadily decreases. Thus, the cleansing process of food particles and bacteria is limited during sleep. Going to sleep without implementing good oral health habits, such as brushing and flossing, can not only lead to bad breath, but also tooth decay, cavities, and gum disease.

In order to help increase saliva production and ultimately prevent morning breath, here are a few things to remember:

  • Some medications can result in a dry mouth overnight, worsening morning breath.

  • Smoking is not only bad for your lungs, but it can also lead to a dry mouth and morning breath.

  • Mucus from allergies or sickness can cause halitosis. The odor-causing bacteria thrive on mucus and can multiply within the mouth.

  • Use a non-alcoholic mouthwash before going to sleep in order to prevent a dry mouth.

  • Clear your nasal passages before going to bed to avoid breathing through your mouth.

Sometimes it can be hard to tell whether or not your breath smells. Looking at your dental floss after flossing to see if the floss smells or if your gums are bleeding can be a good indication of the presence of odors within your mouth. Don’t forget to brush your tongue, which holds odor-causing bacteria!

There is no need to be worried or embarrassed! Halitosis is treatable and easy to eliminate. It is important to have a healthy diet and to drink water. Make sure to carefully rinse, floss, and brush after your morning breakfast. Avoid diets and foods that lack nutrition and have strong odors. When food particles and plaque are not quickly removed from your teeth, bacteria multiply and create unpleasant odors. Stay away from acidic foods, as they provide a favorable environment for bacteria to thrive.

You can lower the amount of bacteria in your mouth by practicing proper oral health care on a daily basis!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/why-do-we-have-morning-breath.aspx

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/change-your-breath-from-bad-to-good

http://www.breathmd.com/bad-morning-breath.php

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Common-Concerns/Bad-Breath/article/What-Causes-My-Bad-Breath.cvsp

http://madisonweeklynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/blueness.jpg

 

The Secret is in the Gums

May 13th, 2014

It’s not new to dentists that their patients aren’t always 100% on top of maintaining their oral health. It’s especially easy to fall behind on consistent flossing, and many think that they can get away with out flossing for some time. The consequences of lack of maintaining oral health may result in varying severity for different people; however, no doubt that bacteria continue to grow and feed on leftover food and sugars in the mouth. Lack of proper oral care can lead to inflamed and bleeding gums, bone loss, all symptoms pointing to gum disease.

Gum disease, also known as periodontitis, is a disease, which causes the gums to bleed. Another symptom includes bone loss and can eventually lead to the loss of teeth over time. Gum disease has tied to the over-active immune response to bacteria in the mouth. Periodontitis is incredibly prevalent in the general population, spurring scientists to find new ways to approach this disease.

Researchers at the University of London with research groups in the United States published their findings in Nature Immunology, in which they looked closer at what may be the cause of gum disease.

Previous studies have connected these inflammatory diseases to age and have found that as people age they become more susceptible to such diseases. These researchers looked into periodontitis in young and old mice and found that there is an increase in gum disease in the older mice when they saw a drop of a chemical called Del-1. Del-1 is considered to be an important protein responsible for restraining the immune system through stopping white blood cells from attacking mouth tissue.

Scientists found that mice that lacked this important protein developed periodontitis and severe bone loss. When the mice suffering from gum disease were treated with Del-1, bone loss was reduced and the other symptoms of gum disease decreased as well.

Before this study, scientists were only aware of the correlation between age and gum disease, but could not pinpoint what exactly was causing the gum disease. This new research can lead to new treatment plans and even prevention plans for gum disease!

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/04/120417102407.htm
http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/nidcr2.nih.gov/Templates/CommonPage.aspx?NRMODE=Published&NRNODEGUID=%7bCE246689-D899-4CC7-B68A-805AD910F4E7%7d&NRORIGINALURL=%2fOralHealth%2fTopics%2fGumDiseases%2fPeriodontalGumDisease%2ehtm&NRCACHEHINT=Guest#whoGets
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/gingivitis-periodontal-disease
https://www.nidcr.nih.gov/ScienceSpotlight/InterviewsbyTopic/PeriodontalDisease/Hajishengallis.htm

Water Flossing vs Traditional Flossing

April 27th, 2014

Waterpik-ultra-water-flosserWater flossers are an alternative to traditional flossing.  Popular water flossers like the "Waterpik" use a pulsating stream of water of different pressures to whisk away food particles and bacteria stuck in between teeth.  Traditional flossing, on the other hand, uses a string of floss in order to rub against the tight junctions between individual teeth to also remove plaque, bacteria, and food particles.

Traditional floss is most effective in removing plaque and preventing plaque from becoming tartar (hardened plaque).  Tartar, also known as dental calculus, can cause gingivitis which can be a risk factor for ultimately developing gum disease.  An ADA spokesperson and Chicago-based dentist, Mary Hayes says, "Flossing scrapes off the sticky film of bacteria, while a Waterpik just rinses it."  However, one way in which water flossing can be beneficial is if you have braces and traditional flossing becomes more difficult for you.  Water flossing can easily be navigated between the network of wires and brackets while string floss can be much more cumbersome.  Regardless, many dentists warn that water flossing should never replace traditional flossing.

Both water flossers and traditional flossing are effective in maintaing good oral health.  People are advised to floss at least once every day to get rid of particles that are unable to be reached by regular brushing.  People are more likely to use a water flosser daily because it is more enjoyable and fun to use.  However, many dentists agree that traditional flossing is still the best method to clean the hard to reach places between teeth.  Furthermore, traditional floss is much more mobile in the sense that you can carry a floss pick or a spool of floss almost anywhere you go.  Using both a water flosser and a traditional flosser would be a great addition to an oral healthcare routine, but not necessary.  If you decide to employ both methods of flossing into your routine, first use the string floss first to break up plaque.  Then, use the water floss to flush the debris out and follow up with your normal brushing routine with fluoride toothpaste.  

In order to ensure that you are flossing correctly, following these illustrated guidelines:

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Sources:

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/products/waterpik-better-than-flossing.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/adult-health/expert-answers/dental-floss/faq-20058112

http://parkridgedds.com/ask-the-dentist-floss-vs-waterpik/

http://www.ada.org/sections/publicResources/pdfs/watch_materials_floss.pdf

http://blog.beamtoothbrush.com/?p=428

http://www.livestrong.com/article/287399-waterpik-vs-floss/

Flossing instructions image: http://wichitafamilydentistry.com/how2floss.jpg

Image credit: http://waterpikultrawaterflosserreview.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/Waterpik-ultra-water-flosser.jpg

What Causes Receding Gums?

April 7th, 2014

Smiling-Young-LadyGum recession is the gradual process in which the gum tissue wears away, uncovering the tooth’s root. Receding gums can be a result of numerous factors, including brushing or flossing too harshly! Receding gums is one of the symptoms of periodontal disease. The gaps formed between the gum line and teeth allow for bacteria to accumulate and cause damage. Bacteria infected gums can destroy gum tissue and supporting bones. This can ultimately lead to tooth loss. The observation of a tooth appearing to be longer, as well as tooth sensitivity, can also be signs of gum recession.

The following points are few common causes of gum recession:

  • Genetics could be a factor of acquiring gum recession. If gum recession runs in the family, you are at a higher risk for receding gums.
  • Harshly scrubbing your teeth rather than brushing can result in receding gums. Tooth brushes labeled “soft” are optimal brushes to reduce the risk of receding gums.
  • Gum recession can occur due to the misalignment of teeth.
  • Poor oral health habits.
  • A traumatic injury has occurred and has impacted the facial structure.

Gum recession is a common dental issue that can be treated. If caught in the early stages, the process of deep cleaning (tooth scaling) can remove the root surfaces below the gum line and even out the root area to eliminate bacteria from forming on the surface.

In order to prevent gum recession, be mindful of changes that occur in your mouth. Make sure to take care of your oral health and be gentle with your teeth!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2014/February/article/SW-281474979262118.cvsp
http://www.ashevilledentalcare.com/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/Smiling-Young-Lady.jpg

Coconut Oil Can Help Fight Tooth Decay

March 14th, 2014

coconut oil
Did you know that coconut oil acts as a natural antibiotic when digested? Did you also know that it kills the bacteria responsible for tooth decay?
It's true! There's also evidence to suggest that the antibiotic part of the oil can be added to oral hygiene products.

Dr. Damien Brady and his team at the Athlone Institute of Technology in Ireland are responsible for these findings. They set out to see if the natural antibiotic in coconut oil could be used to fight strains of streptococcus bacteria, which is commonly found in the mouth and responsible for tooth decay.

The researchers tested the impact of coconut oil, vegetable oil and olive oil in their natural states and when treated with enzymes, in a process similar to digestion.  The oils were then tested against Streptococcus bacteria which are common inhabitants of the mouth. Only the enzyme-modified coconut oil showed an ability to halted most strains of bacteria from reproducing. It also attacked Streptococcus mutans, an acid-producing bacterium which is a major cause of tooth decay.

Test studies have also found that semi-digested coconut oil kills Candida albicans, a yeast that causes thrush. The scientists think that enzyme-modified coconut oil, meaning in its semi-digested state, could possibly have antimicrobial properties in oral healthcare, specially in hygiene products.

The research gave some insight into the workings of antibacterial activity in the human gut. "Our data suggests that products of human digestion show antimicrobial activity. This could have implications for how bacteria colonise the cells lining the digestive tract and for overall gut health," said Dr Brady.

Dr. Brady said: "Dental caries is a commonly overlooked health problem affecting 60-90% of children and the majority of adults in industrialized countries. Incorporating enzyme-modified coconut oil into dental hygiene products would be an attractive alternative to chemical additives, particularly as it works at relatively low concentrations."

nutiva coconut oil

spectrum coconut oil

barleans coconut oil

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    Drs. Ali & Ali are happy to answer any questions you may have about this exciting new discovery! Or, if you have a different question or concern, don't hesitate to contact us at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

coconut oil uses good

References:
http://www.ait.ie/aboutaitandathlone/newsevents/pressreleases/2012pressreleases/title-16107-en.html
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-19435442
http://www.swansonvitamins.com/en_US/images/ItemImages_SW/images_Xl/BAR033_Xl.jpg
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71SWHpNlPeL._SL1500_.jpg
http://images.iherb.com/l/SPE-11201-1.jpg
http://foodmatters.tv/images/coconut-oil.jpg
http://www.lesliekeegan.com/sites/default/files/coconut-oil1.jpg

Cranberries to the Rescue! The Hero in Fending off Oral Thrush

March 13th, 2014

cranberriesCranberries can be a delicious snack on the go and, in form of juice, can be a great way to quench your thirst. Along with being a healthy component to a meal, studies have shown that cranberries may very well keep oral thrush away!

Oral thrush is a common condition where a fungus called Candida albicans that can be found on the lining of your mouth. Oral thrush can leave white lesions, usually foud on the tongue or inner cheeks. These lesions can be very painful and can bleed when scraped. If oral thrush is not treated, it can spread to the roof of the mouth, the tonsils and even the back of the throat.

So what exactly causes thrush? Small amounts of fungus can be found in the mouth, digestive tract and skin of completely healthy people. Fungus is usually kept in check by bacteria and microorganisms found in the body. However, stress and certain medications which can cause fungus to grow without a check in the body.

Oral thrush can affect all age groups including babies, who can pass the infection onto their mothers during breast-feeding. Those who smoke or wear dentures are also at a higher risk of developing thrush.

Researchers at Rutgers University and the University of Laval in Quebec, Canada found that in ingredient in cranberry called AC-PAC that is successful in inhibiting the disease-causing properties of Candida albicans. AC-PAC works to prevent biofilm from forming at the gumline. C. albicans are prone to stick to the oral epithelial cells and saliva-coated resin discs. Because this infection needs to stick to biofilm to spread, AC-PAC can prevent the infection by decreasing adherence, and thus, decreasing infection rates.

Cranberries don’t only come to the rescue in terms of oral thrush; studies have shown that cranberry juice is effective in preventing plaque formation on teeth. Drinking cranberry juice daily is great for fighting off urinary infections and can even kill off bacteria that is known to be the cause of stomach cancer and ulcers.

Many may say that an apple a day keeps the doctor away, but cranberries may also do the trick and maintain your oral and overall health! If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-health-thrush
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2012/article/ADA-06-Cranberries-may-combat-oral-thrush.cvs
http://www.nbcnews.com/id/15814415/ns/health-diet_and_nutrition/t/research-shows-health-benefits-cranberries/#.Uxo-Nxw7vNk

Ancient Dental Problems

February 17th, 2014

neanderthal-jaws-(2)Fossil evidence has shown that our Neanderthal ancestors suffered from many of the same dental problems that afflict us today including bad breath (halitosis) and caries.

Skeletal fossil remains dated about 15,000 years old found in a town in Morocco have given us insight into the prehistoric hunter-gatherer diets and their resulting oral health problems.  A study by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found that a staggering 51% of the teeth found had cavities and abscesses.  Furthermore, evidence has shown us a glimpse of their distinct diet of acorns, pine nuts, and fermentable fruits.  Just like the formation of any other cavity, researchers predict that bacteria broke down carbohydrate rich foods left on teeth.  Ultimately, these bacteria would release harmful acids that cause enamel degradation characteristic of caries.

Another Neanderthal fossil specimen found in France dated an astounding 175,000 years ago was also found to have severe abscesses that would have prevented her from eating properly.  The significance of this particular finding was that it showed that Neanderthals must have helped one another eat and gain nutrients.  One researcher hypothesizes that a peer must have chewed up food for this specimen and fed her in order for her to survive well into her 40s.

Interestingly, both accounts show that many of the dental problems people face today were also the same problems our ancient ancestors faced.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. 

References:

http://racers-republic.com/health/prehistoric-men-had-toothache-and-bad-breath-4495/
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=98275

Taking Toothpaste to the Next Level with Antibacterial Agents

January 17th, 2014

Toothpaste Different colorsHave you ever wondered what’s in your regular fluoride toothpaste? Well, there are most definitely powerful agents that help prevent cavities.

But exactly are these agents that keep bacteria from wreaking havoc in the mouth? Typically, fluoride toothpaste include mild abrasives that clear out the leftover food in the mouth and gets rid of the stains that may linger after that can of soda or that glass of wine. Types of abrasives can include calcium carbonate, magnesium carbonate, and other salts and silicates. Of course, fluoride toothpaste includes fluoride, which is responsible for strengthen tooth enamel and remineralizing tooth decay.

These two ingredients are what’s necessary for clearing away food and strengthening teeth, but many fluoride toothpastes do not actually contain an ingredient that actively deters bacteria production.

However, Philip Riley, a researcher at the University of Manchester, England, came out with a study that details the possible importance and benefits of adding antibacterial agents in fluoride toothpaste. He believes that triclosan and copolymer are two antibacterial agents that seem promising for controlling plaque, inflammation, bleeding and tooth decay.

Tooth decay and gum disease are strongly associated with tooth loss, and plaque is considered the start of the issue. Plaque houses bacteria in a film that builds up in between teeth, and when left untreated, periodontitis, a more serious gum disease, can result.

The Cochrane Oral Health Group looked into 30 published studies of toothpastes that have both triclosan and copolymer in their ingredients. The group found that with these antibacterial agents, toothpaste users had a 22% reduction in plaque, 22% reduction in gingivitis, and a 48% reduction in bleeding gums, and a 5% reduction in cavities, compared to individuals who use regular fluoride toothpaste.

There study indicates that antibacterial agents can have a significant effect in preventing bacterial damage within the mouth. While it is important to have a toothpaste that can abrasives to remove leftover food and fluoride to strengthen teeth, this study demonstrates the importance of antibacterial agents in one’s regular toothpaste! If you have more concerns about caring for baby teeth, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

References:

http://www.ada.org/1322.aspx
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/01/140109175500.htm
http://www.cfah.org/hbns/2014/antibacterial-agent-boosts-toothpaste-effectiveness

Image: http://liveandevolve.com/

Are toothbrushes actually clean?

July 29th, 2013

Researchers at England’s University of Manchester have looked into the various kinds of germs found in bacteria, and they found that toothbrushes are crawling with them! They discovered that a toothbrush could harbor more than 100 million bacteria, with the likes of diarrhea-causing E. coli and skin-infecting staphylococci bacteria. This may sound completely unsanitary, but wait! The mouth isn't the cleanest place to begin with. There are hundreds of microorganisms in the mouth on a daily basis. Medical professionals note that this is perfectly normal and it is not something to sweat over. But what individuals need to worry about is when there is an unhealthy balance of bacteria in the mouth. Many people forget that the plaque that develops inside the mouth (if proper brushing is not taking place) is, in fact, bacteria. Toothbrushes are continuously introduced to bacteria every time it is placed into the mouth.

 

So if there are constantly bacteria on toothbrushes, can they make people sick? Researchers think that it’s not likely. Considering there are already bacteria in the mouth, the body’s natural defenses make it difficult for an infection to occur just from brushing teeth. However, one should not take the body’s ability to defend itself for granted. There are still ways to keep fewer bacteria from entering the mouth. In many homes the bathroom sink is in close vicinity to the toilet. But that should not be the excuse for placing toothbrushes near where flushing occurs! Every time the toilet flushes, it sends sprays of bacteria into the air. Try to place toothbrushes as far as possible from the toilet, giving bacteria less of a chance in getting into the mouth.

 

Bacteria love moist environments and it is important that the brush dries through and through between each brushing. Try to avoid covers that enclose the brush, which would leave the toothbrush moist and bacteria-friendly. It is also a good idea to keep the toothbrush upright in a holder, instead of lying it down. Also, no matter how clean your sister or any of your other members of your family, don’t ever use each other’s brushes. Don’t even place toothbrushes in the same cup! Whenever toothbrushes come in contact with each other, they can easily exchange bacteria.

We recommend that you replace your toothbrush every season(3 months) to help prevent bacterial growth and to maintain oral hygiene.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/the-ugly-truth-about-your-toothbrush

 

http://www.ada.org/1887.aspx

 

Stick with Mussels: they can help strengthen and rebuild teeth!

July 19th, 2013

Good news for all you seafood lovers out there. The Journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces have found something very special about mussels’ adhesive nature. Not only does it let these creatures hold fast to rocks in the ocean, researchers have found that they also can be beneficial for teeth.

Quan-Li Li, Chun Hung Chu, and other researchers noted that there are three out of four people who have teeth sensitive to hot, cold, sweet or sour foods and drinks. These scientists were determined to look for ways to rebuild enamel and dentin, which are important factors that determine tooth sensitivity. They found that mussel’s natural adhesive, which allows them to attach to rocks, can be a synthetic substance used to reform the eroded enamel and dentin. They worked under the hypothesis that the sticky substance in mussels would have the ability to keep essential minerals in contact with dentin long enough for reformation to occur.

In 2011, an international team of scientists that mussel’s adhesive proved to be a successful alternative to other coatings used in teeth. While most coatings tend to make teeth weak and brittle over time, the synthetic coating created from mussel adhesive had the ability to heal itself when damaged. The researchers also found that minerals in other coatings were only able to reform enamel while the synthetic adhesive was able to reform both enamel and dentin. Phil Messersmith of Northwestern University have taken into account mussels’ incredible adhesive properties and have created a polymer used in coating that can mend tears in just a matter of minutes!

While these scientists continue to incorporate this newfound adhesive to the clinical setting, there are still ways to battle sensitive teeth. Doctors continue to recommend that individuals practice good oral hygiene (brushing twice a day and making sure to floss carefully). Those with sensitive teeth can also be extra careful when consuming acidic foods such as juices, vinegar in salad dressings and soft drinks. A good way to protect teeth is to rinse the mouth with water after consuming these foods. Teeth grinding can also leave teeth susceptible to sensitivity; ask the dentist about a mouth guard for nighttime use to prevent teeth grinding.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

Sensodyne on sensitive teeth
ACS journal website
Science Daily website
Yahoo Health
http://www.empowher.com/dental-amp-oral-health/content/sticking-mussels-beneficial-sensitive-teeth

Sweet (But-Teeth Friendly) Desserts

June 18th, 2013

It’s summer time! The school year is finally winding down, and we are excited to make are way down to the beach and enjoy some time out in the sun. Summer also brings ice cream, popsicles, cotton candy, and a whole bunch of food that may be delicious, but are also definitely not doing your teeth a favor.

Every grocery store is bound to have a section of an aisle dedicated to frozen desserts, which can range from strawberry ice cream to jolly rancher-flavored popsicles. Your taste buds may think it’s an excellent idea to grab a few on the go, but your teeth will beg to differ. Popsicles tend to have high sugar content, which will leave teeth susceptible to cavities and tooth decay. These frozen sweets also contain artificial coloring dye, which has been shown to contain carcinogens and maybe contribute Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Instead of getting a pack of popsicles from the grocery store, here are some healthy and enjoyable alternatives.

Smoothies: Milk shakes tend to be a summer favorite after a long soccer practice. While they do contain dairy, which is wonderful for teeth, they also contain lots of sugar, which is wonderful for bacteria in the mouth, not so much for teeth. Bacteria love feeding on sugary residue left in the mouth, and definitely won’t hold back when they are offered a ton from milk shakes. Instead of making a trip to the local diner, start the blender and add in some low-fat milk, yogurt, bananas, strawberries, and blueberries. A yummy smoothie will result, chock full of calcium, antioxidants, and vitamins. Homemade smoothies will allow you to control the amount of sugar that goes into the drink, and sweet and healthy fruit will do just the trick! Here’s a quick and easy recipe (link: http://bit.ly/16upE68) that will satisfy sweet-tooths but will keep teeth happy.

Yogurt Pops: Yogurt, cheese, milk and other dairy products are great saliva generators, protecting teeth from tooth decay. Calcium and phosphates found in milk and other dairy products can put minerals back in teeth, making them healthy and stronger. Here’s ( http://bit.ly/112tASF ) a great recipe for these delicious pops that will make the kids wanting more!

Remember: Desserts can be delicious and healthy at the same time; there’s always great foods out there that are also a treat for teeth as well. Here’s to a summer of healthy choices and yummy eats! If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/rachelhennessey/2012/08/27/living-in-color-the-potential-dangers-of-artificial-dyes/

Gel-Filled Teether Recall

August 5th, 2009

 

Courtesy of the FDA

Luv N’ Care, LTD Issues a Nationwide Recall of all Nuby Gel Filled Teethers and certain UPC Codes of Cottontails and Playschool Teethers

Contact:
Joseph H. Hakim
Luv N’ Care, LTD
1-800-256-2399

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE - July 17, 2009 - Luv N’ Care, LTD, Monroe, LA, is initiating a nationwide recall of all Nuby Gel Filled Teethers. These products have been found to contain Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus circulans in the gel. These bacteria generally do not cause illness. However, the bacteria can affect children with weakened immune systems, causing stomach pain, vomiting, and diarrhea, if the teether is punctured and the liquid from the teether is ingested.

Consumers who have Nuby Gel Filled Teethers and Cottontails and Playschool Teethers with any of the UPC Codes listed below should immediately stop using them, discard them or return them to the place of purchase for a full refund.

The recall includes the following products:

UPC code Brand Name

48526-00451 Nuby

48526-00452 Nuby

48526-00453 Nuby

48526-00454 Nuby

48526-00455 Nuby

48526-00459 Nuby

48526-00467 Nuby

48526-00472 Nuby

48526-00473 Nuby

48526-00482 Nuby

48526-00483 Nuby

48526-00487 Nuby

48526-00490 Nuby

48526-00519 Nuby

48526-00521 Nuby

41520-87115 Cottontails

50428-91511 Playschool

41520-91660 Cottontails

The firm voluntarily recalled the products after learning that samples of two lots collected by the Food and Drug Administration were found to contain Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus circulans, respectively in the gel. FDA has been apprised of this action.

No illnesses have been reported to date.

Product was distributed through retail outlets nationwide and has been found to be marketed on the internet. The products are packaged in a plastic bubble on a printed card and can be identified by the UPC Codes listed above.

The company has ceased product and distribution of the products and is notifying its distributors to return the product. Consumers are urged to return the product to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Consumers with questions may contact the company at 1-800-256-2399 ext. 3106between 8:00 AM and 5:00 PM Central time.

Adverse reactions experienced with the use of this product may be reported to the FDA's MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program either online, by regular mail or by fax.

 

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