fruit juice

Benefits of Tap Water

October 22nd, 2016

tap-water

With the sharp increase in the amount of patients with tooth decay over the last decade, it's important to think of ways to improve your oral health based on your diet and oral health habits.

First, try to avoid sugary and acidic drinks such as fruit juices, energy drinks, sports drinks, or sodas. These kinds of drinks can increase your risk for cavities, since they can lead to tooth erosion. In addition, if you are a parent, you should make sure to stop putting your babies to sleep with a bottle because sugars could stick to their teeth for hours.

Dentists also recommend drinking tap water over bottled water due to the fact that tap water often contains fluoride and that it is usually as safe as other types of water. Drinking tap water is especially important for pregnant women and children whose teeth are still forming.

In addition to healthy eating and drinking habits, you should always maintain a proper oral hygiene routine. Make sure to brush twice a day and floss daily.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.toledoblade.com/Medical/2016/09/18/Dentist-Water-from-tap-best-bet.html

http://www.alltreatment.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/tap-water.jpg

Fruit Juices and Smoothies Can Harm Your Teeth!

April 19th, 2016

Now that it finally feels like spring with all the sunshine, you might think that it's a great time to enjoy some fresh fruit juices and smoothies. They appear to be great alternatives to soda, iced tea, or other sugary drinks. However, these beverages can be harmful for your teeth and actually contain a lot of sugar according to research recently published in the online journal BMJ Open.

While the American Heart Association (AHA) suggests consuming less than 3-4 teaspoons of sugar a day for children and less than 5 teaspoons of sugar for teens, the average sugar content of pure fruit juices was 2 teaspoons and 2.5 teaspoons for smoothies. Additionally, over 40% of these drinks have 4 teaspoons of sugar!

You might think that 100% fruit juice would be better, but its innocence is deceiving. Even the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends serving no juice to infants younger than 6 months old and no more than 4 to 6 ounces to children ranging from 1 to 6 years old. Fruit juices contain free sugars (glucose, fructose, sucrose, and table sugar added by the manufacturer, plus natural sugars such as honey, syrups, and fruit juice concentrates), which can cause tooth decay.

Therefore, some recommendations include:

  • not eating fruit in the form of juice
  • diluting fruit juice with water
  • limiting drinking fruit juice to 5 ounces per day
  • drinking water and milk

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/308290.php

http://media1.s-nbcnews.com/i/newscms/2015_32/716996/fruit-smoothies-today-tease-1-150805_f1b20de057704b0707570a6613e1f25a.jpg

Listen up, Kids: Dental Care for Children

October 9th, 2015

kidBelieve it or not, a third of children today have tooth decay before even starting school. According to statistics published by the Health & Social Care Information Centre, tooth decay is one of the main causes of hospital visits for children in elementary school. Surprisingly, 25,812 children ranging from ages 5 to 9 went to the hospital for tooth extractions in the last year alone.

Here are some tips below on how to protect your child’s teeth to make sure that your child doesn’t become part of these statistics!

  1. Drink less fruit juice!

Just because fruit juice is nutritious and often rich in vitamin C does not mean that it’s also beneficial for your teeth! Many juices have around the same amount of sugar as that in sodas, or even more. For instance, NPR states that apple juice contains 65.8 grams of sugar per liter, while cola contains 62.5 grams of sugar per liter. This copious amount of sugar leads to tooth decay. Furthermore, the acid from the juice destroys the enamel of teeth, which can cause teeth to deteriorate. Even the British Dental Association claims that 50% of children ranging from four to 18 years old show these signs.

Because of these harmful effects of fruit juice, dentists recommend water and milk as healthy beverage alternatives for children. If your child is still craving fruit juice, try to dilute it as much as possible and make sure that your child has a meal with it. Also, try your best to avoid letting your child have too much contact time with the cup and his or her teeth and instead opt for using a straw.

 

  1. Avoid dried fruit !

Dried fruit isn’t a good replacement for candy it has a great deal of sugar, and even worse, its sticky texture clings onto your child’s teeth. Due to these unhealthy properties, dried fruit can ruin enamel and rot your little one’s molars. Although chocolate isn’t a great option, dark chocolate is known to  be rich in antioxidants that help prevent the spread of tooth-decay causing bacteria.

Whole fruit can be a better option than dried fruit and fruit juice because it contains water and fibers that help wash away sugar from teeth. However, try not to feed your child more than one or two low-sugar fruit pieces (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, kiwis, peaches, and pears) instead of high-sugar fruit pieces (grapes or pineapple) per day. Incorporate fruit into meals rather than simply having them as snacksBreadsticks, toast, cheese, nuts, or seeds are some healthier snack alternatives.

 

  1. Baby teeth matter!

It's important not to presume that just because baby teeth are not permanent, that they should not be taken care of! Your child’s permanent teeth are at a higher risk of decay and other dental problems when primary teeth decay. Baby tooth decay could lead children to experience dental anxiety, which could make them less likely to visit the dentist later on.

 

  1. Help your child brush his/her teeth!

Depending on how mature your child is, you should help brush your child’s teeth until at least age seven to ensure that they are using proper brushing techniques. 

 

  1. Proper brushing techniques!
  • Don’t let your child brush his/her teeth right after eating, particularly after eating or drinking something acidic. Doing so will brush the enamel away! Your child should either brush before eating breakfast or wait an hour after the meal. Chewing sugar-free gum can also be an effective way to clean teeth, because it produces saliva, which defends against decay, and brings mouths back to a neutral pH level.
  • It doesn’t matter if your child uses a manual or electric toothbrush. What’s important is that the brushing lasts for at least two minutes! Electric toothbrushes often have built-in timers, so this feature can be effective.
  • Don’t let your child rinse the toothpaste away right after brushing! The fluoride in the toothpaste can keep protecting his or her teeth for 30 minutes. Children under three should use toothpaste with 1,000 fluoride parts per million, while children over three should use adult toothpaste that contains 1,450 fluoride parts per million.

For many parents, the first time they took their children to the dentist was when their children were at least one year old. However, parents should set their first appointment for when their children’s teeth begin to come out, which is around five to six months old. Further oral health tips for children can be found here.

This past spring, we welcomed Dr. Van, our Pediatric Dentist, onto our caring team at the Wellesley Dental Group! Dr. Van strongly believes in the importance of creating a fun and welcoming atmosphere for patients as well as parents. One of his goals is to introduce good dental habits to our youth, preventing dental diseases later on in life.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://mouafaqbtc.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/b4054a_0d4b9e685762e624649fbf8898f77c87.jpg

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/609471/Children-dental-care-truths-myths

http://www.thedentistar.com/images/import/images/glenview-kids-dentist.jpg

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/06/09/319230765/fruit-juice-vs-soda-both-beverages-pack-in-sugar-and-health-risk

Got Milk?.. For Your Cereal

June 4th, 2014

 

Whether you are on-the-go or craving a crunchy snack, dry cereal is a popular snack for both adults and children. Popular cereal brands like Fruit Loops and Cinnamon Toast Crunch have been scrutinized by health care professionals for its high sugar content.  As many of us know, sugar causes cavities.  However, research at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Dentistry suggests that chasing dry, sugary cereal with milk significantly lowers sugar's ability to eat away at our teeth and can prevent cavities.

A cavity is caused by leftover food debris on our teeth.  Our teeth are covered by a tough outer mineral covering called enamel.  However, the enamel can break down and become eroded when it comes into contact with acids. Specifically, bacteria love feeding on sugars and carbohydrates.  As the bacteria feast on these types of leftovers, they produce the harmful acids that break down enamel and cause cavities.

The researchers looked at three different liquids and their effectiveness in bringing down the risk of cavities when combined with dry cereal: apple juice, water, and milk.  They found that drinking milk following sugary cereals led to effectiveness in preventing cavities by most significantly lowering the overall acidity in the mouth.  Water also lowered the acidity, but to a lower extent.  Apple juice, on the other hand, did not lower the acidity because of its sugar content.  Milk is also known to be beneficial for teeth for its high calcium content and ability to help in tooth remineralization.

Interestingly, eating cereal soaked in a bowl of milk does not result in the same cavity-fighting results.  In other words, milk is only beneficial in combatting the detrimental effects of sugary cereals if it is sipped separately following the consumption of dry cereal.  This is because cereal immersed in milk leads to a syrupy, sugary solution as the sugar particles from the cereal become dissolved in the milk.  As a result, the researchers of the study say to avoid drinking sugary fruit juices following a bowl of milk and cereal to significantly lower the chances of introducing excess sugar into your diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Sources:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/07/130731164718.htm

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/problems/how-do-cavities-form.htm

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/news/oral-care-industry-news/drink-a-glass-of-milk-after-your-cereal-it-may-reduce-cavities-20625.asp

Image credit: http://cdn.foodbeast.com.s3.amazonaws.com/content/wp-content/uploads/2012/05/cereal-milk-better.jpg

A Glass of Orange Juice First Thing in the Morning Can Be Bittersweet

March 3rd, 2014

girl drinkingHave you ever rushed down to breakfast and had a glass of orange juice immediately after brushing your teeth? If so, you have probably experienced the distastefulness that lingers within your mouth for quite some time. The natural sweet flavor of orange juice is transformed into a bitter nightmare!

Our mouth contains with approximately 10,000 taste buds, which act as chemical sensors that perceive sweet, salty, bitter, sour, and umami taste types. On average, toothpaste is primarily composed of water, plaque-fighting abrasives, fluoride, and detergent. The compound Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) is a common and strong cleaning detergent found within toothpastes. Aside from producing the foam that forms when brushing, SLS also affects are taste buds. SLS restrains the sweet receptors and phospholipids found within our mouths. This allows bitter molecules to bind to bitter receptors, causing the pucker in our lips from the unappetizing taste.

Although Fruit juices like orange juice contain healthy vitamins and antioxidants, it is important to remember that they can harm your teeth in different ways. People often substitute sugary fruit juices in for sodas, which can be a detrimental choice. Fruit juices often contain plenty of sugar and acids. The enamel on your teeth can deteriorate by these acidic beverages and should therefore not be consumed excessively. According to a study conducted at the Eastman Institute for Oral Health at the University of Rochester Medical Center, orange juice increased the roughness of tooth enamel and decreased the stability of teeth, leaving one prone to more plaque and cavities. It was also discovered that in comparison to individuals who drink quickly, the longer you take sipping on an acidic or sugary beverage, the more damaged your teeth will become. Be sure to limit your consumption of fruit juices and practice healthy oral hygiene!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/06/090630132007.htm

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-06-why-the-pucker-with-your-morning.cvsp

http://www.med-health.net/images/90400573/image001.jpg

Acidic Drinks and Tooth Erosion

May 2nd, 2012

Have you ever taken a moment to think about what soda is doing to your teeth? Dentists have talked about the damaging effects of soda and other sugary, carbonated drinks on teeth for a long time. However, people still consume too much of them on a daily basis.

Research also shows that acidic fruit juice, such as orange juice, and energy drinks are just as corrosive to enamel. Constant consumption bathes the teeth in a sugary, acidic mixture that strips away tooth enamel over time.

What’s important to remember about enamel erosion is that it’s far more dangerous than decay. This is because by drinking these harmful beverages, you are exposing teeth to its corrosive properties all at once. Serious break down of the teeth can occur and may result in crowns or dentures depending on the severity.

You don’t have to give up these types of drinks all together. Like anything, moderation is key. There are techniques you can implement to help minimize erosion.

1. If you drink the acidic beverage all at once, instead of sipping it all day, you won’t constantly bathe teeth in acid or excess sugar.

2. By using a straw, you avoid having the liquid wash your teeth in the harmful acid and sugar.

3. Rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic or sugary beverages.

4. Make a healthier choice and opt for water.

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