Cardiovascular disease

4 Easy Steps to a Healthy Mouth

October 5th, 2019

The work dental hygienists do is tremendously valuable, and worth celebrating every day! In fact, the month of October represents Dental Hygiene Month across the nation. Each October we are all reminded to promote healthy smiles. Practicing good oral health is necessary to keep strong teeth, healthy gums, and even a healthy overall body. The connections between periodontal disease (gum disease) and systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes is real. Unfortunately, the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) reports that approximately 75% of people in America have some form of periodontal disease, which is the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. This, however, is preventable with good oral hygiene practices.

With early starts to your day and a big to-do list, it can sometimes be easy to skip some of your oral hygiene routine. But, not to worry! The American Dental Hygienists Association and American Dental Association offer four essential , quick, and easy tips on how to keep a healthy and clean mouth, even when you're on-the-move: Brush. Floss. Rinse. Chew. Check it out:

Brushing:

Brushing your teeth is necessary twice daily for two minutes each time. Brushing is key to help eliminate the accumulation of food particles and plaque that oral bacteria feed off of leading to gum disease and tooth decay.

 

Flossing:

Flossing may seem tedious, but your oral health depends on it. Flossing is recommended once daily to help remove plaque and food in hard to reach areas between the teeth that the toothbrush cannot remove.

 

Rinsing:

Mouth rinses are not only good to help freshen breath, but also offer an antibacterial component that helps fight and prevent cavities. Be sure to purchase a  non-alcohol based mouthwash with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Mouthwash will help eliminate plaque and keep your gums healthy.

 

Chewing:

Sugar-free gum has been found to help improve your oral health by stimulating saliva to wash away remaining food particles. It also can help strengthen enamel by neutralizing the acids produced by oral bacteria and is recommended to chew for about 20 minutes after consuming meals.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adult-oral-care/ada-october-is-national-dental-hygiene-month

https://nationaltoday.com/national-dental-hygiene-month/

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family-of-three-brushing-their-teeth-in-front-of-royalty-free-image-769730993-1566842159.jpg

Is there a Genetic Component to my Kid's Tooth Decay?

May 4th, 2019

Our genes make us who we are and seem to play a significant role in many conditions in our lives. However, according to a recent study (“Genetic and Early Life Environmental Influences on Dental Caries Risk: A Twin Study), tooth decay may not be one of the conditions influenced by genetics. But what about your lifestyle habits? Recent research shows that environmental factors rather than genetics could be the main culprit influencing the development of tooth decay.



The study done at Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Australia drew several interesting conclusions. By analyzing 173 sets of identical and non-identical twins from pregnancy up to age six, they found that genes did not impact the prevalence of tooth decay. Identical twins with the same genetic makeup were not found to have the same amount of tooth decay. Instead, outside factors such as fluoride availability, diet, and oral hygiene habits may be playing the most important role in the onset of dental cavities. 

In addition, the study recorded and observed the mother's weight, health conditions, medication use, vitamin D levels, stress, alcohol intake and smoking habits during pregnancy through a questionnaire. The researchers discovered a link between the mother’s health and habits during pregnancy with the susceptibility of dental caries. Obesity in pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of tooth decay in children. Unfortunately, in the United States, tooth decay is the #1 most common childhood disease. Even in Australia the researchers found that one in every three children have tooth decay as early as their first day starting school. But, the good news is, tooth decay is highly preventable! It is important to start practicing good oral hygiene habits and live a healthy lifestyle from an early age to help protect your smile and body. This way the risk of developing other systemic issues such as diabetes and cardiovascular problems can be minimized.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190430091838.htm

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/~/media/MouthHealthy/Images/Articles/article_dentist_parent_advice.jpg?h=307&la=en&w=460&hash=BCB9195CABCD8F1B1C8D9281D1EEBAD1DAEFE429

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Protect your Heart by Keeping your Natural Teeth

September 17th, 2018

Who would have guessed that taking care of your teeth could mean simultaneously taking care of your heart? Probably not many people. However, according to research presented at the American Heart Association's Epidemiology and Prevention/Lifestyle and Cardiometabolic Health Scientific Sessions, there has been a link found between cardiovascular disease and losing two or more teeth during middle age.

More researchers are finding significant evidence that your oral health is associated with the overall health of your body. For instance, oral health problems including gum disease involve the body's inflammatory response, which is often associated with other chronic inflammatory diseases such as diabetes. More recently, studies have found that dental health problems are connected with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.

A study conducted by Tulane University School of Public Health, Tropical Medicine, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at tooth loss in a large group of adults aged 45 to 69 years without cardiovascular disease. Participants were asked to document the number of natural teeth they had and to report any recent tooth loss. The participants were tracked over a 8 year period for the occurrence of tooth loss, and over 12-18 years for the incidence of cardiovascular disease among people without tooth loss, with one tooth lost, and with two or more teeth lost. The results revealed that participants with 25-32 natural teeth at the beginning of the study who lost two or more teeth had a 23% increased risk of having cardiovascular disease when compared to those who did not lose any teeth. Participants who had less than 17 teeth at the beginning of the study had a slightly higher risk of developing cardiovascular disease (25%). Not to mention, all participants who lost two or more teeth throughout the study, regardless of number of teeth at the start of the study, had a 16% increased risk of cardiovascular disease. The increased risk percentages were found despite other cardiovascular risks including diet, physical activity, weight, diabetes, and high blood pressure.

It is important to take care of your oral health by brushing and flossing regularly, as well as scheduling regular dental check-ups. This particularly rings true as we continue to age. Saving your teeth can help save your heart in the long run! So, be sure not to forget the popular saying, "You don't have to brush all of your teeth, only the ones you want to keep!"

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Also, be sure to mark your calendars for our Community Blood Donation drive with the American Red Cross and the Wellesley Community Center on Wednesday September 26th, 2018 from 1:00 pm-6:00 pm. The blood drive will be located at the Wellesley Community Center (219 Washington Street, Wellesley, MA 02482). For more info, please click here.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/03/180321162302.htm

https://www.heart.org

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National Wear Red Day 2016 -Today!

February 5th, 2016

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Today, Friday, February 5, 2016 marks National Wear Red Day, which is the kick-start event for American Heart Month! 

Why wear red today? Well, by wearing red,  individuals can help raise awareness of cardiovascular disease and improve the health of our loved ones. National Wear Red Day is an annual tradition that was created to raise money and awareness about heart disease and stroke in women. Through educating others about this number one killer in our nation, we can help others live longer and healthier lives. Heart disease and stroke kill 1 in 3 women each year. Putting it into perspective, it kills approximately one woman every 80 seconds. However, the conditions of cardiovascular disease are 80% preventable!

The organization Go Red For Women advises women to schedule a Well-Woman Visit, a prevention check-up to review a woman’s overall health by measuring blood pressure, checking cholesterol levels and looking for signs of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. They are also collecting donations to help fund research. If you're on social media, you can also use the hashtags, #GoRedWearRed and #WellWomenVisit. Through their initiative and research to healthy lifestyle changes that began in 2003, they've found that:

  • Almost 90% have made at least one healthy behavior change.
  • More than one-third has lost weight.
  • More than 50% have increased their exercise.
  • 6 out of 10 have changed their diets.
  • More than 40% have checked their cholesterol levels.
  • One third has talked with their doctors about developing heart health plans.
  • Today, nearly 300 fewer women die from heart disease and stroke each day
  • Death in women has decreased by more than 30 percent over the past 10 years.

wear-red

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.goredforwomen.org/home/get-involved/national-wear-red-day/

https://www.goredforwomen.org/wearredday-about/

http://cdn.sheknows.com/articles/2011/02/wear-red.jpg

Save Your Heart: American Heart Month

February 5th, 2016

American-Heart-Month

All throughout February we're celebrating American Heart Month! This national awareness month provides WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, and the American Heart Association the opportunity to make others across the world aware about cardiovascular disease. These organizations help organize, educate, and fund medical research on cardiovascular disease and its prevention.

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure, is the NUMBER ONE killer of both women and men in the United States. So much so that it's responsible for one out of every three deaths each year. Over 6 million American women are impacted by heart disease, while another 37 million women are at risk of developing heart disease.

This annual campaign was initiated in 1964 by the American Heart Association and has continued to heighten awareness across the nation. However, the number of individuals impacted by cardiovascular disease is predicted to grow more than 23.6 million by the year 2030. Unfortunately, nearly half of all Americans have at least one major risk factor, but are unaware of it. It's important to also know the warning signs, including chest discomfort, shortness of breath, or sudden lack of responsiveness. To spot a stroke, think F.A.S.T: Face drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty, time to call the police.

Becoming aware of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease, for instance obesity and diabetes, is key to understanding what needs to be done to lower your risk. Eating a healthy diet, not smoking, exercising, and picking up other positive health habits will help keep your heart pumping!

President Obama wrote, “We have lost devoted mothers and fathers, loved siblings, and cherished friends to this devastating epidemic. During American Heart Month, as we honor their memories, let us recommit to improving our heart health and continuing the fight against this deadly disease, for ourselves and our families.”

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://newsroom.heart.org/events/happy-heart-month-2830575

http://www.cchdmt.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/American-Heart-Month.jpg

http://www.womenheart.org/?programs_heartmo2016

Latte, Espresso, Cappuccino? Think Twice Before You Indulge

November 12th, 2015

a-cup-of-coffee

Coffee is America’s favorite beverage, especially for early risers. Not to mention, coffee lovers have many options to choose from. From sweetened flavors like mocha, caramel swirl, and French vanilla, to the less sweet flavors of cinnamon, coconut, hazelnut, raspberry, and toasted almond.

It’s estimated that 68 percent of the American population indulge in a cup of coffee every morning to help them wake up and to keep them going throughout the day. The real question is, "Is coffee good or bad for you?"

Coffees is known to increase mental alertness, boost our concentration, and prevent the development of certain cancers and other diseases.  In addition, according to recent studies, black coffee may help fight bacteria if consumed without artificial sweeteners.

Along with some good effects, there are also many adverse effects on the body. Coffee is often associated with high blood pressure, heart disease, osteoporosis. In addition, coffee can have a negative impact on your dental health. Some studies suggest that coffee wears down tooth enamel. Weakened enamel can make teeth more vulnerable to diseases and permanent damage. Enamel is porous calcified substance made up of matrix of crystal like rods, which keeps our teeth strong. The bad part is that once your enamel is gone, you can't get it back!

Not to mention, moderate to high consumption of coffee can cause tooth discoloration, leaving your teeth stained yellow.

Many of us know that it can be hard to give up the daily dose of coffee each morning. But, there are a few preventive measures that you can take to reduce the amount of coffee you intake. This includes rinsing your mouth after drinking coffee, using proper brushing and flossing habits, and using a straw to prevent coffee from touching the surfaces of your teeth.  Also, Zoom! Whitening is a great way to keep your teeth pearly white.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://cdn1.medicalnewstoday.com/content/images/articles/297/297449/a-cup-of-coffee.jpg

 

Not All Chocolate Is Created Equal: The Health Benefits of Dark Chocolate

October 29th, 2015

dark-chocolateAlthough people usually associate chocolate with trips to the dentist's, eating certain types of chocolate in moderation may actually be beneficial for your health. If you want to indulge on candy this Halloween, dark chocolate is one of the better options. Here are some reasons why:

1. It's nutritious.

Dark chocolate with high cacao content is packed with nutrients. One 100 gram bar (although we recommend consuming dark chocolate in moderation) high in cacao content contains a wealth of fiber, iron, magnesium, copper, and manganese. Despite the sugar and calories, there is also plenty of potassium, phosphorous, zinc, and selenium that is beneficial for your health. The fats in dark chocolate include mostly saturated fats, which are recommended over unsaturated fats, and some polyunsaturated fats, which help lower your chances of developing heart disease, stroke, and high cholesterol. Dark chocolate is also a great choice if you want an energy boost without having to worrying about not being able to sleep at night - its caffeine level is minimal compared to that of coffee.

2. It has tons of antioxidants.

Dark chocolate holds the ranking of the sixth top antioxidant food. This is due to the fact that it is packed with biologically active organic compounds (polyphenols, flavonols, catechins, etc.) which act as antioxidants. In addition, cacao has greater antioxidant activity than many other fruits such as blueberries and Acai berries. Antioxidants help prevent or delay cell damage caused by free radicals, which can effectively help lower risks of cancer and other diseases.

3. It has great benefits for your blood (and your brain)!

According to a study from JAMA (The Journal of the American Medical Association), cacao and dark chocolate can at least mildly improve blood flow and reduce blood pressure. High-flavonol cacao also improves blood flow in the brain and cognitive function, especially for elders with mild mental impairment. Because it contains stimulants such as caffeine, dark chocolate is especially helpful for improving short-term brain function.

4. It's great for your skin!

Flavonols enhance blood flow to the skin, increase hydration , and prevent skin damage from the sun. According to one study, the amount of UV radiation required to produce sunburn or redness within 24 hour of exposure increased significantly after eating high-flavonol dark chocolate for 12 weeks.

5. It can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The substances in dark chocolate prevent cholesterol from accumulating in the arteries and protect against the reaction of unhealthy cholesterol with free radicals. One study published in Clinical Nutrition in 2012 observed that eating chocolate more than 5 times per week reduced cardiovascular disease risks by 57%!

After saving some dark chocolate for yourself, feel free to donate the rest of your candy to our Annual Candy Drive! This November 1st through 5th, we will be collecting candy and handwritten notes for our troops at our office in Wellesley. We are particularly excited about our new grand prize of $1,000 that will be awarded to the school’s PTO who donates the most candy. We hope that you have a happy Halloween, and are looking forward to seeing you at the Candy Drive Nov 5th, 10AM at our office!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://authoritynutrition.com/7-health-benefits-dark-chocolate/

http://www.trustedhealthproducts.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/dark-chocolate.jpg

Fall in Love with These Healthy Fall Foods!

October 15th, 2015

fall-foodFall is finally here! From the beautiful leaves to the abundance of pumpkin spice products, there are so many reasons to love fall. And here’s another one: your favorite fall foods can also be super beneficial for your oral health!

Here are some delicious foods that may lead to better results at your next dental appointment!

  1. Apples

You’ve probably heard the saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” This saying is so well-known for a reason: this delicious fruit that comes in so many varieties has many health benefits. They have antioxidants, which can help prevent slow aging and chronic illnesses.  Furthermore, quercetin, a compound that is found in the skin of apples, can reduce risks of cancer, heart attacks, and asthma attacks. Apples have plenty of water in them, which does wonders for your teeth because water stimulates production of saliva. They also help wash food and neutralize acids from the surfaces of your teeth. The crunch in apples even helps remove dental plaque by loosening particles of food between teeth.

 

  1. Bone Broth

Everybody loves a good soup full of vegetables, broth, herbs, and spices. Bone broth is great for your immune system and digestive system. It’s also packed with calcium, phosphorous, and magnesium, which all do wonders for your teeth.

 

  1. Fish

If you love eating fish, you’re in luck. According to the Journal of Dietetic Association, fish oil can help fight gum disease. Salmon is especially beneficial for your teeth, because it can treat and prevent periodontitis.

 

  1. Cranberries

Best enjoyed October through November, cranberries not only ward off urinary tract infections, but they also restrain cancer growth and prevent oral diseases. 

 

  1. Pumpkins and Squash

Nutritionists at the National Institute of Health claim that foods rich in carotenoids, such as pumpkins and squash, can lower the risk of certain types of cancer. Pumpkins can also lead to healthy vision and cell growth, because they are great sources of alpha- and beta-carotene . Their seeds contain alpha-linolenic acid, which controls heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

If you’re craving dessert, try pumpkin pie (without the crust, which is high in fat and cholesterol). This classic fall treat contains a ton of vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber, and iron. The boost of iron will keep you away from tooth decay and tongue inflammation. Pumpkin spice, a combination of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves, is also especially beneficial for your health. These spices all have phytonutrients, which are anti-inflammatory plant compounds that promote healing in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Cloves fight cancer and blood clots, but they are also used for oral health. They have anaesthetic and antibacterial properties, which can relieve toothache and infections.

 

  1. Raw Dairy

Raw dairy (raw milk, cheese, butter, yogurt) that isn’t pasteurized or homogenized is a great source of calcium, which prevents tooth decay and gum disease.

 

  1. Green Tea

Containing natural catechins, green tea reduces plaque and by destroying plaque-causing bacteria. Enjoy a cup, but don’t forget to chew sugar-free gum afterwards to avoid teeth staining.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/oral-care-tips-and-advice/best-nutritious-fall-foods-20798/

http://greatist.com/health/healthiest-fruits-and-vegetables-fall

http://www.myprimetimenews.com/spice-it-up-for-fall/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17296290

http://naturallysavvy.com/care/dental-care-the-benefits-of-cloves

http://realfoodreallocalinstitute.org/huntington-wva/wp-content/uploads/sites/9/2013/10/fall-food.jpg

Tooth Loss May Increase Your Risk for Heart Disease

September 3rd, 2015

Portrait Of Smiling Senior Woman

Loosing teeth as an adult is already a pain, but tooth loss is also found to be linked to various health diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, heart disease is the number 1 cause of death in the United States, and diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death.In a recent study conducted at the University of Helsinki in Finland with the help of The National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) , it was found that tooth loss could be an additional indicator of diabetes, heart disease, and even death. Not to mention, having diabetes makes having heart disease more likely. Approximately 8,500 individuals aged 25 to 75 were evaluated and participated in clinical examinations. According to the research, individuals with more than five missing teeth had an increased risk for heart disease and heart attacks by up to 140%! Individuals with more than nine missing teeth were at an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases by 51%, diabetes by 31%, and death by 37 %.

Researchers are finding more and more associations between these diseases and common inflammatory oral diseases, including periodontitis. Periodontitis may lead to a loss of teeth if left untreated, which is found to be common in middle aged and elderly men and women.

hdd

It is important to note that smoking also has a strong association with both tooth loss and heart disease, and should be avoided for your oral and overall health.

Tooth loss should not only be dreaded for its appearance, but also for the many diseases that are linked to missing teeth. Practice good oral health habits and your entire body with thank you for it!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150605081609.htm

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

http://positivelyold.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/iStock_000010097783Small.jpg

http://www.dentistmarshall.com/uploads/4/0/4/3/40439637/1412815885.png

Prostate Trouble? Your Dentist Can Help

August 2nd, 2015

man

Researchers are finding even more connections between oral health and the health of your body. Periodontal health for men and women is crucial as it can influence several other health factors.

Current research suggests that there is a higher prevalence of periodontal disease in men (56.4%) than in women (38.4%). Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Departments of Urology and Pathology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center found a link between gum disease and prostatitis, a disease that causes inflammation of the prostate gland in men.  Since the prostate gland is located between the bladder and the penis, inflammation of this gland can make urination difficult. Inflammation of the prostate gland also causes prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels to rise above normal amounts. Research has shown that men with signs of periodontal disease and prostatitis have higher levels of PSA than men with only one of the conditions.

The study included 27 men with prostatitis, who were 21 years of age and older. Of the 27 participants, all experienced moderate to severe gum disease. Each of the participants received treatment for only periodontal disease and were tested again weeks later. Even without prostate treatment, 21 of the 27 participants showed significant improvement in prostate health and periodontal health. Six of the participants showed no changes. The article, "Periodontal Treatment Improves Prostate Symptoms and Lowers Serum PSA in Men with High PSA and Chronic Periodontitis," was published in the journal DentistryDr. Nabil Bissada, chair of periodontics at Case Western Reserve University, explained, "This study shows that if we treat the gum disease, it can improve the symptoms of prostatitis and the quality of life for those who have the disease."

Inflammation associated with periodontal disease does not just affect the mouth. Studies have also shown that chronic inflammatory conditions such as periodontal disease may increase your risk of cardiovascular disease, impotence, and even cancer. Maintaining oral health is essential, particularly for the sake of your overall health!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150505102437.htm

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20150522/treating-gum-disease-might-help-prostate-symptoms-study

https://www.perio.org/consumer/men

http://drperrone.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Marielaina-Perrone-DDS-Mens-Dental-Health-2-680x350.jpg

Mind your Mouth and Body!

March 15th, 2015

In your body, since all of the organs are interconnected, your mouth health will impact your overall body health, and vice versa. In this article, we'll first describe connections between oral health problems and overall body problems. Next, we'll describe the nutritional and lifestyle decisions you can make to help not only your overall body, but your mouth too!

Health professionals have noticed connections between oral health problems, and other medical problems, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, pneumonia, and pregnancy complications. Gum disease and bacteria in your mouth can lead to clogged arteries and blood clots. Mouth bacteria can also cause inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries. This inflammation can lead to atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries, which can increase your risk of heart attacks or stroke.

Doctors have also found a link between diabetes and gum disease. Diabetes lowers your body's resistance to infection, thus making your mouth more susceptible to damage. Gum disease may also make it more difficult for you to control diabetes by causing insulin resistance.

Like diabetes, HIV/AIDS can lower your body's resistance to infection, thus exacerbating gum disease. There are even links between gum disease and pneumonia. If the mouth becomes infected, unhealthy bacteria can get aspirated into the lungs.

Additionally, gum disease is linked to premature and low-weight births. Gum disease can cause the release of toxins throughout the body, which enter the mother's placenta, and thus cause developmental problems for her baby.

It is important to establish healthy lifestyle and dietary habits for a healthy mouth and body. Nutrition is especially important to both your oral health and overall health. The month of March marks National Nutrition Month, making it the perfect time to implement healthy foods into your diet and spread the word about the benefits of good nutrition! Avoid sugary and acidic foods, as they can be damaging to tooth enamel. Tooth decay occurs when plaque come into contact with sugar, causing acid to harm the teeth. Also, make sure that your body intakes vital nutrients. If you lack certain nutrients, tissues in your mouth will have a more difficult time trying to resist infection. Eat a diet high in vegetables to make your entire body health, and you'll even reduce your risk of gum disease. Be sure to get proper nutrients into your body. If you're low on certain nutrients, your mouth may become an acidic environment, which can increase your risk of gum disease.

Links between medications and gum disease have also been found. Hundreds of medications have side effects that include dry mouth. Decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, and diuretics commonly reduce saliva flow. Saliva is an important part of your oral health because it helps prevent too many bacteria from thriving in your mouth. A dry mouth is more likely to have gum disease and tooth decay. Be sure to stay hydrated!

If you are a smoker, strive to quit the habit. Smoking can cause tooth decay, periodontal disease, and oral cancer.

As you keep your mouth healthy, you’ll keep the rest of your body healthy.  Making positive oral health choices will lead to a healthy mouth and body!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-education/articles/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body 

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/healthy-mouth-healthy-body.aspx

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/diet-and-dental-health

http://ricecreekdmd.com/wp-content/uploads/kidsplaying.gif

 

5 Ways to Get an A in Oral Health

August 27th, 2014

happy_male_elementary_school_student_holding_a_tro_by_macinivnw-d68c9ty

With the school season around the corner oral health has to be at the top of your list! During the summer it’s easy to become more lenient with kids about what they eat, so dentists recommend that now is a good time to check in with the dentist and do a cleaning. Research shows that 60% of children fail to visit the dentist once a year. Now is a good time to check for cavities, for untreated tooth decay - all of this can keep a child from eating, speaking, sleeping, and even learning to their fullest potential. Parents should also be mindful of the snacks and lunches they pack. Some schools offering enticing sugary snacks for kids, but it is a good idea to pack healthy foods, keeping a child’s sugar intake at bay.

We challenge you do beat these statistics and start the school year off with healthy teeth! Request an appointment with Dr. Kim, our excellent pediatric dentist, or call 781-237-9071 with questions.

1891176_10151970757410913_476601832_n1. Consistent brushing. As always it is important to instill the habit of brushing twice a day. Getting back to school, children have to be reminded of the morning and evening routine. It is helpful to set up a time for brushing after breakfast and before going to bed. Dentists also recommend that brushing after every meal can be beneficial.  There are many fun toothbrushes that have been coming out, and along with buying new folders and notebooks, parents can look into buying themed travel toothbrush and toothpaste that children can bring to school in their lunchbox. Just make sure that the toothpaste contains fluoride and that the travel toothbrush has soft bristles!

2. Flossing before brushing. To get an A vs. a B in oral care, you have to make sure to remember flossing.  For small children, convenient pre-strung floss picks can make it easier to reach between teeth in little mouths. Put a floss pick on your child’s plate so they remember that right after they eat, they need to floss. By making these actions routine, your child will develop good habits they can lean on for the rest of their life.

3. Fluoride rinses. Once you are sure your child can swish mouthwash without swallowing it, add a rinse to their routine. Not only is it fun and leaves the cleanest feeling, but it also helps remineralise teeth and protect them from the effects sweets and soda have on gentle enamel. This step will put the parent's mind at ease!

4. Help make dentist their friend. Dentist visits are necessary and although many young students are afraid of them, parents can help put their mind at ease. Research shows, that if the parents show anxiety about the dental check-ups, it's far more likely that the children will, as well. Dentist are working to help you have the best quality of life, besides dentistry has come a long way in terms of comfort and amenities. A kid's visit often includes playing in the waiting area, watching cartoons for distraction, drawing and getting fun prizes and stickers. Be sure to prepare your child for their dental visits by explaining how the staff will take a picture of their teeth during X-rays, clean their teeth and examine the teeth. Eliminate the unknowns and your child will walk into the dentist office with more confidence and a better understanding.

At our office in Wellesley, two friends will greet your children upon their visit - dinosaurs Christoper and Kiki. They will help your kids practice their brushing skills!

5. See the dentist every 6 months.  It is recommended that school-age children visit the dentist twice a year. It is important to make sure all transitions that a child’s teeth goes through are happening in a timely manner, whether is it is losing baby teeth or expecting permanent ones to come in. Staying on a regular six month schedule will keep your visits timely and give you an early alert if a child needs extra help with their brushing and flossing or has issues that need to be treated.

Now that everyone is getting back to school, let’s make it important to keep up with good oral health this school year! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

Request a check-up with Dr. Kim, our pediatric dentist, or call 781-237-9071.

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References:

http://fatcatwebproductions.com/ThePaper_2014/md-thenews/content/complete-your-healthy-back-school-routine-dental-care

http://islandgazette.net/news-server5/index.php/local-business-news/business-news/health-and-wellness/20333-back-to-school-time-to-get-back-to-dental-routine-9-11-2013

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2010/article/ADA-08-Consumer-News-Back-to-School.cvsp

http://www.astdd.org/docs/schoolbased-ohp-ma-oh-coalition-whitepaper-nov-2011.pdf

http://thegazette.com/2012/10/31/halloween-a-dentists-dilemma/

 Image credit: http://th05.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2013/161/a/e/happy_male_elementary_school_student_holding_a_tro_by_macinivnw-d68c9ty.jpg

Uncovering the Past: Bacteria Withstanding the Test of Time

February 25th, 2014

ANCIENT TEETH Recently, a team of researched have discovered well-preserved oral bacteria on skeletons around 1,000 years old! What secrets do these remains hold?

The scientists found that dental plaque was what kept the bacteria and particles of food on the teeth in tact, which allowed the research team to look further into what oral pathogens were present in the past. They found that even with the drastic changes in diet and hygiene (we hope!), the ancient human cavity is the home to a variety of pathogens and bacteria similar to the ones found today.

What’s even more exciting was that the ancient human oral microbiome found contained the basic line of antibiotic resistance, which is more than eight centuries before the invention of therapeutic antibiotics in the 1940s! The scientists also uncovered dietary DNA from the dental plaque found, which give the researchers a window into the types of vegetables and fruits consumed.

Although these were exciting finds for the research team, the scientists have a long road ahead of them. Gaining a wealth of data is always an exciting event, but it will be a challenge for the researchers to piece together and identify the genetic sequences that came forth from the ancient oral microbiome they discovered.

These findings can truly be a great step forward towards a better understanding of the evolution of the human oral microbiome and the beginnings of periodontal disease. Periodontal disease affects more than 10% of the world population and has been associated with several systemic diseases including pulmonary disease, cardiovascular disease and even type II diabetes. Through analyzing the human oral microbiome, scientists can track the progression of bacteria, paving new ways to prevent periodontal disease and contain bacterial production within the oral cavity.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/02/140223131629.htm
http://www.natureworldnews.com/articles/6158/20140224/1000-year-old-dental-plaque-reveals-microbial-pompeii.htm
http://images.natureworldnews.com/data/images/full/4756/fossilised-dental-plaque-calculus-on-the-teeth-of-a-middle-aged-man-from-the-medieval-site-of-dalheim-germany-ca-ad-1100.jpg?w=600

Stress on Children: Dental Consequences

February 23rd, 2014

Copy of smile-familyStress is sometimes seen as an inevitable problem that is here to stay throughout a lifetime. There are many sources of stress, including school, work, family and friends. While it does not come as a surprise that adults deal with stress on a daily basis, but it must be kept in mind that children are not exempt from this fact.

School comes to mind as the main source of stress for children, but other events such as world events, natural disasters, familial issues, death, and even separation anxiety as a toddler can present as stressful situations. These occurrences can lead to a physical response in children that can adversely affect oral health.

Some tall tale signs of stress can reveal themselves in various forms in children. These include moodiness, lying, bullying, physical symptoms of headaches and stomach aches, changes in eating habits, and different sleeping schedules. These changes can lead to unhealthy habits, such as indulging in sugary food choices, resulting in higher rates of dental decay. Decay can lead to multiple dental visits for fillings and even abscesses, which are bacteria-induced infections resulting in a swelling.  A child suffering from stress can also go back to habits of thumb sucking, which interferes with proper forming and erupting of teeth.

As parents, it is important to recognize these signs of stress and to make active steps to alleviating it. Here are some tips to helping children cope with stress:

  • Spend quality time with them on a daily basis
  • Have conversations about their day and look for root causes of the stress
  • Help them keep up with a good amount of sleep and a healthy diet
  • Appointments for wellness visits and follow-up visits to the dentist can help ensure healthy teeth

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Glossary/Abscess.cvsp
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/September/article/SW-281474979201581.cvsp
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1009576213027#page-1

Indulgence in Sugary Sodas Can Lead to Poor Oral Health & Cardiovascular Disease

January 24th, 2014

colaThe proven connection between poor oral heath and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should re-enforce the importance of new heath policy creation, focusing on reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks,  say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Poor oral hygiene and excess amount of sugar in the diet can cause periodontal disease and decay of the teeth-supporting bone. It is thought that chronic infection brought on by gym disease can lead to inflammation that will over time cause heart disease through atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. Despite sufficient evidence of the connection between the poor oral health and premature heart disease, the recent suggested UK national guidance on Cardiovascular disease prevention at population level does not suggest the strong need to reduce sugar consumption.

Dr Ahmed Rashid, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, who co-wrote the paper, said: "As well as having high levels of fats and salt, junk foods often contain a great deal of sugar and the effect this has on oral health may be an important additional mechanism by which junk food elevates risk of CVD." He added: "Among different types of junk food, soft drinks have raised particular concerns and are the main source of free sugar for many individuals."

The authors refer to the well-knows  New York 'soda ban' controversy which has brought a lot of attention to the issue. They stress more can be done about making the sugary sodas dominating the public areas in the United States. Dr Rashid said: "The UK population should be encouraged to reduce fizzy drink intake and improve oral hygiene. Reducing sugar consumption and managing dental problems early could help prevent heart problems later in life."

Reference: http://goo.gl/ppiqpM

Cholesterol Medication Can Help Decrease Gum Inflammation

December 12th, 2013

youngoldHeart disease is one of the leading health issues in the United States. Arteries within the body become inflamed and patients are often recommended to take medication that lowers cholesterol

Statins is a commonly prescribed medication that helps patients with heart disease. But what’s more is that a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology demonstrated that statins can also be beneficial for those suffering from gum disease.

Periodontal disease is marked by chronic gum inflammation that affects approximately half of the U.S. adult population. Dr. Ahmed Tawkol of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School notes that there is a connections between heart and gum disease: both periodontitis and atherosclerosis are driven by inflammation. These inflammatory conditions are often seen to occur together, indicating to researchers that their biologies may be related.

A study was administered to test this theory. Patients with either heart disease or considered to have high heart disease risk were asked to take 80 mg of statin or 10 mg of stain daily for 12 weeks. PET/CT scans were used to observe inflammation over the course of the study. Results indicated that the 59 patients in the study demonstrated a significant reduction in gum inflammation, some after only 4 weeks of treatment. The researchers also found that the improvement of inflammation in the gums related closely with the improvement seen in inflammation in the arteries.

This study provides strong evidence that links atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. This research opens doors to new methods of treatments. Because of the relationship between these two diseases, medications that originally targeted one of these diseases may also be beneficial for the other. These results also points to better and improved oral hygiene to reduce inflammation in the gums can also lead to reduced atherosclerosis.

This study again shows the strong relationship between oral health and overall systemic health. Maintaining proper oral care can really go a long way for the body as a whole. Keeping up with oral hygiene can truly lead to a healthier smile and a healthier you!

If you have any questions or concerns please don't hesitate to ask Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group or our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi. We would all be more than happy to help. Please contact us at (781)237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002185652.htm

http://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/statins-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too-680723.html

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20131002/cholesterol-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too

 http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

December 11th, 2013

The elusive yet painful burning mouth syndrome!

Dentists and researchers have been scratching their heads for quite some time over a type of oral pain that seems to be plaguing a good amount of individuals. Patients’ chief complaint is that the mouth feels scalded; however, mouth and gums continue to appear normal. Because of this syndrome’s lack of visible symptoms (except for sensations of pain), it can take several visits before finally concluding that it is BMS. Over these years, it has come to be known as burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Because of its elusive symptoms, dental researchers have been looking into the burning mouth syndrome, hoping to find more clues to where the and why the pain originates.

Dr. Andres Pinto is the new chair in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine, and he is delving into reach on the burning mouth syndrome. BMS have spread to 2-5% of the population and mainly strikes women between the age of 50 and 70 and from three years before to 12 years after menopause. Earlier research on BMS has also paired their symptoms with psychogenic disorders. BMS is also mentioned as a secondary issue along with anemia, diabetes, vitamin deficiency, and thyroid disorders. Although an exact cause has yet to be found, burning mouth syndrome has been suspected to result from the deterioration of the nerves beneath the oral lining. Because the oral lining is not visible, this can explain the difficulty in diagnosing this disorder.

Dr. Pinto encourages individuals that continue to feel pain in their mouth to check for BMS these symptoms:

 

  • Persistent burning tongue and oral pain with no apparent dental cause
  • Abnormal taste or dry feeling in mouth
  • Symptoms that subside when eating
  • Burning sensations that migrate across various oral areas

 

Even when there is oral pain with no sign of these symptoms, it is advised to go in for a dental checkup. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/burning-mouth-syndrome/DS00462

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_53.pdf

 

 

Want To Brighten Your Smile For The Holidays?

December 6th, 2013

sinsational_gal_loIt’s that time of year again, gathering for family affairs and celebrating holidays as the year draws to a close. It definitely doesn’t hurt to have a set of pearly whites for the occasion! Here are a few tips to achieving a brighter smile:

Take a pass on the usual bag of chips and make a grab for fruits: while fruits boost many benefits for one’s overall health, fruits are also a great way to beginning removing stains from teeth. Some fruits, including apples and strawberries, contain malic acid, which has been shown to oxidize and remove stains from teeth. Crunchy fruits and vegetables also help whiten teeth by increasing saliva production, which neutralizes acids from other food such as tomatoes and wines.

Cutting out staining beverages is also a great way to cut down on the instances teeth are susceptible to stains. Drinks such as wine, coffee and various sodas are known to stain teeth; furthermore, beverages, such as soda, are extremely high in sugar content, leading to more bacteria production and more cavities. In the cases where these drinks are consumed, using a straw can really make a difference. The straw keeps the outer teeth from coming in contact with the beverage, preventing stains from forming.

And of course there are whitening strips. These strips are becoming more accessible and easy to use; some even simply dissolve in the mouth when applied! However, for individuals with more sensitive teeth, be mindful about the frequency of treatments used per week.

We also provide Sinsational in-office whitening. They procedure easily lightens your teeth and causes little to no sensitivity! It could be a great option for people who want a brighter smile without feeling any discomfort.

If strips are still a hassle, there are whitening toothpastes that are great for tackling hard to remove stains. While brushing teeth can lead to a brighter smile, it is still important to keep in mind the importance of daily brushing and flossing. Maintaining a bright smile should mean maintaining a healthy smile as well!

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group ; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References

 

http://www.3dwhite.com/teeth-whitening/teeth-whitening-kits/make-teeth-whiter.aspx

 

http://voices.yahoo.com/5-easy-ways-whiten-teeth-remove-stains-4616045.html

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/weighing-your-toothpaste-options

 

Ease Oral Burns With Innovative Strip!

December 5th, 2013

coffee_0

When hot, delicious food is placed before you, it is easy to quick to scarf down that plate of food. Or even in the morning, the goal is to quickly down that cup of coffee before getting to work. In the heat of the moment, the burning sensation is an afterthought, but once that gooey slice of pizza has been consumed or when you have stepped into your workplace, the pain begins to set in and feelings of regret for eating or drinking so quickly start to well up.

 

Pain from burns causing by consumption of hot foods and liquids tends to be an issue that everyone will likely face. Even though the pain eventually subsides, it still lingers for some time. A pharmaceutical, biomedical engineering research team may have found the solution to this problem. Dr. Jason McConville of New Mexico, along with researchers from the University of Texas from Austin, had presented on possible dissolvable strips to treat oral thermal burns. This strip would be applied directly to the affected part of the tongue, cheek or roof of the mouth. Scientists note that this adhesive will not hinder any normal day-to-day activities because of its quickly dissolving nature. These strips will look and act similarly to breath freshening strips that can be found in the local drugstore.

 

The strip would locally deliver anesthetic, benzocaine, and a therapeutic polymer. This film can instantly release benzocaine when it is placed on affected areas in the oral cavity and has shown to relieve pain significantly over an extended period of time. What’s more is all the materials used to create these dissolvable strips are relatively inexpensive. The team of scientists has proposed that this film could give way to instant, sustained, and affordable relief from oral burns.

 

There are high hopes for these dissolvable strips and it will be exciting to see this new product enter the market. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016125647.htm

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-02-scientists-develop-film-strip-to-treat-oral-burns.cvsp

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57535420/

Why Is Junk Food Bad?

December 4th, 2013

Even though junk foods are known to be unhealthy snack options, it is easy to look past health concerns and succumb to sodas, chips, and candies. But just how bad are junk foods an individual and how exactly are these foods harmful? The nature of junk foods suggests that a high level of intake of such foods can lead poor oral health, which is not surprising considering the amount sugar found in these foods. However, it is suggested that the level of sugar in junk foods, which indubitably has an effect on oral health, also ends up increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Past research has shown that high sugar intake along and poor oral hygiene have been linked to periodontal (gum) disease. In the case of periodontal disease, gums end up pulling away from teeth, leaving “pockets” that can end up becoming infected. The body ends up responding to this infection by breaking down bone and connective tissue that support the teeth. If these symptoms are left untreated, the bones eventually become destroyed, leaving teeth loose or in need to be removed.

However, the story does not stop here. Research also shows that chronic gum disease can trigger an inflammatory response, resulting in cardiovascular disease; this occurs through atherosclerosis, which is the process where arteries become hardened. Thus, the sugar in the junk food that is consumed not only affects the oral cavity, specifically the bones surrounding teeth, but can lead to unhealthy consequences for the heart as well.

It is important to keep in mind that the body is comprised of many interconnected parts. Do not hold the misconception that damage done to one area of the body is contained in only that region. Poor oral health choices can result in issues concerning other areas in the body. On the same token, consuming teeth-friendly foods not only is beneficial for the oral cavity but can also be favorable for the rest of the body.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202105301.htm

http://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/bad-foods-teeth

Saliva, a Potential Player In Detecting Systemic Diseases?

December 2nd, 2013

Through a lifetime, saliva proves to be integral for the breakdown and digestion of foods that are consumed. This watery liquid keeps the mouth moist and comfortable, while fighting germs in the mouth. Because of its proteins and minerals, teeth, specifically tooth enamel, is fortified and protected from tooth decay. Saliva has had a consistent function in the maintenance of good oral health, but researchers are now finding that it may have a significant role in revealing systemic diseases.

 

A group at the University of California Los Angeles School of Dentistry has been looking at biological markers derived from saliva that could potential test for the presence of stomach cancer and other deadly diseases. Dr. David Wong, the head of this five-year project, has high hopes of detecting cancer cells through capturing extracellular RNA, an important player in the production of proteins. The researchers hope to develop a method for using saliva to detect life-threatening diseases, such as pancreatic, breast and ovarian cancers. Currently, Dr. Wong’s team initially disordered salivary extracellular molecules and have strong evidence for detecting oral cancer with the biological markers they have created. The team also has successfully developed salivary extracellular RNA biomarkers for diseases such as salivary gland tumors and Sjögren’s syndrome.

 

While this research team continues to look for ways to genetically screen for these cancers, dentists have been able to start the process in detecting these systemic diseases during an oral exam. The initial symptoms of many diseases appear in the mouth. Diabetes, for example, is a complex disease that surprisingly shows many symptoms in the oral cavity. Thrush is an oral infection in the mouth that thrives when there are increased levels of blood glucose found in the saliva, which is an indication of diabetes. Dry mouth is another indicator of this disease, decreasing the production of saliva, leading to mouth soreness and tooth decay. Diabetes also increases the time for wound healing, which can be observed after an invasive dental procedure.  Saliva and the oral cavity as a whole continue to reveal much about an individual’s oral health simply through a check up. It is crucial to consistently make appointments with the dentist both to ensure good oral health and to screen for signs of systemic disease. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-09-Saliva-May-Hold-Key-To-Detecting-Deadly-Diseases-In-The-Body.cvsp

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2674509/

http://www.richmondinstitute.com/salivary-diagnostics-in-dentistry-and-medicine

 

Mealey, B. 2000. Diabetes and periodontal disease. Journal of Periodontology 71(4):664-678.

 


More Effective Pain Relief!

December 2nd, 2013

It can be quite unnerving when going in for dental surgery. Quick and effective pain relief is definitely on patients’ minds, and the hope is that their dentist will come through and prescribe drugs that will do the trick. While there are combinations of drugs that are effective in alleviating postoperative pain, they also come with a price, usually in form of side effects. However, there is new research showing an alternative solution, one involving safer over-the-counter drugs that may be just as, if not more, effective.

According to the Journal of the American Dental Association, taking ibuprofen and acetaminophen (APAP) together can help ease the pain after surgery without any significant side effects. Researchers have been advocating patients to take over-the-counter drugs, such as ibuprofen, APAP and naproxen after oral surgery. One of the most common combinations that patients take is APAP and an opioid, which is a prescription drug. However, the down side of this opioid-APAP combination is that patients may face potential adverse reactions linked with opioids. Most dentists and oral surgeons also frequently prescribe Vicodin, which is a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen for severe postoperative pain. While this form of pain relief is effective, it poses a risk for abuse and other adverse reactions.  Dentists are now advised to move towards the over-the-counter APAP and ibuprofen combination to keep side effects at bay.

Drs. Paul A. Moore from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, and Elliot V. Hersh from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine were able to determine whether this ibuprofen-APAP combination would be the better alternative to take over combinations including opioids. They were able to use the over-the-counter combination to manage the pain patients felt after they had their wisdom teeth removed. Their results indicated that the ibuprofen-APAP combination was more effective at reducing pain and had fewer side effects than many of the combinations including opioids. They also showed that the ibuprofen-APAP combination resulted in greater pain relief than using ibuprofen or APAP alone.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-08-Ibuprofen-And-Acetaminophen-Together-May-Give-Profound-Pain-Relief-With-Fewer-Side-Effects-After-Dental-Surgery.cvsp

 

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/8/898.abstract

 

Making Big News and A Bigger Impact, Thanks To Your Support!

November 26th, 2013

[caption id="attachment_5941" align="aligncenter" width="1024"]Dr. Femina Ali in Wellesley Weston Magazine Dr. Femina Ali in Wellesley Weston Magazine[/caption]

Dr. Ali's Volunteerism was featured in the Wellesley Weston Magazine. Her passion for promoting oral health....Read More here. 

Our Candy Drive was bigger and better than ever! We were highlighted in Boston.com and many other local media. Please check them out below. Together we can do so much!

At this Thanksgiving time, we are thankful for being part of this wonderful community. We love serving as the Smile Ambassadors!

Boston.com

Boston.com

bostonglobe.com

Wellesley Weston Magazine

Wellesley Weston Magazine

Patch 

Patch

swellesley

WickedLocal

InAgist

 

Things To Do During Thanksgiving Break!

November 26th, 2013

happy-thanksgivingHappy Thanksgiving! Hope everyone is excited for it! There are so many things to look forward to at Thanksgiving- having your family gathered together, good friends, great food, smiles and laughter, and of course having some time just to relax. Don’t forget to prepare ahead of time for Thanksgiving dinner so you can avoid those last minute trips to the grocery store! What are you most thankful for this year? I am thankful for the love and support of my many friends and family, my health, and the new experiences.  We are fortunate and grateful for being a part of the Wellesley community for the past fourteen years, and we appreciate all the support we have found within the community and beyond!  Remember to be grateful for healthy teeth, and as always we are extremely thankful and grateful for all our amazing patients!

 

We have compiled a list of things to do around and some favorite recipes, enjoy your Thanksgiving Holiday guide!

RECIPES

Rosemary Roasted Turkey Recipe

Homestyle Turkey Recipe

How to Brine a Turkey

Pumpkin Pie

Cranberry Sauce

Celery Stuffing

 

LOCAL

 Thanksgiving Holiday Guide

Wellesley Parking Restrictions and Road Closures

Wellesley 5 KTurkey5

FREEDOM TRAIL HOLIDAY STROLL

Wellesley vs. Needham : The oldest public school football rivalry in the country

Family Gratitude - 5K Dedham Turkey Trot: Thursday, November 28, 2013, 8:00 AM,  Endicott Estates 656 East Street Dedham, Ma

Dedham-based, Non-Profit Ripples of Hope Presents 2nd Annual Thanksgiving Day Family Gratitude 5K Turkey Trot to Benefit the Dedham Food Pantry and Dedham Youth Commission’s College Bound Program. Family-Friendly Race Offers Area Residents Opportunity to Give Back and Start or Continue a New Family Thanksgiving Day Tradition

Massachusetts Horticultural Society’s Fifth Annual Festival of Trees: Friday, November 29, 2013, 9:00 AM, 900 Washington Street, Wellesley, MA 02482 in the Hunnewell Carriage House

 Admission: $8 adults (children under 11 free)

Featuring: over 70 beautifully decorated Christmas trees- all raffled off!

Horse-drawn Hayrides

Christmas Pajama Story time

Holiday Wreath Workshop

Tropical Terrarium Workshop

Kids’ Holiday Craft Workshops

Santa Visits

Gardeners’ Gift Boutique: December 5th 4-8pm, in the Education Center

Read more here!

 

The Nutcracker presented by Boston Ballet:  Friday, November 29, 2013, 7:30 PM , Boston Opera House: 539 Washington St, Boston, MA 02111

Boston Ballet's production of Mikko Nissinen's The Nutcracker received rave reviews during its premiere in 2012. This sparkling production, with sets and costumes by Robert Perdziola, "brings a softness and light to the venerable holiday classic"  (The Boston Globe).

Remember the magic! The timeless story of Clara, who bravely saves her Nutcracker Prince and is swept away on a magical journey through the Nutcracker Prince's kingdom in the clouds, is an engaging tale for the whole family and a holiday tradition for many years to come.

Get your tickets early - many performances sold out last season  - don't miss your chance to see the production that brought audiences to their feet!

 

Irving Berlin's White Christmas:  Saturday, November 30, 2013, 2:00 PM,  Weston Town Hall, One Town House Road, Weston, MA

The Weston Friendly Society is celebrating the holiday season with Irving Berlin's WHITE CHRISTMAS!  Irving Berlin's WHITE CHRISTMAS tells the story of two showbiz buddies putting on a show in a picturesque Vermont inn, and finding their perfect mates in the bargain.  Full of dancing, romance, laughter, and some of the greatest songs ever written, including "Count Your Blessings Instead of Sheep,"  "Happy Holiday," "Sisters,"  "Blue Skies," and the unforgettable title song, Irving Berlin's WHITE CHRISTMAS promises to be a merry and bright experience for the entire family!

For tickets call 617-795-2195 or visit www.westonfriendly.org

 

GREATER BOSTON NORTH OF BOSTON SOUTH OF BOSTON CAPE COD & THE ISLANDS CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS

GREATER BOSTON

Thanksgiving Dining in Boston

Thanksgiving Day feasts abound in Boston where you’ll find all the trimmings in addition to gourmet delights such as Harvest Pumpkin Bisque with Roasted Pecans, Pan Roasted Duck with Cranberry Molasses Sauce, Ricotta Gnocchi with Pumpkin Sauce and Sage, Apple Cranberry Tart with Pumpkin Gelato and Cinnamon Spiced Popcorn, Hot Mulled Apple Cider and more!

Throughout Boston

Zoolights

November 23-December 31 ?5:00-9:00pm? A beloved holiday family tradition returns to Stone Zoo when ZooLights opens on Thanksgiving. This winter wonderland attracts thousands of visitors each year who get into the holiday spirit by strolling along tree-lined paths lit by thousands of twinkling lights. Upon entering the Zoo, guests will visit Yukon Creek, which not only features dazzling holiday lights but is also home to bald eagles, porcupine, lynx, a gray fox and a pair of reindeer. Children will want to make sure they visit with Santa, who awaits their arrival in Santa’s Castle.

Stone Zoo, Stoneham

Thanksgiving with the Grafton Group

Enjoy Thanksgiving dinner at Russell House TavernPARKGrafton Street Pub & Grill or Temple Bar.

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NORTH OF BOSTON & GREATER MERRIMACK VALLEY

20th Annual Methuen Festival of Trees

November 23-December 7

Visitors are invited to attend the Festival and view the 200+ trees donated by individuals, businesses, organizations, and school groups from Methuen and several Merrimack Valley communities.  The proceeds from the Festival of Trees provide funding to preserve our heritage and the monuments that make Methuen so unique.

Valley Office Park, Methuen

Thanksgiving Grand Buffet

November 28 ?Spend Thanksgiving at the beautiful seaside Emerson Inn by the Sea in Rockport. From noon-5pm, enjoy a delicious 3-course meal with your family for only $45 per person, $22.50 per child (ages 3-10). Tax and gratuity not included.

Emerson Inn by the Sea, Rockport

10th Annual Wild Turkey 5 Mile Run

November 28? Work up your appetite on Thanksgiving morning at the largest road race on the North Shore! All proceeds go to Boys & Girls Club and Salem Park & Recreation Youth programs.

Salem

Lowell City of Lights Parade and Holiday Arts Stroll

November 30, 11 am – 8 pm? Celebrate the coming holiday season in Lowell with festivities including family activities, music and a hot chocolate competition as well as a holiday parade featuring local and regional floats and marching bands. 978-970-4257

Downtown Lowell


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SOUTH OF BOSTON

Thanksgiving at Plimoth Plantation

November 28? – Celebrate the quintessential Thanksgiving experience at Plimoth Plantation. Be among the thousands who make the annual pilgrimage to the museum to share in the holiday spirit. Visitors will explore the Plantation’s multiple sites, which include the Wampanoag Homesite, the 1627 English Village, the Crafts Center and Mayflower II.

Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth

Thanksgiving Day in America’s Hometown

Thursday, November 28

9am-5pm

North Street, Water Street Leyden Street, Town Square, Main Street, Plymouth Visit Pilgrim Hall Museum and Plimoth Plantation, Mayflower II and Plymouth Rock, National Monument to the Forefathers, Jabez Howland House & more!? 10am – “The Pilgrim Progress” Procession? A reenactment of the Pilgrims’ march to their original church site followed by a short worship service. This annual Thanksgiving Procession begins at the Mayflower Society House at the foot of North Street. Costumed participants, representing the 51 Pilgrim survivors of the first, harsh winter of 1620/1621 assemble to the beat of a drum, march down North Street, past Plymouth Rock, up Leyden Street and to the top of Burial Hill, the site of the first fort where Pilgrims met for worship. Psalms sung are taken from “The Book of Psalms” by Henry Ainsworth, which was actually used by the Pilgrims in Holland and in Plymouth. Passages read by Elder Brewster are selected from Gov. William Bradford’s “Of Plymouth Plantation.” After the brief service, the participants descend the hill and travel north along Main Street through the downtown back to the Mayflower Society House.? 12 Noon – National Day of (American Indian) Mourning Ceremonies ?Participants honor Native ancestors and their struggles. Held at the Massasoit Statue on Cole’s Hill (Water Street).

Thanksgiving Day Dinner Train

November 28 – 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Looking to try something new this Thanksgiving? Start a tradition this year on the Cape Cod Central Railroad! Enjoy a leisurely five-course gourmet meal, beautiful scenery, and all the elegance of a bygone era — without any of the work! Reservations are required.

Cape Cod Central Railroad

252 Main Street, Hyannis

508-771-3800

Harvest Dinner with the Pilgrims

November 2, 9, 16, 23, 24, 27, 29, 30 at 5:30 p.m. ?Your Pilgrim hosts, residents of 1627 Plimoth, will spice up your dinner conversation with tales of England, old and new. Discover the table manners and recipes that traveled across the Atlantic with the Pilgrims, and find out about what happened at the famous harvest celebration of 1621. For reservations call 800-262-9356 ext. 8353, 8364, or 8365. Call early as these popular dinners sell out quickly.

Plimoth Plantation

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CAPE COD & THE ISLANDS

17th Annual Vineyard Artisans Festival

November 29-30

The largest Holiday Art Show on the Vineyard with over 85 Island Artisans. Balsam wreaths and ceramic ornaments to start off the holiday season and gifts galore from the Islands finest artists and craftsmen. Fine jewelry, glass, ceramics, fine art, clothing, book arts and much more.

Agricultural Hall, West Tisbury

103rd Lighting of the Pilgrim Monument

November 27

Watch as one of the most recognizable landmarks on Cape Cod is illuminated with 5000 lights. The lights go on at 6:00pm followed by entertainment and refreshments.

Provincetown

Festival of Wreaths

November 27, 29-30, December 1 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

Take a chance and bid on one of the many stunning wreaths made by Nantucket artists, designers, and merchants for this annual silent auction. Free admission.

Peter Foulger Gallery, 15 Broad Street, Nantucket

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CENTRAL MASSACHUSETTS

Thanksgiving 1830?s-style at Old Sturbridge Village

November 28-December 2

This Thanksgiving, costumed historians at Old Sturbridge Village demonstrate hearthside cooking in early New England – roasting turkeys in a tin kitchen and also before the fire suspended on skewers and string to evenly rotate the meat. Old Sturbridge Village re-creates various activities from an early New England Thanksgiving Day, including cooking at the hearth, demonstrations of 19th-century table manners, a Thanksgiving sermon, and after-dinner entertainment. The Thanksgiving Day menu includes turnip sauce, stuffing, pies and Marlboro Pudding. Proper 19th century table manners required eating from one’s knife. After dinner, the men will demonstrate a target shoot, the 1830s entertainment equivalent of today’s Thanksgiving Day football games.? Old Sturbridge Village, Sturbridge

Fireplace Feasts

Check website for dates

Relax by the fire or lend a hand as dinner is prepared for you 18th century style. Stir the chowder as it bubbles in the cast iron cauldron. Watch your prime rib turning as the only known Roasting Jack still operating in America rotates slowly over a crackling fire of cherry logs.

Salem Cross Inn, West Brookfield

Publick House Thanksgiving Day Feast

November 28, 11:00 a.m. Menu available online

On the Common, Route 131, Sturbridge

508-347-3313


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WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS

Parade of the Big Balloons

November 29

A Springfield tradition for the whole family. This wonderful parade features giant helium balloons led by the 75ft “Cat in the hat” along with marching bands, a visit from Santa, and plenty of fun for all ages.

Downtown Springfield

After-Thanksgiving Weekend Sale featuring Midnight Madness

November 29-December 1

Lee Premium Outlets will open at midnight the day after Thanksgiving for the Annual Thanksgiving Sale featuring Midnight Madness! Visit our website for weekend hours and to download weekend offers and specials.

Lee Premium Outlets, Lee

413.243.8196

Find Lodging Options in Massachusetts

 

http://www.wellesley.edu/news/stories/node/31421

 

http://wellesley.patch.com/groups/events/p/massachusetts-horticultural-societys-fifth-annual-festival-of-trees?ncid=newsltuspatc00000001&evar4=events-7-post&newsRef=true

 

http://www.pacificgrilltacoma.com/thanksgiving/ picture credit

Immune Cells: Potential Warriors In the Battle Against Gum Disease

November 22nd, 2013

perio diseasePeriodontal disease is one of the most prevalent oral diseases, affecting 78 million people in the United States. Periodontal disease (also known as gum disease) can range from gum inflammation to serious disease results in severe damage of the soft tissue and bones that support the teeth. While this oral disease remains an issue at large, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh may have found an innovative way to keep this disease at bay. They have discovered that certain immune system cells can be brought right to the inflamed tissues, resulting in effective treatment.

 

When dentists see that patients have symptoms of periodontal disease, the usual recommendation is proper oral hygiene. Through daily brushing and flossing, one is able to prevent plaque and eventually tartar from forming near the gum line.  These strategies aim to keep the growth of oral bacteria at bay. Dr. Charles Sfeir, the director of the Center Regeneration at the University’s School of Dental Medicine notes that these are ways to keep the bacteria from triggering sever inflammation in the oral cavity; however, there needs to be a method to prevent the underlying problem, which is the overreaction of the immune system that results in an adverse response to oral bacteria.

 

Within a healthy mouth, there is a response system between the immune system and bacteria that prevents infection without starting up inflammation. However, when there is too much bacteria in the oral cavity (due to lack maintenance of oral health), the immune system is on overdrive, leading to harmful consequences on oral tissues. The scientists have discovered that these disease tissues are low on a group of immune cells called the regulatory T-cells, which is responsible for informing immune cells to stand down, stopping the inflammatory response. These researchers believe that when more of these regulatory T-cells are brought back to the gums, the inflammatory response will be contained. The researchers are on their way in developing new technology that can deliver these immune cells to where they are lacking. With this new system, perhaps inflammation, thus periodontal disease may potentially be kept at bay.  If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group ; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131101112412.htm

 

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

 

http://www.yurovskydental.com/periodontaldisease.php

Why the Mouth Matters!

November 20th, 2013

[caption id="attachment_5914" align="alignleft" width="594"]Mouth Matters! Mouth Matters![/caption]

Even though the mouth is such an integral aspect of the human body, it’s easy to often take it for granted. It’s only when things go wrong when the oral cavity receives more attention and care. But why wait until those times in need? The mouth holds so many exciting facts that may very well be fascinating and sometimes even surprising. Here are a few interesting facts to keep you on your toes.

 

1. Teeth are the hardest substance in the human body. These mighty parts of your body are powerful tools of digestion and the break down of food. It’s easy to forget that individuals are able to enjoy and consume food only because of teeth! But what exactly keeps teeth so strong and resilient? Scientists have found that the human tooth enamel is composed of a basket-weave structure, which gives teeth their strength and also prevents any cracks that have formed from worsening and propagating through the enamel. Teeth can withstand an incredible amount of force, all due to their well-engineered core!

 

2. Some say that the mouth is the window to the body, but other than the fact that you can physically look into the oral cavity, dentists are able to see how well an individual is doing in terms of their overall health. 90% of life-threatening diseases have symptoms that show up within the mouth. Heart disease, respiratory disease, and even Alzheimer’s disease have been linked to oral health. Taking care of oral health is just as important (in fact it is related) to the body’s overall health.

 

3. Bad breath odors are definitely something that everyone wants to be kept far away from. In fact, more than a billion dollar a year has been spent on over-the-counter products to mask bad breath odors! In the United States, 65% of the population has been estimated to have bad breath, also known as halitosis. But no worries; there are many ways to treat bad breath. Cavities or gum disease have been shown to lead to bad breath, which are caused by lack of brushing and flossing. Always remember to keep up with healthy oral health habits; it may just say you from bad breath.

 

4.  Speaking of flossing, if individuals never make it to pulling some floss out and getting it in between teeth, they are actually missing 35% of their tooth surfaces. That’s quite a lot of tooth surface to be missing out on! When there is lack of proper flossing, bacteria are more than ready to take over these surfaces, foraging for leftover food to consume. The more leftover food, the more bacteria!

 

5. It’s been estimated that there are over 100 million bacteria in just one drop of saliva. But saliva is a big help in dealing with the amount of bacteria in the mouth. It is a major fighter of germs in the mouth and also prevents bad breath! Saliva has key proteins and minerals that fortify tooth enamel and prevent tooth decay. What’s more is that the average human produces 25,000 quarts of saliva in a lifetime, that’s enough to fill up 2 swimming pools!

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References:

 

Where I got inspiration from: http://visual.ly/your-mouth-matters-fun-dental-facts

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/factfiles/teeth/teeth.shtml

http://www.livescience.com/3498-mystery-tooth-strength-cracked.html

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/change-your-breath-from-bad-to-good

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva

http://naturalrevolution.org/natural-body/

 

The Upcoming ‘Great American Smokeout'

November 19th, 2013

smokeoutWhile most people are aware of the dangers that smoking results in, it is surprising to most that dentists can have the ability to not only inform others on smoking effects on overall health, but also the damaging effects of smoking on oral health. Smoking and other tobacco products have been linked to periodontal, or gum, disease through affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to teeth. Along with increasing the risk of periodontal disease, smoking has been linked to specific cancers. There are toxins and carcinogens present in tobacco products, including cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, and chewing tobacco. The American Lung Association has found that cigarettes cause 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Smokers of cigars and pipes have an increased risk of cancer of the oral cavity as well as the overall body. Also, don’t be swayed into thinking that tobacco products are harmless; while they are “smokeless” options including chewing tobacco, there are still more than 28 cancer-causing chemicals found in this form of tobacco. Chewing tobacco can cause cancer in the cheek, gums and lips, and this cancer usually developed where the tobacco is held in the mouth. Regardless of what form of smoking, there is no doubt that smoking is harmful to the oral cavity and the overall health of the body.

 

The American Cancer Society is holds an event called Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November to encourage current smokers to use that day to make a solid plan to quit, or to start making plans prior to the event and to quit on the day of. The American Cancer Society explains that smokers are most successful in stopping the habit is to have access to smoking-cessation hotlines, stop-smoking groups, counseling, nicotine replacement products, online quit groups, and encourage and support from friends and family members. When smokers implement two or more of these sources, they have a better chance of quitting.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Great-American-Smokeout-Is-Nov-21.cvsp

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

 

http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/dental_care/oral_cancer_and_tobacco/Pages/index.aspx

 

Menopause: Possible Mouth Changes to Watch Out For

October 28th, 2013

shutterstock_59839630Menopause is a season where women tend to feel the many changes that occur. Many focus on the bodily changes and usually overlook differences that could be found in the mouth, where hormones can lead to unfavorable consequences. While this process is completely natural, signaling the end of female fertility, women should be aware of the mouth changes they are experiencing. Here are some of the potential changes and problems that have been associated with menopause:

 

Dry mouth: Because of the hormone fluctuations that occur during the time of menopause, the decreased levels of estrogen can lead to mouth dryness. Without sufficient saliva in the oral cavity, teeth become more susceptible to tooth decay and other infections. Saliva also plays an important role in the chewing and breaking down of food, allowing nutrients to enter the body.

 

Burning mouth syndrome: This condition tends to affect the tongue, gums, and lips, and even inside the cheeks of the mouth. The burning sensation primarily comes forth from problems with taste and sensory nerves, but can also be the consequence of dry mouth, nutritional deficiency, and allergic reactions to certain foods and medications. It is important to look out for these symptoms and to consult a dentist on possible ways to ease the pain.

 

Periodontitis and mucosal changes: Gum disease is also something to look out for when hitting menopause. Mucosal changes can also results in changes in appearance of gums, where they tend to look more pale, dry and shiny. Gums also tend to bleed more due to these changes.

 

Eating disorders: Going through menopause can take a psychological toll on some women, resulting in inconsistent and improper eating habits. These eating habits can be very detrimental for teeth, leading to erosion of tooth enamel. When tooth enamel is stripped down, teeth become more sensitive to hot and cold foods and they are more susceptible to cavities.

 

While these are problems that may arise during menopause, it is always possible to discuss possible solutions to these issues. Dentists should be notified of these changes, and they can aid in alleviating these symptoms and suggesting viable treatment plans. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cavities/DS00896/DSECTION=risk-factors

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

 

 

Is the Future of Dental Implants Found In Diamonds or Titanium?

October 25th, 2013

 

 

diamond

 

It may be strange to think that a precious jewel can aid in the field of dentistry. Researchers at UCLA have been looking into diamonds and if they do have a place in creating better dental implants for patients. These researchers are focusing on nanodiamonds, which are made through conventional mining and refining operations and are definitely called “nano” for a reason; they come out to be approximately four to five nanometers in diameters, resembling miniature soccer balls. The UCLA researchers enlisted the help of the UCLA School of Dentistry, the UCLA Department of Bioengineering, Northwestern University, and even the NanoCarbon Research Institute in Japan to help come up with innovative ways to implement these nanodiamonds in dentistry. Their research has led them to believe that these nanodiamonds can improve bone growth and has the potential to counteract osteonecrosis, a disease marked by bone breakdown due to reduce blood flow.

 

Osteonecrosis can affect various parts of the body, but when this disease affects the joints in the jaw, it can keep people from eating and speaking properly, even restricting or impeding movement. What makes matters worse is that when osteonecrosis occurs near implants, including teeth or prosthetic joints, these implants loosen and can eventually fall out. These dental implant failures lead to additional procedures, which can not only be painful, but can also become very expensive.

 

These issues surrounding dental implants led the team at UCLA to conduct a study that would reveal whether nanodiamonds would be a viable solution. Conducted by Dr. Dean Ho, a professor of oral biology and medicine at the UCLA School of Dentistry, and his team used the nonadiamonds to deliver proteins responsible for bone growth. Their results indicated that nanodiamonds have the uncanny ability to bind rapidly the essential proteins and growth factors. The surface properties of these diamonds allow for a slower delivery of these proteins, which researchers believe contribute to a longer period of treatment of the affected area in the oral cavity. What’s more is that these nanodiamonds can be inserted in to patients in a non-invasive way, through either an injection or an oral rinsing.

 

Nanodiamonds are not only the technology that researchers are pursuing to improve. On the other side of the world, researchers in Japan and China have been revisiting the essential components of titanium, which contains alloys that are very commonly used in orthopedic implants. Because of its reliable mechanical and chemical properties, along with its biocompatible and corrosion resistant nature, titanium has been the go-to product to use in dental implant procedures. However, one of the drawbacks that titanium faces is its lack of ability to bond directly to living bone. Researchers have found that calcium phosphate (CaP) and collagen are main components of natural bone; these scientists believe that a composite of both of these components can be used to effectively coat titanium implants. The study they published in the journal of Science and Technology of Advanced Material showed that when titanium implants were coated with CaP gel and inserted into the thigh bone of rabbit, within four and eight weeks, the authors noticed that there was significantly more new bone on the surface of the titanium implants that had been covered with the CaP gel. These coated implants were also able to bond directly to the bone, without needing an intervening soft tissue layer. The researchers believe that this innovative CaP and collagen composite can play an important role in improving dental implants.

 

Both results found for nanodiamonds and titanium prove to be exciting news in field of Periodonistry and even in the medical world as a whole. These nanodiamonds may possibly revolutionize dental implants, allowing them to be longer lasting and effective, while this the new CaP and collagen coating and greatly improve the use of titanium. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130918102002.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131003142214.htm

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/nanodiamond-encrusted-teeth-248066.aspx

http://news.sciencemag.org/health/2011/03/nanodiamonds-could-be-cancer-patients-best-friend

http://www.abcnetspace.com/2013/08/how-diamonds-are-shaping-technology.html to read more about Diamond Technology!

 

 

 

 

Dental Care Decreases Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

October 22nd, 2013

heart-diseaseA study conducted by the University of California, Berkeley that was published in the journal Health Economics suggests that women who consistently get dental care can lower their risk of stroke, heart attacks, and other cardiovascular problems by at least one-third!

 

The university researchers used data of individuals from nearly 7,000 registered for the Health and Retirement Study between the ages of 44 and 88. They used a longitudinal approach, keeping track of the same individuals over time. These participants were given survey questions, including the frequency of dentist visits and if there were any instances of heart, angina, stroke, or congestive heart failure in their health history within the previous two years. The data from the Health and Retirement Study was collected every two years from 1996 to 2004. While there had been previous studies that have found a link between oral health and cardiovascular disease, this study was able to show a causal effect, where dental care leads to fewer heart attacks, strokes, and other cardiovascular issues.

 

It was also found that the same benefits that are attributed to women’s health were not found for men. However, the researchers explain that this was not completely surprising. They believe that these findings demonstrate the differences in how men and women develop cardiovascular disease. Other studies have suggested that estrogen has a protect effect against heart disease, preventing the progression of atherosclerosis. Researchers note that it is not until women reach menopause at age 50 to 55 that they start catching up to men.

 

While this study proves to be great news for women, the study authors note that in order for dental care to have a protective effect, it should be done early in the development of cardiovascular disease. Don’t wait until tomorrow to practice healthy dental care habits! Be proactive in taking care of your teeth through daily brushing and flossing. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2010/article/ADA-10-Dental-Visits-Reduce-Heart-Risks-in-Women.cvsp

 

http://newscenter.berkeley.edu/2010/09/30/dental/

 

 

 

Can Having Asthma Give You More Cavities?

October 4th, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video on Asthma and Dry Mouth

Tooth decay and asthma are two of the most common health problems that plaque children, adolescents, and many young adults. Asthma stands to affect 20 million Americans, 6.3 million of which are children. There has been research detailing a possible link between these two seemingly different health issues. The a dental hygienist and researcher out of Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg looked at patients of varying age ranges, consisting of 3, 6, 12 to 16 and 18 to 24 year olds. Her results demonstrated that 3-year olds with asthma were more prone to cavities than 3-year olds without respiratory issues. When looking at patients in older age ranges, the children and young adults with asthma developed more cavities and even more gum disease than their asthma-free counterparts. Within the asthma group, only 1 out of 20 patients was caries-free, while 13 out of 20 patients were caries free in the asthma-free group.

 

A possible theory that has been posed of this correlation hints at asthma medications being the culprit to the increase in cavities. Because these inhaler formulas are often comprise of powders, they live a dry residue that sticks to teeth. These medications may inhibit the production of saliva, which would lead to an individual getting more cavities. Not only do these medications limit saliva secretion, these drugs, including inhalers, syrups, and even sugar-coated steroids, are taken throughout the day, leaving users’ teeth exposed to a lot of sugar. Children with asthma also have more of a tendency to breathe through their mouth. This would then lead to the case of dry mouth, which would have also contributed to the higher cavities prevalence.

 

Patients should be in communications with dentists about the medication they use and their oral hygiene habits. It is important for dentists to know enough to effectively help keep cavities at bay. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2011/article/ADA-08-Youngsters-with-asthma-have-higher-risk-of-cavities.cvsp

 

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2004-05-30/features/0405300364_1_inhalers-asthma-drugs-decay

 

 

 

 

http://madisonkidsdentist.com/ for pic credit

Fighting Tooth Decay with Licorice!

October 2nd, 2013

Herb Licorice or Liquorice Roots

Licorice is often thought of as a nice, sweet treat, usually found as a main ingredient in candies, but who would of thought that it would keep teeth and gums healthy?

The Journal of Natural Products published a study done by Dr. Stefan Gafner, a researcher for a division of Colgate-Palmolive found two compounds present in dried licorice that were beneficial as antibacterial substances, preventing the growth of major bacteria that have been linked to cavities and periodontal disease. The study demonstrated that licroicidin and licorisoflavan A, which are two main components to licorice, prevented bacteria from introducing tooth decay.

 

Nowadays licorice root has been implemented into many oral health care products, including being used as a breath freshening ingredient in some natural toothpastes. Researchers have also delved in to the possibility of adding licorice root in various food products to cut down on tooth decay. A researcher, Dr. Wenyuan Shi, from University of California, Los Angeles have been working with Alaska Native and American Indian children, a group of individuals that are at high risk of early childhood caries. His research showed positive results, demonstrating that when licorice plant extract was added to lollipops, there was a reduction in the amount of caries found in children.

 

Aside from its contribution to oral health, the health benefits of licorice roots have been known for quite some time. It is a main component in Chinese traditional medicine and is often used in conjunction with other herbs to enhance their effectiveness. Outside of the US, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) showed that licorice roots have also been used to counteract the adverse effects of Hepatitis C.  Dried licorice root is also often used to relieve sore throats, digestive and respiratory problems.

 

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2012/article/ADA-01-Licorice-root-fights-oral-bacteria.cvsp

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20120105/licorice-root-may-cut-cavities-gum-disease

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120104115106.htm

 

http://www.methowvalleyherbs.com/2013/04/brush-your-teeth-with-roots.html

 

 

 

Keeping Cavities Away: Protecting a Child’s Oral Health

September 20th, 2013

After making it to the dentist’s for your child’s biannual checkup, the dentist reveals that a cavity has been spotted. Don’t panic! It is important to monitor and keep up with a child’s oral health, it is definitely something that can occur. However, it is now a great way to brush up on tips to prevent future cavities from forming, which is especially important for children who have permanent teeth coming in.

One of the most effective ways to get a child on board with good oral health is to demonstrate it as a parent. If will make a world of a different if tooth brushing is done together. Emphasizing the steps of brushing, including holding the toothbrush, squeezing out a pea-sized amount of toothpaste, and even brushing the gum line can allow children to carefully learn the process in its entirety. Don’t be forgetting to floss! It is easy to forgo the floss and head straight to bed, but make take it a daily habit, making sure that the child understands that oral health should be a part of everyday life, and it should not be something to do only when it is remembered.

Because tooth brushing may start out seeming rather mundane to children, making the process fun can encourage them to maintain good oral health. Allowing a child to pick a colorful and fun toothbrush may just keep them excited about brushing teeth. Try to obtain child-friendly flossers that make flossing less of an ordeal and yummy tasting toothpaste to help them brush longer. If a child loses track of how long the should be brushing for, invest in an electric toothbrush with a self-timer; there are great brushes that beeps every 30 seconds, allowing the brusher to cover the four quadrants in the mouth in 2 minutes!

For course, it is just as important to keep track of what a child is eating. Cavities may easily arise when improper oral hygiene is coupled with a sugary diet. Try to limit children’s sugar intake and, instead, load their plate with foods from each food group. Look for healthy snacks that can add to their vitamin and mineral intake. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/January/article/SW-281474979047288.cvsp

 

http://www.orajel.com/articles/9-ways-to-make-brushing-fun.aspx

 

http://www.parenting.com/article/ask-dr-sears-toothbrushing-resistance

 

http://www.meetadentist.com/dentalcare/dental-care-for-children/

Eating Disorders and Their Effect On Oral Health

September 18th, 2013

Eating disorders continue to be a pressing issue in our nation. According to the National Association of Anorexia Nervosa and Associated Disorders (ANAD), up to 24 million people of all ages and gender suffer from an eating disorder (anorexia, bulimia, and binge eating disorder) in the U.S. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) explains that eating disorders usually involved extreme attitudes and emotions towards weight and food issues. This disorder can ultimately have a grave impact on health, productivity and relationships. While most people know that eating disorders affect the individuals’ body, including their bones as well as their heart, these disorders also have detrimental consequences on teeth.

 

Without sufficient nutrition, gums and other soft tissue that are in the mouth may have a greater tendency to bleed. The glands that are responsible for the production of saliva may become inflamed, leading to chronic dry mouth. The American Dental Association (ADA) notes that tooth surfaces are in danger during the course of the disease when people decide to clear the contents of their stomach through their mouth. The teeth are then exposed to harsh gastric acids that can wear down teeth, leaving them thin and translucent. Teeth will become brittle and will be more susceptible to chipping.

 

The ADA also provides some treatment options to ease oral health consequences of eating disorders. Patients who purge by vomiting are advised to rinse with baking soda to neutralize the harmful effects of stomach acid. Patients should also be assessed in terms of their oral health, with treatment options including additional fluoride modalities. What is most important is that family and friends help set good examples of healthy eating habits and offer positive encouragement should surround the individuals suffering from eating disorders. Please feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.anad.org/get-information/about-eating-disorders/eating-disorders-statistics/

 

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/anorexia-nervosa/features/anorexia-body-neglected

 

http://www.ada.org/2582.aspx?currentTab=2

 

https://www.unitedconcordia.com/dental-insurance/dental/age-groups/kids-teens/eating-disorders/

 

 

New Crooked Teeth Fad Can Lead to Oral Health Issues

September 17th, 2013

In the American culture, having straight teeth tends to be something that is coveted. People go to the orthodontists’ off, patiently waiting on the day when they can finally ditch the braces and have in place of beautiful teeth. Many see crooked teeth as embarrassing or even imperfections that they need to hide. In other parts of the country, this mindset is completely swapped.  There is a new trend in Japan that has started with women embracing and actually desiring a crooked smile. They believe that the “snaggletooth” look is considered cute and endearing. There are now many dental clinics in Japan offering the “multilayered” or “double” tooth, a look to accent crowded molars and canines that have been pushed forward. These crooked teeth can be temporarily or even permanently glued on teeth. Dentists in Japan believe that this look will be trending in their country for a while, and wonder if this fad will be brought overseas.

 

While Americans strive to have a straight set of pearly whites, there is strong reason to get braces for oral health reasons. When individuals have teeth that are misaligned, they are more susceptible to food, and eventually plaque, buildup in between teeth. Plaque then leads to a greater risk of periodontal disease and gingivitis. Improper bite also can lead to improper chewing, which has been shown to lead to gastrointestinal problems.

 

It may seem like the “snaggletooth” look is here to stay in Japan for a while, but individuals getting this fix should be aware of the possible oral health consequences. While braces can lead to straighter and more beautiful smiles, it is important to take note of the healthy benefits that straight pearly white reap. Please feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

 

http://www.japantoday.com/category/lifestyle/view/why-japanese-women-go-for-fake-crooked-teeth

 

http://shine.yahoo.com/beauty/japanese-snaggletooth-craze-spawns-dental-procedures-girl-group-194500258.html

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/straight-talk-about-braces-for-adults

 

http://geekologie.com/2011/10/all-the-rage-japanese-girls-get-dental-p.php

 

 

 

 

 

 

Finding the Bacterial Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gum Disease

September 16th, 2013

Over the years, researchers have been able to demonstrate the importance of oral health in relation to systemic, or overall, health. Keeping up with oral hygiene has been shown to not only affect the oral cavity, but also various areas in the body. Oral health has been linked to the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and various other conditions. Researchers have been well aware of the strong association between oral health and these health conditions, but continue to look into the root cause and mechanisms that result in these links.

 

However, a research group at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry Oral Health and Systemic Diseases recently published their findings in PloS Pathogens, revealing the bacterium that is responsible for periodontal disease.  They found that the bacterium, Prophromonas gingivalis, leads to a faster progression of gum disease, increasing cartilage and bone destruction. Their research indicated that P. gingivalis produces an enzyme, peptidylarginine deiminanse (PAD), which increases collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). This enzyme makes the body believe that there are intruding proteins within the body, inducing an immune attack. This results in chronic inflammation, which accounts for the weakening of bone and cartilage within the joints.

 

This research group was able to show that there is a viable link between P. gingivalis periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis; however, more research needs to be done to verify these finds. Hopefully further research can bring about new strategies to prevent RA. These studies also should encourage individuals to maintain good oral hygiene. It is always important to keep in mind that brushing and flossing not only keeps the mouth clean, but also keeps the entire body healthy. Please feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130912203327.htm

http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/how-bad-gums-lead-to-arthritis/81248849/

http://arthritisbroadcastnetwork.org/2013/09/gum-disease-may-be-an-indication-of-rheumatoid-arthritis/

 

 

 

Can School Milk Battle Tooth Decay?

September 10th, 2013

In recent news, a school in Blackpool, England had found a staggering level of tooth decay among the children living in the area. The dental health of children in this town have been found to be the worst in the country, with more than 1 in 3 five year olds with at least one tooth with a degree of decay. By the time the children reach the age of 12, the percent of unhealthy teeth reach to 43%.

 

With this overwhelming amount of tooth decay found in schoolchildren, health chiefs have been working on implementing a new plan to bring down the level of decay. This project consists introducing milk fortified with fluoride in the 77 primary schools in Blackpool. Blackpool also happens to be one of the few towns that do not have fluoride in its water; milk fortified with fluoride is considered the next best option after fluoride in water. Dentists in town fully support the idea, believing that it is a step in the right direction to stop the rising level of tooth decay found in the children.

 

Fluoride is a mineral that how shown to work wonders for teeth. On a daily basis, minerals are continuously lost and added to a tooth’s enamel layer via demineralization and remineralization, respectively. Demineralization occurs when acids from bacteria in the mouth attack the enamel. Fluoride, along with calcium and phosphate, are minerals are crucial for the remineralization of teeth. When there is too much demineralization without adequate remineralization, the tooth is then susceptible to tooth decay. Fluoride helps combat tooth decay by strengthening the tooth, making it more resistant to plaque bacteria and sugars that are consumed. Aside from consuming fluoride through water or milk, there are other methods of receiving fluoride. Dentists can apply a fluoride gel, foam, or varnish on the teeth to prevent decay. At your next hygiene visit please ask specifically for a fluoride application. Not only can kids benefit from this  Fluoride supplements in liquid or tablet form are also viable options, but must be prescribed by your dentist, pediatrician or family doctor.

 

For more tips for caring about your smile go here.

Keep Your Kids Cavity Free!

Check Your Local Town Website for the Fluoride Content in Tap Water. Here is Wellesley's!

Please feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/news/education/flouride-plan-for-school-milk-to-target-decay-1-5961467

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/fluoride-treatment

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20001010/is-fluoride-good-for-teeth-bones

 

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=D&iid=303&aid=7363

 

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=%20&iid=295&aid=4236

Link Found Between Poor Oral Health and HPV

September 9th, 2013

There has been a recent studying showing a relationship between poor oral health and the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that has been shown to cause cancer of the cervix, mouth and throat. Cancer Prevention Research has been the first group to document this link. While this association has been made, it is still too early to say that flossing and brushing on a regular basis can prevent oral HPV infection.

 

Research done at the University of Texas health Science Center have looked over data on both low-risk and high-risk oral HPV infection and health in 3,439 adults between the ages of 30 and 69. The original study found that males who smoke cigarettes and having multiple oral sex partners have an increased risk of developing oral HPV infection. Researchers then controlled for smoking and the number of oral sex partners and found that self-rated poor oral health was an independent risk for this oral infection. It was shown that those with poor oral health were 56% more likely to contract the oral HPV infection, compared to those with fair oral health. It was also found that gum disease was linked to a 51% higher oral HPV risk and general dental problems were linked with a 28% increased prevalence of this infection. While there still has not been conclusive evidence revealing this, researcher believe that people who lack of good oral health, such as those suffering from ulcers, sores or lesions, and gum inflammation, give way to more openings in the mouth, providing more locations for HPV to enter.

 

Even though there is not enough evidence to decisively show the link between poor oral health and HPV, it never hurts to maintain good oral health. While more research needs to be done in this topic, there have been many more relationships shown, linking oral health to the body’s overall health. Good oral hygiene should become a lifestyle, a personal habit that individuals should hold up to. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/21/study-ties-poor-oral-hygiene-to-cancer-causing-virus/?_r=0

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/21/oral-health-hpv-risk-_n_3790205.html

 

Toothbrushing Mistakes to Know About (Part 2!)

September 6th, 2013

Proper toothbrushing techniques are always a must to maintain good oral health; there are never too many good tips on keeping teeth healthy! Here are a few more common mistakes that individuals tend to make after years of brush; catch these mistakes and your teeth will be sure to thank you!

 

Beginning at the same place, every time.

 

It’s absolutely great to keep up with the systemic habit of brushing teeth on a daily basis, but sometimes it may be healthier and beneficial to switch things up for a change. Many people are prone to begin brushing in the same place in the mouth and areas that areas that are covered later on in the routine tend to get less attention, becoming more cavity-friendly. A great way to remember to give your undivided attention to all areas in the mouth is to divide the oral cavity into four sections. When it comes time for brushing, pick a different starting quadrant each time and make your way through all 4!

 

Not brushing the right way.

 

While toothbrushing is often thought of as a simple task, dentists have found that individuals don’t seem to know the correct way to brush teeth! A common mistake that people tend to make is to make long, horizontal strokes across teeth; it seems like the most holistic way to get all the teeth. However, this brushing technique tends to be harsh and quite abrasive to the gumline. The best technique is to brush in short stroke down (not across!) teeth. These strokes can be either vertical or circular, have your pick!

 

Forgetting to brush the inner tooth surfaces.

 

Many people tend to place their attention on tooth surfaces that are actually facing outside, neglecting to brush the inside surfaces well. While it’s great keeping the outside surface white and bright, it is just as important to keep the inner surface of teeth from developing cavities. Dentists say that the inner surfaces of the lower front teeth are the most commonly skipped area. Make it a goal to keep that area cavity-free!

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/brushing-teeth-mistakes?page=2

 

http://www.webmd.boots.com/oral-health/guide/brushing-teeth-mistakes

 

http://healthmagazine.ae/10-tooth-brushing-mistakes/

 

Expecting Mothers: Maintain Good Oral Health for the Sake of Your Baby!

September 5th, 2013

Entering pregnancy can be a truly exciting season, with the growing anticipation of a new baby and the joys that he or she will bring. Soon-to-be mothers know that it is crucial to maintain a healthy lifestyle for herself and the baby that is on the way. However, many tend to underestimate how essential good oral health can be. A study published in Public Health Report examined the prevalence of dental care during pregnancy and found that 65% women in the state of California did not go to the dentist during pregnancy.  While 52% of these women reported to have dental problems prenatally, 62% of those women still did not go in to receive proper dental care. It is just as important to keep up with good oral health during pregnancy.

 

The American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) and the European Federation of Periodontology (EFP) recently set out new clinical recommendations, highlighting the importance of maintaining good periodontal health. Periodontal disease, also known as gum disease, is a chronic condition where bacteria have attacked the gum tissues and even bone supporting teeth. When nothing is done to alleviate this disease, individuals may end up with tooth loss and even other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Dentists recommend that individuals look out for signs of periodontal disease, including tenderness, swollen gums, and redness. Other symptoms include gums that tend to bleed during eat or brushing, gums that are pulling away from teeth, loose teeth, and halitosis. Many women see these warning signs but choose to ignore them, thinking that this disease would have no effect on their babies. Several studies have indicated that women with periodontal disease may be more likely to give premature births or have babies with low birth weight than mothers with healthy gums. The Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have stated that babies with weighing less than 5.5 pounds may be at risk of delayed motor skills, learning disabilities, and other long-term health problems. The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recently stated that pregnant women should go in for regular dental cleanings during pregnancy.

 

It is always important to maintain good oral health, regardless of what life stage you are in. Dentists continue to stress good oral hygiene and routine brushing and flossing. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2966664/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/08/130828092310.htm

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-at-Any-Age/Adults/Oral-Health-and-Pregnancy/article/Pregnancy-Oral-Health-and-Your-Baby.cvsp

 

 

 

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