depression

Robbed of a Good Night's Rest?

August 10th, 2019

Sleep is an important part of each day, so much so that the effects of a restless night can change the entire productivity of our next day! Unfortunately, many people suffer from sleeping disorders. In fact, nearly 70 million adults in the United States have a sleeping disorder, the most common of which is sleep apnea. According to the National Sleep Foundation, a whopping 18 million adults in America have sleep apnea. So, what exactly is sleep apnea? There are two main types to know about:

  • The most common form, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is a condition involving involuntary temporary interruptions in breaths for at least ten seconds at a time due to upper airway blockage. This causes a disrupted sleeping pattern and low blood oxygen levels, which can contribute to several health issues.
  • Central sleep apnea is much less common and is characterized by failure of the brain to signal the necessary muscles involved in breathing.

As a result of the interrupted breathing pattern, individuals with sleep apnea often produce snoring and choking sounds throughout the night. You may be wondering, what’s the big deal about having sleep apnea? Sleep apnea does not only just interrupt your night’s rest, it can also put you at a higher risk of developing many conditions, including high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, depression, and worsening of ADHD.

Who does sleep apnea affect?

Obstructive sleep apnea can impact people of all ages and any gender, however, there are some factors that can place some people at higher risk. This includes people 40 years of age and older, smokers, heavy alcohol users, males, African Americans, those who have a family history of sleep apnea, and individuals suffering from obesity, sinus problems, or allergies. Your anatomy also plays a role in your risk of developing sleep apnea. People with nasal septum deviations, a thicker neck, narrow throat, large tongue, small jaw, or enlarged tonsils are at higher risk of sleep apnea.

If you think you have sleep apnea or have been told that you may have sleep apnea by your doctor, don’t worry! Sleep apnea can be treated, and Wellesley Dental Group’s very own Dr. Emad Abdallah can help you conquer sleep-disordered breathing!  Dr. Emad Abdallah received his doctorate, certificate in orthodontics, and Master of Science in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ) and orofacial pain from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. Don't be robbed of a good night's sleep, contact us today!

Stay tuned to our social media accounts including FacebookLinkedIn, Pinterest, and Twitter for more sleep-related posts!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-apnea

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sleep-apnea-and-snoring

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/is-sleep-apnea-or-snoring-robbing-you-from-your-sleep-0713

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Festive Stress Taking a Toll on Your Mouth?

December 15th, 2018

As we approach the holidays, it can be an exciting, yet stressful time as we prepare to decorate, shop, and entertain for our loved ones. Even traveling, finances, or just having a large to-do list can add stress to your body and oral health. Sometimes you may not notice the negative impact that stress is causing to your teeth. Take a look at these common stressors and how they could be harmful to your smile:

Snoring

Snoring does not only cause loud noises at night time-It could also be causing issues with your oral health! Snoring occurs when there is not enough air moving through the throat and nose while sleeping. Snoring could be a result of many conditions, and some risk factors include being male, 40 years of age or older, family history of snoring, and pregnancy. A main complication of snoring is dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is a lack of saliva, which is necessary for neutralizing acids made by bacteria within the mouth, and for moistening your gums and teeth. When there is a lack of saliva you may develop oral problems such as bad breath (halitosis), burning mouth syndrome, cavities, gingivitis, or mouth sores. Depending on the cause, interventions can include an oral appliance, weight loss, or a reduction in alcohol or smoking.

Tooth Grinding

A commonly known issue impacting your teeth is called bruxism, also known as tooth grinding. This often occurs during your sleep which can make it hard for you not to notice. In addition, jaw clenching can also cause similar effects including wearing your enamel down, gum recession, and weakening the supporting structures in your mouth that keep your teeth in place. Not to mention, it can also break or chip existing fillings in your mouth. Grinding and clenching are often due to anxiety or stress, but can also be caused by an abnormal bite. Some of the signs that can clue you in that you may be clenching or grinding include a sore jaw when you wake up in the morning, or your partner may notice clicking sounds during your sleep. Not to worry though, there are treatment options that can fix this. A night guard may be suggested, or relaxation methods including exercise or other stress management interventions may be advised by your dentist to prevent damaging your pearly whites.

Depression

Depression is a common condition for many individuals, and it can come and go in spurts during a person's life. It is important to talk with a Doctor or someone who can help if it begins to interfere with daily life including with the care of your oral and overall health.

Holiday stressors are real! Stay stress-free this holiday and be sure to keep up on health. Brushing, flossing, and making sure your scheduling your regular dental check-ups is particularly important during the holidays when lots of sweets are involved!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

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https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/what-causes-snoring-its-effect-on-oral-health-0713

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/stress-teeth#1

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/bruxism

Is Your Mouth Feeling Sizzling Hot?

October 20th, 2018

Being in pain is one of the worst feelings, especially when you don't know the cause. Thanks to new research, knowledge is increasing about chronic oral pain, also called Burning Mouth Syndrome. This condition commonly impacts middle-aged women and can be very debilitating for most people. In past years this condition has been quite ambiguous, but new discoveries are currently being made.

People experiencing Burning Mouth Syndrome often report a sensation of stinging on their tongue, palate, lips and/or gums. This condition can also cause dry mouth, and bitter or metallic taste sensation in the oral cavity. These symptoms can occur gradually overtime or appear suddenly. For many people, it can lead to difficulty eating, sleeping, and cause anxiety or depression.

A dissertation at Sahlgrenska Academy reported that when 56 women with Burning Mouth Syndrome were asked to rate the condition from 0 (not difficult at all) to 100 (unbearable), the average response was 66. It was also found that 45% of the patients experienced altered taste, and 73% had a burning, stinging, numbness, or combination of the three sensations. Burning Mouth Syndrome was strongly correlated with self reports of teeth grinding, multiple medication use, allergies, and skin diseases. Not to mention, mucin proteins detected in the patients were altered and contained less carbohydrate structures that normally impact the immune system. These patients were found to have higher inflammatory levels than the control group of individuals without Burning Mouth Syndrome. With this information, researchers are looking for methods to help with diagnosis and treatment options.

If you're experiencing some of the symptoms mentioned, this can be evaluated during your dental visit. Burning Mouth Syndrome can be secondary to dry mouth from several factors including multiple medications, fungal infections such as oral thrush, nutritional deficiencies (B1, B2, B6, B9, B12, Iron, Zinc), ill-fitting dentures, stomach acid reflux (GERD), diabetes, or consumption acidic beverages.

In the meantime, to help ease the pain, avoid irritants such as tobacco smoking, hot spicy foods, alcoholic beverages or mouth rinses with alcohol, and acidic foods and beverages.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180921151427.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/burning-mouth-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20350911

burning-mouth-syndrome-chauvin-dental-lafayette-la.jpg

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September Is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September 5th, 2018

What is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month?

Did you know that over 23 million children are obese or overweight in the United States? National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month is a yearly campaign with the goal of letting individuals know the health hazards of obesity, particularly for children. Approximately one third of children in the U.S. are at risk of type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease. But, with the knowledge and proper resources, we can make these statistics and the health of our children better. Several organizations and professionals will be joining together especially this month to raise money, conduct research, and provide treatment to help battle childhood obesity.

Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem that can have a lifelong impact on the overall health. Chronic conditions such as asthma, joint issues, Type 2 diabetes, and sleep apnea may develop at higher rates due to childhood obesity. Also, it has been found that children with obesity often are more likely to experience depression and lower self-esteem. Surprisingly, obesity is also linked with an increased risk of developing periodontal disease due to the body's inflammatory response.

Several factors play a role in childhood obesity, such as genetics, metabolism, your child's home and community environment, as well as eating behavior and level of physical activity. It is important to encourage your child to stay active, get regular sleep, and to have a tooth-friendly healthy diet. When your child's energy is balanced it allows for healthier growth.

Some ways to help prevent obesity include measuring your child's Body Mass Index (BMI). This can be done using the CDC’s Child and Teen BMI Calculator to help identify your child's risk for obesity. Most importantly, make sure your child is provided with nutritious meals that include fruits and vegetables. Now that school is starting up, make sure to pack healthy lunches, which will not only keep your teeth healthy, but also your body! Have your child avoid sugary foods and beverages. Allow a certain amount of time for your child to be involved in physical activity each day. Not to mention, be a role model by following the same guidelines!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/threats-to-dental-health/ada-09-september-is-national-childhood-obesity-awareness-month

https://www.cdc.gov/features/childhoodobesity/index.html

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Are You At Risk For Sleep Apnea?

January 23rd, 2017

It's common knowledge that sleep is important for learning and your overall health, but did you know that your sleeping habits are also linked to your tongue and tonsils?

According to a recent study published in the Saudi Medical Journal, tonsil size, tongue indentations, and tongue teeth imprints may be indicators for obstructive sleep apnea risk. This condition, which affects over 18 million adults in the US, stops and restarts your breathing due to blocked upper airways while you sleep. Common symptoms include interrupted sleep, sleep loss, fatigue, irritability, and a lack of focus.

OSA can also result in learning and memory problems, heart attacks, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, stroke, or depression in severe cases. Obese individuals over 40 years old with large tonsils and tongue indentations are most at risk for OSA.

If you have enlarged tongue or tonsils, we recommend that you visit a sleep specialist.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sleep-apnea-dentist-tongue-tonsil_us_56e04e17e4b0b25c91804c4c?utm_hp_ref=dental-health

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sleep-apnea-and-snoring

http://yourbodychanging.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Does-Sleeping-Make-You-Taller.jpg

Ever Dream of Losing Teeth?

September 8th, 2016

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Typically we all have one-of-a kind dreams at bedtime. However, a common dream that some have experienced is a dream about their teeth falling out. This may be in the form teeth breaking, rotting, or going completely missing. These dreams are not only scary, but are also confusing. If you've ever experienced dreams about losing teeth, check out what it could possibly suggest:

  • Anxiety

Dreaming about losing teeth could be a result of anxiety, according to recent studies in dream interpretation. The dream may indicate that you're experiencing a lack of control in a situation. It is also said that the dream could be a reminder about a important decision you need to make or have made already.

In the report, The Loss of Teeth in Dreams: An Empirical Investigation, analysts compared the personalities of individuals who frequently dream about losing their teeth to individuals who frequently dream about flying. It was found that the individuals dreaming of tooth loss were significantly more anxious and/or depressed than the other individuals studied.

  • Death and fear of aging

In some cultures, such as Chinese, losing teeth in a dream is considered an indicator of the future death of a family member. Also, these dreams have been said to represent a fear of getting older or concern about their own death.

  •  New beginnings

On the brighter side, losing teeth in a dream may be associated with giving birth or welcoming someone new into your life, according to some psychologists.

  •  Life changes

Tooth loss dreams may come during a transition in your life. Dream interpreters suggest that these dreams can arise due to letting something go, leaving a situation, or starting on a new adventure in life.

  • Health related

Dream interpreters have also suggested that dreams of missing or losing teeth could be a sign of malnutrition or poor diet. It could even be a sign of poor dental health.

 

If you're experiencing dreams about losing teeth, it is important to analyze what is going on in your life at the time. These dreams can be shocking, and knowing the possible causes of these dreams may help you control them. If you believe these dreams are due to poor dental health, make sure to schedule an appointment with your dentist.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/07/13/dreams-about-teeth-falling-out_n_891520.html

http://www.dreammoods.com/commondreams/teeth-dreams.html

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-fkRylb-K1DE/V4UJkoDNjbI/AAAAAAAAH3Q/_VgYrVeSKSQGKUvLp_mNv-Yzco-TJELxgCL0B/w523-h294-no/2132f3c1-75be-4de0-bc81-a8ac02e3cde8

Happy National Wine Day!

May 25th, 2016

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Happy National Wine Day! Did you know that moderate wine consumption (no more than one drink per day for women and two per day for men according to the US Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010") can lead to many health benefits?

1. Reduced Risk for Certain Cancers and Diseases

Moderate red wine consumption has the potential to prevent both breast and colon cancer. According to an article in the Journal of Women's Health, red grape skin and seed chemicals decrease estrogen levels and increase testosterone in women in the premenopausal stage, which leads to a reduced risk for breast cancer. A study conducted by scientists from the University of Leicester, UK also showed that drinking red wine decreased bowel tumor growth rate by about 50%. Other problems that red wine helps prevent include: blinding diseases, brain damages following strokes, severe sunburns, lung cancer, prostate cancer, type two diabetes, and liver disease.

2. Improved Mental Health

According to research conducted by a team of universities in Spain and published in BMC Medicine, drinking wine in moderation (two to seven glasses per week) can significantly decrease the risk for developing depression. Furthermore, scientists reported in The Journal of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment that moderate wine drinking decreases dementia risk by 23%. Red wine can also reduce the risk for Alzheimer's.

3. Healthier Heart

By raising omega-3 fatty acid levels in red blood cells, red wine prevents coronary heart disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

4. Longer Lifespan

Research from Harvard Medical School published in Cell Metabolismoffer showed that red wine has anti-aging properties that come from the compound resveratrol (from the skins of red grapes) in wine. Testing on mice demonstrated that the compound benefited the health of mice undergoing a high-fat diet and allowed them to live longer.

Another study conducted by the University of London discovered that another compound, procyanidin, maintains blood vessel health.

However...red wine can also stain your teeth!

Chromogens, which are strong pigments in red wine, can instantly stain your teeth after a little sip because of the cracks and irregularities of enamel. Additionally, acid and tannins in red wine encourage the erosion of enamel because they allow chromogens to bind and dry your mouth. While red wine can reduce gum disease risk and the potential for tooth decay, it is important to consider these options to maintain your pearly whites:

1. Thoroughly Brush and Floss Before Drinking

By eliminating plaque that stains bind to, you can lower the risk for staining. Proper oral hygiene also decreases tooth decay and gum disease risk.

2. Rinse!

Rinse immediately after consuming red wine to prevent the wine from clinging to your teeth for too long and to avoid having a dry mouth. Don't brush right afterwards - wait at least 30 minutes, because your enamel is the most sensitive after eating! When you brush later, use a whitening toothpaste.

3. Drink and Dine

Even if it's just cheese and crackers, a little food can prevent the acid from sticking to your teeth. Fibrous foods such as broccoli, celery, and hard cheeses are the best options to help remove stains and promote the flow of saliva.

4. Get Whitening Treatment (offered here at WDG)!

Here at Wellesley Dental Group (where one of our specialties is cosmetic dentistry), we offer four types of whitening treatment:

  1. Custom Take Home (tray whitening, paint-on teeth whiteners, teeth-whitening strips, whitening toothpaste and mouthwash)
  2. Sinsational Smile
  3. Philips Zoom!
  4. KöR

Please visit our website or contact our office for more details on whitening treatment! We would be happy to answer any questions.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265635.php

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/244905.php

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/cosmetic-dentistry/teeth-whitening/article/how-to-avoid-red-wine-teeth-this-holiday-season-1215

Depression Is a Threat to Oral Health

May 23rd, 2016

Did you know that depression, a common serious mental health and mood disorder, is linked to poor oral health care? If you suffer from depression, you may have a lack of motivation to take care of yourself and experience decreased salivation, which can directly impact oral health. Risk factors for depression include: personal or family history, major stress, and certain illnesses or side effects of medications.

Some signs and symptoms of depression are:

  • lasting feelings of sadness, anxiousness, emptiness, hopelessness, or pessimism
  • irritability
  • lack of energy/motivation
  • no interest in activities
  • guilt, worthlessness, etc.
  • difficulty concentrating or sleeping

There are many different types of depression, including:

  • persistent depression disorder (dysthymia): depressive symptoms for at least two years
  • perinatal depression: major depression during or after pregnancy (postpartum)
  • psychotic depression: severe depression and psychosis (delusions, hallucinations, etc.)
  • seasonal affective disorder: depression during the winter months

Depression is directly linked to oral health, because its consequences include xerostomia (dry mouth), a cariogenic diet (diet composed of sweets), and a poor immune system that can lead to oral infections. Risk for cardiovascular diseases also increases with depression.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://dualdiagnosis.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/bigstock-Girl-Sits-In-A-Depression-On-T-52227706-300x207.jpg

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2016/03/how-depression-threatens-oral-health-and-other-oral-systemic-links.html

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml

Can Depression Undermine Your Oral Health?

October 9th, 2014

Young Woman Biting Her Finger NailDid you know that tooth loss is linked to anxiety and depression? You heard correctly; that means that taking care of your teeth protects more than just your physical well-being, but also, your mental state.

These findings were concluded based on a study that was presented at the 43rd Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research, which occurred in March of this past year, 2014 in Charlotte, North Carolina.

The American Association for Dental Research is a non-profit organization composed of nearly 3,500 members. Its mission is stated as, “to advance research and increase knowledge for the improvement of oral health, to support  and represent the oral health research community, and to facilitate the communication and application of research findings.”

In the study, researchers examined a potential association of tooth loss with depression and anxiety.The study was conducted using The Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) Survey, a complex, telephone survey the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state health departments administer. Researchers focused on the 292 eligible participants, people who were 19 years old and up, who had answered questions pertaining to depression, anxiety, and tooth loss out of the overall 451,075 respondents who participated in the survey in 2010,

13.4 percent of of this eligible group of participants reported anxiety, 16.7 percent reported depression, and 5.7 percent reported tooth loss.

Demographics of the participants included the group being evenly split between males and females, with 68.7 percent of the participants being non-Hispanic whites, 12.7 percent were African American, 12.5 percent were Hispanics, and 6.8 percent reported being other. Further analysis of this selected group of participants confirmed initial thoughts that depression and/or anxiety were significantly related to tooth loss, when compared with participants who had not reported themselves as having depression or anxiety symptoms.

The study was overseen by Dr. R. Constant Weiner, a professor at West Virginia University. Her findings concluded that several biopsychosocial factors influenced a person’s dental health. What are “biopsychosocial factors”? This all-encompassing term is as an expression for all factors, embracing biological, psychological, and societal influences, that result in a scenario, such as tooth loss. Dr. R. Constance Wiener noted that prominent  biopsychosocial factors that resulted in tooth loss were the relative presence or lack of feelings of self worth and self-esteem, as well as a lack of access to dental care.

What are the reasons for this connection? People who suffer from anxiety may avoid dental care, and people who suffer from depression are often negligent in self-care, which includes dental care. It is a chicken-or-the-egg scenario to try and determine whether depression, and its related lack of self-care, leads to tooth loss, or whether tooth loss leads to a loss of self-esteem that results in depression and anxiety. Either/or, the relation between depression/anxiety and tooth loss is significant enough to garner attention.

If you’re suffering from tooth loss, there is help available. At Wellesley Dental Group, we offer dental implants, which are beautiful and fully functional. We offer a caring, non judgemental environment where our focus is on your health and happiness. No matter the current state of your teeth, there is a place for you at our office. Our Dr. Ali is a renowned cosmetic dentist who can help you have a smile you’ll be confident showing off. Rest assured, you’ll be happy with your results! If there is anything we can do at all to take care of your oral health, please call 781-237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment for consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

References:

http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/03/21/tooth-loss-linked-with-anxiety-and-depression/67417.html

http://www.aadronline.org/i4a/pages/index.cfm?pageid=3452

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/plaque-on-teeth

Images:

http://www.faverodental.com/2014/06/tooth-loss-linked-to-depression-and-anxiety/

A Link Between Depression/Anxiety and Tooth Loss

March 29th, 2014

Grow TeethTooth loss is often a result of a variety of factors.  One may experience tooth loss as a result of periodontal disease or severe caries.  A new study led by R. Constance Wiener of West Virginia University has concluded that tooth loss is associated with complex, chronic conditions like anxiety or depression. 

The association is complicated and has to do with a lot of biopsychosocial factors.  For instance, a person suffering from depression is more likely to neglect their oral health.  Alternatively, a person with a lot of anxiety may avoid the dentist due to dental anxiety.

This study looked at surveys conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  These surveys also concluded that people in the 46 - 64 year age bracket, women, blacks, Hispanics, and those that are unemployed were more likely to meet the criteria for major depression.

Tooth loss can lead to a host of negative consequences including speech problems, stiff jaws, chewing problems, and the weakening of remaining teeth.  There are many tooth replacement options available from dental implants to fixed bridges -- all of which look like real teeth!  Dental implants are often the most expensive option, but are considered to be the most comfortable.  An implant consists of an artificial root inserted into the bone and is covered with a crown that mimics a real tooth.  A fixed bridge is made up of a group of crowns fixed together and use the neighboring, existing teeth to anchor it in place.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Dr. Ghazi is available for various oral surgery appointments and wisdom teeth extractions, while Dr. Emad is here to help with your orthodontic needs. 

Sources:

http://psychcentral.com/news/2014/03/21/tooth-loss-linked-with-anxiety-and-depression/67417.html
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140320111903.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fhealth_medicine%2Fdentistry+%28Dentistry+News+--+ScienceDaily%29
http://atlanta.cbslocal.com/2014/03/23/study-tooth-loss-associated-with-depression/
http://www.studiodentaire.com/articles/en/causes-consequences-of-tooth-loss.php
Photo by Peter Macdiarmid/Getty Images

Psychological Distress Linked To Increased Risk Of Death

August 8th, 2012

Stressed out? It may be time to take a breather! New research shows that stress, even at low levels, were 20% more likely to die over a ten year time span.

However, these findings can't necessarily prove that being stressed or depressed is directly linked to death. Similar studies have been conducted and have been unsuccessful in figuring out if people become sick because they're stressed or they become stressed because they're sick.

This study was featured in the British Medicine Journal. The data was compiled from information taken from over 68,000 people over the age of 35. The survey asked a variety of questions on topics such as sleep patterns, ability to face problems, and feelings of worthlessness. The lower the score of the survey taker, the less stressed of a person they are.

The most startling part of the survey is that more than 8,300 people passed away, mostly from heart disease and stroke.

Taking steps toward reducing stress is an important factor in maintaining optimum health. If you feel that your stress level is affecting your quality of life, make an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible.

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