burning mouth syndrome

Festive Stress Taking a Toll on Your Mouth?

December 15th, 2018

As we approach the holidays, it can be an exciting, yet stressful time as we prepare to decorate, shop, and entertain for our loved ones. Even traveling, finances, or just having a large to-do list can add stress to your body and oral health. Sometimes you may not notice the negative impact that stress is causing to your teeth. Take a look at these common stressors and how they could be harmful to your smile:

Snoring

Snoring does not only cause loud noises at night time-It could also be causing issues with your oral health! Snoring occurs when there is not enough air moving through the throat and nose while sleeping. Snoring could be a result of many conditions, and some risk factors include being male, 40 years of age or older, family history of snoring, and pregnancy. A main complication of snoring is dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is a lack of saliva, which is necessary for neutralizing acids made by bacteria within the mouth, and for moistening your gums and teeth. When there is a lack of saliva you may develop oral problems such as bad breath (halitosis), burning mouth syndrome, cavities, gingivitis, or mouth sores. Depending on the cause, interventions can include an oral appliance, weight loss, or a reduction in alcohol or smoking.

Tooth Grinding

A commonly known issue impacting your teeth is called bruxism, also known as tooth grinding. This often occurs during your sleep which can make it hard for you not to notice. In addition, jaw clenching can also cause similar effects including wearing your enamel down, gum recession, and weakening the supporting structures in your mouth that keep your teeth in place. Not to mention, it can also break or chip existing fillings in your mouth. Grinding and clenching are often due to anxiety or stress, but can also be caused by an abnormal bite. Some of the signs that can clue you in that you may be clenching or grinding include a sore jaw when you wake up in the morning, or your partner may notice clicking sounds during your sleep. Not to worry though, there are treatment options that can fix this. A night guard may be suggested, or relaxation methods including exercise or other stress management interventions may be advised by your dentist to prevent damaging your pearly whites.

Depression

Depression is a common condition for many individuals, and it can come and go in spurts during a person's life. It is important to talk with a Doctor or someone who can help if it begins to interfere with daily life including with the care of your oral and overall health.

Holiday stressors are real! Stay stress-free this holiday and be sure to keep up on health. Brushing, flossing, and making sure your scheduling your regular dental check-ups is particularly important during the holidays when lots of sweets are involved!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

getty_134936674_2000133320009280167_75133.jpg

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/what-causes-snoring-its-effect-on-oral-health-0713

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/stress-teeth#1

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/bruxism

Is Your Mouth Feeling Sizzling Hot?

October 20th, 2018

Being in pain is one of the worst feelings, especially when you don't know the cause. Thanks to new research, knowledge is increasing about chronic oral pain, also called Burning Mouth Syndrome. This condition commonly impacts middle-aged women and can be very debilitating for most people. In past years this condition has been quite ambiguous, but new discoveries are currently being made.

People experiencing Burning Mouth Syndrome often report a sensation of stinging on their tongue, palate, lips and/or gums. This condition can also cause dry mouth, and bitter or metallic taste sensation in the oral cavity. These symptoms can occur gradually overtime or appear suddenly. For many people, it can lead to difficulty eating, sleeping, and cause anxiety or depression.

A dissertation at Sahlgrenska Academy reported that when 56 women with Burning Mouth Syndrome were asked to rate the condition from 0 (not difficult at all) to 100 (unbearable), the average response was 66. It was also found that 45% of the patients experienced altered taste, and 73% had a burning, stinging, numbness, or combination of the three sensations. Burning Mouth Syndrome was strongly correlated with self reports of teeth grinding, multiple medication use, allergies, and skin diseases. Not to mention, mucin proteins detected in the patients were altered and contained less carbohydrate structures that normally impact the immune system. These patients were found to have higher inflammatory levels than the control group of individuals without Burning Mouth Syndrome. With this information, researchers are looking for methods to help with diagnosis and treatment options.

If you're experiencing some of the symptoms mentioned, this can be evaluated during your dental visit. Burning Mouth Syndrome can be secondary to dry mouth from several factors including multiple medications, fungal infections such as oral thrush, nutritional deficiencies (B1, B2, B6, B9, B12, Iron, Zinc), ill-fitting dentures, stomach acid reflux (GERD), diabetes, or consumption acidic beverages.

In the meantime, to help ease the pain, avoid irritants such as tobacco smoking, hot spicy foods, alcoholic beverages or mouth rinses with alcohol, and acidic foods and beverages.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180921151427.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/burning-mouth-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20350911

burning-mouth-syndrome-chauvin-dental-lafayette-la.jpg

images

More Pets = Less Stress = Healthy Teeth!

February 2nd, 2016

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Do you have a pet? Well, good news! Research published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that pet dogs can decrease stress levels in children, which can have a positive impact on oral health as well. If you're looking for something to add to your family wishlist, make sure to include "cute puppies!"

How can dogs can improve our health?

They may help reduce social anxiety

Pets such as dogs follow human communication cues and help spark conversation. They also provide comfort and self-esteem to children, which can lead to emotional development. Through animal-assisted therapy (AAT), dogs improve attachment and decrease separation anxiety in children. This can result in improved mental health and decreased risk of developmental disorders (emotional, behavioral, and mental) during adolescence and later on.

They may decrease stress

According to a study conducted by researchers from Bassett Medical Center in New York, 21% of children who did not have pet dogs had anxiety, while only 12% of the children who interacted with dogs at home were tested positive for anxiety. Playing with dogs can reduce cortisol levels and release oxytocin, which helps decrease physiologic responses to stress.

How does stress affect oral health, you ask?

  1. Stress is linked to canker sores, grinding of teeth, poor hygiene, dryness, TMJ, gum disease, and burning mouth syndrome.
  2. It can result in chronically high cortisol levels, which can lead to a weaker immune system. This can make it more likely for plaque bacteria to attack the gums.
  3. There is a strong connection between stress and periodontal or gum disease, which can cause tooth loss.
  4. You may not brush or floss as frequently!

Make sure to take care of your teeth properly and don't get too stressed out. Get a pet dog for bonus points!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/303276.php

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17668968

http://awomanshealth.com/stress-and-oral-health/

https://blog-photos.dogvacay.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/baby-flash-games-211.jpg

Can Yoga Improve Your Oral Health?

April 30th, 2015

 

 

Stressed out? Your dentist can usually tell! Stress can have a significant impact on your oral health.  In fact, dentists can detect oral symptoms of stress, including canker sores, teeth grinding (bruxism), gum diseasetemporomandibular disorders (TMD), burning mouth syndrome, and dry mouth, just to name a few. Luckily, many studies have shown that yoga can help people relieve stress, anxiety, and believe it or not, dental troubles!

Many studies have revealed that individuals who are stressed are more likely to neglect their oral care. As mentioned above, the tension in jaw muscles can lead to jaw clenching and teeth grinding. The good news is that along with alleviating stress, yoga improves posture. Poor posture not only affects your body, but also your mouth. It can cause the jaw to shift and affect the alignment of teeth. This can lead to Temporo-Mandibular Joint disorders (TMJ), which can cause pain chewing, nerve inflammation, headaches, and more!

Stress can also lead to dry mouth, which occurs due to low amounts of saliva production. Saliva flow is essential in helping get rid of germs in the mouth. Dry mouth leads to bad breath (halitosis), and can eventually develop into tooth decay and periodontal disease. Further, stress has been shown to increase inflammation in the mouth and  body. Bacteria in your mouth can cause gum inflammation, which plays a huge part in gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Although yoga may not fight cavities, it can improve the condition of your mouth and the health of your body by eliminating tension and stress. Yoga is a popular form of exercise that dates years and years back from India. Yoga incorporates both physical and mental disciplines for the purpose of achieving a peaceful balance between body and mind.  It promotes relaxation and can boost your mood, which can help you live longer and age-well. It also can reduce your blood pressure.

Another great thing about yoga is that it encourages a healthy lifestyle. It typically prompts people to practice better oral hygiene habits, implement healthier diets, and to get rid of poor oral health habits, including smoking.

So why not enjoy the many health benefits of yoga? There are plenty more, including:

  • Improving flexibility
  • Increasing muscle strength 
  • Preventing cartilage and joint breakdown 
  • Boosting immunity
  • Lowering blood sugar
  • Helping you focus
  • Improving your balance
  • Helping you sleep better
  • Increasing your self-esteem 
  • Benefiting your relationships

Yoga may not have been the first thing that you thought of when discussing how to maintain a healthy mouth. However, few methods of stress relief compare to that of yoga! Eliminating stress through practicing yoga may be a great option for preventing pain and oral health problems.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://lacunaloft.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Kids-Yoga-Portrait.jpg

http://awomanshealth.com/stress-and-oral-health/

http://yoganonymous.com/practice-for-the-teeth-3-ways-yoga-improves-dental-health

http://www.medicinenet.com/temporomandibular_joint_syndrome_tmj/article.htm

http://www.yogajournal.com/article/health/count-yoga-38-ways-yoga-keeps-fit/

Tongue Health is No Tongue-Twister!

March 9th, 2015

Girl Sticking Out TongueNever forget to brush your tongue! It's often referred to as the "strongest muscle in the body," yet it needs care. In this article, we will describe how you can care for your tongue, and then we will explain common health problems related to the tongue and what you should do if you see any symptoms of them. Armed with these facts, you can maintain a healthy mouth!Did you know that some toothbrushes are made specifically for your tongue? It’s true, but regular toothbrushes can get the job done too!  Place toothpaste on your brush and gently stroke your tongue from back to front to remove plaque and bacteria. Another option for brushing your tongue is to use a tongue scraper. Pull it across your tongue to clean it and improve your breath. Following these steps and practicing good oral hygiene, you can keep your tongue healthy!

Some people do develop tongue soreness or discoloration. Fortunately, these are often caused by easily treatable problems. One problem that people sometimes have is that their tongue develops a white coating or white spots. While there are a number of different conditions that can cause a tongue to have these symptoms, three of the most common causes of a "white tongue" include leukoplakia, oral thrush, and oral lichen planus. Leukoplakia occurs when too many cells grow in your mouth. The excessive amount of cells can cause white patches to form.  Although leukoplakia is usually not dangerous, it can sometimes be a precursor to cancer. A dentist can diagnose whether you have leukoplakia and inform you on how to treat it.

Oral thrush, also known as candidiasis, is another reason why some people have “white tongue.” Oral thrush is a yeast infection that can produce white patches on your mouth, including the tongue. It is especially common for infants and the elderly, individuals who use inhaled steroids to treat asthma or lung disease, and for those who have diabetes. It can also occur after a person uses antibiotics. See a dentist who can diagnose this infection and even provide you with medications to help cure it.

Oral lichen planus causes raised white lines to form on your tongue. Usually, doctors cannot diagnose the cause. Most of the time, this problem resolves on its own with time. Still, you can do your part to help your body get better by practicing proper dental hygiene and avoiding foods that irritate your mouth.

Other factors can cause a pink tongue to turn red. Vitamin deficiencies, geographic tongue (harmless condition causing red spots), scarlet fever, and kawasaki syndrome are frequent causes. If your tongue is an unhealthy red color, you may have vitamin deficiencies of B-12 or folic acid. You can simply take supplements in this situation. Kawasaki syndrome is an illness that affects the tongue's blood vessels and is usually seen in children less than five years of age. Children may develop a red tongue, a high fever, and redness in the hands and feet. Be sure to bring the child to the doctor immediately.

Some people have a black, hairy tongue. Fortunately, this is almost always benign. Your tongue has small bumps called papillae, which grow throughout your lifetime. For most people, daily activities wear down their papillae. However, for others, these bumps can continue to grow long. When papillae are long, more bacteria can live on them and create a dark, hairy appearance. Usually, this condition is seen in people who aren't practicing healthy dental hygiene or who are using chemotherapy or antibiotics. People with diabetes can also have this problem. Fortunately, a black, hairy tongue is usually not dangerous to your overall health.

 

Another common tongue condition involves painful, bumpy tongues. Causes include biting your tongue, canker sores, burning mouth syndrome, enlarged papillae, smoking, and other medical conditions.

Finally, be careful if you or someone has a swollen tongue. If the person also has trouble breathing, the person may have a severe allergic reaction and need emergency medical care. In rare cases, tongue problems can be symptoms of serious conditions, such as diabetes, anemia, and oral cancer can also cause tongue pain. Be sure to see a dentist and get a diagnosis if your pain is lasting for a significant amount of time. Follow these ideas to maintain a healthy tongue. Nobody wants a strawberry tongue!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/tc/basic-dental-care-home-treatment

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/tongue-problem-basics-sore-or-discolored-tongue-and-tongue-bumps

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/tongue-scrapers

http://www.everydayhealth.com/allergies/swollen-tongue.aspx

https://badabingbadabambadaboom.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/attitude.jpg

Soothe a Burnt Tongue!

September 13th, 2014

At some point or another, it has happened to the best of us! Taking a mouthful of our morning hot coffee or biting into a meal straight from the oven, resulting in a burnt tongue. A burnt tongue can be a rough way to start the day. Burning your tongue can destroy taste buds, which is why often other meals taste strange after the incident. No need to worry, taste buds regenerate about every two weeks!

Fortunately, a few home remedies can relieve the temporary discomfort:

  • Grab something cold! Placing an ice cube or Popsicle on your tongue can help soothe the pain. Even a cold drink will eliminate the warm sensation on your tongue. Applying something cold for simply a minute can help reduce inflammation.
  • Have a cup of yogurt. Letting yogurt sit on your tongue for a few seconds before swallowing can help cool off your tongue.
  • Sugar will do the trick! Interestingly, sprinkling a pinch of white sugar on a burnt tongue and letting it dissolve can have a soothing effect on your tongue’s nerves.
  • Eat a spoonful of honey. Honey is a naturally substance that will have your tongue feeling better in no time.
  • Vitamin E oil can help make your experience better by allowing the tongue tissue to regenerate quickly.
  • Apply aloe vera! If the taste doesn’t bother you, try using aloe vera gel from the plant, rather than from store-bought cream. Unless specified for oral use, burn creams should not be used in the mouth, as they may be toxic if ingested.
  • Suck on a cough drop that contains benzocaine, menthol or phenol. These ingredients, which can also be found in some mouthwashes, can help numb your tongue and relive pain.

Avoid citrus fruits, sodas, and other acidic items, as well as salty foods such as potato chips. These foods and drinks tend to irritate the affected area and aren't good for teeth! If the pain is very bad, try taking over-the-counter medicine, such as  acetaminophen or ibuprofen to reduce inflammation. Most importantly, be careful! Don’t underestimate the temperature of foods and beverages, as they can cause a burn on your tongue, mouth, or even your lips. Luckily, even though a mild burn of the tongue can be annoying, the burning sensation will eventually go away. However, if you are experiencing a severe burn, seek a medical professional. In addition, if the burning sensation on your tongue occurs without having burnt it on hot foods or drinks or by any other means, you may have burning mouth syndrome.

Burning mouth syndrome is a relatively common problem that is linked to many factors. Symptoms include experiencing a daily burning sensation in the mouth and dry mouth. Although the causes and prevention methods for burning mouth syndrome are not entirely known, possible causes include:

  • Damage to nerves
  • Hormonal changes, such as during menopause
  • Dry mouth
  • Allergies
  • Vitamin deficiencies
  • Acid reflux
  • Anxiety and depression
  • Poorly-fitting dentures
  • Certain medications
  • Diabetes
  • Teeth grinding

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.healthline.com/health/tongue-burn#Prevention9

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/picture-of-the-tongue

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/oralhealth/Topics/Burning/BurningMouthSyndrome.htm

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2007/04_03/soupgirl0905_228x342.jpg

 

 

Snoring is a Culprit to Oral Health Issues

April 23rd, 2014

Stop-SnoringAre you often told that you snore in your sleep? If so, you are not alone! Snoring is a common problem that can be caused by many factors. According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, approximately 30 to 50 percent of individuals within the United States snore during their lifetime. Snoring not only affects your physical health, but also your oral health!

Snoring happens when air struggles to move freely through the nose and mouth during sleep. Snoring is often a result of abnormalities of the soft tissues in the mouth. Narrowing of the airway during sleep could cause tissues at the top of the airway to hit each other, resulting in a vibration and a loud noise. This noise can range from a soft wheezing to loud whistling sounds and can suggest breathing problems that interrupt sleep.

Dry mouth is a direct result of snoring. Snoring causes a lack of salivary flow, which is essential for coating the oral tissues. According to the American Dental Association, A lack of saliva due to snoring can lead to several other oral health problems, including bad breath, burning mouth syndrome, infections, mouth sores, tooth decay, and periodontal disease. Saliva acts as a buffer by neutralizing the acids produced by plaque. Saliva helps wash away food particles, cleanse the oral cavity of dead cells that create odors, and eliminate bacteria within the mouth. Snoring can also be a symptom of sleep apnea, which has damaging effects on the body. Sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that involves short breaks of breathing during sleep.

Some common symptoms of sleep apnea include:

  • Gasping for air that causes a break in sleep
  • Fatigue
  • Morning headaches
  • Irritability
  • Mood changes
  • Sore throat
  • Dry mouth
  • Attention problems

To avoid such problems, dentists can be a good source of help! Snoring and sleep apnea can be treated by using dental devices. The mandibular advancement device, also referred to as oral appliance therapy, is widely used to treat sleep apnea and snoring. Resembling a sports mouth guard, it helps keep the lower jaw down, which helps to keep the breathing airway open. Dentists can perform a polysomnogram, also known as a sleep study, which analyzes your sleeping patterns throughout the night. Also, a tongue-retraining device helps to treat sleep apnea by positioning the tongue in order to keep the breathing airway open. Orthodontic treatments, including rapid maxillary expansion, can provide additional help, especially for those with a narrow upper jaw. This nonsurgical treatment will reduce nasal pressure by tightening the upper teeth with the application of a screw device on the upper jaw. These oral devices can be useful in reducing the frequency of snoring, thereby improving your sleep patterns and oral health.

It is important to practice good oral hygiene in order to reduce your risk of developing these oral health problems. With the support of a dental professional,  the issue of snoring issue and sleep problems can be resolved!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/June/article/SW-281474979163102.cvsp

http://finallyasleepco.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Stop-Snoring.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Personal/2013/July/article/SW-281474979158441.cvsp

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/11/using-oral-and-dental-devices-to-treat-snoring-and-sleep-apnea.html

Indulgence in Sugary Sodas Can Lead to Poor Oral Health & Cardiovascular Disease

January 24th, 2014

colaThe proven connection between poor oral heath and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should re-enforce the importance of new heath policy creation, focusing on reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks,  say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Poor oral hygiene and excess amount of sugar in the diet can cause periodontal disease and decay of the teeth-supporting bone. It is thought that chronic infection brought on by gym disease can lead to inflammation that will over time cause heart disease through atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. Despite sufficient evidence of the connection between the poor oral health and premature heart disease, the recent suggested UK national guidance on Cardiovascular disease prevention at population level does not suggest the strong need to reduce sugar consumption.

Dr Ahmed Rashid, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, who co-wrote the paper, said: "As well as having high levels of fats and salt, junk foods often contain a great deal of sugar and the effect this has on oral health may be an important additional mechanism by which junk food elevates risk of CVD." He added: "Among different types of junk food, soft drinks have raised particular concerns and are the main source of free sugar for many individuals."

The authors refer to the well-knows  New York 'soda ban' controversy which has brought a lot of attention to the issue. They stress more can be done about making the sugary sodas dominating the public areas in the United States. Dr Rashid said: "The UK population should be encouraged to reduce fizzy drink intake and improve oral hygiene. Reducing sugar consumption and managing dental problems early could help prevent heart problems later in life."

Reference: http://goo.gl/ppiqpM

Cholesterol Medication Can Help Decrease Gum Inflammation

December 12th, 2013

youngoldHeart disease is one of the leading health issues in the United States. Arteries within the body become inflamed and patients are often recommended to take medication that lowers cholesterol

Statins is a commonly prescribed medication that helps patients with heart disease. But what’s more is that a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology demonstrated that statins can also be beneficial for those suffering from gum disease.

Periodontal disease is marked by chronic gum inflammation that affects approximately half of the U.S. adult population. Dr. Ahmed Tawkol of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School notes that there is a connections between heart and gum disease: both periodontitis and atherosclerosis are driven by inflammation. These inflammatory conditions are often seen to occur together, indicating to researchers that their biologies may be related.

A study was administered to test this theory. Patients with either heart disease or considered to have high heart disease risk were asked to take 80 mg of statin or 10 mg of stain daily for 12 weeks. PET/CT scans were used to observe inflammation over the course of the study. Results indicated that the 59 patients in the study demonstrated a significant reduction in gum inflammation, some after only 4 weeks of treatment. The researchers also found that the improvement of inflammation in the gums related closely with the improvement seen in inflammation in the arteries.

This study provides strong evidence that links atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. This research opens doors to new methods of treatments. Because of the relationship between these two diseases, medications that originally targeted one of these diseases may also be beneficial for the other. These results also points to better and improved oral hygiene to reduce inflammation in the gums can also lead to reduced atherosclerosis.

This study again shows the strong relationship between oral health and overall systemic health. Maintaining proper oral care can really go a long way for the body as a whole. Keeping up with oral hygiene can truly lead to a healthier smile and a healthier you!

If you have any questions or concerns please don't hesitate to ask Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group or our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi. We would all be more than happy to help. Please contact us at (781)237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002185652.htm

http://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/statins-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too-680723.html

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20131002/cholesterol-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too

 http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

December 11th, 2013

The elusive yet painful burning mouth syndrome!

Dentists and researchers have been scratching their heads for quite some time over a type of oral pain that seems to be plaguing a good amount of individuals. Patients’ chief complaint is that the mouth feels scalded; however, mouth and gums continue to appear normal. Because of this syndrome’s lack of visible symptoms (except for sensations of pain), it can take several visits before finally concluding that it is BMS. Over these years, it has come to be known as burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Because of its elusive symptoms, dental researchers have been looking into the burning mouth syndrome, hoping to find more clues to where the and why the pain originates.

Dr. Andres Pinto is the new chair in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine, and he is delving into reach on the burning mouth syndrome. BMS have spread to 2-5% of the population and mainly strikes women between the age of 50 and 70 and from three years before to 12 years after menopause. Earlier research on BMS has also paired their symptoms with psychogenic disorders. BMS is also mentioned as a secondary issue along with anemia, diabetes, vitamin deficiency, and thyroid disorders. Although an exact cause has yet to be found, burning mouth syndrome has been suspected to result from the deterioration of the nerves beneath the oral lining. Because the oral lining is not visible, this can explain the difficulty in diagnosing this disorder.

Dr. Pinto encourages individuals that continue to feel pain in their mouth to check for BMS these symptoms:

 

  • Persistent burning tongue and oral pain with no apparent dental cause
  • Abnormal taste or dry feeling in mouth
  • Symptoms that subside when eating
  • Burning sensations that migrate across various oral areas

 

Even when there is oral pain with no sign of these symptoms, it is advised to go in for a dental checkup. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/burning-mouth-syndrome/DS00462

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_53.pdf

 

 

Menopause: Possible Mouth Changes to Watch Out For

October 28th, 2013

shutterstock_59839630Menopause is a season where women tend to feel the many changes that occur. Many focus on the bodily changes and usually overlook differences that could be found in the mouth, where hormones can lead to unfavorable consequences. While this process is completely natural, signaling the end of female fertility, women should be aware of the mouth changes they are experiencing. Here are some of the potential changes and problems that have been associated with menopause:

 

Dry mouth: Because of the hormone fluctuations that occur during the time of menopause, the decreased levels of estrogen can lead to mouth dryness. Without sufficient saliva in the oral cavity, teeth become more susceptible to tooth decay and other infections. Saliva also plays an important role in the chewing and breaking down of food, allowing nutrients to enter the body.

 

Burning mouth syndrome: This condition tends to affect the tongue, gums, and lips, and even inside the cheeks of the mouth. The burning sensation primarily comes forth from problems with taste and sensory nerves, but can also be the consequence of dry mouth, nutritional deficiency, and allergic reactions to certain foods and medications. It is important to look out for these symptoms and to consult a dentist on possible ways to ease the pain.

 

Periodontitis and mucosal changes: Gum disease is also something to look out for when hitting menopause. Mucosal changes can also results in changes in appearance of gums, where they tend to look more pale, dry and shiny. Gums also tend to bleed more due to these changes.

 

Eating disorders: Going through menopause can take a psychological toll on some women, resulting in inconsistent and improper eating habits. These eating habits can be very detrimental for teeth, leading to erosion of tooth enamel. When tooth enamel is stripped down, teeth become more sensitive to hot and cold foods and they are more susceptible to cavities.

 

While these are problems that may arise during menopause, it is always possible to discuss possible solutions to these issues. Dentists should be notified of these changes, and they can aid in alleviating these symptoms and suggesting viable treatment plans. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cavities/DS00896/DSECTION=risk-factors

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

 

 

Feeling the burn

April 12th, 2013

The burning mouth syndrome (BMS) has been noted as a chronic and painful condition known by burning sensations in the tongue, lips, roof of the mouth, gums, insides of the cheeks, and also the back of the mouth or throat. While dentists are still puzzled by this condition, the burning mouth syndrome has shown to be seven times more frequent in women than in men. Studies have shown that, in general, those who have dealt with this syndrome are middle aged.

Symptoms that have been documented to be prominent for BMS includes a pain or burning sensation that starts out in the mornings, but progressively worsens throughout the day, eventually reaching its worst during the evenings. Some have reported to feel pain that continues to persist throughout the day and some even say that the pain comes in here and there.

Although the cause of BMS has not been fully uncovered, dentists have their hunches of what factors may be related to this burning sensation; here are just a few:

Nutritional deficiencies: individuals who lack proper amounts of iron, folate and vitamin B complex have be linked with the burning sensation in the mouth; to counter this effect, some dentists believe that supplementing with B vitamin’s and minerals such as zinc and iron my relieve some of the pain.

Dry mouth: those who experience dry mouth have also reported a burning sensation as well; to reduce dry mouth, it is recommended to continue to stay hydrated throughout the day to lessen the symptoms that comes with this condition.

Diabetes: diabetics are known to be more vulnerable when it comes to oral infections, which is a possible culprit to burning mouth sensations; diabetics should continue to be mindful of blood sugar levels as to prevent the start up of burning mouth and may potentially lessen the symptoms that are related to this condition.

Menopause: as stated earlier, dentists believe that women are more likely to suffer from BMS, and it’s been thought that menopause attributes to this reason. Hormonal changes are shown to trigger the burning sensation in middle-aged women; hormone replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in treating the burning sensation in certain patients.

While dentists continue to find appropriate methods to find a way to counter BMS, there are several tips that may relieve the burning sensation you may be experiencing:

  • Don’t use mouthwash that contains alcohol
  • Don’t use toothpaste that contains sodium lauryl sulfate
  • Keep away from alcoholic beverages
  • Keep away from beverages with high acidity (sodas, juices)
  • Continue to stay hydrated

If you believe that you are experiencing burning sensations in your mouth, it is important to visit your dentist to discuss the symptoms and possible reasons for why this condition started occurring. If you have more concerns about this issue, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

 

References:

Your Dentistry Guide

National Institute of Health

 

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