burning sensation

What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

December 11th, 2013

The elusive yet painful burning mouth syndrome!

Dentists and researchers have been scratching their heads for quite some time over a type of oral pain that seems to be plaguing a good amount of individuals. Patients’ chief complaint is that the mouth feels scalded; however, mouth and gums continue to appear normal. Because of this syndrome’s lack of visible symptoms (except for sensations of pain), it can take several visits before finally concluding that it is BMS. Over these years, it has come to be known as burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Because of its elusive symptoms, dental researchers have been looking into the burning mouth syndrome, hoping to find more clues to where the and why the pain originates.

Dr. Andres Pinto is the new chair in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine, and he is delving into reach on the burning mouth syndrome. BMS have spread to 2-5% of the population and mainly strikes women between the age of 50 and 70 and from three years before to 12 years after menopause. Earlier research on BMS has also paired their symptoms with psychogenic disorders. BMS is also mentioned as a secondary issue along with anemia, diabetes, vitamin deficiency, and thyroid disorders. Although an exact cause has yet to be found, burning mouth syndrome has been suspected to result from the deterioration of the nerves beneath the oral lining. Because the oral lining is not visible, this can explain the difficulty in diagnosing this disorder.

Dr. Pinto encourages individuals that continue to feel pain in their mouth to check for BMS these symptoms:

 

  • Persistent burning tongue and oral pain with no apparent dental cause
  • Abnormal taste or dry feeling in mouth
  • Symptoms that subside when eating
  • Burning sensations that migrate across various oral areas

 

Even when there is oral pain with no sign of these symptoms, it is advised to go in for a dental checkup. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/burning-mouth-syndrome/DS00462

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_53.pdf

 

 

Feeling the burn

April 12th, 2013

The burning mouth syndrome (BMS) has been noted as a chronic and painful condition known by burning sensations in the tongue, lips, roof of the mouth, gums, insides of the cheeks, and also the back of the mouth or throat. While dentists are still puzzled by this condition, the burning mouth syndrome has shown to be seven times more frequent in women than in men. Studies have shown that, in general, those who have dealt with this syndrome are middle aged.

Symptoms that have been documented to be prominent for BMS includes a pain or burning sensation that starts out in the mornings, but progressively worsens throughout the day, eventually reaching its worst during the evenings. Some have reported to feel pain that continues to persist throughout the day and some even say that the pain comes in here and there.

Although the cause of BMS has not been fully uncovered, dentists have their hunches of what factors may be related to this burning sensation; here are just a few:

Nutritional deficiencies: individuals who lack proper amounts of iron, folate and vitamin B complex have be linked with the burning sensation in the mouth; to counter this effect, some dentists believe that supplementing with B vitamin’s and minerals such as zinc and iron my relieve some of the pain.

Dry mouth: those who experience dry mouth have also reported a burning sensation as well; to reduce dry mouth, it is recommended to continue to stay hydrated throughout the day to lessen the symptoms that comes with this condition.

Diabetes: diabetics are known to be more vulnerable when it comes to oral infections, which is a possible culprit to burning mouth sensations; diabetics should continue to be mindful of blood sugar levels as to prevent the start up of burning mouth and may potentially lessen the symptoms that are related to this condition.

Menopause: as stated earlier, dentists believe that women are more likely to suffer from BMS, and it’s been thought that menopause attributes to this reason. Hormonal changes are shown to trigger the burning sensation in middle-aged women; hormone replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in treating the burning sensation in certain patients.

While dentists continue to find appropriate methods to find a way to counter BMS, there are several tips that may relieve the burning sensation you may be experiencing:

  • Don’t use mouthwash that contains alcohol
  • Don’t use toothpaste that contains sodium lauryl sulfate
  • Keep away from alcoholic beverages
  • Keep away from beverages with high acidity (sodas, juices)
  • Continue to stay hydrated

If you believe that you are experiencing burning sensations in your mouth, it is important to visit your dentist to discuss the symptoms and possible reasons for why this condition started occurring. If you have more concerns about this issue, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

 

References:

Your Dentistry Guide

National Institute of Health

 

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