heart attack

Can a Toothpaste Help Prevent Heart Attacks or Strokes?

March 21st, 2020

Our immune response to illness and injury is pretty amazing. Inflammation is our body's defense mechanism to help our body heal, however, chronic inflammation can sometimes cause harm to our bodies. When arteries become blocked by a buildup of plaque, a composition of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances, this can initiate an inflammatory response that can increase your risk of developing a heart attack or stroke. And, it's no secret that oral health has been connected with many systemic inflammatory diseases, as inflammation significantly affects the oral cavity. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 47.2% of Americans over the age of 30 have some form of periodontal disease, which is a pathological inflammatory disease of the gums and oral tissues that surround the teeth. Inflammation within the body is measured by high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), which circulates throughout the blood and increases in response to inflammation. Doctor's can monitor the amount of hs-CRP in the blood to help lower the risk of having a heart attack or stroke.
Now, new research has suggested that the first toothpaste to identify dental plaque, Plaque HD®, may help to lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes by lowering C-reactive protein! The study, published in the American Journal of Medicine, conducted by researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Schmidt College of Medicine, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health looked at whether or not the toothpaste Plaque HD® reduces hs-CRP in individuals. Plaque HD® helps make dental plaque visible on the surfaces of teeth in addition to weakening the dental plaque so that it can easily be removed with regular toothbrushing. Participants of the study were randomly split into groups, one group with Plaque HD® toothpaste, and the other group with a similar non-plaque identifying placebo toothpaste. The participants were monitored for 30 days. It was found that those who used Plaque HD® toothpaste had a statistically significant reduction in hs-CRP in comparison with the placebo group. However, more research is needed to determine if the Plaque HD® toothpaste directly correlates to a decrease in heart attacks or strokes.

Remember that it is important to take care of your teeth and practice good oral hygiene habits to help keep a healthy body.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200224100554.htm

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Can Changing your Bedtime Impact your Health?

March 13th, 2020

Sleep can often be overlooked when discussing personal health, but research education on sleep has proven that sleep should be a top priority! World Sleep Day, sponsored by the World Sleep Society (WSS), annually focuses on important issues regarding sleep in relation to many topics, including medicine, oral health, and everyday physical and mental performance.

Turns out, staying up to binge watch your favorite TV show may be putting your health at risk. A recent study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology found that your risk of having a heart attack or heart disease significantly increases with the simple act of changing your regular sleep cycle in either direction by just 90 minutes! In fact, According to Tianyi Huang, the study's author and an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, it was found that individuals with more than a 90 minute time difference on average for seven consecutive nights were two times more at risk of heart disease over a 5 year period. The participants of this study included over 2,000 people ages 45 to 84 who did not have any cardiovascular disease over a five-year period. The participant's sleep was monitored using a sleep wrist tracker for seven days. Approximately 1/4th of the participants were found not to have a regular bedtime. Huang notes that this observation may be even more drastic in younger people, as the demands for work and school are often present. Other studies have also linked lack of sleep with weight gain, a weakened immune system, high blood pressure, stroke, diabetes, Alzheimer's, depression, anxiety and other disorders.

Here's what you can do to help improve your sleep schedule:
Be sure to get your daily Exercise:
According to the National Sleep Foundation, exercising helps promote good quality sleep! Staying active daily is important for your overall health.
Keep cool:
Be sure to make sure the room you sleep in is a comfortable tempetuare, typically between 60 and 67 degrees, and is well ventilated. Also, avoid watching television or doing work in your bedroom. Bright lights from electronics can disrupt your sleep cycle.
Avoid certain food and drink:
Avoid consuming caffeine at least six hours before your normal bedtime. This can include coffee, sodas, tea, and even chocolate. Also, heavy and spicy foods can cause digestive trouble and affect your quality of sleep. Sugar is also on the top of the list to avoid, particularly before bedtime as it is linked to restlessness. Not to mention, you will be helping your teeth by cutting back on the sugar! The National Sleep Foundation recommends switching to healthy snacks suchas nuts, cherries, bananas, and decaffeinated teas. Alcohol should also be avoided prior to bedtime, as it can disrupt the normal stages of sleep.
Create and stick to a regular bedtime and wake-up time:
Keeping our circadian rhythm consistent is important, as the more days you sleep irregularly, the more you are at risk for diseases such as heart disease as shown by research. Create a regular routine before going to bed each night. The recommended amount of sleep is typically between 7-10 hours each night, depending on age.
Be mindful of naps:
Although naps can be helpful, it is recommended to not exceed more than 45 minutes during naps. Taking longer naps can place you into a deeper sleep cycle and often make you feel more tired throughout the day. In addition, it can interfere with your ability to fall asleep during the night. The optimal nap should be about 15 to 20 minutes, but should be done before 3 p.m. to avoid interrupting your full night's rest.
Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://worldsleepday.org

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/13/health/10-sleep-commandments-wellness/index.html

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/02/health/irregular-sleep-health-risk-wellness/index.html

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Are You At Risk For Sleep Apnea?

January 23rd, 2017

It's common knowledge that sleep is important for learning and your overall health, but did you know that your sleeping habits are also linked to your tongue and tonsils?

According to a recent study published in the Saudi Medical Journal, tonsil size, tongue indentations, and tongue teeth imprints may be indicators for obstructive sleep apnea risk. This condition, which affects over 18 million adults in the US, stops and restarts your breathing due to blocked upper airways while you sleep. Common symptoms include interrupted sleep, sleep loss, fatigue, irritability, and a lack of focus.

OSA can also result in learning and memory problems, heart attacks, congestive heart failure, cardiac arrhythmia, stroke, or depression in severe cases. Obese individuals over 40 years old with large tonsils and tongue indentations are most at risk for OSA.

If you have enlarged tongue or tonsils, we recommend that you visit a sleep specialist.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/sleep-apnea-dentist-tongue-tonsil_us_56e04e17e4b0b25c91804c4c?utm_hp_ref=dental-health

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sleep-apnea-and-snoring

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Psychological Distress Linked To Increased Risk Of Death

August 8th, 2012

Stressed out? It may be time to take a breather! New research shows that stress, even at low levels, were 20% more likely to die over a ten year time span.

However, these findings can't necessarily prove that being stressed or depressed is directly linked to death. Similar studies have been conducted and have been unsuccessful in figuring out if people become sick because they're stressed or they become stressed because they're sick.

This study was featured in the British Medicine Journal. The data was compiled from information taken from over 68,000 people over the age of 35. The survey asked a variety of questions on topics such as sleep patterns, ability to face problems, and feelings of worthlessness. The lower the score of the survey taker, the less stressed of a person they are.

The most startling part of the survey is that more than 8,300 people passed away, mostly from heart disease and stroke.

Taking steps toward reducing stress is an important factor in maintaining optimum health. If you feel that your stress level is affecting your quality of life, make an appointment with your doctor as soon as possible.

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