hydrated

Got Chapped Lips?

January 21st, 2021

Dry or chapped lips can be a true mood killer, especially when you’re trying to speak, eat, or smile! Chapped lips are extremely uncomfortable, and when they begin to peel it can be a real pain, both literally and figuratively.  Even so, dry lips also look painful. It’s important to know how to care for your lips and keep them healthy and protected.

But what causes dry lips to occur? According to the Cleveland Clinic, the skin that makes up the lips are thin and can dry out 10 times quicker than the skin on other areas of the face. People may experience dry lips as a result of an allergic reaction, trauma, cold weather, frequent licking of the lips, smoking, mouth breathing, dehydration, certain medications, medical conditions (i.e. lupus) , ultraviolet rays from sun exposure, and nutritional deficiencies, for instance.

With dry lips also may come cracking at the corners of the mouth, known as angular cheilitis. The corners of the mouth can also become infected by bacteria. Individuals who suck their thumbs or those who wear poorly fitted dentures have an increased risk of developing angular cheilitis.

Signs of angular cheilitis can include:

  • Bleeding
  • Blisters
  • Cracks
  • Crust
  • Itchy
  • Painful
  • Red
  • Scaly
  • Swollen

Another form of cheilitis is actinic cheilitis, which is dry lips caused by excessive sun exposure.

Luckily, dry lips can be managed! Be sure to keep your lips protected in both cold and hot environments, as both cool windy weather and sun exposure on a hot summer day can be harsh on your lips. Try using a lip balm with sunscreen to help keep your lips moist. The American Academy of Dermatology also recommends using lip balms containing petroleum jelly to help keep the lips moist. Plus, if you notice the air in your home is dry, a humidifier can help add moisture to the air and help manage dry lips. Not to mention, staying hydrated with water is particularly necessary to keep your skin healthy. If you notice any lip dryness or irritation after using a new lip balm or face moisture, be cautious with use as it may be a sign of an allergic reaction.

Avoid licking your lips when they feel chapped at all costs, as this makes them drier than before. It's also important not to peel or bite your lips when they feel dry and flaky. If these tips and tricks don’t seem to help, or if you notice your condition is severe, be sure to check with a dermatologist or doctor to help manage dry lips.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/angular-cheilitis#1

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/dry-mouth/waking-up-with-dry-mouth

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/6-tips-to-protect-your-lips-from-the-cold/

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.goodhousekeeping.com%2Fbeauty%2Fanti-aging%2Ftips%2Fa16642%2Fdry-skin-relief%2F&psig=AOvVaw2q6L4bDOs8a569C9nqWpYX&ust=1611288398240000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKDjt5yTrO4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAK

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wikihow.health%2FHelp-Chapped-Lips&psig=AOvVaw2q6L4bDOs8a569C9nqWpYX&ust=1611288398240000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKDjt5yTrO4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAQ

 

Proper Oral Hygiene Can Boost Your Immune System

June 22nd, 2020

Being sick...none of us have time for that. Luckily, our body's immune system is our defense mechanism against harmful bacteria, germs, allergens, and foreign particles that enter our body. That’s why keeping a strong and healthy immune system is key to fighting infectious diseases like COVID-19. Your immune system is a complex system made up of many cells, organs, and tissues that span throughout your entire body, including your oral cavity. In fact, your mouth is generally the first entry point to the rest of your body. Therefore, it’s important to maintain good oral health to help keep your immune system and overall health strong, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

When your immune system is functioning properly, normal oral bacteria and your natural microbiome aren’t typically a dangerous threat. However, when your oral health is not being maintained, bacteria can breakdown your pearly whites and lead to gum disease and inflammation, which can ultimately weaken your immune system. The early stages of gum disease is also known as gingivitis, which can be reversed with proper oral hygiene habits such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, healthy diet and stress maintenance, and regular dental visits for comprehensive care. Some signs of gingivitis include inflamed gums, presenting with swelling, redness, and possible bleeding. A more severe form of gum disease is known as periodontitis, and the damage is typically irreversible. In periodontal disease, the inflammatory response triggered by bacteria not only impacts your teeth and gums, but also attacks your surrounding oral tissues and bone that hold your teeth in place. If untreated, periodontal disease can lead to both bone and tooth loss. Consequently, your immune system begins to work extra hard to help fight gum disease, and may promote inflammation within other parts of your body. Sadly, an unhealthy mouth has been linked to many systemic health conditions and inflammatory diseases, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, preterm birth, and more! The case for having good oral hygiene undeniably keeps getting stronger. It’s important to keep your mouth healthy to help allow your immune system to be strong for taking care of the rest of your body!

During a pandemic, it’s important to do everything you can to strengthen your immune system. Here are some ways you can help your body stay healthy during these unprecedented times:

  • Minimize stress: Some research suggests that stress can exacerbate inflammatory disease such as gum disease. Try to stay active and keep a healthy diet to help relieve stress.
  • Exercise regularly and stay hydrated
  • Get adequate sleep: It is recommended that most adults need between 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best. Children and teens might need more sleep for their growing bodies.
  • Brush your teeth daily
  • Floss daily to remove bacteria between your teeth
  • Wash hands regularly
  • Disinfect high-touch surfaces including bathroom surfaces, toilets, faucets, sinks, tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones and keyboards
  • Wear a mask and practice social distancing
  • Eat a healthy diet heavy with fruits, vegetables, lean meats and healthy fat
  • Visit your dentist regularly for check-ups/professional cleanings/outstanding treatments

It's also important to avoid practices that are harmful to your teeth and body:

  • Avoid smoking
  • Avoid high sugar diets
  • Avoid acidic drinks like soda and energy drinks
  • Drink alcohol in moderation
  • Avoid nail biting, chewing on ice, and using your teeth to open bottles or objects

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19.  Our office follows the recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group. We look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors, and friends.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.guardiandirect.com/resources/articles/how-good-oral-health-may-help-you-keep-your-immune-system-strong

https://www.colgateprofessional.com/education/patient-education/topics/systemic/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body

living-with-an-immunocompromised-system-and-covid-19-722x406.jpg

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How Does My Mouth Change as I Age?

May 13th, 2020

With age comes many changes, and that includes changes within our health. The month of May is celebrated nationally as Older Americans Month, and we have some tips on how to keep your teeth healthy throughout each decade!

Because we only get one set of permanent teeth for our entire life, it's important that we do our best to keep them healthy. Many older adults suffer from gum disease, and often show signs of swollen and red gums that likely may bleed. In fact, the Washington Dental Service Foundation (WDSF) reported that severe gum disease impacts about 23% of individuals aged between 65 to 74, which can significantly impact the survival of natural teeth. Not to mention, the development of many systemic diseases have been linked with older age, in addition to poor oral health. So, its extremely necessary to continue to schedule your regular dental visits and practice good oral hygiene habits at home, especially to prevent tooth loss later on in life.

There are many factors impacting oral health that can be at play as we age. For instance, dry mouth is a common culprit of tooth decay, which often increases with medication use. Dry mouth has been noted to be a common side effect in over 500 medications, such as antidepressants, anxiolytics, antihypertensives, and antipsychotics just to name a few. It is important to inform your dentist about any medications that you are taking. To help alleviate dry mouth and lower your risk of developing cavities, your dentist may recommend avoiding certain acidic foods and beverages that can irritate dry mouths, in addition to over the counter mouth rinses, or saliva stimulants such as sugar-free gum or lozenges. Depending on the severity, your dentist may consult with your physician. Also remember, it is important to stay hydrated too!

Sometimes it can be harder to brush and floss as individuals age due to certain impairments. Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or osteoporosis, for instance, often may need extra assistance taking care of their teeth and making regular dental visits. If your loved on has trouble brushing or flossing, speak with your dentist who can add helpful recommendations.

In addition, if recession has occurred overtime, it is important for older adults to properly clean exposed root surfaces of dental plaque and leftover food particles to help prevent decay on the root surfaces.

Most of us have experienced tooth sensitivity at some point in their lives, and age can be one of the many factors that can increase your risk of tooth sensitivity. Your dentist may recommend using a desensitizing toothpaste, or review toothbrushing techniques.

The rate of oral cancer also has been noted to increase with age. According to the American Cancer Society, the average age of most people diagnosed with oral cancer is 62. Often, your dentist is the first to detect oral cancer, which is another reason why keeping up with regular dental visits is important.

Here a few important tips to keep your pearly whites strong and help them last a lifetime:

  • Keep up with regular dental visits, even if you wear dentures, having your gums and surrounding oral tissues checked is necessary for your overall health.
  • Be sure to clean dentures or retainer daily to remove bacteria, using only cleaners made specifically for your oral appliance to avoid damaging. Make sure you remove your denture at night time to keep your oral tissues healthy.
  • Remember to brush at least twice each day for approximately two minutes, and use toothpaste containing fluoride.
  • It is important to floss once daily to remove leftover food debris and plaque in the areas in-between your teeth that the toothbrush cannot reach.
  • Try your best to avoid high intakes of sugar from items such as candy and soda to help lower your risk of tooth decay and improve your overall health.
  • Avoid using tobacco, which has been linked to oral cancer, gum disease, heart disease, and many other health problems. Talk to your dentist or physician for resources and help with quitting, it's never too late!
  • Add an antibacterial mouthwash to your oral hygiene routine to help reduce plaque buildup.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/oral-care-age-55-up

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/adults-over-60?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhtopstories&utm_content=older-americans-month

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Happy Easter!

April 12th, 2020

We hope that you and your loved ones are in good health. Although the world health crisis of COVID-19 has interrupted everyone's daily routine, we hope that all are staying safe and making efforts to flatten the curve.

Even though the Easter bunny is not out and about this year, individuals are making new traditions in celebration of Easter ranging from virtual Easter egg hunts to online church services. Our team at WDG would like to wish those who celebrate a Happy Easter! Easter is a Christian holiday celebrating the resurrection of Jesus Christ. Easter comes after a period of fasting, also known as Lent, which lasts for 40 days beginning on Ash Wednesday and ending on Good Friday, the day of Jesus' death.

Here's a fact that you may not have known about Easter: It's the second best-selling candy holiday in the nation, with nearly 2 billion dollars spent on Easter candy! If you have candy stocked up in the house and plan on indulging in some sweets this Easter, keep these quick tips in mind to help keep your pearly-whites healthy:

  1. Help wash away the harmful acids made by oral bacteria by consuming lots of water when eating candy. The basic properties of water also help neutralize the acids.
  2. Avoid snacking on candy throughout the day. It is best to eat candy or sugary sweets during mealtime to lower the frequency of acid exposure to your teeth.
  3. Hold off on brushing and flossing for at least 30 minute to 1 hour after consuming candy to help prevent wearing away the acid-attacked tooth enamel.
  4. Sticky and gummy candies, such as jelly beans and Peeps, are more damaging towards tooth enamel because they tend to be the most acidic and remain on tooth surfaces longer. Also, you want to avoid chewing on a chocolate easter bunny all day as this also exposes your teeth to more breakdown from the acids produced by bacteria.

Some healthier Easter candy alternatives can still be satisfying! For instance, dark chocolate has been found to be tooth-friendly, according to several studies. Dark chocolate is high in antioxidants and polyphenols, which can help limit oral bacteria.

The Easter Bunny is a fan of carrots, and so are our teeth! Real eggs are also a fun part of easter, great for decorating and eating too. They're rich in vitamin D, which can help keep your tooth enamel strong.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Given the ongoing practices of social distancing and our efforts to flatten the curve, Wellesley Dental Group will remain closed until further notice. We are hoping to open our doors as soon as possible to continue providing the very best dental care to our wonderful patients and community, but it is hard to predict at this time when it will be safe and prudent to do so. We are hoping this will be the first week of May, but we will continue to keep you updated.

In the interim, please note that our emergency line is available 24/7. IF you are in a dental emergency, please call us at 781-237-9071  and select option 2 to leave a voicemail for the on call doctor. For non-urgent matters, we can be reached by email at info@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

References:

https://universe.byu.edu/2012/04/05/easter-the-nations-second-biggest-candy-selling-holiday/

https://recipes.howstuffworks.com/dark-chocolate-good-for-teeth.htm

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Gain Wisdom on your 3rd Molars

January 25th, 2020

Many people seek to gain wisdom throughout life, but some may not realize that they might already have some towards the back of their mouth...their wisdom teeth! Wisdom teeth, also called third molars, are typically the last teeth in the mouth to erupt, and are the last molars present on the upper and lower jaw. Since they are the last permanent teeth to erupt (usually between the ages of 17 and 25), sometimes there is not enough space for them, which can lead to impacted wisdom teeth. If your dentist tells you that you have an impacted wisdom tooth, this means that your tooth may have only partially erupted, or stayed buried underneath the gum tissue.

When this occurs, symptoms including swelling, infection, pain, or tenderness may develop. Some people however, may not experience any problems with their wisdom teeth. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that people between ages 16 and 19 be evaluated by their dentist to see if they need to be removed. This age range is preferred by dentists because the roots of the wisdom teeth are usually not fully formed yet and are easier to remove than in older patients. Also, the risk of developing greater problems is lowered the earlier they are removed, including damage to the major nerve on the lower jaw, the inferior alveolar nerve. People receiving braces may also be recommended to remove their wisdom teeth to avoid their eruption altering the alignment of their teeth.

If it is determined by your dentist or dental specialist that your wisdom teeth need to be extracted, they will recommend either local anesthesia, IV sedation, or general anesthesia depending on the multiple factors of each case. After the extraction, you may be asked to bite softly on a piece of gauze for approximately 30 minutes to limit any bleeding. Bleeding, swelling and tenderness post-extraction are common and may last normally for a few days. However, if it is to continue past a few days, it is important to contact your dentist.

It is recommended not to brush, rinse, or spit within the first 24 hours after the extraction to allow proper healing of the extraction site. Staying hydrated and eating is important following the extraction for your recovery. It is important not to drink through a straw however, as this can lead to dry socket. Dry socket is a possible complication of wisdom tooth removal, which can occur during the first five days after extraction. This happens when the blood clot that formed a seal after the extraction begins to break down and exposes the bone and nerves of the tooth. Only approximately 2 to 5% of people will develop a dry socket. According to a study published in the Journal of Oral Health and Dental Management, dry socket was more common in people who smoke and more likely to occur in the lower jaw. Dry socket can be very painful and may present with an unpleasant smell or taste, but can be treated by your dentist. The site will be cleaned of all debris and covered with a medication until it heals.

If your wisdom teeth are still present and healthy within your mouth, be sure that you are still brushing and flossing them, as these teeth can still develop tooth decay.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth/what-is-a-wisdom-tooth-0415

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth/5-possible-wisdom-teeth-removal-complications

Impacted-Wisdom-Tooth-Types-Optimized.jpg

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Tips on Living Long and Healthy

September 16th, 2019

Now that we're into the month of September, it's time to focus our attention on how to improve our overall health in honor and celebration of Healthy Aging Month! This yearly observance focuses on highlighting tips to help individuals improve their physical and mental health as adults get older. This means also focusing on oral health, since the mouth is a window to the rest of the body. In fact, gum disease, which is common in older people, has been found to be linked with memory loss. Which means taking care of your mind may rely heavily on taking care of your mouth! It is important to realize that as we continue to age, there are changes that occur within the mouth that affect our teeth and the surrounding gums and bone. It is key to minimize damage to our oral cavity at any age by maintaining regular dental visits, and keeping up with good oral hygiene habits each day. Often, poor oral health becomes a factor that worsens existing chronic health problems that an individual may face, including heart disease and diabetes.

In addition, older adults may often be taking several medications daily, which can lead to dry mouth. Not only is the feeling of dry mouth annoying, but it also is harmful to your teeth because it can increase your risk of developing tooth decay due to less saliva being present within the mouth.

No matter what age we are, it is always a great time to start practicing healthy lifestyle habits. Take a look at these tips for healthy aging:

NIH Living Longer Infographic

1. Drink plenty of water!

Staying hydrated is very important for our bodies. Tap water is the best resource because it contains fluoride, which plays a major role in keeping your teeth healthy.

2. Healthy snacks are the way to go

We need to be a little picky with our food choices in order to have a diet that is healthy for our teeth and body. Snacks filled with protein including yogurt, cheese, and nuts make great healthy and tooth-friendly snacks. Also eating foods high in iron, such as spinach, meats, and beans, can help give you the energy you need for each day. Avoid eating sugary foods and candy, as these items aren't so tooth-friendly despite their tastiness.

3. Brushing and flossing habits at home

It is important to brush at least twice a day, and floss at least once a day to help wash away all of the food particles and bacteria within the mouth that could cause harm to your pearly whites. If you wear any oral appliances, such as a retainer or denture, be sure to clean these since bacteria can harbor themselves there too! Fluoride Mouthwash also makes for a good addition to your oral care habits. Not only does the mouth wash help make your breath smell nice and fresh, it also may contain beneficial fluoride and can easily be added to your night and/or morning time routine.

4. Be active

Exercise is essential for staying healthy as we get older. Adults are recommended to get at least 150 minutes of exercise each week.

5. Schedule your dental visit

Be sure that your are visiting your dentist for a regular check up at least twice a year to ensure that your teeth are healthy.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/oral-health/

https://www.deltadentalma.com/About-Us/News/2016/For-Healthy-Aging-Month,-know-your-mouth-may-hold

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/september-is-healthy-aging-month-10-tips-to-celebrate/

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/

GettyImages-579980625-56c667695f9b5879cc3e17ea.jpg

NIA Living Longer Infographic.png

Healthy Start to the School Year

August 21st, 2019

Sometimes we often forget just how important our food choices are for our bodies. Especially when we are craving that most-delicious sweet that we all cannot resist! Things like candy and soda both typically fill our hearts desires, but as we all know they’re not on our good side. But, we truly do need to be more careful about what we eat, not only for your health but also for your pearly whites. Now that summer is soon coming to an end and school is approaching, it’s important to review what should be included on you and your child’s plate. Take a look at these healthy foods that can help satisfy your taste, and keep your mind, body, and teeth in good shape!

Dairy

Dairy products like cheese, milk, and yogurt make great tooth-friendly snacks. Cheese can help lower the risk of tooth decay by raising the pH, making the mouth less acidic. Not to mention, dairy is often full of protein and nutrients that help keep your enamel strong, like calcium. Yogurt contains healthy bacteria, also known as probiotics, which are known to help with digestion and fight off bad bacteria. Dairy is also typically low in sugar, making it a great pick for your lunch.

Nuts

 

Nuts are low in sugar, and are full of protein and minerals that are great for your overall health. Plus, chewing nuts helps trigger saliva production, which can lower your risk for tooth decay. Try tossing them in salads, or grab a bag of them to add to your lunchbox.

 

Hight Fiber Foods/Vegetables

Foods high in fiber such as leafy greens are the way to go when looking for something healthy! It aids digestion, promotes good cholesterol levels, and enhances saliva production necessary for protecting your teeth. Not only are they low in calories, but they're also loaded with vitamins and minerals.

Water

Staying hydrated with water, particularly fluoridated water, is key for keeping your body healthy. Fluoride is an important component as it helps remineralize tooth enamel and makes teeth more resistant to decay.

Apples

An apple a day can actually be good for your health and smile! Apples contain a great amount of fiber and water, and help act similarly to a toothbrush by helping to remove food particles from your teeth.

Carrots

Crunchy carrots also help stimulate saliva production and are a great source of fiber and vitamin A. They make a great snack by themselves or added to salad.

Cranberries

Cranberries have been found to protect your smile by helping keep plaque from sticking to teeth with the help of polyphenols.

Sugarless gum

For all of the gum lovers, sugar-free gum is the best option for your pearly whites. Chewing sugarless gum helps increase saliva production and helps wash away leftover food particles that bacteria feed on.

Prevention is the best way to keep your body and smile in tip-top shape. One method of prevention is to carefully choose healthy foods full of essential nutrients.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/healthy-foods-list-seven-best-foods-for-your-teeth-0214

https://www.livescience.com/44111-foods-healthy-teeth-bad-breath.html

Images:

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Each Bite Counts: National Nutrition Month

March 10th, 2019

The popular saying, "You are what you eat," reminds us that a healthy diet is important in order to keep our bodies healthy, vibrant, and energized. National Nutrition Month is a yearly initiative each March created by the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics to educate individuals on healthy food choices. What we eat on a daily basis not only effects our general health, but also the health of our teeth and gums. In fact, the initial signs of poor nutrition can often first be seen in the mouth.

Healthy teeth aren't just a result of daily toothbrushing and flossing...nutrition plays a major role, too! It is important to include a variety of nutrient-rich foods from all the food groups.

Here are some tips to help you make informed choices on foods and beverages that are tooth-friendly and heart-healthy:

  • Be sure to educate your children about the benefits of eating smart and keeping hydrated with milk and water over sugary sodas and sports drinks. If consuming acidic foods or beverages, it is best to drink water immediately, but wait 30 minutes before brushing your teeth to avoid damaging your enamel since it is at a weakened state during this period. If you have an infant, only send them to sleep with water, as milk or juice can lead to baby bottle tooth decay.
  • Find out your nutritional and calorie needs, based on your age, gender, amount of physical activity, and other health factors. A balanced diet should include:
    • Fruits and Vegetables
      • Fruits and vegetables contain a high water and fiber content, which is beneficial for your teeth and body.
    • Whole Grains
      • Whole wheat bread
      • Brown rice
      • Oatmeal
    • Dairy (low-fat or fat-free)
      • Cheese, milk, and plain yogurt help keep your pearly whites strong!
    • Protein
      • Lean beef
      • Skinless poultry and fish
      • Eggs
      • Beans
      • Peas
      • Legumes

  • Avoid foods that harm your dental health, including empty calorie foods like candy, sweet desserts and non-nutritional snacks. Foods and drinks high in sugar, starch, and carbohydrates, stick to tooth enamel and the bacteria within your mouth consume the sugar. In return the bacteria then release harmful acid that breaks down tooth enamel. It is best to limit your consumption of soda, juice, and sweetened coffee or tea, as these choices promote tooth decay. Not to mention, coffee, tea, and wine are big culprits of causing tooth staining.
  • Nutrients including phosphorus, calcium, Vitamin D, and probiotics, help strengthen enamel and fight against tooth decay. Also, Vitamin C , found in citrus fruits, tomatoes, peppers, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes to name a few, helps promote gum health.
  • Snacking between meals can expose your teeth to more sugar and acids, so it is best to limit snacking. If you do snack, make a conscious nutritious choice, such as cheese, yogurt, fruits, vegetables, or nuts.
  • In addition to eating healthy, make sure you are staying physically active for at least 1 hour a day.
  • If you have medical conditions including gastrointestinal reflux or an eating disorder, your risk of cavities and enamel erosion may be higher.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.eatright.org/food/resources/national-nutrition-month/national-nutrition-month

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/ada-march-is-national-nutrition-month

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/nutrition/food-tips?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=nutrition-month

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Are Summer Foods Ruining Your Smile?

July 14th, 2015

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From sunny afternoons by the poolside to perfect evenings under the stars, summer is the best time to relax, be adventurous, and most importantly, to smile. Many of us also enjoy summer for the delicious foods, fruit juices, and tropical cocktails. Although a summer diet may appear healthy, there are some cravings that are harmful to your teeth that may take you by surprise.

Here are some treats that can damage your teeth and gums:

Juices sometimes contain a higher amount of sugar than soda.

Many people are aware that candy and soda can erode tooth enamel, but how about fruit drinks? Although some juices, smoothies, and cocktails contain many good nutrients, many of the drinks we consume during the summer are acidic and contain a high amount of sugar per serving. Sugars can cling to teeth and harm your pearly whites by feeding the bacteria in your mouth. This process produces acids that can sometimes irreversibly damage teeth.

As it becomes hotter, make sure to keep a glass of water by your side. Also, it is best to drink juice through a straw so that the juice has a harder time sticking to the surface of your teeth. Wait to brush your teeth at least 45-minutes after consuming sugary or acidic foods/drinks, as brushing them immediately after can leave them more susceptible to damage.

Dried Fruit

Dried fruit is often sticky and packed with sugar that can harm teeth the same way that candies do. Instead, opt for crisp apples or pears.

Chewable Vitamins

Gummy vitamins are not much better for our mouths than regular gummy candies. They often stick to the surfaces of teeth and can hide in hard-to-reach places, leading to tooth decay. It is best to take vitamins in pill form.

Popcorn

We often turn to popcorn as a snack choice, especially at the movies. Yet, popcorn is famous for getting stuck in your teeth and in areas that are hard to reach with a toothbrush. Make sure to brush and floss after consuming popcorn.

Peanut Butter and Jelly

Although a delicious and easy-to-make sandwich, peanut butter and Jelly is sticky and high in sugar content. Make sure to check nutrition labels and look for natural peanut butters and sugar-free jelly.

Salad Dressing

Salad dressings often give a nice taste to salad, but the vinegar and sugar inside the dressings can harm your smile. Avoid drenching your healthy salad with too much dressing.

Barbecue sauce

Barbecues are a great part of summer, however, the sweet barbecue sauce can cause tooth discoloration and even lead to cavities if proper oral habits are not implemented.

Vinegar with Vegetables

While the vegetables are healthy, adding vinegar, which is acidic, can harm your teeth and smile.

Wine

While red and white wine has its benefits, they also can cause trouble for your teeth. Red wine can cause staining, and the acids in white wine can damage your enamel. When consuming wine, accompany it with cheese, which is rich in nutrients including protein, calcium and phosphorus, to help fight the acids.

 

Don't fall into the sweet summer temptations that can harm your smile! There are many products sold that brand themselves as healthy products, however, sometimes the ingredients can cause damage to your teeth. It is important to remember that along with brushing, flossing, visiting the dentist, and practicing other good oral health habits, your diet plays a significant role in the health of your teeth. Make sure that your smile sparkles by monitoring the foods and drinks you consume this summer.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://time.com/3907886/teeth-damage-causes/

http://summertomato.com/10-foods-you-didnt-know-were-damaging-your-teeth/

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Summertime in the City: What's Healthy and What's Not

June 2nd, 2015

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June is finally here and it will be hard for many of us to resist a cold drink on a hot summer day. With the many family barbecues and outings, you're sure to be in for a treat this summer. During the warmer months, there are many tasty foods and drinks at our convenience. However, some of these items aren’t so tooth-friendly. As we all know, it is important to limit the amount of sugary foods and drinks we intake to ensure a healthy smile. For the health of your mouth, which links to your overall health, try adding these healthy options to your plate and glass this summer:

Drink, Drink, and Drink more water:

A nice glass of water can be a refreshing drink as you relax by the poolside. Water is important for staying hydrated, especially when your active and the sun is shining. Your smile will also thank you if you rinse your mouth with water after meals. Water, particularly tap water, even has the benefit of containing fluoride.

Watermelon:

Watermelon, made of 92% water, is another tasty  and healthy snack that will keep you hydrated this summer. It contains  lycopene, which helps keep skin protected. Also, many foods that are mainly composed of water have fewer calories. Your kids may even enjoy making watermelon popsicles!

Milk:

Milk is a great alternative to sugary drinks because it has been found to reduce levels of acid produced by plaque bacteria. Milk helps remineralize teeth by providing calcium to keep your teeth strong.

Sugar-Free Gum:

Chewing sugar-free gum can help to stimulate saliva flow and ultimately help to wash away left behind foods. However, it is not clear whether or not xylitol, commonly found in sugar-free gum, actually lowers the risk of developing dental cavities.

Strawberries:

Strawberries are in season and packed with healthy ingredients. Strawberries contain malic acid, which is known to whiten enamel. They also contain many antioxidants and vitamin C, which can help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, and promote eye health.

Cheese:

Cheese is full of calcium, the protein casein, and vitamin D, all good for the health of your teeth. Researchers have discovered that cheese helps increases the pH levels of dental plaque, helping to reduce tooth decay.

Pears:

Pears contain a wealth of fiber that will benefit your teeth. They help to produce saliva and lower plaque levels in the mouth.

Apples:

Crispy apples are full of vitamins and nutrients. Full of water and lots of fiber, apples help to scrub and clean the surface of your teeth.

Vegetables:

Veggies ranging from carrots rich in Vitamin A to dark leafy greens rich in iron, can make a great snack to chew on. Including vegetables in your diet is essential for the health of your teeth and body.

Cranberries:

Research has suggested that cranberries help lower the risk of cavities by helping to keep plaque from sticking to teeth. But, you may want to pay attention to the labels on cranberry products, as many of them can contain added sugars to compensate for their naturally tart flavor.

 

Some foods and drinks that are hard-to-resist, but should be avoided to keep strong and healthy teeth, include:

 

Soft Drinks, Sports Drinks, Sweet Tea, and Juice: Drinking a cold soda may sound refreshing, but it is damaging to tooth enamel. It can also dehydrate your body and make you feel more thirsty. Even sports drinks, artificially sweetened drinks, and concentrated fruit juice contain sugars for the bacteria in dental plaque to feed on and produce harmful acids. The acid then tears away at tooth enamel and can eventually lead to tooth decay. Highly acidic drinks can even cause heartburn and stomach pain. Sipping on these drinks throughout the day rather than at meal times should also be avoided because saliva production is not at its peak. Saliva is important for washing away bacteria and food particles.

Ice Cream:

The many flavors of ice cream are delicious, but unfortunately is full of sugar. Some individuals may also experience tooth sensitivity. Sensitive teeth results when the dentin underneath tooth enamel becomes exposed. This can cause pain, but can be treated. If you do have a taste for ice cream, try and select ice cream with less sugar.

Citrus Fruits:

As we all know, limes, lemons, oranges, and grapefruits are very acidic. These fruits contain citric acid and can be damaging to teeth if consumed frequently.

Vinegar:

A common practice, but an unhealthy one, is to mix vegetables with vinegar. This acidic combination can erode tooth enamel. Pickles are also very acidic.

Granola and Energy Bars:

These items may appear to be good for teeth, but often the dried fruit and other ingredients can be sticky, chewy, and hard to get off of teeth.

Candy: 

We all know that candy contains a lot of sugar, and should be avoided for the protection of your smile.

 

It is important to remember that if you do choose some of the not-so-healthy foods and beverages, consume them in moderation. Also, avoid snacking between meals, as acids can stick around for up to 20 minutes after eating. Not to mention, be mindful of the dyes used in many foods and beverages that can cause tooth discoloration. Practice good oral health habits and lean more towards a tooth-friendly diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/blog/fresh-breath-happenings/teeth-friendly-summer-food-ideas-34659.asp

http://greatist.com/health/healthy-teeth-foods

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-watermelon-popsicles-10713

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