EEC

Vitamins: Key to Healing after Oral Surgery

January 13th, 2014

While vitamin C is a great way to boost your immune system, vitamins can also play a major role in timely recovery after oral surgery.

The Academy of General Dentistry explained that patients lacking in vitamin C have shown to recover at a slower rate. Appropriate amounts of vitamin C, along with other vitamins, minerals, fats, and protein, were reported to be essential for the growth and regeneration of normal tissues. Nutrients work both individually and cooperatively to move along the healing process. Tissue maintenance and repair requires the help of carbohydrates, fat and protein. Recovery of these tissues involves vitamin C, along with vitamins such as vitamins E, B and K.

Vitamin C is responsible for the making collagen (connective tissue) that strengthens skin muscles and blood vessels; this is key to proper wound healing.

Vitamin E has the ability to...thin blood, preventing blood platelets from clumping. It also speed up cell regeneration and promotes blood circulation, strengthening capillary walls while nourishing cells.

Vitamin B is crucial for carbohydrate metabolism and energy production. It facilitates energy-releasing reactions and can also help deliver oxygen and nutrients, allowing energy pathways to run smoothly.

Vitamin K promotes blood clotting and prevents bleeding; this is can be used to prevent post-surgery bruising.

Without these important nutrients, patients are more prone to infection and healing time can be further delayed. Researchers note that severely underweight or overweight patients, or those who take steroids, immunosuppressant, or chemotherapeutic agents may experience poor recovery after oral surgery. It is crucial to maintain a healthy balance of vitamins before going into surgery.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=N&iid=315&aid=1277

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/003042208290295X

http://www.livestrong.com/article/470706-nutrition-related-to-the-oral-cavity/

Kick that Bad Habit: Stop Slouching to Relieve Oral Pain and Stress

August 8th, 2013

Slouching seems to be a problem that has swept through teenagers across the world. Well, there’s no doubt that slouching is a comfortable position; however, it has always been highly recommended for anyone with bad posture to correct it immediately in order to prevent strain and injury of muscles. What’s more, dental professionals have also been commenting on problems that can occur due to bad posture. The Academy of General Dentistry (AGD) recommends that if patients are feeling frequent headaches and pain in the lower jaw, poor posture may be the issue at hand.

 

Poor posture keeps the spine at a position that induces stress to the jaw joint. When individuals are slouching, the lower jaw actually moves forward, keeping the lower and upper teeth from aligning and fitting together. This type of movement can really put stress on muscles, bones and joints, and if let on its own, one can develop pain and inflammation near the joints where the mouth has the most motion. Dentists have noted that patients with facial pain tend to have unbalanced posture. This ends up rearranging their facial muscles, causing bumps and grooves (that naturally fit together properly) to not match up. When individuals end up with a bad bite, TMJ (Temporomandibular joint disorder) results. This is a condition where jaw joints that do not function properly end up causing pain and stress in the surrounding tissue. This can lead to symptoms including ringing in the ears, difficulty biting, and jaw popping.

 

Having good posture is constantly talked about in terms of back problems, but it can very well be linked to maintaining good oral health. It is important to practice good posture, not just to avoid back problems, but also to avoid oral cavity issues. Try to make sitting and standing up straight a healthy habit! If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.healthcentral.com/chronic-pain/h/does-slouching-cause-back-and-neck-pain.html

 

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=h&iid=334&aid=1347

 

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/001227.htm

 

Washing Down Cereal with Milk is Beneficial to Oral Health!

August 6th, 2013

When people say that milk is cereal’s best friend, that saying is true with respect to many aspects. Milk is definitely a great complement to any cereal consumed in the morning, but it can also do wonders for teeth! New research done at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry demonstrated that downing some milk after consuming sugary cereal could greatly cut down plaque acid levels, preventing damage to tooth enamel that could eventually lead to cavities.

 

Studies have previously shown that when individuals eat carbohydrates four times a daily, they are in fact increasing the risk of cavities. Christine Wu, a professor of pediatric dentistry at the University of Illinois, was interested in ways to prevent the onset of cavities while not avoiding morning carbs. Wu and her former graduate student conducted a study with 20 adults. Each participant was given 20 grams of dry Froot Loops cereal, along with one beverage, including whole milk, 100% apple juice or tap water. A microelectrode placed between premolar teeth before consumption was used to measured plaque pH or acidity in the oral cavity. A pH below 7 is considered acid; a pH at 7 is considered neutral; a pH above 7 is considered basic. Wu found that pH in plaque dropped quickly (became acidic) after consuming cereal alone, and remained at a pH of 5.83 after 30 minutes.

 

The individuals who drank milk after eating the Froot Loops showed the highest increase in pH, from 5.75 to 6.48 in 30 minutes. Those who drank apple juice were only at a pH of 5.84 after 30 minutes while those who consumed water experienced an increase of pH to 6.02. Wu’s study showed that milk was the only beverage that significantly reduced the acidity of dental plaque after the consumption of sugary carbs. She believes that milk counteracts the damaging effect of fermentable carbs and has the ability to effectively bring up plaque pH.

 

Diet continues to be absolutely crucial in oral health and the different types of food truly do determine the likelihood of developing cavities. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130731164718.htm

 

http://life.nationalpost.com/2013/08/02/drinking-a-glass-of-milk-after-sugary-cereal-may-cut-risk-of-cavities-study/

 

http://www.nydailynews.com/life-style/health/drinking-milk-eating-sugary-foods-cut-cavity-risk-article-1.1415092

 

 

Chewing On Ice: A Safe Way to Cool Down?

August 5th, 2013

There’s definitely no denying that summers can really bring the heat. There are tons of clever ways we try to cool down. A popular choice tends to be chewing on ice; I mean, who doesn’t like a cool down with zero calories? It may sound like an ingenious way to beat the heat, but in fact, chewing on ice can be harmful to teeth.

While ice does melt in the mouth, it is still a hard solid before a does! Dentists tend to see patients come in with gum injuries and broken teeth…all because of ice! The American Dental Association (ADA) has recommended that avoiding chewing on ice is a great way to keep away from tooth injuries.

But don’t worry! Dentists are not saying to keep away from ice at all costs. Instead of taking in large chunks of ice at a time, dentists recommend letting ice slivers melt in the mouth, just like candy. That way, you still get the cool down, but you’re keep teeth from harm’s way as well. If there are chewers out there who can’t resist a good crunching, safe and healthy alternatives can include baby carrots or apple chunks.

If there is still a need or craving to chew on ice, please let the dentist know. Craving to chew on ice has been shown to be associated with iron deficiency anemia. This case is due to the body’s lack of iron, as the name implies. Iron plays a key role in producing hemoglobin, which allows red blood cells to carry oxygen.

Even if the weather outside is sweltering, try to find refreshments that are both healthy for the body and safe on teeth. Here (hyperlink ‘here’ to the article I wrote on healthy summer popsicles) are a few fun ways to cool down in the summer. These treats will definitely keep you wanting more! If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2006/article/ADA-07-Chew-On-This.cvsp

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/chewing-ice/AN01278

http://www.burgpediatricdentistry.com/2012/10/top-three-habits-that-damage-teeth/

Toothbrushing Mistakes to Know About

August 2nd, 2013

Many think that by now, after all these years, they have gotten toothbrushing down. While brushing teeth may seem like an easy and routine matter, there are common mistakes that tend to occur!

Mistake #1: Picking the wrong toothbrush

Dentists at the American Dental Association ask individuals to not forget to consider the size of the mouth. With a toothbrush too big, one will not be able to get to tough to reach areas in the mouth. A general rule of thumb that can be followed is to see if it takes straining to open the mouth wide enough to let the toothbrush in. If that’s the case, the brush may be too large!

Another big concern is determining which is the better toothbrush: a manual one or an electronic? The general consensus among doctors is that it’s the individual preference. Dr. Richard H. Price of the American Dental Association explains, “It’s not the toothbrush, it’s the brusher”. What’s important is how well the individual brushes his or her teeth. Dentists believe that a manual toothbrush can do just as well as an electronic toothbrush.

Mistake #2: Not brushing long enough

Everyone generally knows that the rule is to brush teeth twice a day. However, many people tend to rush through their brushing time and have the mindset that as long as they brushed, everything is okay! However, that is not the case! Brushing should last at least two minutes, and preferably for three minutes. Dentists recommend that the mouth be split into four quadrants, and at least 30 seconds should be spent at each quadrant. Electric toothbrushes also have self-timers that can keep people on track. Another suggested way to brush for enough time is to multi-task: listen to your favorite song or watch a show while you’re at it. It’ll make time fly and your teeth clean.

Mistake #3: Brushing too hard

Some think that if they really get in there and scrub their teeth, they are most definitely doing their teeth some good. However, brush too vigorous can actually erode tooth enamel! Dentists recommend that individuals brush lightly to avoid erosion of the enamel and irritation of the gums. When choosing bristle type of toothbrushes, doctors also suggest opting for soft bristles.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-10/brushing-teeth-mistakes?page=1

http://www.webmd.boots.com/oral-health/guide/brushing-teeth-mistakes

http://healthmagazine.ae/10-tooth-brushing-mistakes/

http://www.prevention.com/health/healthy-living/toothbrush-mistakes-can-damage-enamel

Caring For a Young Smile

August 1st, 2013

It’s an exciting time when parents are able to welcome a new face into the family. After some time caring for the new baby, you finally spot your little boy or girl’s new teeth budding out through the gums. In a blink of an eye, your child will have a full set of baby teeth. While baby teeth are quite small and are know to be replaced by adult teeth, it is very important for a baby to develop and maintain healthy teeth. A healthy set of baby teeth is integral for speech development and chewing. Here are a few pointers to ensure that your baby’s teeth have proper care!

It is important to choose a toothbrush that was be optimal for cleaning and maintaining healthy baby teeth. Be on the lookout for a soft brush with a small head and a large handle. This type of toothbrush will allow a parent to gently maneuver through a little one’s small mouth, getting the brush even to the smallest of crevices. Before the age of 1, baby teeth can be brushed with just a wet toothbrush; past that age, a pea-sized amount of non-fluoridated toothpaste can be incorporated into the brushing routine. It is advised that fluoride toothpaste should be held off until a child is at least 2 years old. While brushing, look for signs that would point to baby tooth decay, which can be found in form of brown or white spots on the teeth. If possible decay is detected, the child should be taken to a pediatric dentist for an examination. Good ways to prevent cavities from forming is to avoid giving your child juices, sodas, or any other drinks with high sugar content. Bacteria in the mouth easily thrives on any sugar present in the mouth, so it is essential to limit a baby’s sugar intake. As a child continues to grow, he or she will begin to want to be in command of their brushing routine. Parents still need to supervise their child with this process until he or she is able to hold the brush, and can rinse and spit without help.

The period it takes for a baby to develop a full set of teeth can be a difficult time for both the child and parents. Through this time, each tooth will begin to emerge, which is a process known as teething. Babies can begin to exhibit signs of teething through drooling, swollen gums, and even having temperatures a little above normal. Teething can be a very uncomfortable experience for the baby, but no fear! Teething rings can be used to allow the babies to chew something safe while their teeth starts to come in. Avoid giving a child small objects to chew on that could potentially lead to choking. If your child is in serious pain, consult your pediatrician and ask if the baby can take acetaminophen (i.e. Tylenol) for pain relief.

Helping your child develop beautiful pearly whites can take time and effort, but it will definitely be worth it! Oral hygiene doesn't begin when an individual ready to pick up a toothbrush, it starts right away! We have an excellent pediatric dentist, Dr. Pradhan, who would be more than happy to help your child. If you have more concerns about caring for baby teeth, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

Make Teeth Shine with Fruits and Vegetables!

June 26th, 2013

While coffee and red wine may have shown to be beneficial for health, they are drinks that can easily darken those pearly whites. Here are some healthy foods that are both great for the body and can leave teeth whiter. According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), these are a couple fruits and vegetables that can naturally make teeth brighter and whiter.

 

 

Pineapples: research has shown that these tangy fruits contain the enzyme bromelain, which acts as a natural stain remover. Bromelain helps fight plaque from forming, which can wear down the enamel of teeth and lead to cavities.

Apples: like that saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”, apples can help keep bacteria away. Munching on this particular fruit can generate saliva, which can help neutralize the acid from other foods, keeping teeth free from decay

Carrots: these stringy vegetables are a reservoir of vitamin, which keep tooth enamel in tip-top shape. Eating these veggies raw can help the mouth replenish saliva, which is responsible for keeping the mouth clean. Chewing on crunchy vegetables (count celery in!) will help keep teeth clean.

Broccoli: these mighty greens are chock-full of iron, which helps keep acid that is developed in the mouth from damaging the enamel of teeth. A Brazilian study found that broccoli can prevent erosion of enamel due to acid found in sodas.

Onions: although this vegetable is usually the culprit of leaving bad breath after a delicious sandwich, onions contain sulfur compounds, including thiosulfinates and thiosulfonates, which can reduce bacteria in mouth that cause decay. Researchers suggest to eat onions raw, for cooking them will destroy these sulfur compounds. If you are not a fan of onions, garlic also can supply you with these sulfur compounds.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1601-5037.2010.00473.x/abstract

http://www.aacd.com/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20922161

http://www.3dwhite.com/teeth-whitening/teeth-whitening-kits/make-teeth-whiter.aspx

http://modestyplusglamour.wordpress.com/2012/10/07/pineapple-for-acne-scars/ (picture credit) Also, did you know that pineapples are good for acne scars?

Our Latest Google Reviews!

June 25th, 2013

Finding a dentist can be a process – a process that may include asking friends for advice, searching online, reading reviews, checking with dental insurance, and then actually calling the dental office for an appointment. You deserve to reach a friendly person on the line, too, when you do make the call.
Here’s a sampling of what some of the wonderful things our patients have said about their experience with Drs. Ejaz and Femina Ali, our specialists, and with Wellesley Dental Group. We also have a profile on DemandForce. Feel free to check it out!

[box] "Wellesley Dental Group is the best :) But, seriously...the best. PERIOD. I first went there when I was a student at Wellesley about 2 or so years ago. They did a wonderful job of giving me a new crown when the one I had done at a dentist back home fell out. I have been going ever since for cleanings and my teeth are beautiful. Thanks y'all!" Victoria Boyd- Google

 

"For someone who has never been fond of going to the dentist, I always find my experience at the Wellesley Dental Group to be effortless and even enjoyable. Both Dr.'s Ali are extremely knowledgeable and skilled practitioners. Not only do they use cutting edge technology and employ a standard of excellence in their craft, but they are also quick to explain what they are seeing and ensure that you are comfortable and cared for throughout your visit. On my most recent visit, I was even given headphones so I could listen to the music of my choice while having a cavity filled. Everyone from the Dr.'s to the hygienists to the front desk were helpful, kind and professional. I highly recommend this dental practice!" Tanya Khan- Google

 

"I was very nervous. Had terrible, painful experiences at the dentist before. They went to great lengths to make me feel comfortable and to make sure I was ready before starting. The procedure turned out to be painless, even a bit relaxing. I couldn't believe it and was so relieved. I hadn't been to the dentist in 20 years because of my phobia and now I have no reservations about going back. Thank you." Bill Ladd- Google

 

"I have been going to Wellesley Dental Group for approximately 7 years and have been very happy with the care and treatment I've received. About 5 years ago, I decided to get fitted for a night guard for TMJ. It took a few weeks to adjust to wearing it. It not only helped my jaw problems, but also unexpectedly helped with my chronic headaches. I had been taking four to six ibuprofen daily for, what I thought, were stress or tension headaches. Within six weeks of regular wear my headaches were gone. I'm thrilled with the impact the mouth guard has had on both my jaw and headaches and never sleep without it. It's wonderful to be headache free!" Karen Hegarty - Google

 

"It's always a challenge to find a good dentist. Wellesley Dental Group came highly recommended from a couple of people I know and for extremely good reasons. I found the doctors there to be very knowledgeable, timely, and professional. They take really good care of their patients. They also pay special attention to detail to ensure the highest quality of service and work on your teeth. The staff and all of the hygienists are extremely friendly and helpful. They staff goes out of their way to make your experience a great one. If you are looking for a great dentist in the area, definitely give them a try." Ayesha Khan- Google

 

"My entire family has been coming to see Dr. and Dr. Ali at the Wellesley Dental Group for years and they have consistently offered us all the best dental experience every time any of us visit visit! Whether I am coming in for my bi-annual teeth cleaning, teeth-whitening checkups, or even a cavity fill, Dr. and Dr. Ali and their talented and friendly staff ensure that my visit is as smooth and comfortable as possible. It doesn't hurt that their office is located conveniently in Wellesley right off Route 9! I would highly recommend coming to the Wellesley Dental Group (if you don't already) !" Anonymous- Google[/box]

 

Early Childhood Caries: Is it something to worry about?

June 24th, 2013

Early Childhood Caries (ECC) is an infectious disease that affects the primary or baby teeth of young children. The American Dental Association defines ECC as the presence of one or more decayed, missing or filled tooth surfaces on any primary tooth in a preschool-aged child between birth and 71 months of age. Both the American Dental Association (ADA) and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) identify ECC as a serious health problem.

Both the ADA and the AAPD continue to push health professionals and the general public to realize that once a child’s teeth is exposed (after eruption), there needs to be steps taken right away to prevent tooth decay. Early childhood caries is an infectious disease that cannot be taken lightly. ADA provides a few ways to leave child’s teeth less susceptible to tooth decay.

• The Association recommends scheduling a child’s first dental visit within the first six months of eruption of the first tooth, and no later than 12 months of age. At the dental visit, not only is the child screened for any damage done to teeth, parents are also educated on preventative steps to keep early childhood caries from surfacing.

• ECC risk can also be lowered if the mother’s mutans (bacteria) levels are decreased. Parents (including expectant parents) are also encouraged to set up an appointment with a dentist to maintain their own oral health.

• Infants should be kept on a balanced healthy diet; parents should keep their child away from liquids and beverages that have fermentable carbohydrates, such as juices, soft drinks, and starches, which are drinks that can easily lead to tooth decay.

• An unrestricted intake of sugary drinks during the day or while the child is in bed is not encouraged; parents should have their child finish their bottle before getting put to bed.

• Children should learn to drink from a cup by the time they are one-year-olds; parents should wean their child off of training cups as much as possible.

Our pediatric dentist, Dr. Pradhan, will be more than willing to take care of your child’s dental needs. Also, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ada.org/2057.aspx

http://www.aapd.org/media/Policies_Guidelines/P_ECCClassifications.pdf

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