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Consuming Cheese Can Prevent Cavities

January 20th, 2014

Happy National Cheese Lover's Day!

Dairy has been long known to be packed with a great amount of calcium, protein, and vitamin D in every serving. It has always been said that drinking milk and other dairy products will keep bones healthy and strong, but there has not been much research done on how beneficial dairy products are to oral health until recently. General Dentistry just published in their most recent journal issue that cheese and other dairy products have the potential of keeping cavities at bay.

Researchers that conducted the study looked at 68 participants between the ages of 12 and 15. The subjects had their dental plaque pH checked before eating cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. Previous studies indicate that a pH level below 5.5 makes an individual more susceptible to the wearing down of enamel, resulting in tooth erosion. The higher the pH level, the lower the chance an individual has of getting cavities.

The subjects were randomly split into three groups: one that ate cheddar cheese, another that drank milk, and a final group that ate sugar-free yogurt. After eating their chosen type of dairy for 3 minutes, the subjects were asked to rinse their mouth with water. The pH level of each subject’s mouth was then measured 10, 20, and 30 minutes the dairy product was consumed. The researchers found that the individuals who drank milk and ate sugar-free yogurt did not have a significant change in pH level; however, those who ate cheese showed a great increase in pH levels after each time interval, indicating that this particular dairy product may be the key to preventing cavities. The results suggest that because there is more of a need to chew when consuming cheese, there is an increase in saliva production, which also leads to an increase of pH levels. The researchers also found compounds inherent in cheese binds to tooth enamel, preventing acid from causing further damage.

This new finding gives us more of a reason to add a slice of cheese to a sandwich. Continue to make sure daily that your diet increases and strengthens oral health!

If you have any questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605130118.htm

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/6-reasons-to-get-your-diary

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57587876/cheesy-grins-may-protect-teeth-from-cavities/

Picture Credit: http://dailym.ai/17rk9ET

Local recommendation: Wasik Cheeseshop 

Mouth Sores: How to Differentiate and Alleviate

July 10th, 2013

As you are getting dressed for a night out, you notice a tingling sensation near your lips. One glance in the mirror reveals an unsightly sore forming. Is it a cold sore or a canker sore?

Canker sores also occur in the mouth, but unlike cold sores, they are not contagious. But canker sores can also be triggered by stress, genetics, trauma, medications, menstruation, food allergies, or even unrelated medical problems. To treat canker sores, one can acquire over-the-counter oral anesthetics. With a visit to a dentist, a treatment plan can be instigated for more serious outbreaks.

Cold sores are usually found to be small, clear fluid-filled blisters that form near the mouth, which are caused by herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1). These blisters usually do not show up on the lips, instead, they are found inside the mouth, on the face, or even inside the nose. In most cases, these sores do not last for more than two weeks; however one should be cautious. Sores are very contagious and are prone to come back due to stress, sunlight, fever, or illness. With the onset of a cold sore, one can apply ice cubes to the sores to help relieve pain. Cold sores can be treated with topical medication, which can prevent the sore from becoming more severe. Antiviral medication can also be used for serious cases.

Academy of General Dentistry ran clinical studies that revealed that students that are surrounded by a high stress environment are more likely to have canker sores or cold sores. It was found that after graduation, when stress levels have come down, sores become less prevalent as well. But sometimes it may be difficult to escape stressful situations. In this case, a natural soothing gel can do the trick. For more than 2,000 years, the aloe vera plant has become a great alternative treatment for a whole host of oral health problems, including sores, lichen planus and gingivitis. The Academy of Dentistry’s clinical, peer-reviewed journal found that the gel from the aloe has the able to cure canker sores and cold sores, both inside and outside of the mouth.

Mouth sores can be a hassle, but there are various treatments to alleviate their symptoms. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://kidshealth.org/teen/your_body/skin_stuff/cold_sores.html
http://kidshealth.org/teen/diseases_conditions/mouth/canker.html
http://www.agd.org/public/OralHealthFacts/files/FS_MouthSores.pdf

Sweet (But-Teeth Friendly) Desserts

June 18th, 2013

It’s summer time! The school year is finally winding down, and we are excited to make are way down to the beach and enjoy some time out in the sun. Summer also brings ice cream, popsicles, cotton candy, and a whole bunch of food that may be delicious, but are also definitely not doing your teeth a favor.

Every grocery store is bound to have a section of an aisle dedicated to frozen desserts, which can range from strawberry ice cream to jolly rancher-flavored popsicles. Your taste buds may think it’s an excellent idea to grab a few on the go, but your teeth will beg to differ. Popsicles tend to have high sugar content, which will leave teeth susceptible to cavities and tooth decay. These frozen sweets also contain artificial coloring dye, which has been shown to contain carcinogens and maybe contribute Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Instead of getting a pack of popsicles from the grocery store, here are some healthy and enjoyable alternatives.

Smoothies: Milk shakes tend to be a summer favorite after a long soccer practice. While they do contain dairy, which is wonderful for teeth, they also contain lots of sugar, which is wonderful for bacteria in the mouth, not so much for teeth. Bacteria love feeding on sugary residue left in the mouth, and definitely won’t hold back when they are offered a ton from milk shakes. Instead of making a trip to the local diner, start the blender and add in some low-fat milk, yogurt, bananas, strawberries, and blueberries. A yummy smoothie will result, chock full of calcium, antioxidants, and vitamins. Homemade smoothies will allow you to control the amount of sugar that goes into the drink, and sweet and healthy fruit will do just the trick! Here’s a quick and easy recipe (link: http://bit.ly/16upE68) that will satisfy sweet-tooths but will keep teeth happy.

Yogurt Pops: Yogurt, cheese, milk and other dairy products are great saliva generators, protecting teeth from tooth decay. Calcium and phosphates found in milk and other dairy products can put minerals back in teeth, making them healthy and stronger. Here’s ( http://bit.ly/112tASF ) a great recipe for these delicious pops that will make the kids wanting more!

Remember: Desserts can be delicious and healthy at the same time; there’s always great foods out there that are also a treat for teeth as well. Here’s to a summer of healthy choices and yummy eats! If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/rachelhennessey/2012/08/27/living-in-color-the-potential-dangers-of-artificial-dyes/

The Importance for Teens to Balance a Fast-Paced Life and Oral Health

June 10th, 2013

Once that alarm starts going off in the morning, teens are on a jam-packed schedule, shuffling through classes, extracurricular activities, and sometimes even part-time jobs. In order to keep up with the pace, teens often make a grab for quick meals in form of carbonated beverages and “nutrition bars” to keep them on edge and alert for all of their obligations; however, this kind of lifestyle may leave teens with permanent damage to oral and overall health.

In a 2003 issue of General Dentistry, studies have shown that teens that constantly indulge in sugary drinks can result in premature loss of tooth enamel and the weakening of overall tooth structure. While research has deemed carbonated beverages and energy drinks detrimental for oral health, these sugary drinks can also affect overall bone growth in teens. Read more here. Adolescence is the known time period of optimal bone growth, when more nutrient-packed calories are necessary to fuel growing bodies and to strengthen teeth and bones. These calories tend to be counteracted when teens continue to take in high-carbohydrate foods, which are instead replacing healthy foods such as milk, vegetables, and fruits.

Reports have shown that these beverages are the main causes of increases cavities and obesity in teens today. Unfortunately, researchers expect obesity to remain a major issue as more pre-school-aged children continue to become more addicted to caffeine and sugar. The various acids found in sodas and energy drinks breakdown tooth enamel around cavity sealants and previously done restorations, which leads to more necessary dental treatment to prevent tooth loss.

Phosphoric acid in many carbonated drinks limits calcium absorption, influencing body density. By age 16, girls have acquired 90-96% of their bone mass, making adequate calcium intake extremely important. However, national statistics indicate that only 19% of girls ages 9-19 are receiving the recommended 1,3000 mg of calcium per day. The lack of calcium intake indubitably affects bone structure of the mouth, which can lead to complications such as periodontal bone loss.

While it is important for teens to work hard and strive to do their best, it is just as essential for them to watch what they consume and maintain a healthy lifestyle. If you have more questions, be sure to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=T&iid=333&aid=1335
http://www.healthywomen.org/condition/oral-health

Pacifiers:Do They Boost or Weaken Your Child’s Health?

June 7th, 2013

Many parents have been taught that sharing utensils or sucking on pacifiers to clean them can help a child build immunity. The journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics has even published a study detailing the immunological benefits of adult saliva. However there has been much debate about whether parents should follow this rule of thumb.

The American Dental Association (ADA) was quick to follow up this study with their respond, explaining that this may not be a good idea. ADA noted that the adult saliva contains a whole host of microorganisms that may be harmful to a child health. The transfer of saliva may end up increasing a baby’s chance of developing tooth decay in the future. Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, who is a spokesperson for the ADA, points to Streptococcus mutans as a bacteria present in adult saliva that my end up doing some serious damage to teeth.

However, there are others that continue to support the American Academy of Pediatrics. While they understand the risks of being more susceptible to bacteria, proponents of adult saliva transfer believe that should not be the main concern at hand. It has been argued that certain adults may not even have these harmful microorganisms present in their oral cavity. What should be priority is parents’ responsibility to provide good oral hygiene for their child. These dentists argue that no matter what, babies will continue to be exposed to different harmful microorganisms, whether it Is from what they consume or touch throughout the day. The key to limiting the progression of child tooth decay is to keep up with proper oral care. Parents need to be reminded of the importance of proper brushing, rinsing, and flossing for their child. Dentists believe that this aspect of oral health takes precedent over staying away from microorganisms that can harm the child.

Our pediatric Dentist, Dr. Pradhan, will more than willing to take care of your child's dental needs. Also, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts, questions,or concerns; they will be happy to answer them! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ada.org/news/8582.aspx

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/04/30/peds.2012-3345

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/260144.php

Five Green Foods That Can Bring About Good Oral Health

June 4th, 2013

Have you been looking to get healthier and searching for how to change up your current diet? Here are a couple green healthy foods that can get you started on spicing up what you eat and also can be beneficial for your oral health!

Green tea: get ready to cut out sugary and carbonated beverages and look into a lighter and calming alternative. While green tea has been proven to reduce the risk of both stroke and oral cancer, it contains catechins, which are a type of antioxidants that also prevents cavities and gingivitis. Green tea also prevents halitosis by hindering bacterial growth. Make sure to read our blog to find out more about green tea health benefits!

Celery: these crunchy greens can help produce saliva, freshening up the mouth while neutralizing bacteria that results in cavities. Celery is also known to stimulate and massage gums during chewing and also cleanses areas between teeth.

Wasabi: the spicy Japanese horseradish not only adds flavor to sushi and sashimi, but can also be front line defense for teeth. What makes wasabi taste hot is a substance known as isothiocyanates, which also prevents the growth of bacteria in the mouth. Eating green paste can keep cavities away!

Parsley: these leaves can add flavor to a variety of dishes but can also help freshen up the mouth after a meal. These greens contain monoterpenes, which are substances that travel through the lungs and bloodstream; their odor ends up being released through one’s breath.

Kiwi: most fruits contain an assortment of vitamins, but kiwis are known to be jam-packed with Vitamin C, which allow maintains the collagen in gums, preventing tenderness and vulnerability to bacteria. Snacking on these sweet green fruits is another way to prevent cavities.

If you have any more questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/26/health/it-works-on-sushi-it-could-help-teeth-too.html

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/getting-your-vitamin-c-from-kiwi-fruit.html#b

Green Tea May Prevent the Onset of Oral Cancer

June 3rd, 2013

Green tea has been shown to a soothing drink that has the ability maintain healthy teeth and gums. Research also reveals that green tea extract can be used as a chemopreventative agent to fight oral cancer. The Daily Meal also reports that "Green tea has also been proven helpful to people who suffer from diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol and blood pressure, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as even skincare and tooth decay."

Cancer Prevention Research published online that out of the oral leukoplakia patients who took the green tea extra, more than half of them experienced a clinical response. Their preclinical models indicated that green tea is filled with polyphenols, which can prevent the progression of cancer. Researchers have noted that while these clinical trials may not show definitive proof that green tea can be used to prevent cancer, these results can lead to more studies focusing on patients who are at risk for oral cancer. Green tea has shown to be promising because of its nontoxic nature, which is essential to prevent further harm in individuals battling cancer.

In phase 2 of their study, oral leukoplakia patients were given either the green tea extract or a placebo at one of three dosage amounts. Participants ingested the tea or the extract for three times a day for three months. After these three months, the patients underwent oral tissue biopsies. These biopsies were able to reveal that green tea extract were beneficial to the patients but also lead the researchers to believe that antiangiogenetic effects (growth and development of tissue) were the mechanism of action.

Out of the patients that took the two highest doses ended up, 58.8% of the patients had a clinical response, compared to the 36.4% of patients that took the lowest dose of green tea extract. Although these results were not statistically significant, researchers noted that the extract was well received by the patients and only a few of the patients that took the highest extra dosage showed signs of insomnia and nervousness.

The researchers note that there were only a few patients that participated in their clinical trials and that more research needs to be done to see if green tea can conclusive prevent oral or other types of cancer. Green tea needs to be looked at to determine whether it can provide long-term prevention for patients. However, this research proves to be a promising stepping-stone for further studies.

Green tea is stimulatory in nature as it contains some caffeine, which will naturally boost your metabolism. Green tea is also an antioxidant that, like wine, cranberries, and dark chocolate, will target and scavenge for toxins that could lead to cancer, blood clots, and even atherosclerosis.

We recommend an oral cancer screening annually and this can be done at your next preventative visit. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12004708
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm
Photo Credit to http://www.thedailymeal.com/health-benefits-green-tea-could-save-your-life

Myth Proven: Thumb Sucking Can Lead to Buck Teeth

May 30th, 2013

It is a precious sight for parents when they see their newborn baby playfully giggling and sucking their thumb. Some often worry about bacteria and germs that that babies may be placing in their mouth but others also hold the belief that thumb sucking can lead to buck teeth. David Horwitz, a pediatrician at the New York University School of Medicine, was able to show that this is in fact not a myth.

It has been shown that about 80% of infants and children tend to suck on their thumbs, which is a behavior that has been considered rather normal during the first few years after birth. However, thumb sucking can start causing problems down the line. The American Dental Association predicts that by age 6, a child’s permanent teeth start to come in and it is very likely that misalignment of teeth, also know as malocclusion, can occur. If a child continues to suck his or her thumb, the thumb slowly pushes the top teeth out, changing the relationship between a child’s upper and lower jaw. This movement may go unnoticed to parents, but can be identified by the orthodontist.

Dr. Horwitz explains that this thumb sucking habit can be noticed early on in child development. Ultrasounds of mothers often show babies that seem to be sucking their thumbs even in the womb. Dr. Horwitz believes that some babies may be thumb suckers since the time there are born. It has been recommended that parents can put socks or gloves on babies’ hands before they sleep at night. There are also dental devices that can be placed on the roofs of babies’ mouths to make thumb sucking more difficult.

We have a great pediatric dentist that would be happy to evaluate your child. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/27/health/27real.html?_r=0

http://www.uamshealth.com/?id=5256&sid=1

Detecting Breast Cancer Through Saliva Analysis

May 29th, 2013

In 2006, the America Cancer Society predicts that there would be 212,920 new cases of invasive breast cancer, and in that year, 40,970 women would die from it. While breast cancer is the second leading cause of death for women in the United States, many lives can also be saved if a diagnosis was given earlier. Studies recently show that salivary tests can now be used to make early diagnoses for breast cancer.

In General Dentistry, researchers explain that there are proteins levels in saliva that can play a role in forming a diagnosis, treatment plan, and potential follow-up care for a patient with breast cancer. That would put general dentists in a position to assist with diagnosis samples. Because patients tend to make more frequent dental visits than physician visits, it would make sense for dentists to easily take saliva samples from patients’ mouths during checkups.

Salivary tests have also shown to have advantages over blood testing. Researchers have compared saliva and blood samples and explained that while saliva is clear and colorless, blood can change in color, which may affect test results. Saliva collection is also safe and non-invasive, and can be taken without causing the patient any pain.

This method of diagnosis is still pending and under the consideration of the Food and Drug Administration. If salivary testing does get approved, dentists and physicians can work together to help catch the onset of breast cancer early on. However, this does not mean that women should not go in for mammogram screenings or blood analysis; they are still considered the first line of defense. Even if breast cancer was detected via a salivary sample, a mammogram or imaging test is still needed to find the location of the cancer.

The possibility of detecting breast cancer early on through something as non-invasive as salivary analysis is truly promising. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080110123921.htm

Wellesley Parade and Picnic

May 23rd, 2013

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Wellesley’s Wonderful Weekend was once again truly wonderful—what an amazing experience to celebrate another year of this great community tradition!

Thank you to the Wellesley Celebrations Committee for organizing such wonderful events for the community and the volunteers who support it. We also want to thank the Wellesley Police Department for not only keeping everyone safe this weekend but for also representing our town in the OneFund by selling BostonStrong t-shirts and donating proceeds to those who were affected by the recent Boston Marathon tragedy.

Our tractor float caught a lot of attention this year! It was all thanks to the little smile ambassadors we had on board helping our team promote healthy, happy smiles. The fun continued later at the picnic, where the Wellesley Dental Group tent was a real party! We had face painting and feather extensions, guest appearances from the Tooth Fairy and Chuckles the Dinosaur, and lots of treats for all our young smile ambassadors! Even a little rain didn't dampen the community spirit, and the night came to a perfect end with some truly spectacular fireworks. We can’t wait to sponsor them again next year!

Spring sniffles can lead to poor oral health

May 17th, 2013

After a long winter, spring can literally be a breath of fresh air. However, for some, spring may mean going through countless tissue boxes. Seasonal allergies can mean lots of sneezing, and a lot of congestion, which is usually coupled with “mouth breathing.” While this may seem harmless, a clinical study published in General Dentistry pointed out that there can also be oral health repercussions to mouth breathing.

 

Mouth breathing, also known as upper airway obstruction, has been shown to cause abnormal facial and dental development, including long, narrow faces and mouths, and gummy smiles. Mouth breathing can lead to lack of saliva in the mouth. Saliva is essential for the reduction of acid and bacteria in the mouth, which causes individuals who lack saliva to end up with gingivitis. Crooked teeth can also be caused by an upper airway obstruction due to poor position of the tongue. Mouth breathers tend to rest their tongue on the roof of their mouths, causing cheek, muscles to relax and rest on the upper teeth. This causes the upper jaw to become more narrow leading to crooked teeth down the line. This condition can lead to poor sleeping habits, and can lead to poor oxygen concentration in the blood stream, resulting in possible high blood pressure-related conditions. Children who suffer from mouth breathing usually do not get enough rest, leading to tiredness throughout the day and lack of concentration on academics.

 

But no fear! There are possible treatments for mouth breathing, and it is very beneficial to discover this condition early on.  A dentist is able to look for mouth breathing symptoms, including dry, cracked lips, dry mouth, bad breath, snoring and daytime fatigue. Swollen tonsils are also known to be a prominent symptom of this disease. If there is the presence of inflamed tonsils, they can be surgically removed by an ear-nose-throat (ENT) specialist. If one has narrow face and mouth, dentists are able to use expansion appliances to aid in the widening of sinuses and the opening of nasal airway passages. After surgery and orthodontic treatment, patients have been shown to improve in behavior, energy level, academic performance, and peer acceptance.

 

If you believe that you are a mouth breather, be sure to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/04/100406125714.htm

 

http://www.webmd.com/allergies/video/josephson-mouth-breathing

 

 

We couldn't have done it without you!

May 10th, 2013

Drs. Ali & Ali of Wellesley Dental Group want to thank the community for the wonderful turnout as they conclude their two-week long fundraiser for the One Fund Boston. The fundraiser was held from April 29th through May 10th. Inspired by the phrase, Boston Strong, they wanted to give the community a way to show strength through smiling. As "Smile Ambassadors" their mission was quite clear: give supporters a beautiful smile when they do good for the community. They donated 100% of all proceeds from teeth whitening treatments.
Drs. Ali & Ali are incredibly thankful to their community for supporting this remarkable cause, helping the victims of April 15th's Marathon Monday bombings. Smiling together, we are all Boston Strong.

Make your grin pearly white for a good cause!

May 7th, 2013

Wellesley Dental Group’s teeth whitening fundraiser is still running at full speed. We’d like to dedicate this post to all those who have already donated to our One Fund fundraiser!  In solidarity with those affected by last month’s Boston Marathon bombings, Drs. Ali & Ali thank you from the bottom of their hearts for the steady influx of donations pouring in from all corners of the community. With your help, we’ve been making a huge impact on the physical and mental well-being of our community. It’s so inspiring to see how quickly our neighborhood has risen to the challenge, and to know that we are taking care of our own. Thank you for setting such an incredible example for the rest of us; together we are Boston Strong!

As you may have heard, Drs. Ali & Ali are taking great strides to rally our community together and help our neighbors in need. Until May 10th, Wellesley Dental Group will be donating 100% of the proceeds from all whitening treatments to Boston’s One Fund.  If you haven’t heard about this great cause, it’s time to get involved!

The Wellesley Dental Group is offering two whitening options: the Sinsational treatment, in which your smile is brightened by a few shades, and the Custom Home Whitening treatment, in which Dr. Ali creates custom whitening trays tailored specifically to your needs. The suggested minimum donations are $199 and $550, respectively, and will be donated directly to help the marathon victims and their loved ones. We invite you to come in for a free consultation to explore the different options and decide which works best for you. Please call us at (781) 237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to schedule an appointment today! For more information about this event, click here.  Our office is open this week Monday-Friday from 8 am to 5 pm, at 5 Seward Road in Wellesley.

Remember, this is the final week of the fundraiser, so if you've been thinking that your smile could use a makeover, now is the time to act! A new smile, a new YOU, and a re-newed Boston is exactly what our city needs to regain its footing. Now that spring is upon us, what better way to rejuvenate your oral health, all the while rebuilding the health and unity of our community. And again, to those who have already made a difference, thank you SO much for your continued support!

Smiling because we’re Boston strong - raising money for One Fund

April 25th, 2013

Get your pearly whites even whiter for a great cause! Wellesley Dental Group is teaming up with the community to fund-raise for The One Fund, Boston to help those affected by the Marathon Monday tragedy on April 15th. Drs. Ali & Ali will be donating 100% of all proceeds gathered from whitening treatments to the Fund. They are inviting Wellesley and its surrounding communities to stop by, boost smiles, and donate to this important cause.

From April 29th to May 10th, Wellesley Dental Group will be fundraising for The One Fund. Make an appointment by calling (781) 237-9071 or emailing smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com. The office is located at 5 Seaward Road in Wellesley.

The whitening treatments offered vary from Sinsational whitening, which boosts the smile by a few shades to custom home whitening, in which Dr. Ali creates whitening trays. The suggested minimum donation for the Sinsational whitening is $199 and is $550 for the custom home whitening. Feel free to make an appointment for a free consultation prior to deciding on which whitening option is best for you.

Join Wellesley Dental Group and smile in the face of what descended upon the community. Show how strong Boston truly is by sharing a newly radiant smile that gives hope to those in need. In the words of Mayor Menino, “We are one Boston. We are one community. As always, we will come together to help those most in need. And in the end, we will all be better for it.”

 

 

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