cosmetic

Chipped Teeth? We've got you covered!

September 9th, 2016

It's no fun when you chip your teeth, but no worries: we have your back! :) Recreating a beautiful smile is an easy and painless process. Here are some common treatment options for chipped teeth:

1. Bonding

Cosmetic bonding attaches filling material to the enamel (outer tooth layer made of tightly packed calcium crystals) and dentin (porous inner layer of the tooth and living tissue) of the original chipped tooth with little tooth reduction required.  Bonding is a popular treatment, because it is less expensive than crowns or veneers and can last just as long with proper maintenance. Dental porcelain can imitate enamel, while composite resins (a mix of plastic resin and silica filler) can mimic dentin. Together, these materials help mask the broken tooth.

2. Crowns

Porcelain dental crowns are recommended for chipped back teeth. You may want to choose this option if you want to restore both the form and the function of the broken tooth. Furthermore, crowns are suitable for teeth that were destroyed by decay, traumatic events, grinding, or enamel erosion. They repair the entire outer portion of the tooth, unlike bonding which simply covers the part that was chipped, and are thicker than veneers. Crowns are secured with a resin that hardens between the tooth and the crown with a special light .

3. Veneers

Veneers, which consist of many thin custom-made ceramic layers that are bonded to the front of the tooth with a special adhesive, are the ideal treatment for teeth that show when you smile. They help create small alternations in tooth position, size, shape, or color that repair chipped teeth or gaps. Only a minimal amount of your natural tooth needs to be altered so that the veneer can attach.

If you're interested in repairing your chipped teeth, please give our office a call so we can help you determine which treatment is the best match! We are happy to help.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://cliparts.co/cliparts/pc5/oRB/pc5oRB7zi.jpg

http://yoursmilebecomesyou.com/procedures/repairing-chipped-teeth/

http://www.wellesleydentalgroup.com/cosmetic-dentistry-faqs

http://www.wellesleydentalgroup.com/veneers

Abnormal Tooth Enamel: Amelogenesis Imperfecta

March 17th, 2016

 enamelAmelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disorder in which tooth enamel forms abnormally. As a result, individuals with this condition are at a higher risk of developing cavities. It typically causes teeth to be smaller than usual, discolored, grooved, easily damaged, among other dental problems that can vary by the individual. Secondary effects could be early tooth loss, periodontal disease, tooth sensitivity, and jaw problems.

Unfortunately, Amelogenesis imperfecta can negatively impact both primary teeth and permanent teeth. Around 14 forms of this condition have been determined by researchers. It has also been found to affect approximately 1 in 700 people in northern Sweden to 1 in 14,000 people in the United States.

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Many cases of Amelogenesis imperfecta are a result of mutations in the AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and FAM83H genes, which are normally responsible for making proteins essential for normal tooth and enamel development (ameloblastin, enamelin, tuftelin and amelogenin). Tooth enamel is a hard outer layer rich in calcium that functions to protect the tooth. As a result of a mutation, tooth enamel becomes thin and weaker than normal, and may even appear yellow or brown in color. The genetic causes of other cases have not yet been identified.

This condition can be inherited in both an autosomal dominant pattern and autosomal recessive pattern. In an autosomal dominant pattern, once copy of the mutated gene in each cell can cause Amelogenesis imperfecta. An autosomal recessive pattern involves two mutated copies of the gene in each cell. Researchers found that around 5 percent of amelogenesis imperfecta cases are due to mutations in the AMELX gene and are inherited in an X-linked pattern. They also found that males with X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta have more severe dental problems than females with this form of the condition.

Preventive and restorative dental treatments can help make teeth impacted by this condition look normal and remain healthy. Full crown restorations are often used to treat this disorder. For severe cases, teeth may have to be extracted and implants or dentures may be required. If you feel like you have Amelogenesis imperfecta or any other enamel conditions, our very Dr. Ejaz Ali is an expert at fixing the issue, bringing the teeth back to ideal form, function, and esthetic. Dr. Ali was trained at Tufts School of Dental Medicine, and also did additional training at New York University’s in “Full Mouth Reconstruction: Advanced Principles and Practice for the GP” with special focus on Implants, Aesthetics, and Occlusion.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

Can Depression Undermine Your Oral Health?

October 9th, 2014

Young Woman Biting Her Finger NailDid you know that tooth loss is linked to anxiety and depression? You heard correctly; that means that taking care of your teeth protects more than just your physical well-being, but also, your mental state.

These findings were concluded based on a study that was presented at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research, which occurred in March of this past year, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The American Association for Dental Research is a non-profit organization composed of nearly 3,500 members. Its mission is stated as, “to advance research and increase knowledge for the improvement of oral health, to support  and represent the oral health research community, and to facilitate the communication and application of research findings.”

In the study, researchers examined a potential association of tooth loss with depression and anxiety.The study was conducted using The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey, a complex, telephone survey the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments administer. Researchers focused on the 292 eligible participants, people who were 19 years old and up, who had answered questions pertaining to depression, anxiety, and tooth loss out of the overall 451,075 respondents who participated in the survey in 2010,

13.4 percent of of this eligible group of participants reported anxiety, 16.7 percent reported depression, and 5.7 percent reported tooth loss.

Demographics of the participants included the group being evenly split between males and females, with 68.7 percent of the participants being non-Hispanic whites, 12.7 percent were African American, 12.5 percent were Hispanics, and 6.8 percent reported being other. Further analysis of this selected group of participants confirmed initial thoughts that depression and/or anxiety were significantly related to tooth loss, when compared with participants who had not reported themselves as having depression or anxiety symptoms.

The study was overseen by Dr. R. Constant Weiner, a professor at West Virginia University. Her findings concluded that several biopsychosocial factors influenced a person’s dental health. What are “biopsychosocial factors”? This all-encompassing term is as an expression for all factors, embracing biological, psychological, and societal influences, that result in a scenario, such as tooth loss. Dr. R. Constance Wiener noted that prominent  biopsychosocial factors that resulted in tooth loss were the relative presence or lack of feelings of self worth and self-esteem, as well as a lack of access to dental care.

What are the reasons for this connection? People who suffer from anxiety may avoid dental care, and people who suffer from depression are often negligent in self-care, which includes dental care. It is a chicken-or-the-egg scenario to try and determine whether depression, and its related lack of self-care, leads to tooth loss, or whether tooth loss leads to a loss of self-esteem that results in depression and anxiety. Either/or, the relation between depression/anxiety and tooth loss is significant enough to garner attention.

If you’re suffering from tooth loss, there is help available. At Wellesley Dental Group, we offer dental implants, which are beautiful and fully functional. We offer a caring, non judgemental environment where our focus is on your health and happiness. No matter the current state of your teeth, there is a place for you at our office. Our Dr. Ali is a renowned cosmetic dentist who can help you have a smile you’ll be confident showing off. Rest assured, you’ll be happy with your results! If there is anything we can do at all to take care of your oral health, please call 781-237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment for consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

References:

http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/03/21/tooth-loss-linked-with-anxiety-and-depression/67417.html

http://www.aadronline.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3452

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/plaque-on-teeth

Images:

http://www.faverodental.com/2014/06/tooth-loss-linked-to-depression-and-anxiety/

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