cigarettes

Reminder: Take Good Care of your Heart!

February 12th, 2020

It's hearts all over the world each month of February, especially with Valentine's Day right around the corner. But, this month isn't just about the cards and candy, it's also American Heart Month, where the importance of heart health is advocated by communities across the world. Heart disease is sadly the number 1 killer of Americans, killing more people than all forms of cancer! Both heart disease and stroke are the cause of approximately 2,300 deaths each day. This year, it is the 56th consecutive American Heart Month, which was first implemented by President Lyndon B. Johnson in February 1964. Organizations such as the American Heart Association promote the importance of heart disease awareness.

Over the years, rising obesity rates in children and adults have contributed to the progression of heart disease in America. Luckily, heart disease can be prevented with the right healthy life-style choices. From being more physically active, to eating healthier diets, and tracking your heart health by regularly checking your blood pressure and weight. Most people also don't realize that managing your stress and sleep schedule plays a role in your heart health. Lack of sleep can increase your risk for developing chronic health problems because your body needs the rest in order to keep your mental and physical health regulated.

Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease and can lead to heart attacks. People are at a higher risk of developing heart disease if they have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, preeclampsia during pregnancy, or prediabetes or diabetes. In addition, people who smoke cigarettes, are over age of 55 for women or 45 for men, or people with a family history of heart disease are also at a higher risk for having heart disease. Although some risk factors cannot be change, most others are modifiable! It is important to make conscious choices to eat healthy and stay active.

Take a look at this list of food groups that should regularly be included in your diet:

  • Vegetables such as leafy greens (spinach, collard greens, kale, cabbage), broccoli, and carrots
  • Fruits such as apples, bananas, oranges, pears, grapes, and prunes
  • Whole grains such as plain oatmeal, brown rice, and whole-grain bread or tortillas
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy foods such as milk, cheese, or yogurt
  • Protein-rich foods:
    • Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids (salmon, tuna, and trout)
    • Lean meats such as 95% lean ground beef or pork tenderloin or skinless chicken or turkey
    • Eggs
    • Nuts, seeds, and soy products (tofu)
    • Legumes such as kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, and lima beans
  • Oils and foods high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats:
    • Canola, corn, olive, safflower, sesame, sunflower, and soybean oils (not coconut or palm oil)
    • Nuts such as walnuts, almonds, and pine nuts
    • Nut and seed butters
    • Salmon and trout
    • Seeds (sesame, sunflower, pumpkin, or flax)
    • Avocados
    • Tofu

It is important to limit sodium (salt), saturated and trans fats, added sugars, and alcohol. Reading food labels can be tedious but could also save your life! Sweetened drinks and desserts have a lot of added sugars which can not only impact your oral health but also your heart health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.heart.org/en/around-the-aha/february-marks-56th-consecutive-american-heart-month

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/education-and-awareness/heart-month

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Gain Wisdom on your 3rd Molars

January 25th, 2020

Many people seek to gain wisdom throughout life, but some may not realize that they might already have some towards the back of their mouth...their wisdom teeth! Wisdom teeth, also called third molars, are typically the last teeth in the mouth to erupt, and are the last molars present on the upper and lower jaw. Since they are the last permanent teeth to erupt (usually between the ages of 17 and 25), sometimes there is not enough space for them, which can lead to impacted wisdom teeth. If your dentist tells you that you have an impacted wisdom tooth, this means that your tooth may have only partially erupted, or stayed buried underneath the gum tissue.

When this occurs, symptoms including swelling, infection, pain, or tenderness may develop. Some people however, may not experience any problems with their wisdom teeth. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that people between ages 16 and 19 be evaluated by their dentist to see if they need to be removed. This age range is preferred by dentists because the roots of the wisdom teeth are usually not fully formed yet and are easier to remove than in older patients. Also, the risk of developing greater problems is lowered the earlier they are removed, including damage to the major nerve on the lower jaw, the inferior alveolar nerve. People receiving braces may also be recommended to remove their wisdom teeth to avoid their eruption altering the alignment of their teeth.

If it is determined by your dentist or dental specialist that your wisdom teeth need to be extracted, they will recommend either local anesthesia, IV sedation, or general anesthesia depending on the multiple factors of each case. After the extraction, you may be asked to bite softly on a piece of gauze for approximately 30 minutes to limit any bleeding. Bleeding, swelling and tenderness post-extraction are common and may last normally for a few days. However, if it is to continue past a few days, it is important to contact your dentist.

It is recommended not to brush, rinse, or spit within the first 24 hours after the extraction to allow proper healing of the extraction site. Staying hydrated and eating is important following the extraction for your recovery. It is important not to drink through a straw however, as this can lead to dry socket. Dry socket is a possible complication of wisdom tooth removal, which can occur during the first five days after extraction. This happens when the blood clot that formed a seal after the extraction begins to break down and exposes the bone and nerves of the tooth. Only approximately 2 to 5% of people will develop a dry socket. According to a study published in the Journal of Oral Health and Dental Management, dry socket was more common in people who smoke and more likely to occur in the lower jaw. Dry socket can be very painful and may present with an unpleasant smell or taste, but can be treated by your dentist. The site will be cleaned of all debris and covered with a medication until it heals.

If your wisdom teeth are still present and healthy within your mouth, be sure that you are still brushing and flossing them, as these teeth can still develop tooth decay.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth/what-is-a-wisdom-tooth-0415

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth/5-possible-wisdom-teeth-removal-complications

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Is Vaping Really a Safer Alternative to Smoking?

August 26th, 2018

Electronic cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular, especially as they are constantly being advertised as a “safer alternative” to traditional cigarettes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that the use of e-cigarettes has increased from 1.5% in 2011 to over 16% in 2015 among high-school aged students. When it comes to oral health, however, new research suggests E-cigarettes could be just as bad as smoking.

E-cigarettes have a battery inside with a heating device that vaporizes a liquid that gets inhaled. Although this liquid does not contain tobacco, it does have nicotine and flavoring chemicals that are harmful to your body.  Nicotine in particular is a highly addictive component that can have a negative impact on  adolescent brain development. Not to mention, E-cigarettes can produce many oral health problems, such as oral cancer, tooth loss, and gum disease.

A study was conducted in South Korea involving a representative sample of middle-school and high-school aged students. 65,528 students were asked if during the past year they had experienced gingival pain, bleeding, tongue pain, inside cheek pain, a cracked tooth, or a combination of any of the above asked. They were also asked if they had ever used an E-Cigarette. The researchers found that 297 students (0.5%) used E-cigarettes daily, 1,259 (1.9%) used ECs 1 to 29 days in the past month, 3,848 (5.9%) were former EC users, and 60,124 (91.8%) never used E-cigarettes.

The study revealed that there were significantly higher chances of having experienced a cracked tooth, tongue pain, inside-cheek pain, or both among daily, within 1-29 days in the past month, and former E-cigarette users.

Another study looked at vapor-exposed epithelial cells under a microscope and discovered that there was a significant increase in epithelial cell death. They found that E-cigarette vapor destroyed 53% of cells within the mouth after 3 days. This suggests that the death of protective cells may lead to a higher risk of infection, gum disease, inflammation, and even possibly cancer.

Talk to your kids about the harms of E-cigarettes and smoking products, as well as the importance of maintaining your oral health to ensure overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://pages.ada.org/jada-specialty-scan/oral-pathology/oral-pathology-august-24-2018?utm_campaign=JADA%20Specialty%20Scan&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65440658&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8yc_SI07OAU_XhoSEngQA1QYRsc_1bMXptS802Wpvje1MWrzTPC7hgwm8P3TJs2uVJJQX4lCf7gQpm5oawtYGYfFPqZQ&_hsmi=65440658#article1

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314190.php

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/Quick-Facts-on-the-Risks-of-E-cigarettes-for-Kids-Teens-and-Young-Adults.html

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Secondhand Smoke Is No Joke To Oral Health

May 29th, 2015

As you may have heard before, "secondhand smoke kills." It sure does. Nearly 54,000 people die each year from secondhand smoke. A combined total of more than 480,000 deaths a year are caused from smoking and secondhand smoke. It can sometimes be easy to forget that even non-smokers are in danger of health problems as a result of cigarette smoke. Not to mention, children are at a high risk of developing several chronic diseases and health issues because of secondhand smoke.

There are many reasons to avoid smoking, and in this article, we'll offer you yet another reason. Believe it or not, secondhand smoke can negatively impact your oral health. Although more research is needed in the area, it is believed that children are at risk of developing tooth decay from secondhand smoke.

15 studies were conducted and reviewed in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health by researchers in Japan about the possible correlation between secondhand smoke and the development of cavities in children. The studies reported weak to moderate evidence that secondhand smoke causes cavities in primary teeth, yet, more information is needed to make a conclusive argument.

Further, Researchers now have concluded that smoking is one of the causes of periodontal disease because tobacco can damage gums and leave teeth susceptible to infection. This makes smokers more at risk for developing periodontal disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 47% of adults have either mild, moderate or severe periodontitis in the United States. The early stages of periodontal disease is gingivitis, which can eventually lead to periodontitis if untreated.

In a recent study funded by the National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, researchers investigated the link between serum cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, and periodontitis in U.S. non-smokers. The study found that non-smokers exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) had 1.45 times the odds of moderate/severe periodontitis as unexposed non-smokers.

In addition, smokers and non-smokers exposed to secondhand smoke are more prone to significant amounts of oral bone loss. For example, research in the Journal of Periodontology showed the correlation between secondhand smoke and oral bone loss in rats. The study concluded that rats with periodontitis that were exposed to secondhand smoke were at greater risk of experiencing oral bone loss and ultimately tooth loss.

Along with serious oral issues, secondhand smoke has caused oral cancer, breast cancer, middle ear infections in children, pregnancy problems, asthma, lung disease, heart disease, among many other health problems.

If you are a smoker, quitting is the best option to keep yourself and those around you healthy. Whether being exposed in homes, cars, offices, or other public places, secondhand smoke is severely detrimental to oral and overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.no-smoke.org/getthefacts.php?id=13

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/secondhand-smoke-and-cavities

http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/tobacco_related_mortality/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150313083627.htm

http://helpforsmoking.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/SecondHandSmoke-43321674.jpg

E-cigarettes are Under FDA's Supression

June 17th, 2014

electronic_vs_classicE-cigarettes are gaining popularity among smokers and have attracted the attention of FDA who recently updated the regulation requirements for tobacco products.

"On April 24, the agency proposed rules that call for strict regulation of electronic cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, water pipe tobacco and hookahs", CNN reports. The new rule updates will include health warning requirements, vending sale prohibition,  age limitations (at least 18 years old) and mandatory ingredients listing. Until recently, only cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and roll-your-own tobacco fell under the FDA's regulatory authority.

Being unregulated by FDA, e-cigarettes are estimated to be used by 4 millions of Americans and are believed not to deliver the carcinogens that raise health concerns. But since they haven't been studied properly it's unknown what health risks they pose, how much nicotine or other chemicals are actually being inhaled, or whether there is any benefit to using them.

E-cigarette is a battery operated nicotine inhaler stimulating  tobacco smoking by producing a vapor resembling smoke. While some research show that e-cigarettes have a thousand times less contaminates than a tobacco and due to the lack of tobacco can reduce discoloration of teeth and risk of cavities, other scientists say it's always harmful to inhale anything other than fresh air. "As for long-term effects, we don't know what happens when you breathe the vapor into the lungs regularly," Thomas Glynn, the director of science and trends at the American Cancer Society, says.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Resources:

http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/24/health/fda-e-cigarette-regulations/index.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/fda-regulates-ecigarettes/story?id=23445234#

http://joyetech.by/p89-polza_perehoda_na_elektronnye_sigarety.html

Maternal Smoking Can Cause Cleft-Lip in Babies

January 29th, 2014

pregnant womanIn the United States alone, there is a 1/750 chance that a baby is born with isolated, also called non-syndromic, cleft lip and/or palate. While this condition can be corrected through various surgeries, families of the child with this condition can be inundated both emotionally and economically. Throughout the world, there are about 12 million women each year who smoke through pregnancies. About one in every 600 U.S. babies is born with a cleft lip and/or palate. The American Journal of Human Genetics published results from a study done at the University of Iowa demonstrating that if a pregnant woman smokes 16 cigarettes or more per day, the chances of her GSTT1-lacking fetus developing a cleft increase 20 fold.

Researchers at the University of Iowa have found through an international study that some babies are predisposed to cleft lip and/or palate because of their inability to detoxify and process cigarette smoke. The study showed that the fetuses lacking both copies of a gene used to thwart the smoke and have mothers who smoked during pregnancy had a greater risk of developing cleft lip. These scientists have compiled a last of 16 genes that are directly related in cigarette smoke toxicity and determined whether variations of these genes would influence a baby’s ability to remove the toxins. The researchers found that the GSTT1 gene made a significant contribution to clefting; this gene is responsible for 20 different enzymes in the body, specifically essential for common detoxification processes. The study also found that 60 percent of babies with Asian ancestry and 25 percent of babies of European ancestry do not possess copies of the gene called GSTT1. Without this gene, the baby is unable to eliminate the toxins from the smoke that has been spread across the placenta.

During any stage of life, it is always important to make healthy choices. A poor health decision is not always specific to one location in the body, but can very well affect many different areas of the body. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions!

Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Ref: http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2007/article/ADA-03-Mom-Smoking-Cleft-Lip.cvsp

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jan2007/nidcr-03.htm

How Exactly Does Smoking Affect Oral Health?

January 28th, 2014

While smoking has been found to lead to various unhealthy consequences, it also has been linked with resulting in poor oral health.

Smoking and tobacco-based products have been shown to result in gum disease. It damages bone and soft tissue of teeth and interferes with the functioning of gum tissue cells. This leaves smokers more susceptible to infections, including periodontal disease, and also tends to lessen blood flow to the gums, which would hinder wound healing.

The Journal of the American Dental Association published results showing that cigar smokers have experienced tooth loss and alveolar bone loss, which is the bone within the jawbone responsible for anchoring teeth. The rate at which bone and tooth are loss for cigar smokers are very similar to cigarette smokers. Pipe smokers also are in danger of tooth loss; moreover, they are also at risk for oral and pharyngeal (throat) cancer, even if the smoke is not inhaled. Other oral health consequences included halitosis, stained teeth, and gum disease.

While some smokers believe that using smokeless tobacco products tend to be safer, that is not the case. Similar to cigars and cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products, including chewing tobacco, contain at least 28 chemicals that have shown to increase the risk of oral cancer, along with cancer of the throat and esophagus. Smokeless tobacco can also irritate gum tissue, leading to the receding and pulling away of teeth. When gum tissue recedes, teeth roots are left more exposed, which increases the chance for tooth decay to occur. The Journal of the American Dental Association also showed that chewing tobacco users were four times more likely than nonusers to have tooth decay. Smokeless tobacco also contains sand and grit, which can easily wear down teeth.

Even though you may be a tobacco product user, it is never too late to quit. Studies have shown that 11 years after quitting, former smokers were found to have risks of developing gum disease that were not too different from those who had never smoked. Cutting out tobacco products can truly lead to healthier oral health. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

http://www.dentalplans.com/dentalhealtharticles/53837/smoking-tobacco-may-affect-oral-health.html

The Upcoming ‘Great American Smokeout'

November 19th, 2013

smokeoutWhile most people are aware of the dangers that smoking results in, it is surprising to most that dentists can have the ability to not only inform others on smoking effects on overall health, but also the damaging effects of smoking on oral health. Smoking and other tobacco products have been linked to periodontal, or gum, disease through affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to teeth. Along with increasing the risk of periodontal disease, smoking has been linked to specific cancers. There are toxins and carcinogens present in tobacco products, including cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, and chewing tobacco. The American Lung Association has found that cigarettes cause 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Smokers of cigars and pipes have an increased risk of cancer of the oral cavity as well as the overall body. Also, don’t be swayed into thinking that tobacco products are harmless; while they are “smokeless” options including chewing tobacco, there are still more than 28 cancer-causing chemicals found in this form of tobacco. Chewing tobacco can cause cancer in the cheek, gums and lips, and this cancer usually developed where the tobacco is held in the mouth. Regardless of what form of smoking, there is no doubt that smoking is harmful to the oral cavity and the overall health of the body.

 

The American Cancer Society is holds an event called Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November to encourage current smokers to use that day to make a solid plan to quit, or to start making plans prior to the event and to quit on the day of. The American Cancer Society explains that smokers are most successful in stopping the habit is to have access to smoking-cessation hotlines, stop-smoking groups, counseling, nicotine replacement products, online quit groups, and encourage and support from friends and family members. When smokers implement two or more of these sources, they have a better chance of quitting.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Great-American-Smokeout-Is-Nov-21.cvsp

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

 

http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/dental_care/oral_cancer_and_tobacco/Pages/index.aspx

 

Quick Tips from the Tooth Fairy

August 28th, 2013

As a parent with a busy schedule, it can get tough monitoring and helping with the care of a child’s oral health. However, a child’s maintenance of good oral hygiene is extremely important, not just for their oral health but also for their overall health. On top of this week’s grocery list and the errands that need to be completed, we’ll throw in just a few more reminders and tips on the care of a child’s teeth.

 

  • Although work schedules can get overwhelming, a great and healthy way to spend time with the kids is to join them while they brush and floss. Children learn by example, and a great way for them to pick up good oral hygiene is if their parents show them great brushing and flossing techniques.

 

  • Keep track of times when your child demonstrates good oral hygiene. A fun way to get children to stick to good oral care is to create a calendar that can track their oral health. Hang the calendar in the bathroom and post a gold star or a fun sticker on days when they did a great job brushing and flossing their teeth. This is can get children excited about maintain good oral health and is a wonderful way to let their dentist know how they are doing!

 

  • There have been recent studies showing that bacteria responsible for tooth decay can be transferred when parents clean their child’s pacifier or bottle nipple. It’s best to clean these items in warm, soapy water and to avoid sharing food and drinks and children.

 

  • It is no secret that children love to get their hands on sweets. However, sugar-heavy foods can end up creating an environment that is optimal for the growth of tooth decay-causing bacteria. Try to opt for products containing xylitol, which is a tooth-friendly, nonfermentable sugar alcohol that does not get converted in the mouth to acids like regular sugars. It can reduce the levels of bacteria in saliva and can also act against some of the bacteria responsible for ear infections!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-996-XYLITOL.aspx?activeIngredientId=996&activeIngredientName=XYLITOL

 

http://www.ncohf.org/resources/parents-corner

 

http://www.ada.org/news/8582.aspx

 

Chronic Rhinosinusitis Linked to Secondhand Smoking

August 23rd, 2013

Patients often come in during a dentist appointment mentioning sinus pain coupled with congestion and toothache. This pain can either be quite severe or even chronic, and can be hassle to deal with. Patients experiencing these symptoms have been found to be suffering from rhinosinusitis, which can arise due to allergies or infection. However, the Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Surgery published a study that showed a link between secondhand smoke and chronic rhinosinusitis.

In their study, interviewers from the Henry Ford Health System were trained to hold telephone interviewed with 306 patients who have been suffering from rhinosinusitis between January 2000 and May 2004, along with 306 matched control patients. The researchers were able to collect data on age, ethnicity, sex, diet, and contact with possible air pollutants and chemicals. The main data that was examined were the secondhand smoke exposure that the patients were exposed to; the exposure could have been from home, work, public places, and private function, including parties and weddings.

This study revealed that there is a dose-response relationship found between chronic rhinosinusitis and the number of environments that individuals were susceptible to secondhand smoke. Amanda Holm, a study coauthor and project manager at the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention explained that their findings “reaffirm the health hazards of secondhand smoke.” She notes that the irritants found in secondhand smoke are harmful to the sinus and nasal passages and are the main cause to the progression of rhinosinusitis.

Secondhand smoke has also been shown to increase risk of respiratory ailments, lung cancer, and heart disease in nonsmokers. Although there have been antismoking laws established in the United States, 60% of nonsmokers continue to be exposed the toxic chemicals found in cigarette smoke. While many tend to shrug this issue off and may label this as unimportant, researchers urge individuals to be wary of secondhand smoke, highlighting that consequences are real and truly harmful. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:
http://jada.ada.org/content/141/6/632.1.full

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12931083

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/04/19/secondhand.smoke.sinus/index.html

Limited Knowledge of Cancers Caused by Smoking

July 16th, 2012

A study conducted in the UK found that more than 80% of people are ignorant to the types of cancers caused by smoking. The survey examined over 4,000 people.

Most people knew of the obvious cancers caused by smoking, such as oral, lung and esophageal, but a large number didn't know it is linked to cancers of the kidney, stomach, and bladder. Cigarette smoke itself contains numerous chemicals that are distributed throughout the bloodstream when inhaled.

What's alarming is that people know smoking is dangerous but still continue to do it for whatever reason. Nearly half of all smokers who smoke for a long period of time will die from either cancer or other illnesses brought on by this habit. You can read the article in full here.

Drs. Ali and Ali urge all of their patients who are smokers to consider quitting. Smoking increases the risk of oral cancer and many other related problems dramatically. Contact us today to learn more about how smoking impacts your oral health at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

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