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The Link Between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

June 13th, 2013

26 million adults are known to be affected by diabetes. Statistics show that 1 out of 10 healthcare dollars are spent on diabetes. The link between periodontal disease and diabetes has been extensively studied over the past 50 years. There is strong evidence that diabetes is a risk factor for periodontitis and gingivitis. A study dating back to more than 30 years ago has already shown that children suffering from type 1 diabetes had a higher prevalence of gingival inflammation. Ervasti et al. examined patients with gingival bleeding and determined that there was greater amount of bleeding in patients with poorly controlled diabetes when compared to subjects that do not have diabetes and subjects with well-controlled diabetes. Research has also shown that types with type 2 diabetes also tend to have more gingival inflammation than the control group in the study.

Studies also show that the risk of developing periodontitis is increased when one has diabetes. Teenagers with type 1 diabetes have been found to be five times more likely to develop periodontitis. Research also supports the idea that there may be more bone loss linked to adults with diabetes. Subjects suffering from type 2 diabetes are three times more likely to develop periodontitis compared to subjects without diabetes.

Doctors were able to pinpoint the root cause of this relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. There is a protein known as the c-reactive protein (CRP), which is found in the blood stream. CRP levels rise with inflammation of blood vessels, which has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Researchers have also shown that CRP is continuously produced in the presence of periodontal diseases. It is important to note that an individual cannot keep diabetes under control if he or she is also suffering from periodontal disease. It is absolutely crucial that diabetic patients maintain good oral health to keep CRP at bay.

Periodontal disease can affect your general health; read more here.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! They can assess the risk of periodontal disease and if need be our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi, can help.Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

Cianciola L, Park B, Bruck E, Mosovich L, Genco R. Prevalence of periodontal disease
in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (juvenile diabetes). JADA
1982;104(5):653-60.

Ervasti L, Knuuttila M, Pohjamo L, Haukipuro K. Relation between control of
diabetes and gingival bleeding. J Periodontol 1985;56(3):154-7.

http://www.diabetes.org/news-research/research/access-diabetes-research/greenfield-protein.html

http://www.ada.org/sections/professionalResources/pdfs/Perio_diabetes.pdf

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Can playing a musical instrument effect oral health?

June 11th, 2013

It has been widely accepted that playing a musical instrument can increase and nourish intelligence in children, but playing a used instrument can be a health risk as well.

General Dentistry published a clinical study that revealed that woodwind and brass instruments that have been previously used were found to be ridden with various bacteria and fungi some that have been linked to serious infectious and allergic diseases, which can further lead to conditions such as mouth breathing. Click here to read more about mouth breathing. Children who are involved with their school band or orchestra typically rent their instrument for over the course of the year. These instruments have already been played by other students and without proper cleaning, bacteria an fungi have been indubitably thriving in the instrument. The same growth has been seen in dentures, athletic mouth guards, and tooth brushes.

In the clinical study, 117 instrumental pieces, including mouthpieces, internal chambers, and cases were tested on 13 previously used instruments. There were 442 different bacteria found on the instruments, along with 58 molds and 19 yeasts. Mold can lead to the increased likelihood of developing asthma, while yeasts found on the instruments can lead to skin infections around the mouth and lips. These bacteria, fungi, mold, and yeast that are presence on these instruments are highly resistant to the antibiotics that are normally prescribed, which highlights the importance of sterilizing instruments that have been previously played. It is essential to wipe areas that come in contact with the skin and mouth frequently. Instruments should be cleaned on a regular basis with cleaning cloths and solution.

If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/142/5/490.3.fullv

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