garlic

Noticing Bad Breath in your Mask?

August 20th, 2020

Halitosis, also known as bad breath, is an oral health problem that leads to your breath being less than socially acceptable. Up to one-third of the population experiences this. According to the Journal of International Society of Preventive and Community Dentistry, 90% of the causes of halitosis start within the mouth. The bacteria within the mouth can cause unpleasant odors and tastes.

Many states have issued face covering mandates as the cases of COVID-19 have risen around the United States. Wearing face coverings may have you wondering, “hmmm, is that my breath?” A lot of factors could play a role in causing bad breath, for instance poor oral health, uncontrolled diabetes or other medical conditions, smoking, and certain foods, just to name a few! Below are some surprising foods that may be leading to your bad breath and some tips to help combat it:

Alcohol

A study by Microbiome has shown that alcohol consumption reduces the amount of “good bacteria” in your mouth leading to the increase in favorable conditions for the growth of odor producing bacteria. If you choose to consume alcohol, follow it up with water. Not only does it remove alcohol from remaining on the structures within the mouth, it also replenishes saliva and reduces the dry mouth effect created by alcohol.

Sulfur Producing Foods

Certain foods like garlic and onions are part of the allium family which are made of sulfur compounds. These foods are absorbed by the blood stream where their particles are taken to the lungs and released when you exhale. To combat their sulfuric odor, brush and floss after each meal. This removes food residue as well as reduces the amount of odor producing bacteria. Studies have also shown that eating raw apples, mint and drinking green tea can help deodorize breath after the consumption of garlic.

Citrus Fruits

They’re refreshing but very acidic. Do you know what odor producing bacteria love? An acidic environment. Consuming large quantities of citrus creates the perfect home for the unwanted bacteria. If you have acid reflux, the citrus can cause a flare up leading to the production of unwanted, smelly gas.

Coffee

Coffee and Diabetes - Benefits of Coffee & Effect on Blood Sugar

Coffee, especially when had with cream or sugar contributes to bad breath. The caffeine in coffee dries out the mouth and reduces the production of saliva. This allows for odor producing bacteria to feed on any remnants of food that remain in the mouth. The sugars found in milk and cream also feed the odor producing bacteria, causing for rapid growth of the bacteria.  Brushing your teeth and rinsing with water can help alleviate the unwanted “coffee breath”.

High Protein Diet

Bulking up for the summer on protein? This could be contributing to your bad breath. Ammonia is created as the body breaks down protein. This creates a “rotten egg” smell. Consuming foods with zinc helps destroy bacteria and aids in the reduction of bad breath.

Peanut Butter

It’s thick, creamy and delicious. It is also very sticky. So sticky that it is hard for water to wash it away. Peanut butter sticks to the structures in the mouth which allows for the feeding and overproduction of bad bacteria. To help reduce peanut butter from lingering on teeth and other structures, brush and floss after consumption.

Skipping Meals

Has the “Quarantine 15” caused weight gain and you’ve found yourself skipping meals? Don’t! Bad breath is common in those who are dieting or skipping meals. Chewing food produces saliva which washes away bacteria; skipping meals causes a reduction in saliva which allows for the growth of bacteria that cause bad odors.

You will need to visit your oral health provider if you notice that your bad breath is persistent. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References

https://www.uofmhealth.org/health-library/sig258649spec

https://www.healthline.com/health-news/alcoholic-drinks-kill-good-mouth-bacteria-but-leave-the-bad#3

https://www.healthline.com/health/get-rid-of-garlic-onion-breath#1

https://smartmouth.com/articles/blog/coffee-breath-mouthwash/

http://home.bt.com/lifestyle/health/wellness/unlikely-causes-of-bad-breath-4-foods-that-encourage-halitosis-11363921489068

https://www.glendale.edu/home/showdocument?id=23931

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcQAQ56THE9AgiaMcv7vVr9jUMeQmNq68ax_SQ&usqp=CAU

https://www.dietdoctor.com/low-carb/alcohol

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn%3AANd9GcRQDlkjkrUZqxM9OOYTL4i5_V9zexczBTTRLQ&usqp=CAU

https://food.ndtv.com/food-drinks/7-citrus-fruits-you-must-try-this-summer-from-blood-orange-to-buddhas-hand-1682443

https://www.diabetes.co.uk/food/coffee-and-diabetes.html

https://www.pamperedchef.ca/recipe/Side+Dishes/Deluxe+Cooking+Blender/Peanut+Butter/1564381

https://www.mynetdiary.com/can-a-high-protein-meal-plan-help-you-lose-weight.html

https://images.everydayhealth.com/images/diabetes/type-2-diabetes/diabetes-diet-no-no-skip-meals-01-1440x180.jpg?w=720

Acid Reflux: A Dental Threat

January 17th, 2020

An upset stomach can ruin your whole day! Individuals who experience acid reflux, a chronic digestive disease in which stomach acid travels into the esophagus, often experience a range of uncomfortable symptoms. Some symptoms of acid reflux include heartburn, chest pain, and regurgitation, leaving a sour or bitter taste in the mouth. Acid reflux is commonly referred to as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and this disease particularly impacts your oral health. This is because during those uncomfortable times of stomach acid entering your oral cavity, your tooth enamel is being surrounded by acid, which in turn can cause enamel erosion. Underneath the tooth enamel, the outer layer of the tooth, is dentin, which can then become exposed once the enamel is worn down. In addition, the lining of your esophagus can also become damaged as a result of acid reflux.

Not to mention, what you eat plays a huge role in this condition as well! Acid reflux can be exacerbated by certain foods, including tomatoes, citrus fruits, mint, chocolate, coffee, tea, sodas, spicy foods, garlic, onions, or fatty foods.

Your dentist may notice signs of acid reflux during your oral exam. This condition can affect all ages, even children! A study done at the University of California at San Francisco reported that children with acid reflux are six times more likely to experience damage to their tooth enamel than children without this condition. Your child may not recognize that they have acid reflux, but once diagnosed the proper steps can be taken to help protect their teeth.

Remember, prevention is key, so it is important to see your dentist regularly to ensure the proper diagnoses and treatment. Fluoride can add an extra layer of protection to teeth exposed to acid by helping to add important minerals to the tooth enamel. It is important to consume fluoridated water and use toothpaste containing fluoride. Your Doctor may prescribe medication to help with acid reflux depending on the severity. In addition, avoiding foods that typically trigger acid reflux is necessary to help keep acid reflux under control.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/gastrointestinal-disorders/acid-reflux-a-dental-disaster-in-the-making-1013

Best-and-Worst-Foods-for-Acid-Reflux-720x450.jpg

whatyouneedtoknowaboutgerd.jpg

Are toothbrushes actually clean?

July 29th, 2013

Researchers at England’s University of Manchester have looked into the various kinds of germs found in bacteria, and they found that toothbrushes are crawling with them! They discovered that a toothbrush could harbor more than 100 million bacteria, with the likes of diarrhea-causing E. coli and skin-infecting staphylococci bacteria. This may sound completely unsanitary, but wait! The mouth isn't the cleanest place to begin with. There are hundreds of microorganisms in the mouth on a daily basis. Medical professionals note that this is perfectly normal and it is not something to sweat over. But what individuals need to worry about is when there is an unhealthy balance of bacteria in the mouth. Many people forget that the plaque that develops inside the mouth (if proper brushing is not taking place) is, in fact, bacteria. Toothbrushes are continuously introduced to bacteria every time it is placed into the mouth.

 

So if there are constantly bacteria on toothbrushes, can they make people sick? Researchers think that it’s not likely. Considering there are already bacteria in the mouth, the body’s natural defenses make it difficult for an infection to occur just from brushing teeth. However, one should not take the body’s ability to defend itself for granted. There are still ways to keep fewer bacteria from entering the mouth. In many homes the bathroom sink is in close vicinity to the toilet. But that should not be the excuse for placing toothbrushes near where flushing occurs! Every time the toilet flushes, it sends sprays of bacteria into the air. Try to place toothbrushes as far as possible from the toilet, giving bacteria less of a chance in getting into the mouth.

 

Bacteria love moist environments and it is important that the brush dries through and through between each brushing. Try to avoid covers that enclose the brush, which would leave the toothbrush moist and bacteria-friendly. It is also a good idea to keep the toothbrush upright in a holder, instead of lying it down. Also, no matter how clean your sister or any of your other members of your family, don’t ever use each other’s brushes. Don’t even place toothbrushes in the same cup! Whenever toothbrushes come in contact with each other, they can easily exchange bacteria.

We recommend that you replace your toothbrush every season(3 months) to help prevent bacterial growth and to maintain oral hygiene.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/the-ugly-truth-about-your-toothbrush

 

http://www.ada.org/1887.aspx

 

3 Tips On Keeping Your Breath Fresh!

July 26th, 2013

Are you worried about the prospect of having breath? Don’t worry you’re not alone; according to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association, there are 40 millions Americans that suffer from bad breath. However, it doesn't need to be this way! Here are a few ideas on how to go about your day without worrying about halitosis.

1. Keep up with brushing and flossing

After a big meal, people are bound to have food caught in between the many crevices of their mouths. Food that has been left behind can break down, resulting in sticky build-up known as plaque. To keep this plaque build-up from happening, try brushing and flossing after meals, which can keep the mouth clean and breath fresh.

 

2. Don’t forget the tongue!
After brushing and flossing at night, many people just turn off the bathroom lights and hit the hay. But wait; the tongue can harbor tons of bad-smelling bacteria! Without proper maintenance, a white layer can form on the tongue. People tend to find toothbrushes to big to reach to back end of the tongue without causing discomfort. Dentists suggest using tongue scrapers, which can easily maneuver the tongue, getting rid of bacteria, leftover food, and even dead cells that brushing can’t take away.

3. Pass on the onions and garlic
Although they are undeniably great additions to a great sandwich, these two food ingredients are infamous bad-breath causers. Unfortunately, brushing after consuming garlic and onions does not do the trick; substances within these foods actually travel down the blood stream and into the lungs, where they constantly get breathed out. If you know fresh breath is necessary for a certain social meeting, save onions and garlic for another time!

 

These are simple tips to keep in mind, but they do go a long way. Always maintain good oral health and soon enough, you’ll be able to say goodbye to bad breath! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/get-rid-bad-breath

http://www.uihealthcare.org/Adam/?/HIE%20Multimedia/1/003058

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