breathing

Robbed of a Good Night's Rest?

August 10th, 2019

Sleep is an important part of each day, so much so that the effects of a restless night can change the entire productivity of our next day! Unfortunately, many people suffer from sleeping disorders. In fact, nearly 70 million adults in the United States have a sleeping disorder, the most common of which is sleep apnea. According to the National Sleep Foundation, a whopping 18 million adults in America have sleep apnea. So, what exactly is sleep apnea? There are two main types to know about:

  • The most common form, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is a condition involving involuntary temporary interruptions in breaths for at least ten seconds at a time due to upper airway blockage. This causes a disrupted sleeping pattern and low blood oxygen levels, which can contribute to several health issues.
  • Central sleep apnea is much less common and is characterized by failure of the brain to signal the necessary muscles involved in breathing.

As a result of the interrupted breathing pattern, individuals with sleep apnea often produce snoring and choking sounds throughout the night. You may be wondering, what’s the big deal about having sleep apnea? Sleep apnea does not only just interrupt your night’s rest, it can also put you at a higher risk of developing many conditions, including high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, depression, and worsening of ADHD.

Who does sleep apnea affect?

Obstructive sleep apnea can impact people of all ages and any gender, however, there are some factors that can place some people at higher risk. This includes people 40 years of age and older, smokers, heavy alcohol users, males, African Americans, those who have a family history of sleep apnea, and individuals suffering from obesity, sinus problems, or allergies. Your anatomy also plays a role in your risk of developing sleep apnea. People with nasal septum deviations, a thicker neck, narrow throat, large tongue, small jaw, or enlarged tonsils are at higher risk of sleep apnea.

If you think you have sleep apnea or have been told that you may have sleep apnea by your doctor, don’t worry! Sleep apnea can be treated, and Wellesley Dental Group’s very own Dr. Emad Abdallah can help you conquer sleep-disordered breathing!  Dr. Emad Abdallah received his doctorate, certificate in orthodontics, and Master of Science in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ) and orofacial pain from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. Don't be robbed of a good night's sleep, contact us today!

Stay tuned to our social media accounts including FacebookLinkedIn, Pinterest, and Twitter for more sleep-related posts!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-apnea

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sleep-apnea-and-snoring

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/is-sleep-apnea-or-snoring-robbing-you-from-your-sleep-0713

trouble-falling-asleep.jpg

Sleep-Apnea-Diagram.png

Are You At Risk For Sleep Apnea?

January 23rd, 2017

It's common knowledge that sleep is important for learning and your overall health, but did you know that your sleeping habits are also linked to your tongue and tonsils?

According to a recent study published in the Saudi Medical Journal, tonsil size, tongue indentations, and tongue teeth imprints may be indicators for obstructive sleep apnea risk. This condition, which affects over 18 million adults in the US, stops and restarts your breathing due to blocked upper airways while you sleep. Common symptoms include interrupted sleep, sleep loss, fatigue, irritability, and a lack of focus.

OSA can also result in learning and memory problems, heart attacks, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, stroke, or depression in severe cases. Obese individuals over 40 years old with large tonsils and tongue indentations are most at risk for OSA.

If you have enlarged tongue or tonsils, we recommend that you visit a sleep specialist.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sleep-apnea-dentist-tongue-tonsil_us_56e04e17e4b0b25c91804c4c?utm_hp_ref=dental-health

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sleep-apnea-and-snoring

http://yourbodychanging.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Does-Sleeping-Make-You-Taller.jpg

Sleep Apnea and Permanent Tooth Extraction

April 12th, 2016

sleep

Sleep apnea is common condition that can lead to trouble sleeping and cause tiredness throughout the day even after a full night's rest. Individuals with sleep apnea experience one or more pauses in breathing during their sleep that can last from seconds to minutes. Aside from excessive daytime sleepiness, signs of sleep apnea also include dry mouth, headache, and snoring, just to name a few.

Research has found that sleep apnea may increase the risk of of high blood pressure, heart problems, stroke, obesity, and diabetes, and the chance of getting into a car accident.

So, you may be wondering how this condition plays a role in dentistry. Some studies suggest that getting teeth extracted for braces can increase one's risk for developing sleep apnea.Orthodontic treatment is the perfect solution to correcting crowded teeth, protruding teeth, gapped teeth, and jaw problems. For well over 50 years and still today, dentists have debated the treatment of extracting permanent teeth for orthodontic treatment. Some dentists extract permanent teeth because it's easier to create more space between teeth, while others use alternative methods, such as palate expansion or headgear to correct one's smile.

Some argue that pre-orthodontic tooth extraction makes the jaw narrower and forces the tongue to lay further back into the mouth and restrict the airway. Also, some believe that extractions can lead to changes in one's facial appearance and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). TMD is a condition that results in oral issues including chewing problems and jaw pain. However, further research is needed because it is unclear whether these notions are actually the case.

Others counter these arguments and claim that the jaw doesn't necessarily become narrowed and can even become widened depending on various factors. In addition, some argue that extractions can be beneficial for individuals with lip strain or thin gums.

Studies observing patients who've had teeth extracted for orthodontic treatment are inclusive in their findings. These studies often only offer a limited assessment of the patient's airway to see what's actually occurring.  Two studies of patients found no change in the pharyngeal airway as well as a third study.  However, three other studies found a reduction in the airway size of some patients. Researchers believe that the difference in findings could be due to racial differences in the response of the airway to movement of the teeth.

Overall, its unclear whether or not extractions lead to sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a complex condition and further research is needed to explain its association with permanent tooth extractions. If you feel that you are excessively sleepy during the day you may want to contact a sleep specialist so that they can conduct a sleep study. If you are in need of any orthodontic treatment or have questions regarding permanent tooth extractions,  Dr. Emad is happy to help. Dr. Emad Abdallah is a faculty member at Tufts Craniofacial Pain Center.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea

http://www.naturalhealingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/iStock_000002751438Medium.jpg

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24963245

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20677956

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24963245

 

E-cigarettes are Under FDA's Supression

June 17th, 2014

electronic_vs_classicE-cigarettes are gaining popularity among smokers and have attracted the attention of FDA who recently updated the regulation requirements for tobacco products.

"On April 24, the agency proposed rules that call for strict regulation of electronic cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, water pipe tobacco and hookahs", CNN reports. The new rule updates will include health warning requirements, vending sale prohibition,  age limitations (at least 18 years old) and mandatory ingredients listing. Until recently, only cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and roll-your-own tobacco fell under the FDA's regulatory authority.

Being unregulated by FDA, e-cigarettes are estimated to be used by 4 millions of Americans and are believed not to deliver the carcinogens that raise health concerns. But since they haven't been studied properly it's unknown what health risks they pose, how much nicotine or other chemicals are actually being inhaled, or whether there is any benefit to using them.

E-cigarette is a battery operated nicotine inhaler stimulating  tobacco smoking by producing a vapor resembling smoke. While some research show that e-cigarettes have a thousand times less contaminates than a tobacco and due to the lack of tobacco can reduce discoloration of teeth and risk of cavities, other scientists say it's always harmful to inhale anything other than fresh air. "As for long-term effects, we don't know what happens when you breathe the vapor into the lungs regularly," Thomas Glynn, the director of science and trends at the American Cancer Society, says.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Resources:

http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/24/health/fda-e-cigarette-regulations/index.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/fda-regulates-ecigarettes/story?id=23445234#

http://joyetech.by/p89-polza_perehoda_na_elektronnye_sigarety.html

How Much Water Should I Drink?

April 15th, 2014

womandrinkingwaterWe are all made up primarily of water.  In fact, about 60% of our body weight is water.  Water is crucial in the proper functioning of all of our physiological systems from flushing out harmful toxins to facilitating the travel of nutrients from one location to another.  We are constantly losing water through processes like sweating, breathing, and excretion.

The Institute of Medicine advises men to drink about 3 liters (13 cups) of water daily while women should drink about 2.2 liters (9 cups) of water daily.  Another way to calculate how much water you should drink, is to use the "half your body weight" rule.  For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you should drink half that number in ounces (75 ounces of water).  One cup is defined as 8 ounces of water.  So, a 100 pound person should drink about 9.4 cups of water daily.  However, these guidelines for adequate intake of water will varying depending on individual lifestyles.  For example, an athlete that is constantly exercising or a person that lives in a hot, humid environment will need more water on a daily basis.  Intuitively, this makes sense.  You are losing fluids and electrolytes more quickly as you sweat more.

Surprisingly, thirst and dry mouth should not be used as accurate indicators of when to drink.  In fact, once you already feel these symptoms, your body is already dehydrated.  Dehydration can lead to a host of negative symptoms including: fatigue, headaches, dizziness, and weak muscles.  One effective way of determining whether or not you are drinking enough water is to examine the color of your urine.  A dark yellow color indicates dehydration while a clearer, lighter color indicates proper hydration.

The wide-range of benefits of drinking water are well-known.  Research has shown that sufficient water intake results in a better balance of body fluids, weight loss, healthier looking skin, and better bowel function.  Water is also beneficial for your teeth.  Water can wash away food debris and acidic residue left behind on teeth which keeps saliva levels high.  High saliva levels are necessary for combating cavities.  Furthermore, water can dilute high-sugar drinks and mitigate some of its harmful effects.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Sources:
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/not-drinking-enough-water-per-day-2786.html
http://healthy-alkaline-water.com/side-effects-of-not-drinking-enough-water/
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256
http://www.joybauer.com/photo-gallery/5-fortifying-foods-for-your-teeth/Water.aspx
http://health.usnews.com/health-news/blogs/eat-run/2013/09/13/the-truth-about-how-much-water-you-should-really-drink

Image credit: http://www.wellness.uci.edu/images/womandrinkingwater.jpg

Is Your Child a Mouth Breather?

April 2nd, 2014

smiling child big eyes happySay hello to spring as warm weather and flowers blossom throughout the city. However, as spring comes, seasonal allergies follow. Many children suffer from allergies, which causes nasal congestion and trouble breathing. This can lead to a bad habit called “mouth breathing.” Mouth breathing is prominent in children, but is also true for adults. Many individuals are not aware of the health and behavioral problems associated with mouth breathing.

Breathing through the mouth has many negative benefits. Children who habitually breathe through their mouth often experience problems getting enough oxygen into their blood, which affects their weight, sleep, and even their performance at school. This poor oxygen concentration within the blood can also lead to high blood pressure, heart problems, and other health concerns.

If untreated, children may undergo atypical facial development, including narrow faces and mouths, and gingivitis. Mouth breathing can cause teeth to come in at an improper angle, resulting in crooked teeth. Obtaining treatment for mouth breathing can considerably improve one’s daily life!

Breathing through the mouth instead of the nose can lead to trouble for children. It is important to watch to see if your child is chronically breathing through his or her mouth, because mouth breathing can be treated in children if caught early!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100406125714.htm
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/tc/mouth-breathing-and-malocclusion-topic-overview
http://www.eyeglasses-calgary-optometrists.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/child-eyes.jpg

Are toothbrushes actually clean?

July 29th, 2013

Researchers at England’s University of Manchester have looked into the various kinds of germs found in bacteria, and they found that toothbrushes are crawling with them! They discovered that a toothbrush could harbor more than 100 million bacteria, with the likes of diarrhea-causing E. coli and skin-infecting staphylococci bacteria. This may sound completely unsanitary, but wait! The mouth isn't the cleanest place to begin with. There are hundreds of microorganisms in the mouth on a daily basis. Medical professionals note that this is perfectly normal and it is not something to sweat over. But what individuals need to worry about is when there is an unhealthy balance of bacteria in the mouth. Many people forget that the plaque that develops inside the mouth (if proper brushing is not taking place) is, in fact, bacteria. Toothbrushes are continuously introduced to bacteria every time it is placed into the mouth.

 

So if there are constantly bacteria on toothbrushes, can they make people sick? Researchers think that it’s not likely. Considering there are already bacteria in the mouth, the body’s natural defenses make it difficult for an infection to occur just from brushing teeth. However, one should not take the body’s ability to defend itself for granted. There are still ways to keep fewer bacteria from entering the mouth. In many homes the bathroom sink is in close vicinity to the toilet. But that should not be the excuse for placing toothbrushes near where flushing occurs! Every time the toilet flushes, it sends sprays of bacteria into the air. Try to place toothbrushes as far as possible from the toilet, giving bacteria less of a chance in getting into the mouth.

 

Bacteria love moist environments and it is important that the brush dries through and through between each brushing. Try to avoid covers that enclose the brush, which would leave the toothbrush moist and bacteria-friendly. It is also a good idea to keep the toothbrush upright in a holder, instead of lying it down. Also, no matter how clean your sister or any of your other members of your family, don’t ever use each other’s brushes. Don’t even place toothbrushes in the same cup! Whenever toothbrushes come in contact with each other, they can easily exchange bacteria.

We recommend that you replace your toothbrush every season(3 months) to help prevent bacterial growth and to maintain oral hygiene.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/the-ugly-truth-about-your-toothbrush

 

http://www.ada.org/1887.aspx

 

3 Tips On Keeping Your Breath Fresh!

July 26th, 2013

Are you worried about the prospect of having breath? Don’t worry you’re not alone; according to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association, there are 40 millions Americans that suffer from bad breath. However, it doesn't need to be this way! Here are a few ideas on how to go about your day without worrying about halitosis.

1. Keep up with brushing and flossing

After a big meal, people are bound to have food caught in between the many crevices of their mouths. Food that has been left behind can break down, resulting in sticky build-up known as plaque. To keep this plaque build-up from happening, try brushing and flossing after meals, which can keep the mouth clean and breath fresh.

 

2. Don’t forget the tongue!
After brushing and flossing at night, many people just turn off the bathroom lights and hit the hay. But wait; the tongue can harbor tons of bad-smelling bacteria! Without proper maintenance, a white layer can form on the tongue. People tend to find toothbrushes to big to reach to back end of the tongue without causing discomfort. Dentists suggest using tongue scrapers, which can easily maneuver the tongue, getting rid of bacteria, leftover food, and even dead cells that brushing can’t take away.

3. Pass on the onions and garlic
Although they are undeniably great additions to a great sandwich, these two food ingredients are infamous bad-breath causers. Unfortunately, brushing after consuming garlic and onions does not do the trick; substances within these foods actually travel down the blood stream and into the lungs, where they constantly get breathed out. If you know fresh breath is necessary for a certain social meeting, save onions and garlic for another time!

 

These are simple tips to keep in mind, but they do go a long way. Always maintain good oral health and soon enough, you’ll be able to say goodbye to bad breath! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/get-rid-bad-breath

http://www.uihealthcare.org/Adam/?/HIE%20Multimedia/1/003058

Request an
Appointment

patient
forms

read
our blog

Top