disease

Protect Your Smile in the Cold!

January 8th, 2017

Baby, it's cold outside! Since having healthy teeth is important for self-confidence and the prevention of diseases or pains (such as canker sores or cold sores), we need to make sure to take care of our teeth as the temperatures drop. This is especially important if your teeth are sensitive.

If you have sensitive teeth in cold weather, it may be due to several reasons. For instance, you could have cracked teeth, weakened enamel, gum recession, gingivitis, or an infection. Make sure not to brush too hard or clench or grind your teeth, because these habits could make your teeth even more sensitive.

However, teeth sensitivity problems can be easily resolved. Just maintain proper oral hygiene habits and make an effort to protect your teeth! Brush with a soft toothbrush after meals, floss, and use densensitizing toothpaste.

Maintaining a healthy diet and staying hydrated is just as important. Drink at least two liters of water per day to ensure moist gums and teeth and adequate saliva production (and don't forget to apply a lip balm to avoid cracked lips!). Avoid beverages with high sugar content and acidic foods.

If you can, try to limit your time outside as well. Sudden changes in temperature can result in the formation of teeth fractures, so if you have to be outside, wear a scarf and cover your mouth!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.imgion.com/images/01/Playing-in-Winter-.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/mouth-sores-and-infections/article/winter-tips-for-a-healthy-mouth-dealing-with-common-winter-mouth-woes-0115

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rahis-saifi/5-dental-health-tips-on-h_b_12457368.html?utm_hp_ref=dental-health

Happy National Wine Day!

May 25th, 2016

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Happy National Wine Day! Did you know that moderate wine consumption (no more than one drink per day for women and two per day for men according to the US Department of Agriculture's "Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2010") can lead to many health benefits?

1. Reduced Risk for Certain Cancers and Diseases

Moderate red wine consumption has the potential to prevent both breast and colon cancer. According to an article in the Journal of Women's Health, red grape skin and seed chemicals decrease estrogen levels and increase testosterone in women in the premenopausal stage, which leads to a reduced risk for breast cancer. A study conducted by scientists from the University of Leicester, UK also showed that drinking red wine decreased bowel tumor growth rate by about 50%. Other problems that red wine helps prevent include: blinding diseases, brain damages following strokes, severe sunburns, lung cancer, prostate cancer, type two diabetes, and liver disease.

2. Improved Mental Health

According to research conducted by a team of universities in Spain and published in BMC Medicine, drinking wine in moderation (two to seven glasses per week) can significantly decrease the risk for developing depression. Furthermore, scientists reported in The Journal of Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment that moderate wine drinking decreases dementia risk by 23%. Red wine can also reduce the risk for Alzheimer's.

3. Healthier Heart

By raising omega-3 fatty acid levels in red blood cells, red wine prevents coronary heart disease, according to a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

4. Longer Lifespan

Research from Harvard Medical School published in Cell Metabolismoffer showed that red wine has anti-aging properties that come from the compound resveratrol (from the skins of red grapes) in wine. Testing on mice demonstrated that the compound benefited the health of mice undergoing a high-fat diet and allowed them to live longer.

Another study conducted by the University of London discovered that another compound, procyanidin, maintains blood vessel health.

However...red wine can also stain your teeth!

Chromogens, which are strong pigments in red wine, can instantly stain your teeth after a little sip because of the cracks and irregularities of enamel. Additionally, acid and tannins in red wine encourage the erosion of enamel because they allow chromogens to bind and dry your mouth. While red wine can reduce gum disease risk and the potential for tooth decay, it is important to consider these options to maintain your pearly whites:

1. Thoroughly Brush and Floss Before Drinking

By eliminating plaque that stains bind to, you can lower the risk for staining. Proper oral hygiene also decreases tooth decay and gum disease risk.

2. Rinse!

Rinse immediately after consuming red wine to prevent the wine from clinging to your teeth for too long and to avoid having a dry mouth. Don't brush right afterwards - wait at least 30 minutes, because your enamel is the most sensitive after eating! When you brush later, use a whitening toothpaste.

3. Drink and Dine

Even if it's just cheese and crackers, a little food can prevent the acid from sticking to your teeth. Fibrous foods such as broccoli, celery, and hard cheeses are the best options to help remove stains and promote the flow of saliva.

4. Get Whitening Treatment (offered here at WDG)!

Here at Wellesley Dental Group (where one of our specialties is cosmetic dentistry), we offer four types of whitening treatment:

  1. Custom Take Home (tray whitening, paint-on teeth whiteners, teeth-whitening strips, whitening toothpaste and mouthwash)
  2. Sinsational Smile
  3. Philips Zoom!
  4. KöR

Please visit our website or contact our office for more details on whitening treatment! We would be happy to answer any questions.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/265635.php

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/244905.php

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/cosmetic-dentistry/teeth-whitening/article/how-to-avoid-red-wine-teeth-this-holiday-season-1215

The Link Between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

June 13th, 2013

26 million adults are known to be affected by diabetes. Statistics show that 1 out of 10 healthcare dollars are spent on diabetes. The link between periodontal disease and diabetes has been extensively studied over the past 50 years. There is strong evidence that diabetes is a risk factor for periodontitis and gingivitis. A study dating back to more than 30 years ago has already shown that children suffering from type 1 diabetes had a higher prevalence of gingival inflammation. Ervasti et al. examined patients with gingival bleeding and determined that there was greater amount of bleeding in patients with poorly controlled diabetes when compared to subjects that do not have diabetes and subjects with well-controlled diabetes. Research has also shown that types with type 2 diabetes also tend to have more gingival inflammation than the control group in the study.

Studies also show that the risk of developing periodontitis is increased when one has diabetes. Teenagers with type 1 diabetes have been found to be five times more likely to develop periodontitis. Research also supports the idea that there may be more bone loss linked to adults with diabetes. Subjects suffering from type 2 diabetes are three times more likely to develop periodontitis compared to subjects without diabetes.

Doctors were able to pinpoint the root cause of this relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. There is a protein known as the c-reactive protein (CRP), which is found in the blood stream. CRP levels rise with inflammation of blood vessels, which has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Researchers have also shown that CRP is continuously produced in the presence of periodontal diseases. It is important to note that an individual cannot keep diabetes under control if he or she is also suffering from periodontal disease. It is absolutely crucial that diabetic patients maintain good oral health to keep CRP at bay.

Periodontal disease can affect your general health; read more here.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! They can assess the risk of periodontal disease and if need be our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi, can help.Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

Cianciola L, Park B, Bruck E, Mosovich L, Genco R. Prevalence of periodontal disease
in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (juvenile diabetes). JADA
1982;104(5):653-60.

Ervasti L, Knuuttila M, Pohjamo L, Haukipuro K. Relation between control of
diabetes and gingival bleeding. J Periodontol 1985;56(3):154-7.

http://www.diabetes.org/news-research/research/access-diabetes-research/greenfield-protein.html

http://www.ada.org/sections/professionalResources/pdfs/Perio_diabetes.pdf

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Can playing a musical instrument effect oral health?

June 11th, 2013

It has been widely accepted that playing a musical instrument can increase and nourish intelligence in children, but playing a used instrument can be a health risk as well.

General Dentistry published a clinical study that revealed that woodwind and brass instruments that have been previously used were found to be ridden with various bacteria and fungi some that have been linked to serious infectious and allergic diseases, which can further lead to conditions such as mouth breathing. Click here to read more about mouth breathing. Children who are involved with their school band or orchestra typically rent their instrument for over the course of the year. These instruments have already been played by other students and without proper cleaning, bacteria an fungi have been indubitably thriving in the instrument. The same growth has been seen in dentures, athletic mouth guards, and tooth brushes.

In the clinical study, 117 instrumental pieces, including mouthpieces, internal chambers, and cases were tested on 13 previously used instruments. There were 442 different bacteria found on the instruments, along with 58 molds and 19 yeasts. Mold can lead to the increased likelihood of developing asthma, while yeasts found on the instruments can lead to skin infections around the mouth and lips. These bacteria, fungi, mold, and yeast that are presence on these instruments are highly resistant to the antibiotics that are normally prescribed, which highlights the importance of sterilizing instruments that have been previously played. It is essential to wipe areas that come in contact with the skin and mouth frequently. Instruments should be cleaned on a regular basis with cleaning cloths and solution.

If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/142/5/490.3.fullv

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