centers for disease control and prevention

Take a Deep Breath: Vaping Effects On Your Lungs

October 20th, 2019

Many of us have been following the devastating news of young adult deaths related to vaping across the country. Vaping has recently become an epidemic and major public health issue. With Respiratory Care Week beginning today, October 20th-26th, and  Healthy Lung Month the entire month of October, we would like to highlight all of the necessary information needed to keep our lungs breathing well to last us an entire lifetime!

The statistics on lung disease are disheartening, with greater than 35 million Americans living with a chronic lung disease such as asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Not to mention, lung cancer is the #1 cause of death related to cancer for both women and men in the U.S. Many lung diseases have been a result of cigarette smoking. Cigarette use has decreased in comparison to the past, however the rise of e-cigarettes/vaping has drastically made its way into society, particularly with young adults. The use of e-cigarettes has been reported by approximately 20% of high school students in the U.S. within the last month. Surprisingly even 5% of middle school students in the U.S. have reported using e-cigarettes within the last month. In Massachusetts, the numbers are even higher: 40% of high school students and 10% of middle school students have used e-cigarettes within the past month. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 1000 people have become affected with respiratory issues as a result of vaping. As of today, the CDC reports that there have been 33 deaths in 24 states.

The use of e-cigarettes not only damages lungs and brain development, but also one’s oral health, and it is important to our caring team here at WDG to keep you in the loop and ensure your safety and health. Sadly, vaping has been marketed as a “healthy” alternative to smoking tobacco cigarettes. With research still ongoing, vaping can contain the addictive substance nicotine, and chemical particles within the vapor, including volatile organic compounds, flavoring agents, cancer-causing chemicals, and heavy metals which can all negatively impact your health. Plus, e-cigarettes can cause dry mouth, gum inflammation, and increase the amount of cavity-causing bacteria. Long-term effects of vaping are still being researched.

It is important to spread the word about the dangers of vaping and provide individuals who are vaping with the information and resources needed to quit, which can be found below:

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://nationaltoday.com/respiratory-care-week/

https://www.lung.org/about-us/mission-impact-and-history/our-impact.html

http://www.deltadentalma.com/The-Brush-Up/Blog/What-Dentists-Need-to-Know-About-the-Teen-Vaping-E

3224569-QOBYFJXD-32.jpg

vape-04.jpg

Vaping: A Public Health Emergency

September 28th, 2019

You may have heard about the recent devastating health crisis in young adults: electronic cigarettes (e-cigarette) and vaping products causing severe lung disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and state health departments, are looking into the link between e-cigarette products and lung disease. As of September 24, 2019, Governor of Massachusetts, Charles D. Baker, declared a public health emergency on this issue and initiated a temporary four-month statewide ban on the sale of vaping products, including tobacco and marijuana, in stores and online until January 25, 2020. The latest news reports 805 cases of lung damage from 46 states in America, with 12 current deaths. According to the CDC, 67% of cases are aged 18 to 34 years old, 38% are under the age of 21 years old, 17 % are over 35 years old, and 16% are under the age of 18. A majority of the individuals reported using e-cigarette products with THC and nicotine. The direct cause of the lung problems is still being investigated.

E-cigarette use is also known as vaping, and works by warming up a liquid which becomes inhaled into the lungs. E-cigarettes have become increasingly advertised over the past few years. So much so that Juul, an electronic cigarette company, increased their sales by almost 800% from 2017 to 2018. Sadly, they have been marketed as “safer” alternatives to cigarette smoking, although in reality they carry many of the same risks as well as new risks.The inhaled liquids are often made up of nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, along with other substances. Each product, however, may contain a variation of other ingredients and concentrations, which may be toxic to the body.

Both cigarettes and vaping products are not only damaging for your lungs and body, but also are not good for your oral health. Nicotine has been found to prevent healthy blood flow within the gums, which can increase your risk of developing gingivitis and periodontitis. In addition, one of the ingredients found in vaping products, propylene glycol, has been found to cause dry mouth. Dry mouth plays a detrimental role in oral health because it can lead to tooth decay and oral thrush. Not to mention, e-cigarettes can contribute to DNA damage and result in oral cancer.

For your health and safety, avoid smoking all e-cigarettes/vaping products and use of tobacco cigarettes. The Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program offers information and resources that can help individuals quit. Massachusetts also partners with national resources for teens interested in quitting smoking or vaping via My Life, My QuitTM and This is Quitting powered by Truth® program.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.foxnews.com/health/vaping-harming-teeth-study

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/severe-lung-disease.html

https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/marijuana/2019/09/24/governor-baker-make-vaping-announcement-amid-spate-lung-illnesses/o8sO6mf3GOmX4mOpLLtcEL/story.html

https://www.mass.gov/guides/vaping-public-health-emergency#-information-for-providers-

vaping-1.jpg

man-holding-a-vape-pen-and-cigarettes.jpg

The Hard Hitting Truth: Play Safe!

April 15th, 2019

As the sun begins to peak through the clouds and warmer weather approaches, it is a concern for many parents to protect their little ones from injuries as they gear up for outdoor activities this spring. In fact, this time of the year numerous patients suffer with head, mouth, and facial injuries because of sports accidents. Did you know, according to research published in the Journal of American Dental Association, teeth injured from a traumatic accident may never completely heal? This could result in extra dental treatment costs and long-term problems within the oral cavity. Luckily, with the right equipment and information, these accidents can be prevented and your smile can remain safe and sound! Each April, National Facial Protection Month, sponsored by the Academy for Sports DentistryAmerican Academy of Pediatric DentistryAmerican Academy of PediatricsAmerican Dental AssociationAmerican Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons and the American Association of Orthodontists, reminds us to play hard, smart, and safe by taking the necessary safety measures to prevent sports-related accidents.

Prevention is key, take a look at how you can protect your pearly whites, and what you need to do if an accident does occur:

Approximately 80 percent of dental trauma occurs on the upper two front teeth. Unfortunately, mouthguard use in sports is very low, with about 67% of parents reporting that their child does not use a mouthguard. In addition, 27% of the same surveyed parents reported that their child had an emergency room visit due to a sports-related accident.

Baseball, soccer, basketball and football make up a good majority (80%) of sports-related emergency room visits for kids aged between 5 and 14, as reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. However, facial injuries can occur at any age and regardless of the sport!

Mouthguards are known to protect your face, and lower the risk of broken teeth and damage to the lips, tongue, jaw, and surrounding structures of the face. Your teeth are at a 60% higher risk of being damaged when a mouthguard is not worn for protection. Therefore, make sure that all who participate in sports or recreational activities own and wear a fitted mouthguard.

Take a look at the different types of mouthguards available:

Custom-made Mouthguard:

A custom-made mouthguard is made by the dentist to the exact fit of your mouth. As a result, it provides the most protection and comfort, but is typically more expensive than the store-bought mouthguards. It covers all of the surfaces of the teeth and cushions the jaw.

Boil and Bite Mouthguard:

Boil-and-Bite mouthguards are placed in boiling water and then placed on the teeth to form the exact shape. It can be found at sports stores and other department stores. It is, however, less comfortable than the custom-made mouthguard and often wears down quicker and needs to be replaced often.

Commercial Mouthguard:

Found at several department stores, commercial mouthguards are the least expensive, but is the least effective because it cannot be shaped to the exact fit of your mouth. It is made out of rubber or polyvinyl and comes in generic small, medium, and large sizes.

Be sure to keep your mouthguard clean by rinsing and brushing it to remove any bacteria build up on the mouth guard.

If you or your child happen to be injured in the mouth, here's what you need to know:

Fractured/Broken tooth

  • If your tooth chips or falls out and you can find the broken piece, store it immediately preferably in Hanks Balanced Salt Solution, or in milk, or water. You can also try to gently push an extruded tooth back into the socket after carefully rinsing. See your dentist immediately within 1 hour because time is critical if it can be placed back in position. When handling the tooth only hold it by the crown and not at the root.

Facial cuts

  • Cover the wound with a clean dressing and apply pressure. Visit an emergency room if wounds are severe.

Cuts within the mouth

  • Rinse the mouth gently with cold water and apply pressure to cut with gauze. Immediately seek emergency care to evaluate for jaw injury. If you notice swelling, apply ice. Also, stick to soft food diet. Seek dental care or medical attention if to improvement occurs after a day.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

Secondhand Smoke Is No Joke To Oral Health

May 29th, 2015

As you may have heard before, "secondhand smoke kills." It sure does. Nearly 54,000 people die each year from secondhand smoke. A combined total of more than 480,000 deaths a year are caused from smoking and secondhand smoke. It can sometimes be easy to forget that even non-smokers are in danger of health problems as a result of cigarette smoke. Not to mention, children are at a high risk of developing several chronic diseases and health issues because of secondhand smoke.

There are many reasons to avoid smoking, and in this article, we'll offer you yet another reason. Believe it or not, secondhand smoke can negatively impact your oral health. Although more research is needed in the area, it is believed that children are at risk of developing tooth decay from secondhand smoke.

15 studies were conducted and reviewed in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health by researchers in Japan about the possible correlation between secondhand smoke and the development of cavities in children. The studies reported weak to moderate evidence that secondhand smoke causes cavities in primary teeth, yet, more information is needed to make a conclusive argument.

Further, Researchers now have concluded that smoking is one of the causes of periodontal disease because tobacco can damage gums and leave teeth susceptible to infection. This makes smokers more at risk for developing periodontal disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 47% of adults have either mild, moderate or severe periodontitis in the United States. The early stages of periodontal disease is gingivitis, which can eventually lead to periodontitis if untreated.

In a recent study funded by the National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, researchers investigated the link between serum cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, and periodontitis in U.S. non-smokers. The study found that non-smokers exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) had 1.45 times the odds of moderate/severe periodontitis as unexposed non-smokers.

In addition, smokers and non-smokers exposed to secondhand smoke are more prone to significant amounts of oral bone loss. For example, research in the Journal of Periodontology showed the correlation between secondhand smoke and oral bone loss in rats. The study concluded that rats with periodontitis that were exposed to secondhand smoke were at greater risk of experiencing oral bone loss and ultimately tooth loss.

Along with serious oral issues, secondhand smoke has caused oral cancer, breast cancer, middle ear infections in children, pregnancy problems, asthma, lung disease, heart disease, among many other health problems.

If you are a smoker, quitting is the best option to keep yourself and those around you healthy. Whether being exposed in homes, cars, offices, or other public places, secondhand smoke is severely detrimental to oral and overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.no-smoke.org/getthefacts.php?id=13

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/secondhand-smoke-and-cavities

http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/tobacco_related_mortality/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150313083627.htm

http://helpforsmoking.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/SecondHandSmoke-43321674.jpg

Are toothbrushes actually clean?

July 29th, 2013

Researchers at England’s University of Manchester have looked into the various kinds of germs found in bacteria, and they found that toothbrushes are crawling with them! They discovered that a toothbrush could harbor more than 100 million bacteria, with the likes of diarrhea-causing E. coli and skin-infecting staphylococci bacteria. This may sound completely unsanitary, but wait! The mouth isn't the cleanest place to begin with. There are hundreds of microorganisms in the mouth on a daily basis. Medical professionals note that this is perfectly normal and it is not something to sweat over. But what individuals need to worry about is when there is an unhealthy balance of bacteria in the mouth. Many people forget that the plaque that develops inside the mouth (if proper brushing is not taking place) is, in fact, bacteria. Toothbrushes are continuously introduced to bacteria every time it is placed into the mouth.

 

So if there are constantly bacteria on toothbrushes, can they make people sick? Researchers think that it’s not likely. Considering there are already bacteria in the mouth, the body’s natural defenses make it difficult for an infection to occur just from brushing teeth. However, one should not take the body’s ability to defend itself for granted. There are still ways to keep fewer bacteria from entering the mouth. In many homes the bathroom sink is in close vicinity to the toilet. But that should not be the excuse for placing toothbrushes near where flushing occurs! Every time the toilet flushes, it sends sprays of bacteria into the air. Try to place toothbrushes as far as possible from the toilet, giving bacteria less of a chance in getting into the mouth.

 

Bacteria love moist environments and it is important that the brush dries through and through between each brushing. Try to avoid covers that enclose the brush, which would leave the toothbrush moist and bacteria-friendly. It is also a good idea to keep the toothbrush upright in a holder, instead of lying it down. Also, no matter how clean your sister or any of your other members of your family, don’t ever use each other’s brushes. Don’t even place toothbrushes in the same cup! Whenever toothbrushes come in contact with each other, they can easily exchange bacteria.

We recommend that you replace your toothbrush every season(3 months) to help prevent bacterial growth and to maintain oral hygiene.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/the-ugly-truth-about-your-toothbrush

 

http://www.ada.org/1887.aspx

 

3 Tips On Keeping Your Breath Fresh!

July 26th, 2013

Are you worried about the prospect of having breath? Don’t worry you’re not alone; according to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association, there are 40 millions Americans that suffer from bad breath. However, it doesn't need to be this way! Here are a few ideas on how to go about your day without worrying about halitosis.

1. Keep up with brushing and flossing

After a big meal, people are bound to have food caught in between the many crevices of their mouths. Food that has been left behind can break down, resulting in sticky build-up known as plaque. To keep this plaque build-up from happening, try brushing and flossing after meals, which can keep the mouth clean and breath fresh.

 

2. Don’t forget the tongue!
After brushing and flossing at night, many people just turn off the bathroom lights and hit the hay. But wait; the tongue can harbor tons of bad-smelling bacteria! Without proper maintenance, a white layer can form on the tongue. People tend to find toothbrushes to big to reach to back end of the tongue without causing discomfort. Dentists suggest using tongue scrapers, which can easily maneuver the tongue, getting rid of bacteria, leftover food, and even dead cells that brushing can’t take away.

3. Pass on the onions and garlic
Although they are undeniably great additions to a great sandwich, these two food ingredients are infamous bad-breath causers. Unfortunately, brushing after consuming garlic and onions does not do the trick; substances within these foods actually travel down the blood stream and into the lungs, where they constantly get breathed out. If you know fresh breath is necessary for a certain social meeting, save onions and garlic for another time!

 

These are simple tips to keep in mind, but they do go a long way. Always maintain good oral health and soon enough, you’ll be able to say goodbye to bad breath! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/get-rid-bad-breath

http://www.uihealthcare.org/Adam/?/HIE%20Multimedia/1/003058

Tips to Conquer Dental Fear!

July 25th, 2013

Let’s be honest: many people tend to be scared or nervous before a visit to the dentist’s office. Dental phobia is something that people continually cope with; however, it doesn’t always have to be this way! Here are a few tips on how to beat dental fear.

 

Look for a dentist that you feel most comfortable working with. There are many dentists out there with different personalities, and finding one that suits an individual can be key in feeling less anxious and nervous during an appointment. Dentists are willing to work through fears and are happy to go slow if need be.

 

Ask the dentist to go through the procedure beforehand. Having a dentist go through the steps can allow individuals to prepare for what is to come. Patients always have the right to know what kind of work their dentist will be doing on them.

 

Don’t be afraid to let the dentist know when the procedure is uncomfortable. Patients are able to establish “stop” signals with dentists. This allows the patient to take breaks when needed and can allow them to relax before proceeding.

 

Breathing exercises are also a great way to calm the nerves and prepare for a dental procedure. Here are six breathing exercises (hyperlink six breathing exercises and use: http://healthland.time.com/2012/10/08/6-breathing-exercises-to-relax-in-10-minutes-or-less/ ) that can bring about relaxation. Turning up your favorite music can also help turn down the anxiety. When sitting in the waiting room, pop in your earphones and listen to calming music or even music that you love. There are also dental offices that have TV monitors in the exam rooms. This is also a great way to take your mind off of the fear and anxiety and to tune into a great show.

 

There are medications that allow patients to relax. Dentists recommend nitration oxide, anti-anxiety medicine or sedation for patients who can become extremely nervous during an appointment. If you believe that medication can help cope with a dental visit, find a dentist that can cater to your needs.

 

Here at the Wellesley Dental Group, we need to make our patients feel as comfortable as possible. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://psychcentral.com/library/phobia_dentist.htm

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/dental-fear-our-readers-suggest-coping-techniques-20100825327

http://healthland.time.com/2012/10/08/6-breathing-exercises-to-relax-in-10-minutes-or-less/

READ MORE HERE!!!

http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=1981

http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=600

Healthy Lifestyle = Good Oral Health!

July 9th, 2013

A study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the German Institute of Human Nutrition reported that adult men and women who never smoked, kept a healthy diet, maintained physical activity, and had a body mass index (BMI) under 30 were 78% less likely to develop chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and stroke. Those who stuck it out with only one of these four healthy lifestyle factors lowered their chronic disease risk by almost 50%, and risk levels decreased as individuals adapted more of these healthy behaviors.

So how does this connect to dentistry and oral health? Well, when looking these healthy factors from the flip side, poor eating habits, tobacco use, and excess body weight have strong correlations with oral health, especially periodontal disease, along with other health conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The participants in the study ranged from ages 35-65 and at the start of the study, each individual’s weight and height were measured. Participant’s health history, physical activity and eating habits were also recorded. They were tracked for almost 8 years and their health was tracked throughout that time. Out of the participants that actively exhibited all four healthy behaviors, they had a 93% reduced risk for diabetes, 81% reduced risk for heart disease, 50% reduced risk for stroke, and 36% reduced risk for cancer.

Dentists continue to back up the importance of eating healthy, getting enough physical activity, and limiting tobacco use. Dental research continues to document oral health benefits that come with tobacco cessation, leading a healthy diet, and maintaining a healthy weight. Dentists continue to push for less frequent exposure to soft drinks and beverages with a high sugar content, which can lead to both tooth decay and an unhealthy increase in body mass index.

Remember: monitoring what you eat not only benefits your oral health but also benefit your overall body. Continue to be mindful of how much you exercise and what you decide to put in your mouth. Your teeth and your entire body will thank you! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ada.org/3127.aspx
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1108507

Request an
Appointment

patient
forms

read
our blog

Top