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National Eating Disorders Awareness Week: #ComeAsYouAre

February 28th, 2020

National Eating Disorders Awareness Week is happening now and people around the world are encouraged to Come as You Are! This year's theme is Come as You Are: Hindsight is 20/20 during February 24th to March 1st, which is the time where individuals are reflecting on their journeys toward accepting themselves and others.

The purpose of National Eating Disorders Awareness Week (#NEDAwareness) is to shed light on eating disorders through education and provide resources that could save lives. According to the National Eating Disorder Association, approximately 30 million people in the United States are affected by an eating disorder, including anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa or binge eating disorder. In addition, about 70 million across the world are impacted by eating disorders. It is important to know that eating disorders can affect anyone, including people of all ages, genders, ethnicities and backgrounds. Overtime, eating disorders can place a tremendous toll on both a person's physical and mental wellbeing.

Individuals who are affected by eating disorders often experience a variety of symptoms, ranging from anxiety, emotional distress, depression, problems with development and growth, and medical problems. However, not all eating disorders are experienced in the same way by individuals.

Many are aware that diet can impact not just your physical health, but also your oral health. Signs of an eating disorder are often seen first within the mouth. Lack of nutrients and harmful habits can permanently damage teeth. Take a look at some of the consequences of eating disorders for your oral cavity:

  • Improper nutrition can impact the amount of protective saliva present within the mouth that may cause dry mouth. Dry mouth significantly increases your risk for developing tooth decay along with it's uncomfortable sensation. In addition, the gums and soft tissue may bleed easier due to lack of essential nutrients.
  • Nutritional deficiencies can increase the risk of developing tooth decay and gum disease, because teeth rely on vitamins and minerals including  calcium, iron and B vitamins. A lack of proper amounts of iron can lead to the development of oral sores. Also, a lack of sufficient amounts of vitamin B3 (niacin) can contribute to bad breath, dry mouth,  and the development of canker sores.
  • Vomit can be extremely damaging to teeth, because the stomach acid causes the tooth enamel, the outermost layer of the tooth, to wear down. This not only changes the shape and size  of teeth, but also changes the color. The layer underneath tooth enamel, dentin, which has a yellow hue can become exposed and increase sensitivity and make your tooth become brittle. Erosive lesions within the mouth may also appear. In more severe cases, the pulp, the innermost layer of the tooth, may become exposed and result in pulp death.
  • Degenerative arthritis within the temporomandibular joint in the jaw has been found to be associated with eating disorders, which can cause severe pain, chronic headaches, and trouble chewing or opening/closing the mouth.
  • Frequent binge-and-purging can cause the salivary glands to become inflamed and enlarged, causing pain within the oral cavity.

Eating disorders if not treated can result in death. Treatment can include a combination of psychotherapy, nutrition education, and medical monitoring, but can vary based on the type of eating disorder.

If you have any questions about eating disorders, talk with your primary care physician or dentist. The National Eating Disorders Association (NEDA) also has screening tools  available online. Now is the perfect time to help increase awareness and support those impacted by eating disorders.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/get-involved/nedawareness

https://www.livewellmagazine.org/eating-disorder-awareness-week-feb-24-march-1/

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/dental-complications-eating-disorders

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https://www.mirror-mirror.org/eating-disorders-statistics.htm

Drinking from a Can? Think Again!

December 4th, 2019

Ever wonder if drinking from a can, a glass, or using straw could make a difference to your teeth? We all know that foods and drinks can play a role on the health of your teeth, but many would not have thought that the way you consume your drink can also be an important factor. Well, as it turns out, your drinking method does matter when consuming sugary beverages!

Sugary drinks can cause a lot of damage to your teeth, and your body too. According to a study published in the Academy of General Dentistry people in the United States consume about one and a half cans of soda a day, and a total of 576 each year! The study found that people who drink soft drinks straight from the can are more likely to get tooth decay on their back molar teeth. Consuming sugary drinks like sodas and energy drinks increase your risk of weight gain, and developing several medical conditions including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and gout -and kids are not exempt! Children are 60% more likely to become obese with each sugary beverage consumed per day and are 2 times more susceptible to tooth decay.

Sugar as we know is what bacteria love to eat, and as a result the bacteria within your mouth produce acids that ultimately lead to tooth decay and breakdown your tooth enamel. But, we all have that craving for a soda every once and a while. That's why it is important to learn about preventative measures to take when consuming sugary beverages. Research shows that holding a drink in your mouth and taking long sips is detrimental to your teeth because it increases the acidity within your mouth. A smaller drop in the pH occurs when you drink the beverage straight down quickly and in one sitting. Sipping on a soda can throughout the day leads right to decay due to the constant exposure of your teeth to the sugars. The American Dental Association (ADA) also recommends using a straw positioned towards the back of your mouth when consuming beverages to avoid contact of the drink with your teeth. This of course does not prevent you from developing cavities, but it will help reduce your risk.

Not to mention, when you consume your sugary beverages also matters. It is best to do so during mealtime as opposed to by itself. Rinsing with water is also important to help wash away the sugars. In addition, avoid brushing immediately after consuming sugary drinks, because your tooth enamel is in a weakened state and can be harmed from brushing.

Remember, everything in moderation is key. Always try to be mindful of what drinks you are consuming and how you are consuming them.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.bphc.org/whatwedo/healthy-eating-active-living/sugar-smarts/be-sugar-smart/Pages/Health-Effects-of-Sugary-Drinks.aspx

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050616060426.htm

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/does-drinking-out-of-cans-affect-your-risk-for-tooth-decay

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Sipping Soft Drinks Associated with Obesity and Tooth Wear

November 17th, 2019

We all have certain food and drink cravings. For many, sodas may be one of them. We all know soda isn't the healthiest drink choice, however, you may not have known that sodas have been associated with both tooth decay and obesity, according to new research. According to the study published in ‘Clinical Oral Investigations,’ researchers found a direct link between the amount of sugary soft drinks and the breakdown of tooth enamel. In adult study participants who had tooth wear, researchers found that the number of surfaces affected was 1.4 times higher for each additional sugary/acidic beverage per day. They also found that the number of surfaces with moderate-to-severe tooth wear was 17% lower for each additional non-sugar/non-acidic beverage the adult drank each day.

Carbonated and acidic drinks can lead to enamel erosion, or tooth wear, which can have a negative impact on your oral health. Once the tooth enamel becomes worn down, the shape and appearance of the teeth can begin to change. The layer beneath tooth enamel, known as dentin, also begins to show and you may begin experiencing tooth sensitivity to  cold or hot foods and beverages. This can lead to many extra costly dental procedures down the road. Plus, acidic beverages are also known to increase the risk of gastric reflux disease in people who are overweight. So, not only are these drinks causing harm to your teeth, they are also damaging your body. The good news is, tooth wear can be preventable!

Diet is important for your overall health and pearly whites. Be sure to choose healthier drink alternatives. If you are to indulge in soda, do so in moderation and be sure to drink plenty of water afterwards to dilute the acid and sugar. Using a straw when consuming acidic beverages is also helpful to keep the sugar away from sitting on your teeth. Not to mention, ever heard of the slogan, "sip all day, get decay?" The statement is true! Sipping on soda throughout the day for long p periods of time can quickly breakdown your teeth, as the acid attacks your enamel with each sip of soda you take. Be sure to engage in physical activity each day and keep up with good oral hygiene practices.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028075946.htm

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Each Bite Counts: National Nutrition Month

March 10th, 2019

The popular saying, "You are what you eat," reminds us that a healthy diet is important in order to keep our bodies healthy, vibrant, and energized. National Nutrition Month is a yearly initiative each March created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to educate individuals on healthy food choices. What we eat on a daily basis not only effects our general health, but also the health of our teeth and gums. In fact, the initial signs of poor nutrition can often first be seen in the mouth.

Healthy teeth aren't just a result of daily toothbrushing and flossing...nutrition plays a major role, too! It is important to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups.

Here are some tips to help you make informed choices on foods and beverages that are tooth-friendly and heart-healthy:

  • Be sure to educate your children about the benefits of eating smart and keeping hydrated with milk and water over sugary sodas and sports drinks. If consuming acidic foods or beverages, it is best to drink water immediately, but wait 30 minutes before brushing your teeth to avoid damaging your enamel since it is at a weakened state during this period. If you have an infant, only send them to sleep with water, as milk or juice can lead to baby bottle tooth decay.
  • Find out your nutritional and calorie needs, based on your age, gender, amount of physical activity, and other health factors. A balanced diet should include:
    • Fruits and Vegetables
      • Fruits and vegetables contain a high water and fiber content, which is beneficial for your teeth and body.
    • Whole Grains
      • Whole wheat bread
      • Brown rice
      • Oatmeal
    • Dairy (low-fat or fat-free)
      • Cheese, milk, and plain yogurt help keep your pearly whites strong!
    • Protein
      • Lean beef
      • Skinless poultry and fish
      • Eggs
      • Beans
      • Peas
      • Legumes

  • Avoid foods that harm your dental health, including empty calorie foods like candy, sweet desserts and non-nutritional snacks. Foods and drinks high in sugar, starch, and carbohydrates, stick to tooth enamel and the bacteria within your mouth consume the sugar. In return the bacteria then release harmful acid that breaks down tooth enamel. It is best to limit your consumption of soda, juice, and sweetened coffee or tea, as these choices promote tooth decay. Not to mention, coffee, tea, and wine are big culprits of causing tooth staining.
  • Nutrients including phosphorus, calcium, Vitamin D, and probiotics, help strengthen enamel and fight against tooth decay. Also, Vitamin C , found in citrus fruits, tomatoes, peppers, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes to name a few, helps promote gum health.
  • Snacking between meals can expose your teeth to more sugar and acids, so it is best to limit snacking. If you do snack, make a conscious nutritious choice, such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables, or nuts.
  • In addition to eating healthy, make sure you are staying physically active for at least 1 hour a day.
  • If you have medical conditions including gastrointestinal reflux or an eating disorder, your risk of cavities and enamel erosion may be higher.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/national-nutrition-month

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/ada-march-is-national-nutrition-month

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=nutrition-month

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The Olympics Are Here!

August 9th, 2016

August 5th marked the beginning of the 2016 Summer Olympics (or the Games of the XXXI Olympiad) with a stunning opening ceremony in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil!

Rio is the first South American city to become a host city for the Olympics. There are 33 venues in Rio de Janeiro, along with five venues at São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Salvador, Brasilia, and Manaus. The motto for the 2016 Olympics is: Um mondo novo (which means "a new world" in Portuguese, Brazil's official language).

There were many controversies leading up to the games, including the instability of Brazil's government, Zika virus concerns, pollution in the Guanabara Bay, and Russia's doping scandal that banned athletes from participating in this year's Olympics.

This year, over 11,000 athletes from 206 nations are participating in 28 Olympic sports (including recently added golf and rugby sevens). There are 306 sets of medals at stake! In addition, there are both refugee and independent athletes competing this year.

Sports that have always been part of the Olympics include athletics (track and field), aquatics (swimming), cycling, fencing, and gymnastics. All exciting sports to watch!

But...let's take a closer look at the teeth of the Olympic athletes. The Oral Health Foundation, which claims that elite athletes are more at risk for dental erosion than the average person, recommends that they pay more attention to their oral health.

Why? Athletes are more likely to develop cavities because of the high carbohydrate content of their diets, including sports drinks, gels, and bars that are highly acidic, with pH levels below 5.5.

Protecting your teeth will surely earn you a gold medal at the dentist's! Here are some suggestions for teeth-friendly snacks to munch on while watching sports events.

Make sure to catch some Olympic highlights before the closing ceremony on August 21st!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1455224409/rio-OLYMPICS0216.jpg?itok=yZqKSKfP

https://www.rio2016.com/en

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/industrynews/item/1149-olympic-athletes-at-greater-risk-of-poor-oral-health

Is There Such a Thing as Too Much Fluoride?

January 28th, 2015

Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in water and many foods. It can also be applied to teeth through several dental products. Fluoride helps protect teeth from developing cavities by making the tooth more resistant to acids from plaque bacteria in the mouth. It also helps reverse early stages of tooth decay.

Fluoride intake is critical for infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 16 years, when primary and permanent teeth are developing. It is also beneficial for adults.

Intuitively, it may seem like the more fluoride, the better! However, this is not the case! Too much fluoride, particularly in young children can be damaging to tooth enamel. It can lead to a tooth discoloration called dental fluorosis.

Children 8 years of age and younger, when permanent teeth are forming underneath the gums, are at risk of dental fluorosis. Once permanent teeth have come in fully, fluoride will no longer cause dental fluorosis. Although fluorosis can be cosmetically treated, the stains left by fluorosis are permanent and may darken over time.

But how bad is it really? Dentists have rated the severity of fluorosis using the following degrees:

  • Questionable: The enamel may show a few white spots or lines.
  • Very mild: Less than 25% of the tooth surface is affected by small opaque white spots.
  • Mild: Less than 50% of the tooth surface is affected by white opaque areas . Research suggests that mild cases of fluorosis may actually be beneficial for children. A 2009 study published in The Journal of the American Dental Association suggests that molars with fluorosis are more resistant to cavities than normal molars.
  • Moderate: 50% of the enamel surface is affected by white opaque areas.
  • Severe: All enamel surfaces are affected. Teeth may also have pitting and are at risk of dental erosion.

Common sources of fluoride include tap water, toothpaste, mouth rinses, gels, beverages and foods, and prescription supplements. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 75% of individuals' fluoride intake is from drinking water and processed beverages. You can minimize the risk of your child developing dental fluorosis by monitoring their fluoride intake. Find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water at home. Recommendations for adequate fluoride levels in drinking water are 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter. According to the World Health Organization, fluoride levels above 1.5 mg/L can lead to dental fluorosis.

Fluoride in toothpaste is important to protect kids' teeth against tooth decay. However, the CDC recommends avoiding fluoride toothpaste at all until age 2. Only place a pea-sized amount on your child's toothbrush and monitor your child’s brushing to ensure that they are not swallowing the toothpaste. To promote spitting out toothpaste, avoid purchasing toothpastes containing flavors your child is likely to swallow. If a child ingests a large amount of fluoride in a short period of time, it may cause nausea, diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain.

If treatment is necessary for your child, most options vary from tooth whitening to veneers or full crowns. Make sure to keep all fluoride-containing products out of the reach of young children.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van Orenstein. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/dental-fluorosis-what-you-should-know.aspx

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19571049

http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/dental_fluorosis.htm

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/f/fluorosis

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/products/how-much-fluoride1.htm

http://www.webmd.com/children/fluorosis-symptoms-causes-treatments?page=3

http://images.goodfood.com.au/2012/12/24/3911889/smilewide-620x349.jpg

http://parentingpatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Fluoride-Supplements-for-Infants-Hot-Topic-Tuesday-Blog-Hop.jpg

Improper pH Levels in the Pool Can Lead to Tooth Decay!

April 27th, 2014

child-swimmingThe spring and summer aren’t the same without making a visit to the swimming pool! Pool safety topics, including the dangers of sun exposure, are usually reiterated as warm weather appears. Yet, many are unaware of the harmful chemicals in swimming pools that can affect your teeth! According to researchers at the New York University College of Dentistry, swimming pools can erode tooth enamel. Their research was conducted based on a case study of a 52 year-old man who had never examined or maintained the pH balance in his pool. Consequently, his oral health was significantly impacted. He developed extreme tooth sensitivity and tooth discoloration within a period of five months due to tooth enamel loss.

Chlorine and pH levels should be examined weekly in order to maintain a suitable swimming environment. If a pool is not properly maintained, your oral health can suffer dramatically. Whether you are cooling off in your own backyard pool, a friend’s pool, or a community pool, it is important to pay close attention to your oral health. An ideal pool pH level should fall between 7.2 and 7.8. Pool water below this range of pH levels is considered too acidic, which can erode tooth enamel in a short amount of time. The water can stain teeth and irritate your skin and eyes. Also, high pH levels can limit chlorine’s ability to sterilize water, which can cause environmental toxins and bacteria to enter your child’s system. These pools could be putting your family’s dental health at risk for permanent tooth damage.

Is your swimming pool safe for your family’s oral health? Worried about what chemicals might be swimming along with you in your local pool? No worries, there are ways to protect your family from exposure to harmful chemicals and keep your children healthy in the water.

Make sure that enjoying the pool isn’t harming your teeth. Here are a few tips:

  • Inform your family members to keep their mouths closed as much as possible when swimming.
  • Always brush your teeth after swimming to help restore your own pH levels within the mouth.
  • Only swim in a pool if the water looks clear. Cloudy water is a sign of a pool that's not being properly conserved.
  • Be aware of the pool lining and surrounding metal surfaces to see if there are spots of rust that show acid corrosion.
  • Purchase pool pH test strips at a local pool-supply store. These test strips are portable and easy to carry around to swimming pools and waterparks.
  • Hire a professional pool maintenance service can help ensure proper pH levels. Although the price of hiring a professional pool maintenance service can be costly, your family’s oral health will not pay the price!

Most people jump into swimming pools escape the heat or to burn calories. However, it is important to remember that chlorine not only causes stinging eyes, but also dental erosion!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2011/article/ADA-05-Swimming-Pools-can-cause-Enamel-Erosion-and-Tooth-Sensitivity.cvsp

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/features/summer-safety-protecting-your-family-from-environmental-health-risks

http://www.blackcelebkids.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/child-swimming.jpg

 

Sports Drinks Damage Teeth

May 9th, 2012

Did you know that there is a strong correlation between sports drinks/energy drinks and tooth enamel damage? The Academy of General Dentistry has learned just how harmful these beverages are after completing a lengthy study. Over the years, children and teens have drunk an increasing number of sports drinks, which is leading to early tooth decay.

Various brands and types of drinks were tested, such as Gatorade, Powerade, Propel, Fuze, Monster, and Red Bull. Several factors were considered, such as the frequency of consumption, the sugar content, acidic properties, etc.

The AGD found that both sports drinks and energy drinks have acidic content, sugar, and more that contributes to the breakdown of tooth enamel. Frequent consumption of these beverages can lead to serious oral problems. You can read the study in full here.

Acidic Drinks and Tooth Erosion

May 2nd, 2012

Have you ever taken a moment to think about what soda is doing to your teeth? Dentists have talked about the damaging effects of soda and other sugary, carbonated drinks on teeth for a long time. However, people still consume too much of them on a daily basis.

Research also shows that acidic fruit juice, such as orange juice, and energy drinks are just as corrosive to enamel. Constant consumption bathes the teeth in a sugary, acidic mixture that strips away tooth enamel over time.

What’s important to remember about enamel erosion is that it’s far more dangerous than decay. This is because by drinking these harmful beverages, you are exposing teeth to its corrosive properties all at once. Serious break down of the teeth can occur and may result in crowns or dentures depending on the severity.

You don’t have to give up these types of drinks all together. Like anything, moderation is key. There are techniques you can implement to help minimize erosion.

1. If you drink the acidic beverage all at once, instead of sipping it all day, you won’t constantly bathe teeth in acid or excess sugar.

2. By using a straw, you avoid having the liquid wash your teeth in the harmful acid and sugar.

3. Rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic or sugary beverages.

4. Make a healthier choice and opt for water.

Eating Disorders and Teeth

April 23rd, 2012

Did you know that eating disorders are a leading cause of dental problems? These compulsive diseases are known to cause several problems, such as enamel erosion, sensitivity to hot and cold, and decreased saliva production.

Continuous vomiting leaves teeth susceptible to stomach acids, which eat away at enamel. The teeth deteriorate and become candidates for major problems. Extensive decay, breakage, and even tooth loss are all associated with eating disorders.

Numerous cavities over a small amount of time are a major problem for patients with eating disorders. Binging and purging are to blame for this. The sugar in food assaults tooth enamel when it’s consumed and purging subsequently washes the teeth in stomach acid. This acid is highly corrosive to teeth. Also, because eating disorders leave teeth highly fragile, infection is a possibility.

At Wellesley Dental Group, Drs. Ali are happy to help turn your oral health around. They will evaluate your mouth and devise a treatment plan to restore your smile to its radiant beauty. Please call us at 781-237-9071 or email us at smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to schedule an appointment today!

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