canker sores

A Great Reason to Celebrate: World Sleep Day

March 19th, 2021

World Sleep Day®, which sounds like one of the coolest days ever, is put on yearly to celebrate sleep and inform the public on the importance of sleep, which can often be overlooked. This year it's held today, Friday March 19th, 2021, with this year's slogan being ‘Regular Sleep, Healthy Future.’ ! Organized by the World Sleep Day Committee of the World Sleep Society, this day of awareness brings to light prevention and management of sleep disorders, education about sleep, sleep medications, and driving issues related to sleep.

Why is sleep important?

There are many benefits to getting a regular amount of sleep, and it's an essential part of life. Several research studies have reported that having a regular bedtime and getting the recommended amount of sleep for your age plays an important role in the quality of your life, including its effect on your mood, psychomotor performance, and even your academic performance. That's why a lack of sleep or chronic sleep interruptions can negatively impact your health.

What is sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea is one of the more common sleep disorders that you may have heard a lot about, which impacts approximately 25 million Americans, according to the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Common signs of sleep apnea include snoring, insomnia, trouble remembering, trouble breathing, gasping for air during sleep, daytime tiredness, trouble concentrating, dry mouth, headaches shortly after waking up, frequent urination during night time, and sexual dysfunction. Children may also show signs of sleep apnea including worsening of asthma, hyperactivity, bed-wetting, and trouble concentrating in school. Individuals with sleep apnea are plagued with constant breathing interruptions during their sleep cycles due to a lack of oxygen reaching the lungs. According to the American Sleep Apnea Association, approximately 4% of children ages 2-8 years old have sleep apnea. Surprisingly, untreated sleep apnea can even be threatening if not enough oxygen reaches the lungs.

Is there a specific cause of sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea could be caused from many different factors, including weak airway muscles, an enlarged tongue, enlarged neck, obesity, small jaw bone, nasal or sinus issues, and the position of your lower jaw. In addition, males and individuals with a family history of snoring or sleep apnea are at an increased risk of having sleep apnea.

How is sleep apnea treated?
There are different treatment options to alleviate sleep apnea depending on each individual case, including a CPAP machine, orthodontic treatment, orthognathic surgery, behavior modifications, and dental mouth guards for example.

How does my oral health factor into sleep conditions?

Plus, sleep disorders like sleep apnea can also impact your dental health and vice versa. Getting adequate rest helps reduce the risk of having bad breath, oral sores, and worsening of gum disease. Individuals with sleep apnea often have temporomandibular disorders (TMJ), experience teeth grinding or clenching, and also mouth breathing. A research study showed individuals with sleep apnea are 3 times as likely to have a TMJ disorder, which is often characterized by trouble chewing, jaw, head, neck and shoulder pain, clicking sounds of the jaws, and locked jaw where the jaw is unable to open or close temporarily. In addition, mouth breathing can also cause dry mouth which is another factor that contribute to gum disease and dental cavities, and if not resolved can even result in tooth loss.

Wondering how much sleep your body requires? Check out the recommended sleep requirements by age reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The World Sleep Society recommends these 10 tips to help you achieve better sleep leading to a healthier overall life:

If you believe you suffer from a sleep condition, be sure to discuss your symptoms with your primary Doctor and dental professional.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://worldsleepsociety.org/programs/world-sleep-day/

https://www.verywellhealth.com/sleep-apnea-and-oral-health-4587690

https://www.cdc.gov/sleep/about_sleep/how_much_sleep.html

https://worldsleepday.org/tips-for-adults

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fholisticdentalcenternj.com%2Fsleep-oral-health%2F&psig=AOvVaw3Km_gH_SEXjLbWXF8PaFiL&ust=1616166659444000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCPiJq52Quu8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAY

Every Body Has a Seat at the Table: Eating Disorder Awareness

February 21st, 2021

Every year, many organizations and individuals across the nation recognize National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (#NEDAwareness), which is the biggest and most recognized eating disorders education effort in the United States. This year, NEDAwareness Week runs from Monday, February 22 - Sunday, February 28. This national event aims is to shed light on eating disorders through educating, spreading hope, and making resources accessible to individuals in need. The theme for 2021 is "Every Body to Has a Seat at the Table."

According to the campaign, approximately 30 million people in the United States will be affected by an eating disorder during their lifetime. Even though this year brings additional challenges as we combat COVID-19, communities across the nation are still coming together to raise awareness through social media events, virtual discussions, and more informative and cool activities.

As reported by the National Eating Disorders Association, eating disorders have been found to be most common in teenagers and young adult women, although they can effect people of any gender or age. Eating disorders can negatively impact a person's physical and mental well-being, and have an effect on personal relationships, confidence, and overall performance at life tasks. In addition, eating disorders can have a significant impact on an individual's oral health. Your teeth, gums, and the surrounding oral tissues depend on healthy nutrients and a healthy diet.

Eating disorders can stem from many physical, mental and social hardships. If you suffer from an eating disorder, it’s important to talk to your health care providers so that proper diagnosis and treatment can begin.

So, what are some of the different types of eating disorders?

  • Anorexia: Individuals with anorexia may experience severe fear of gaining weight and may experience negative thoughts on the way their body appears. Signs may include individuals starving themselves to avoid gaining weight, and excessive exercise.
  • Bulimia: This condition is similar to anorexia in the sense that individuals may also have fears of being overweight. However, individuals may also experience periods of overeating/binge eating followed by self-induced vomiting, purging, misusing laxatives, or fasting throughout the day or several times throughout the week.
  • Binge Eating or Compulsive Overeating: This condition involves individuals who binge eat but do not regularly try to purge the food. Individuals may experience feelings of guilt, making it easier to continue to overeat.

In fact, your dentist may be the first to notice the signs of an eating disorder as changes in the mouth are often the first physical signs that become noticeable. Unfortunately, eating disorders can cause permanent damage to the teeth and oral tissues. Recognizing the signs of an eating disorder early can help lead to a better and easier road to recovery for the body and mouth.

Some of the oral consequences of eating disorders include:

  • Easily bleeding gums
  • Swollen salivary glands which may cause Individuals to experience chronic dry mouth, increasing the risk of developing tooth decay.
  • Lack of nutrients that promote healthy teeth such as calcium, iron and vitamins B and D can also increase the risk of developing tooth decay and gum disease. Lack of iron can lead to the development of oral sores. Similarly, improper amounts of vitamin B3/niacin can lead to bad breath (halitosis) and the development of oral canker sores. Gums may also become puffy and red.
  • Frequent vomiting causes the tooth enamel, or the outer layer of your teeth, to become weak, eroded, soft, and become yellow in color due to the highly acidic environment created from stomach acids. This can create tooth sensitivity when eating hot or cold foods or drinks, and eventually lead to tooth and tissue loss. As enamel wears away, the layer underneath, the dentin, can become exposed and in extreme cases the pulp, which is the next layer of the tooth underneath the dentin, can be exposed and cause infection and pulp death. Tooth decay can even be worsened by extensive tooth brushing following vomiting due to the acidity and weakened state of the mouth.

    Water should be rinsed with following purging to help reduce the high acidic content in the mouth. Vomiting can also induce inflammation, cuts, and soreness of the roof of the mouth/soft palate.

  • Degenerative arthritis of the jaw's temporomandibular joints (TMJ) are also associated with eating disorders. This can lead to jaw pain, chronic headaches, and problems chewing and opening/closing the mouth.

If you suffer from an eating disorder, it is important to contact a health professional. To help reduce associated oral health issues it is also important to maintain oral health care by proper tooth brushing and flossing, and frequent visits to your dentist. Your dentist may provide fluoride rinses or other products to help remineralize tooth enamel.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/get-involved/nedawareness

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/dental-complications-eating-disorders

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/e/eating-disorders

What to do about Swollen Tongue Bumps?

February 1st, 2021

Ever notice the rough small bumps on the top of your tongue when you look in the mirror? These bumps, known as papillae, naturally appear on all of our tongues and are typically the same color as the tongue. These bumps often appear small and have different names depending on their form and location. The bumps located in the front of the tongue and are called fungiform papillae, whereas the bumps appear slightly larger and in a V-shape near the back of the throat and are called circumvallate papillae. The Fungiform papillae contain taste buds and help us enjoy all of the tasty delicious foods we love.

Other types of papillae include Filiform papillae, which is the most common type and the only form of papillae that does not have taste buds. Another form of papillae are called Foliate papillae, which are present on the sides of your tongue.

Sometimes, you may notice the bumps become enlarged and inflamed. This could be due to a number of reasons, including canker sores, an oral infection, and in rare cases due to oral cancer. Take a look at some of the common causes of enlarged papillae:

  • Canker sores can be a real pain, and typically take around 10-14 days to resolve themselves without treatment. Canker sores typically present as painful red lesions. Over-the counter pain medications and salt-water rinses may help temporarily relieve pain.

  • Oral thrush is another condition that may trigger enlarged tongue papillae. It is caused by an accumulation of the fungus Candida albicans. It presents with white patches on the tongue or cheeks inside of the mouth, and may cause trouble swallowing and discomfort. Oral thrush is typically managed with oral anti-fungal medications prescribed by a health professional.

  • Lie bumps/transient lingual papillitis may occur as a result of the papillae being irritated, and is believed to be caused by stress, poor nutrition, smoking, allergic reactions, particular foods, or hormones, although definitive causes have not been determined. They present as small white or red bumps on the surface of the tongue. These bumps can also be painful and may alter your sense of taste. Lie bumps typically heal on their own after a few days and no treatment is necessary. However, if you are experiencing extreme pain or notice that the bumps do not resolve after several days, contact a health professional.

  • Leukoplakia, which is characterized by white patches, may appear on the gums, cheeks, or tongue. It is often associated with use of tobacco products. These lesions are typically noncancerous, however, it is a risk factor for oral cancer. Leukoplakia is usually painless and will heal on its own. Contact a dental professional if these lesions fail to heal or develop a red border.

  • Squamous cell papilloma may be present on the tongue and is often described as small noncancerous bumps. This condition is typically cause by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV). In rare cases this condition may become cancerous.

  • Oral cancer may occur in rare instances on the back of the tongue. Oral cancer may present as painful white or red bumps, and may bleed. These lesions must be biopsied for proper diagnosis and may be referred to an oncologist.
  • Eruptive lingual papillitis is a condition commonly seen in children, where the tongue may have show enlarged papillae. This condition is contagious and is typically caused by a viral infection. It typically resolves on its own in several days and does not require treatment.

If you notice enlarged or inflamed papilla on your tongue, usually there’s no need to be concerned. But, if the tongue bumps do not seem to be resolving or you are experiencing excruciating pain or trouble swallowing or speaking, it is best to consult your health care professional to be evaluated. In general, if you notice swollen tongue papilla, it is helpful to drink lots of water, use an alcohol-free mouthwash, avoid irritants such as tobacco products and acidic or spicy foods, and continue to practice proper oral hygiene.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/adult-oral-care/bumps-on-the-back-of-the-tongue-normal-or-abnormal

https://crest.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/tongue-hygiene/tongue-bumps-enlarged-papillae-and-other-problems

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/mouth-sores-and-infections/what-are-lie-bumps

https://dermnetnz.org/topics/transient-lingual-papillitis/

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.yourdentistryguide.com%2Foral-thrush%2F&psig=AOvVaw1-pmhZ1xVNnaRPZH2Y1bor&ust=1612298599089000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMilgr_Gye4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.yahoo.com%2Flifestyle%2Fcovid-tongue-strange-under-radar-190918223.html&psig=AOvVaw1okqk9pwvqj3GIsNKzeD3u&ust=1612299042198000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCODdspTIye4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAK

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Flupinepublishers.com%2Fpediatric-dentistry-journal%2Ffulltext%2Foral-squamous-papilloma-on-the-tongue-of-a-12-year-old-female.ID.000145.php&psig=AOvVaw01nbY9t8HGNp7Df3asdpPA&ust=1612299130445000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJjMm7zIye4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.nhs.uk%2Fconditions%2Fleukoplakia%2F&psig=AOvVaw24H7bkZnsUX2BuuAJDJ8vG&ust=1612299331426000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLi24JrJye4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.medicalnewstoday.com%2Farticles%2Fcanker-sore-on-tongue&psig=AOvVaw0dbRgjnKhBPJl4I-YCAnTR&ust=1612299384991000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLi8kLTJye4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

The Benefits of a Salt Water Gargle

December 31st, 2020

After experiencing the annoying symptoms of a sore throat or mild pain in your mouth, have you ever turned to a salt water mouth rinse for comfort? The use of salt for medicinal purposes dates far back to 1600 B.C. in Egypt, according to the Science Tribune. Although salt water rinses cannot replace proper dental hygiene practices such as brushing and flossing, it can be a positive addition to your oral routine when trying to relieve symptoms from a sore throat or gum sores for instance. In addition, the American Dental Association (ADA) recommends the use of a warm salt water rinse after dental extractions to help promote healing of the extraction sites. Rinsing with salt water after dental extractions can also help keep food particles out of the extraction site and lower the risk of developing an infection. Rinsing with salt water has been a cost-friendly, safe, and effective way to help alleviate symptoms of common oral conditions without irritating the oral tissues, as do some conventional mouthwashes that contain alcohol.

Some common uses for an oral salt water rinse include soothing the pain from sore throats, canker sores, respiratory infections, and allergies. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), saltwater rinses can help lower the risk of infections, especially for individuals undergoing chemotherapy or radiation therapy. In addition, a study published in International Journal of Preventive Medicine in 2013 found that those who gargled with salt water were less likely to have upper respiratory infections.

Does salt water reduce oral bacteria?

According to Medical News Today, salt water can kill some, but not all, oral bacteria and help bring some bacteria to the surface of the gums by temporarily creating a less acidic environment in your mouth. This harms bacteria, which tend to thrive in a more acidic environment, which is harmful to your oral health and can lead to tooth decay.

How do you make a salt water mouth rinse?

The ADA recommends mixing half of a teaspoon (tsp) of salt with 8 ounces of warm water until combined. Another recipe according to the ACS involves combining 1 qt water, 1 tsp salt, and 1 tsp baking soda.

When rinsing with salt water, gargle the solution around the back of the throat and rinse around your gums and teeth for approximately 30 seconds, then spit the solution out. Rinsing with salt water can be done several times a day. However, if used over a long period of time over time, an oral salt solution may negatively affect the tooth enamel, leading to tooth decay.

If instructed to use the salt water rinse by your dental professional, be sure to follow your instructions given. If you have high blood pressure (hypertension), it is best to discuss with your dentist before using salt water rinses.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/mouth-sores-and-infections/how-salt-water-mouth-rinse-benefits-oral-health

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/325238

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DIljWnRjvdf4&psig=AOvVaw2ktupQYRzE1ATzw8uMKlkj&ust=1609353250412000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLiTuqXq8-0CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAY

https://www.verywellhealth.com/how-to-make-saline-solution-salt-water-mouth-rinse-4109216

https://www.guardiandirect.com/resources/articles/how-saltwater-rinse-can-improve-your-oral-health

World AIDS Day

December 1st, 2020

December 1st each year marks World AIDS Day, which was first observed in 1988. Every year, organizations and people across the globe spread awareness about HIV and AIDS to help increase the public's knowledge and counter HIV stigma. This year's theme is “Ending the HIV/AIDS Epidemic: Resilience and Impact."

Red ribbon for AIDS awareness

So, what is HIV and AIDS? HIV, also known as human immunodeficiency virus, is a viral disease that attacks CD4 cells, which are a specific type of T cell that our immune system needs to help fight off infections and keep us healthy when we get sick. If HIV progresses untreated, the CD4 cell count can be so low that the disease can be progressed to AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), where the immune system no longer fights infections and is in a life-threatening weakened state. HIV impacts over 1.2 million people in the United States alone, and can commonly be contracted through sexual contact or use of a contaminated needle or syringe. But, approximately 1 in 8 people in the United States are living with HIV but are unaware that they have the virus. This is one of the reasons why HIV testing and early diagnosis is extremely important. If you believe you have come into contact with HIV, it is important to get tested immediately. According to the  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), routine testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases is recommended for anyone who is sexually active with a new partner or multiple partners.

Currently there is no exact cure for HIV, however, HIV can be effectively managed through antiretroviral therapy and continued monitoring of CD4 cell levels in the body for those who have living with HIV. If an individual is initially exposed to HIV, post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) therapy should be started as soon as possible to potentially block HIV infection, and is typically recommended to be taken for up to 4 weeks.

Interestingly, HIV can have a significant impact on your oral health. In fact, your mouth may be the first part of your body to be affected with HIV. Individuals with HIV may be a greater risk for developing the following oral conditions:

 

  • White lesions on the sides of the tongue (oral hairy leukoplakia)

  • Red band gingivitis

HIV Infection—AIDS | Pocket Dentistry

  • Ulcerative periodontitis
  • Karposi’s Sarcoma

Picture of Kaposi's Sarcoma of the Palate Otolaryngology Houston

  • Outbreaks of herpes simplex virus

  • Mouth ulcers

Should I worry about mouth ulcers? - Redmires Dental Care Website

Oral issues related to HIV can be painful and may contribute to trouble chewing or swallowing. Most mouth health problems related to HIV can be resolved and managed by your dental professional. It's important to visit your dentist for routine check-ups and continue practicing good oral hygiene. If taking HIV medicine, inform your health care professionals if you are experiencing dry mouth potentially from the medication or any other oral conditions related to HIV.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/hiv-aids-and-stds/dental-problems-associated-with-hiv-aids

https://www.nidcr.nih.gov/health-info/hiv-aids/more-info#:~:text=Some%20of%20the%20most%20common,tongue)%2C%20and%20dental%20caries.

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/h/hiv-aids-and-dental-health

https://www.hiv.gov/events/awareness-days/world-aids-day

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ghorayeb.com%2Fkaposisarcoma.html&psig=AOvVaw1Jk_rUZh6xFadRdM8zWYkT&ust=1606916655969000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLDpmZ31rO0CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fpocketdentistry.com%2Fhiv-infection-aids%2F&psig=AOvVaw0ApVmRpRCPMuHq_8z04Cv0&ust=1606916702827000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCOjGmrH1rO0CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAK

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.redmiresdentalcare.co.uk%2F2017%2F08%2Fshould-i-worry-about-mouth-ulcers%2F&psig=AOvVaw3r9FIjd3uQ44DlK3p1vhXx&ust=1606916774716000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKC4oM_1rO0CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAJ

Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Will a Healthy Mouth Help?

September 28th, 2020

Believe it or not, bacteria found normally in your mouth may be involved with gut diseases and digestion issues. Digestive tract diseases, such as Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) can be a real pain! The most common types of IBD include ulcerative colitis and Chron’s disease, which both involve chronic inflammation, and sometimes even painful sores (ulcers). Some common signs and symptoms of both ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease include severe diarrhea, abdominal pain, fatigue and weight loss. As these conditions take a toll on the digestive tract, it can be easy to forget that the mouth is a part of this system, too! Your dentist may even be the first to notice common oral signs of these gastrointestinal diseases that could lead to early diagnosis, such as cobblestoning of the oral mucosa, canker sores (aphthous ulcers), pyostomatitis vegetans, inflammation at the corners of the mouth (angular cheilitis), redness around the mouth, and inflammation of the tongue (glossitis), just to name a few! Here are some common oral conditions that may manifest as a result of Chron's disease and ulcerative colitis:

Several research studies in the past investigating the guts of individuals diagnosed with IBD have found an overgrowth of common oral bacteria present in the gastrointestinal tracts of studied participants. Now, a recent study at the University of Michigan School of Medicine and School of Dentistry has also uncovered further discoveries on the topic, and suggests that poor oral health may make IBD symptoms more severe. Researchers are warning that neglecting your oral health may lead to trouble beyond tooth decay- extending to other systemic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, and potentially IBD. According to the study, IBD affects an estimated 3 million adults in the United States, and may be the latest condition made worse by poor oral health.

The study, published in the journal Cell, investigated mice and showed two pathways that involved oral bacteria appearing to exacerbate gut inflammation. In the first pathway, researchers looked at the gut microbes in mice with inflamed colons and periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease. They found that periodontitis led to an increase in oral bacteria, which were also found to be present within the guts of the mice by traveling through the digestive tract. They believe that the disease-causing oral bacteria may aggravate gut inflammation by disrupting the normal healthy gut bacteria. They also observed that these mice were found to have both greater weight loss and disease activity.

The second pathway involved the initiation of T cells (a main component of the immune system). The researchers believe that the inflammation resulting from periodontal disease triggers T cells, which can travel from the mouth to the gut where they may aggravate inflammation and prompt an immune response within the gut. Co-author Dr. William Giannobile, Professor of dentistry and chair of the department of periodontics and oral medicine at the U-M School of Dentistry, mentioned, "This exacerbation of gut inflammation driven by oral organisms that migrate to the gut has important ramifications in emphasizing to patients the critical need to promote oral health as a part of total body health and wellbeing,"

More research is necessary to determine the association between IBD and oral health, and exciting new research may provide more clues to how monitoring oral inflammation relates to improving systemic diseases like IBD. Practicing proper oral hygiene and attending regular dental visits to keep your oral care and inflammation under control is extremely important for keeping the rest of your body healthy!

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/06/200616113927.htm

https://labblog.uofmhealth.org/lab-report/could-cure-for-ibd-be-inside-your-mouth

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/inflammatory-bowel-disease/symptoms-causes/syc-20353315

https://images.everydayhealth.com/images/digestive-health/crohns-disease/crohns-management-tips-for-seniors-1440x810.jpg?sfvrsn=2cf1348e_0

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851452/#:~:text=Among%20the%20main%20oral%20manifestations,%2C%20perioral%20erythema%2C%20and%20glossitis.

https://decisionsindentistry.com/article/oral-manifestations-crohns-disease/

https://www.cell.com/cell/fulltext/S0092-8674(20)30681-4

https://image.slidesharecdn.com/oralpathology-en-lecture-6-170820102334/95/oral-pathology-enlecture6-31-638.jpg?cb=1503224626

 

What's the Deal with Canker Sores?

April 29th, 2020

With the summer season around the corner, citrus fruits and fresh vegetables are aplenty. However, acidic foods such as oranges or tomatoes often trigger the appearance of canker sores. Additionally, salty and spicy foods or lack of vitamins and minerals can also lead to canker sores. According to the American Academy of Oral Medicine, canker sores (also known as recurrent aphthous stomatitis) are experienced by over half the population and typically first emerges in young teens. The oral condition affects the softer tissues of the mouth, such as the lips, cheeks, tongue, or soft palate. Sores are typically less than 1 centimeter in diameter and disappear without treatment, but it is not uncommon for sores to reappear in the same location. 

While the exact cause of a canker sore is not known, canker sores are thought to arise due to an accumulation of white blood cells in the mucosal tissue. Diet, stress, or hormonal changes are all considered possible triggers. If the canker sore is accompanied by a fever, abdominal pain, or fatigue, the sores could be a function of a systemic issue such as Crohn's, Bechet’s, or Celiac disease, and you should seek immediate medical attention. It is fairly common for canker sores to be a result of orthodontic treatment such as braces. If that is the case, ask your dentist for wax to cover any intrusive wires. 

 

To subside the pain and minimize the reoccurrence of canker sores, avoid any toothpaste or mouthwash that contains sodium lauryl sulfates and refrain from acidic, salty, or spicy foods that appear to irritate your mouth. Ask your dentist about over the counter gels available that can be applied to the sore to further ease the pain. Rinsing with warm salt water can also help. If the canker sores cause difficulty with eating, extreme pain, or the sores persist for more than two weeks you should immediately speak with your dentist to be further evaluated. 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.aaom.com/

https://wa.kaiserpermanente.org/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/canker-sore/

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National Eating Disorders Awareness Week: #ComeAsYouAre

February 28th, 2020

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is happening now and people around the world are encouraged to Come as You Are! This year's theme is Come as You Are: Hindsight is 20/20 during February 24th to March 1st, which is the time where individuals are reflecting on their journeys toward accepting themselves and others.

The purpose of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (#NEDAwareness) is to shed light on eating disorders through education and provide resources that could save lives. According to the National Eating Disorder Association, approximately 30 million people in the United States are affected by an eating disorder, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder. In addition, about 70 million across the world are impacted by eating disorders. It is important to know that eating disorders can affect anyone, including people of all ages, genders, ethnicities and backgrounds. Overtime, eating disorders can place a tremendous toll on both a person's physical and mental wellbeing.

Individuals who are affected by eating disorders often experience a variety of symptoms, ranging from anxiety, emotional distress, depression, problems with development and growth, and medical problems. However, not all eating disorders are experienced in the same way by individuals.

Many are aware that diet can impact not just your physical health, but also your oral health. Signs of an eating disorder are often seen first within the mouth. Lack of nutrients and harmful habits can permanently damage teeth. Take a look at some of the consequences of eating disorders for your oral cavity:

  • Improper nutrition can impact the amount of protective saliva present within the mouth that may cause dry mouth. Dry mouth significantly increases your risk for developing tooth decay along with it's uncomfortable sensation. In addition, the gums and soft tissue may bleed easier due to lack of essential nutrients.
  • Nutritional deficiencies can increase the risk of developing tooth decay and gum disease, because teeth rely on vitamins and minerals including  calcium, iron and B vitamins. A lack of proper amounts of iron can lead to the development of oral sores. Also, a lack of sufficient amounts of vitamin B3 (niacin) can contribute to bad breath, dry mouth,  and the development of canker sores.
  • Vomit can be extremely damaging to teeth, because the stomach acid causes the tooth enamel, the outermost layer of the tooth, to wear down. This not only changes the shape and size  of teeth, but also changes the color. The layer underneath tooth enamel, dentin, which has a yellow hue can become exposed and increase sensitivity and make your tooth become brittle. Erosive lesions within the mouth may also appear. In more severe cases, the pulp, the innermost layer of the tooth, may become exposed and result in pulp death.
  • Degenerative arthritis within the temporomandibular joint in the jaw has been found to be associated with eating disorders, which can cause severe pain, chronic headaches, and trouble chewing or opening/closing the mouth.
  • Frequent binge-and-purging can cause the salivary glands to become inflamed and enlarged, causing pain within the oral cavity.

Eating disorders if not treated can result in death. Treatment can include a combination of psychotherapy, nutrition education, and medical monitoring, but can vary based on the type of eating disorder.

If you have any questions about eating disorders, talk with your primary care physician or dentist. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) also has screening tools  available online. Now is the perfect time to help increase awareness and support those impacted by eating disorders.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/get-involved/nedawareness

https://www.livewellmagazine.org/eating-disorder-awareness-week-feb-24-march-1/

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/dental-complications-eating-disorders

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National-Eating-Disorder-Awareness-Week-1.png

https://www.mirror-mirror.org/eating-disorders-statistics.htm

Is Your Body Trying to ask for Vitamins and Minerals?

April 8th, 2019

It's been ingrained in us that a healthy and well-balanced diet is necessary for normal daily functioning and growth. However, it may not be that simple to realize when we're deficient in certain vitamins and minerals, even when we're eating healthy! Vitamins and minerals play a major role in carrying out the normal functions of our bodies, including synthesizing  tissues, removing waste products, and being necessary precursors for enzymes. Therefore, deficiencies can result in several health problems, so it is important to know what signs to look for in order to meet the body's needs! For instance, oral signs such as burning tongue and mouth sores, feeling tired after a good night's rest, having a pale appearance, or brittle fingernails can all be signs of particular nutrient deficiencies. In fact, it has been reported that when the proper nutrients are not consumed in adequate amounts, both physical and mental issues such as skin problems, bone abnormalities, and even dementia could be negative consequences.

Take a look at the signs of various vitamin deficiencies and how to make these symptoms improve or be gone altogether:

Severe hair loss

If you notice that you are losing more than the typical 100 strands of hair a day, this could be a sign of a deficiency in the minerals iron and zinc, in addition to the fatty acids linoleum acid and alpha-linolenic acid, and vitamins such as biotin (Vitamin B7) and Niacin (Vitamin B3):

  • Iron is necessary for the production of DNA, which is present in hair follicles.
  • Zinc is needed for the synthesis of proteins necessary for hair growth.
    • A deficiency in both iron and zinc can lead to hair loss or cause the hair to stop growing. A diet rich in meat, fish, eggs, legumes, dark leafy greens, nuts, seeds and whole grains can help manage a deficiency in iron and zinc.
  • Linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) are integral to hair growth.
    • A diet comprising leafy vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and vegetable oils all offer a source of LA. ALA can be found in chia seeds and soy nuts.
  • Niacin (vitamin B3): Niacin is needed for keeping healthy strong hair.
  • Biotin (vitamin B7): Biotin helps form thick hair and stimulates hair growth.
    • Meat, fish, dairy, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds and leafy greens are rich in both niacin and biotin.

You may notice that there are also a lot of supplements advertised for hair loss prevention that include these nutrients. These supplements should be taken at the discretion of your health care provider, as there is limited research on their effects.

Brittle nails

A sign of brittle or splitting nails could be your body telling you that it is in need of iron or biotin.

  • Iron: In addition to brittle nails, a deficiency in iron can include fatigue, pale skin, chest pain, constant sensation of cold, inflamed or sore tongue, and dizziness just to name a few.
    • Iron-rich foods include in meat, poultry, seafood, and spinach.
  • Biotin: biotin deficiencies are rare, but can present as brittle hair or nails, in addition to fatigue, and muscle pain. Risk factors of a biotin deficiency include pregnancy, smoking, alcoholism, Crohn's disease, and individuals on some anti-seizure medications or prolonged antibiotic use. Consumption of raw egg whites can also lead to a deficiency in biotin because  the protein avidin within raw egg whites reduces the absorption of biotin.
    •  Egg yolks, organ meats, fish, meat, dairy, nuts, seeds, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, yeast, whole grains and bananas are good sources of biotin.

Mouth ulcers or cracks in the corners of the mouth

Mouth ulcers, also known as canker sores, and cracking around the corners of the mouth have been linked to deficiencies including iron, B1, B2, B6 and B12.

  • Iron
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1) plays a role in maintining the nervous system and the release of energy from food.
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) helps keep the skin, eyes and nervous system healthy, and helps the body release energy from food.
  • Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) is responsible for the storage of protein and carbohydrates absorbed from food, and the formation of hemoglobin in red blood cells. A deficiency in B6 is typically rare.
    • Thiamin, riboflavin and pyridoxine can all be found in whole grains, poultry, meat, fish, eggs, dairy, organ meats, legumes, green vegetables, starchy vegetables, nuts and seeds.

In addition, cracking at the corners of the mouth could be caused by angular cheilitis (inflammation and an accumulation of microorganisms, particularly Candida albicans, at the corners of the mouth).

Bleeding Gums

Bleeding gums could be a result of several things, including gingivitis due to bacterial plaque, medications, brushing technique, and poor diet or oral hygiene habits. In addition, it could be due to a lack of vitamin C in your diet.

  • Vitamin C: Vitamin C plays a role in healing wounds, your immunity, and also helps prevent cell damage. If the deficiency is severe, the condition known as scurvy could develop. Symptoms of scurvy include tooth loss, weakness, fatigue, and muscle soreness.
    • Citrus fruit, guava, kiwi, broccoli, dark green leafy vegetables (broccoli, spinach, lettuce, kale), berries, tomatoes, cabbage, and brussel sprouts all are sources of Vitamin C.

Burning tongue

The sensation of a burning tongue or feet could be a result of a deficiency in Vitamin B12.

  • Vitamin B12: B12 is known to help produce hemoglobin in red blood cells, and is also needed for the proper function of the digestive system. Vegans are at an increased risk of B12 deficiency because meats and dairy products are common sources of good amounts of B12. Signs of a deficiency in vitamin B12 often include damage to your nervous system, memory changes, and can sometimes mimic anemia.
    • Vitamin B12 an be found in meats, shellfish, poultry, fish, dairy, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and fortified soy and coconut milk.

Muscle cramps

If you notice that you begin having muscle cramps, your body could be craving potassium. A deficiency in potassium is typically caused by loss of fluid (excessive sweat, vomit, diarrhea).

  • Potassium: Potassium is known to help build muscle and protein.
    • A good source of potassium can be found in sweet potatoes, bananas, avocados, and coconut water.

 

So, you may be wondering, "will dietary supplements help get me all of the nutrients I need?" The best way to ensure that you are getting adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals is to make sure your diet includes each major food group, rather than relying only on dietary supplements. Some individuals may be lacking certain vitamins or minerals due to an underlying medical condition. Be sure to have your regular check-ups with your primary care physician so that the proper diagnoses and treatment can be made.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1101051/vitamin-deficiency-symptoms-B12-D-signs-tiredness-hair-loss-mouth-ulcers

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-deficiency#section1

https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/08/22/the-common-signs-of-vitamin-and-mineral-deficiencies_a_21456849/

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CAR_healthy_eating_young_people.jpg

Bleeding-gums-1-e1496432155892.jpg

shutterstock_230187658.jpg

BrittleNails_Background.jpg

Reap the Potential Benefits of Coconut Oil

February 11th, 2016

cYou may have heard about oil pulling in the news, on blogs, or from friends. This latest trend is actually an old Indian oral therapy dating back 3,000 years! It's an inexpensive practice that involves the gentle swishing of approximately 1 tablespoon of oil through the teeth for about 10 minutes daily before rinsing out. However, it should be well noted that this procedure should never replace brushing, flossing, and other daily dental habits.

Research has found that coconut oil may be effective in keeping our mouths healthy. It was tested against strains of Streptococcus bacteria, which are often found in the oral cavity and aid in producing acids that cause tooth decay. The study reported that the oil was able to fight off cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth. A beneficial ingredient of coconut oil is lauric acid, which is well-known for its anti-microbial agents that help defeat gingivitis, plaque, and microbes that cause bad breath.

Not to mention, recently, there has been news of individuals using coconut oil as toothpaste (for both humans and pets!). The suggested reasons behind this trend are that coconut oil does not contain harmful antibacterial chemicals, for example triclosan, which are sometimes found in traditional toothpastes. These harmful chemicals have raised concerns about antibiotic resistance and endocrine disruption. In addition, coconut oil is believed to help maintain a healthier balance of lipids on your tongue in comparison to some toothpastes. Toothpastes often contain chemicals that create the foam-like texture of the toothpaste, including sodium laureth sulfate (SLS), or sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES). These chemicals interfere with phospholipids found on the tongue, which as a result can create a bitter taste in your mouth. Research has found that SLS may even negatively impact the health of individuals with recurring canker sores. However, further research is needed to prove the effectiveness of using coconut oil as toothpaste.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.yahoo.com/health/the-4-best-uses-for-coconut-1343871427731510.html

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/oil-pulling

More Pets = Less Stress = Healthy Teeth!

February 2nd, 2016

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Do you have a pet? Well, good news! Research published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that pet dogs can decrease stress levels in children, which can have a positive impact on oral health as well. If you're looking for something to add to your family wishlist, make sure to include "cute puppies!"

How can dogs can improve our health?

They may help reduce social anxiety

Pets such as dogs follow human communication cues and help spark conversation. They also provide comfort and self-esteem to children, which can lead to emotional development. Through animal-assisted therapy (AAT), dogs improve attachment and decrease separation anxiety in children. This can result in improved mental health and decreased risk of developmental disorders (emotional, behavioral, and mental) during adolescence and later on.

They may decrease stress

According to a study conducted by researchers from Bassett Medical Center in New York, 21% of children who did not have pet dogs had anxiety, while only 12% of the children who interacted with dogs at home were tested positive for anxiety. Playing with dogs can reduce cortisol levels and release oxytocin, which helps decrease physiologic responses to stress.

How does stress affect oral health, you ask?

  1. Stress is linked to canker sores, grinding of teeth, poor hygiene, dryness, TMJ, gum disease, and burning mouth syndrome.
  2. It can result in chronically high cortisol levels, which can lead to a weaker immune system. This can make it more likely for plaque bacteria to attack the gums.
  3. There is a strong connection between stress and periodontal or gum disease, which can cause tooth loss.
  4. You may not brush or floss as frequently!

Make sure to take care of your teeth properly and don't get too stressed out. Get a pet dog for bonus points!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/303276.php

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17668968

http://awomanshealth.com/stress-and-oral-health/

https://blog-photos.dogvacay.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/baby-flash-games-211.jpg

Is Mouthwash Necessary?

June 18th, 2015

As your walking down the isles in a drug store, it's easy to find a row full of mouthwashes.  From cosmetic to therapeutic mouthwashes, there are several types that can cater to your oral health needs. But, are they really necessary?

Although mouthwash should not be used as a substitute for brushing and flossing, it can be a positive habit to help improve oral health.

 Mouthwashes can be useful for both adults and children when used after brushing and flossing. They can provide many advantages, including:

  • Preventing Cavities

Mouthwashes containing fluoride can help reduce your risk of developing cavities. After swishing for approximately one minute, a small amount of fluoride sticks to teeth and is then quickly washed away by saliva.

  • Freshening Breath

There are many mouthwashes available that can help mask bad breath. These mouthwashes typically contain natural and artificial flavors that help give your mouth a fresh aroma. Rinsing can also help get rid of food particles left on teeth that have their own smelly scents. However, it is important to note that masking bad breath doesn't fix the underlying cause. Bad breath, or halitosis, may be a result of an infection, tooth decay, or other health issues.

  • Whitening Teeth

Some cosmetic mouthwashes contain a low concentration of the active ingredient, hydrogen peroxide, which is believed to help whiten teeth.

  • Preventing Dry mouth, Periodontal Disease, and Sensitivity

Mouth rinses can act as a therapeutic and help sooth canker sores. Many therapeutic mouthwashes contain xylitol, which may help prevent tooth decay. Some rinses help kill germs that can lead to gingivitis and periodontal disease. In addition, some can even help individuals with dry mouth produce more saliva.

 

A common myth about mouthwash is that the flavor or color offers additional benefits to oral health, however, it is mainly for atheistic purposes to attract consumers to buy the product. Once you've found the right mouthwash that addresses your needs, make sure to rinse according to the directions. For example, it is best to gargle and rinse twice a day with mouthwashes aimed to remove debris from teeth.

Incorporating mouthwash into your daily routine can help remove dental plaque, prevent tartar buildup, and left behind food particles from your teeth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-03-mouthwash.html

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/specialist/jacobs/need-to-use-mouthwash.aspx

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Travel/Pix/pictures/2011/8/27/1314438844663/Mouth-wash-007.jpg

Can Yoga Improve Your Oral Health?

April 30th, 2015

 

 

Stressed out? Your dentist can usually tell! Stress can have a significant impact on your oral health.  In fact, dentists can detect oral symptoms of stress, including canker sores, teeth grinding (bruxism), gum diseasetemporomandibular disorders (TMD), burning mouth syndrome, and dry mouth, just to name a few. Luckily, many studies have shown that yoga can help people relieve stress, anxiety, and believe it or not, dental troubles!

Many studies have revealed that individuals who are stressed are more likely to neglect their oral care. As mentioned above, the tension in jaw muscles can lead to jaw clenching and teeth grinding. The good news is that along with alleviating stress, yoga improves posture. Poor posture not only affects your body, but also your mouth. It can cause the jaw to shift and affect the alignment of teeth. This can lead to Temporo-Mandibular Joint disorders (TMJ), which can cause pain chewing, nerve inflammation, headaches, and more!

Stress can also lead to dry mouth, which occurs due to low amounts of saliva production. Saliva flow is essential in helping get rid of germs in the mouth. Dry mouth leads to bad breath (halitosis), and can eventually develop into tooth decay and periodontal disease. Further, stress has been shown to increase inflammation in the mouth and  body. Bacteria in your mouth can cause gum inflammation, which plays a huge part in gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Although yoga may not fight cavities, it can improve the condition of your mouth and the health of your body by eliminating tension and stress. Yoga is a popular form of exercise that dates years and years back from India. Yoga incorporates both physical and mental disciplines for the purpose of achieving a peaceful balance between body and mind.  It promotes relaxation and can boost your mood, which can help you live longer and age-well. It also can reduce your blood pressure.

Another great thing about yoga is that it encourages a healthy lifestyle. It typically prompts people to practice better oral hygiene habits, implement healthier diets, and to get rid of poor oral health habits, including smoking.

So why not enjoy the many health benefits of yoga? There are plenty more, including:

  • Improving flexibility
  • Increasing muscle strength 
  • Preventing cartilage and joint breakdown 
  • Boosting immunity
  • Lowering blood sugar
  • Helping you focus
  • Improving your balance
  • Helping you sleep better
  • Increasing your self-esteem 
  • Benefiting your relationships

Yoga may not have been the first thing that you thought of when discussing how to maintain a healthy mouth. However, few methods of stress relief compare to that of yoga! Eliminating stress through practicing yoga may be a great option for preventing pain and oral health problems.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://lacunaloft.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Kids-Yoga-Portrait.jpg

http://awomanshealth.com/stress-and-oral-health/

http://yoganonymous.com/practice-for-the-teeth-3-ways-yoga-improves-dental-health

http://www.medicinenet.com/temporomandibular_joint_syndrome_tmj/article.htm

http://www.yogajournal.com/article/health/count-yoga-38-ways-yoga-keeps-fit/

Tongue Health is No Tongue-Twister!

March 9th, 2015

Girl Sticking Out TongueNever forget to brush your tongue! It's often referred to as the "strongest muscle in the body," yet it needs care. In this article, we will describe how you can care for your tongue, and then we will explain common health problems related to the tongue and what you should do if you see any symptoms of them. Armed with these facts, you can maintain a healthy mouth!Did you know that some toothbrushes are made specifically for your tongue? It’s true, but regular toothbrushes can get the job done too!  Place toothpaste on your brush and gently stroke your tongue from back to front to remove plaque and bacteria. Another option for brushing your tongue is to use a tongue scraper. Pull it across your tongue to clean it and improve your breath. Following these steps and practicing good oral hygiene, you can keep your tongue healthy!

Some people do develop tongue soreness or discoloration. Fortunately, these are often caused by easily treatable problems. One problem that people sometimes have is that their tongue develops a white coating or white spots. While there are a number of different conditions that can cause a tongue to have these symptoms, three of the most common causes of a "white tongue" include leukoplakia, oral thrush, and oral lichen planus. Leukoplakia occurs when too many cells grow in your mouth. The excessive amount of cells can cause white patches to form.  Although leukoplakia is usually not dangerous, it can sometimes be a precursor to cancer. A dentist can diagnose whether you have leukoplakia and inform you on how to treat it.

Oral thrush, also known as candidiasis, is another reason why some people have “white tongue.” Oral thrush is a yeast infection that can produce white patches on your mouth, including the tongue. It is especially common for infants and the elderly, individuals who use inhaled steroids to treat asthma or lung disease, and for those who have diabetes. It can also occur after a person uses antibiotics. See a dentist who can diagnose this infection and even provide you with medications to help cure it.

Oral lichen planus causes raised white lines to form on your tongue. Usually, doctors cannot diagnose the cause. Most of the time, this problem resolves on its own with time. Still, you can do your part to help your body get better by practicing proper dental hygiene and avoiding foods that irritate your mouth.

Other factors can cause a pink tongue to turn red. Vitamin deficiencies, geographic tongue (harmless condition causing red spots), scarlet fever, and kawasaki syndrome are frequent causes. If your tongue is an unhealthy red color, you may have vitamin deficiencies of B-12 or folic acid. You can simply take supplements in this situation. Kawasaki syndrome is an illness that affects the tongue's blood vessels and is usually seen in children less than five years of age. Children may develop a red tongue, a high fever, and redness in the hands and feet. Be sure to bring the child to the doctor immediately.

Some people have a black, hairy tongue. Fortunately, this is almost always benign. Your tongue has small bumps called papillae, which grow throughout your lifetime. For most people, daily activities wear down their papillae. However, for others, these bumps can continue to grow long. When papillae are long, more bacteria can live on them and create a dark, hairy appearance. Usually, this condition is seen in people who aren't practicing healthy dental hygiene or who are using chemotherapy or antibiotics. People with diabetes can also have this problem. Fortunately, a black, hairy tongue is usually not dangerous to your overall health.

 

Another common tongue condition involves painful, bumpy tongues. Causes include biting your tongue, canker sores, burning mouth syndrome, enlarged papillae, smoking, and other medical conditions.

Finally, be careful if you or someone has a swollen tongue. If the person also has trouble breathing, the person may have a severe allergic reaction and need emergency medical care. In rare cases, tongue problems can be symptoms of serious conditions, such as diabetes, anemia, and oral cancer can also cause tongue pain. Be sure to see a dentist and get a diagnosis if your pain is lasting for a significant amount of time. Follow these ideas to maintain a healthy tongue. Nobody wants a strawberry tongue!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/tc/basic-dental-care-home-treatment

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/tongue-problem-basics-sore-or-discolored-tongue-and-tongue-bumps

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/tongue-scrapers

http://www.everydayhealth.com/allergies/swollen-tongue.aspx

https://badabingbadabambadaboom.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/attitude.jpg

Stress Undermines a Healthy Smile

April 25th, 2014

frustrated-child (1)Stress not only affects your body, but also your mouth, teeth, and gums! Stress is easy to come by, and can often be overwhelming. Stress weakens the immune system, which negatively impacts your body’s capability to fight against the bacteria that causes many oral health problems, including periodontal disease. Stressing out can result in mouth sores, teeth grinding, nail biting, poor health care habits, and developing a bad diet.

Stress can affect anyone, even your child. Common worries ,including separation anxiety, academic pressure, world events, natural disasters, family worries, and social pressures can prompt stress in children. These troubles can provoke a physical response in children that can negatively impact their oral health. Stress is often revealed in a child by a change in behavior.

Recognizing the signs of stress can help improve your child’s oral health and well-being:

Mouth Sores

Stress, along with fatigue, can increase the chance of having canker sores. Canker sores are small ulcers that emerge inside the mouth. Emotional distress can trigger cold sores and last for up to 10 days!

Teeth Grinding

Stress may initiate bruxism. Bruxism can lead to problems with the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Night guards are commonly recommended to minimize teeth grinding.

Change in Diet

Unhealthy eating habits, including snacking, and a desire for sugary foods or drinks is often induced by stress. This can lead to tooth decay and tooth loss. Remember that nutrition is also related to your oral health!

Developing Poor Dental Habits

Stress may affect moods and lead to skipping essential dental habits, including brushing, flossing, and rinsing.

Gum Disease

Even a brief period of stress can result in the risk of gingivitis and an accumulation of dental plaque.

Stress can be controlled with practical strategies to overcome the challenges that arise from daily life. Your child’s overall health depends on their oral health! Encourage a balance in your child’s schedule and reiterate the importance of sleep and a healthy diet.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/stress-teeth

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/September/article/SW-281474979201581.cvsp

http://www.betterparenting.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/frustrated-child.jpg

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