inflammation

Don't Pause Your Dental Check-Ups During COVID-19

April 18th, 2021

With the unexpected and unpredictable COVID-19 pandemic entering our lives well over a year ago, it has put a pause to many of our normal daily activities and brought about caution to our regular lives. With the national shutdowns, and confinement to our homes and closure of business and schools for a period of time, many have had to cancel important events and scheduled appointments. Although the pandemic isn't over yet, with vaccines becoming readily available throughout the world, we are beginning to get a glimpse of some normalcy returning. Studies have reported the efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines in helping prevent contraction of the virus and lowering the risk of having severe symptoms of the virus if infected.

Now, dental and doctor's offices that were previously closed or limited in available procedures are starting to resume normal services and have effective and safe health safety protocols in place to avoid the spread of COVID-19. According to a survey in TIME-Harris Poll of over 1,000 Americans, approximately 78% of individuals have canceled at least one medical service during the past three months, 30% have missed their dental exam, and 27% missed their yearly physical. But, health experts are currently reminding individuals that it's time to reschedule and attend your regular appointments and to not put your oral health or overall health on the back-burner. To find out what safety precautions and protocols your Doctors are performing, be sure to contact their offices with any questions or concerns you may have. Check out some of the changes we have made at WDG, in addition to those mandated by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of General Dentistry (AGD), to ensure the well-being of patients: https://www.wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/2020/05/whats-new-at-wdg-covid-19-safety-precautions

Visiting your dentist is particularly necessary to keep you healthy and strong, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. Your dentist will determine based on your individual needs and oral condition how often dental cleanings and check-ups are needed. Early detection of harmful oral conditions/diseases are key to keeping the rest of your body healthy, as your oral cavity is the window into the rest of your body. Your dentist will even check for signs of COVID-19 in the oral cavity. Radiographs can help identify tooth decay, gum issues, bone loss, and other pathology, and are often taken during your dental exams. Your dentist will also perform an oral cancer screening of your head, neck, and mouth. When issues are detected early, this can help prevent problems from increasing severity/harm, and potentially save you from having to have more invasive and costly dental procedures such as root canals and dental crowns when tooth decay is too extensive to be managed by a dental filling. 

Individuals with gum disease are at a higher risk of developing or worsening many systemic diseases, often linked due to the body's inflammatory immune response. This includes threatening conditions such as heart disease, diabetes, and cerebrovascular events such as strokes. Not to mention, individuals with uncontrolled gum disease are 9 times more likely to die from infection with COVID-19, as reported in a recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology. Don't risk harming your health by putting of your health appointments!

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.wsj.com/articles/dentist-gum-disease-11618003919

https://www.health.com/mind-body/doctor-appointments-to-stop-postponing-covid

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fsuccess.ada.org%2Fen%2Fpractice-management%2Fpatients%2Fcovid-19-patient-communication-resources-for-dental-visits&psig=AOvVaw2smOVUaOZ4_HNLiFEt2hD8&ust=1618853646751000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCOCj15iqiPACFQAAAAAdAAAAABAg

Kidney Function and Gum Disease: New Study

January 25th, 2021

Swollen, red, and tender gums, mobile teeth, bad breath, tooth loss: Do these symptoms sound familiar? Periodontal disease, also known as a later and more harmful form of gum disease, is a commonly reported disease as approximately 47.2% of adults over the age of 30 years in the United States have some degree of periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease which has been linked to many other systemic diseases, for instance, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, diabetes, and much more. Earlier research has even showed a link between gum disease and chronic kidney disease. Studies have suggested that gum inflammation can lead to worsened kidney function.

The Oral Microbiome: A New Culture of Health & Well-being | by Bonnie Feldman | Medium

A new study conducted by researchers at the University of Birmingham evaluated the connection between periodontal inflammation and kidney function. They analyzed more than 700 patients with chronic kidney disease and found that simply a 10% increase in gum inflammation lowers kidney function by 3%! They found that the increase in gum inflammation also increases the risk of kidney failure from 32%-34% over a 5 year period. The study also reported that a 10% reduction in kidney function increases periodontal inflammation by 25%.

The researchers reported that the link between periodontal disease and kidney function was a result of oxidative stress, which is a biological process where the body’s tissues become damaged due to an improper amount of oxygen reactive species (ROS) and antioxidants in the body. This is groundbreaking research because, "This is the first paper to quantify the casual effect of periodontitis on kidney function and vice-versa as well as the first to elucidate the pathways involved…It showed that even a modest reduction in gum inflammation can benefit renal function. Given the relative ease of achieving a 10% reduction in gum inflammation, through simple measures like correct brushing techniques and cleaning between the teeth, these results are very interesting,” according to lead study author, Dr Praveen Sharma.

As more research continues to be done pertaining to kidney function and periodontal disease, it will be exciting to see how improvement in oral health can help improve the overall health of individuals.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/conditions/periodontal-disease.html

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/01/210105095615.htm

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.absolutedental.com%2Fblog%2F10-health-issues-caused-by-bad-oral-health%2F&psig=AOvVaw0BlLu29W0Q6Syx-TQYHyPf&ust=1611606783829000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKipqam1te4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fmedium.com%2F%40DrBonnie360%2Fthe-oral-microbiome-a-new-culture-of-health-well-being-1d26147214d9&psig=AOvVaw1V3wcDToy99LCHCrkzV5PZ&ust=1611606934043000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKi0jOm1te4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABA8

Could Poor Oral Health be Related to Metabolic Syndrome? 

January 11th, 2021

Having swollen or bleeding gums? No one likes that. Gum disease can involve pesky symptoms such as swollen inflamed gums, gums that bleed easily, bad breath, and painful chewing, for instance. A main cause of gum disease is dental plaque, which with good oral health practices can be managed and prevented! When dental plaque adheres to the surfaces of your teeth and is not removed, this can lead to gum inflammation. Gingivitis can progress into periodontal disease, in which irreversible bone loss and tissue damage begins to occur. Unfortunately, gum disease can lead to permanent tooth loss. But, that's not all! Periodontal disease has also been found in many research studies to be linked with several other systemic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, and now also metabolic syndrome, according to a new study.

Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that a common bacteria known to cause periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), also has the capability to cause skeletal muscle metabolic dysfunction through changing an individual's gut microbiome.The purpose of their study, according to the study's author Kazuki Watanabe, was to determine how infection with periodontal bacteria may lead to metabolic changes in skeletal muscle and ultimately lead to metabolic syndrome. However, the study reports that a direct link between the periodontal bacteria and the metabolic function of skeletal muscle has not been proven yet.

The oral cavitiy is a true window into the rest of the body. Oral inflammation caused by periodontal bacteria can influence inflammation within other parts of the body, and the study reports that it can lead to increases in body weight and increased insulin resistance. The body's resistance to insulin is a huge part of type 2 diabetes, in addition to the development of metabolic syndrome.

What's Metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome consists of multiple conditions in association with each other, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, obesity, abnormal fat metabolism, and systemic inflammation.

The researchers studied individuals with metabolic syndrome and discovered that these individuals had high antibody titers against P. gingivalis, meaning they had likely been infected with the bacteria. In addition, they found a positive correlation between the antibody titers and increased insulin resistance. The researchers then observed mice given both a high fat diet, a common risk factor for developing metabolic syndrome, and P. gingivalis injected orally. As a result, they discovered that the mice developed an increased insulin resistance, fat infiltration, and lower uptake of sugar into the skeletal muscle creating metabolic dysfunction when compared to mice not infected with the bacteria. The researchers noted a significant difference in the gut microorganisms in the mice infected with P. gingivalis versus the mice that were not infected.

So, one important thing that the researchers noted in their study is how periodontal disease can impact other parts of the body, and not just the mouth. More research is needed to investigate the link between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201208111428.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20351916

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fflairzhealth.com%2Fwhat-is-the-metabolic-syndrome%2F&psig=AOvVaw2Cz9QHTUqmTqo55YxjB1dP&ust=1610405890584000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMiIksu7ku4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABA3

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dockeodental.com%2Fgum-disease%2F&psig=AOvVaw1fQ3ks6wQZmJ_Jv-DJufGS&ust=1610406249444000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLi0-vm8ku4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAp

COVID-19 Symptoms to Watch Out For!

November 10th, 2020

As the days pass, we can probably all say that we are counting the days until the world beats COVID-19. This global pandemic has created many obstacles and sadly has taken the lives of many. We remain united together and will continue doing our part to stop the spread of coronavirus. A lot of information and evidence based research continues to be gathered regarding the virus as time goes on, and it's important to stay abreast of all of the new findings to keep everyone safe and protected. As reported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), anyone exposed to COVID-19 can experience mild to severe symptoms. In particular, researchers have found that older individuals and individuals who have severe underlying medical conditions, such as heart or lung disease or diabetes, are at an increased risk for developing more serious complications from the virus.

So what exactly are the documented symptoms of COVID-19? Well, a wide range of symptoms have been reported, which typically have been found to appear approximately 2-14 days after exposure to coronavirus. Check out some of the more common symptoms reported by the CDC:

According to a study published in the journal Abdominal Radiology conducted by the University of Alberta faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, approximately 1 in 5 patients (20%) with COVID-19 may only show gastrointestinal symptoms. These symptoms can include abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and appetite loss. The article analyzed 36 studies conducted on COVID-19 symptoms starting in July 2020. Plus, the researchers found potential signs that radiologists should look for while conducting abdominal radiographs that could be evidence of COVID-19 infection. They noted signs of inflammation of the small and large intestines, air within the wall of the intestines (pneumatosis) and perforation (pneumoperitoneum). However, researchers reported that these symptoms are rare. Mitch Wilson, a radiologist and clinical lecturer in the University of Alberta's Faculty of Medicine & Dentistry, explained, "Seeing these things is not necessarily telling us a patient has COVID-19," said Wilson. "It could be from a variety of potential causes. But one of those potential causes is infection from the virus, and in an environment where COVID-19 is very prevalent, it's something to consider and potentially raise as a possibility to the referring physician."

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://decisionsindentistry.com/2020/11/one-in-five-covid-19-patients-presents-only-with-gastrointestinal-symptoms/?inf_contact_key=45820791642b1ab6a6e4dcf7c731f3a0d18a532c4142cb79caf2b269de1401fa

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/11/201103104734.htm

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/symptoms-testing/symptoms.html

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.elitecme.com%2Fresource-center%2Fcovid-19%2Fcovid-19-digestive-issues-and-common-symptoms&psig=AOvVaw1XjnenYq5fifIjEfELuYra&ust=1605048878955000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJi8kJfH9uwCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

Does Oral Bacteria Impact COVID-19 Complications?

August 25th, 2020

Scientists and researchers across the globe are in full-force battle mode when it comes to finding out more information about COVID-19 to help beat the virus. Although COVID-19 has brought about many challenges, losses, and uncertainties, it has brought so many individuals and an abundance of knowledge from across the world together, even if simply virtually! This constantly evolving pandemic has helped fuel important research, all sharing a common goal of finding connections and solutions to bringing this outbreak to a close. In the United Kingdom, researchers have explored the potential connection between oral health and COVID-19. The study, “Could There Be a Link Between Oral Hygiene and the Severity of SARS-Cov-2 Infections?,” published in the British Dental Journal, aimed to determine whether health complications and deaths as a result of COVID-19 were linked to oral bacteria and periodontal disease (gum disease). Also, they hoped to learn more about whether or not the amount of bacteria present in the mouth plays a role in the severity of COVID-19, as well as how improving oral health could possibly lower the risk of individuals experiencing detrimental COVID-19 complications. As many researchers have found, COVID-19 seems to impact individuals in differing ways in terms of symptoms and severity of the disease. Some of the common severe complications of coronavirus include pneumonia, heart problems, blood clots, organ failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and acute kidney injury.

In a healthy mouth, the presence of oral bacteria is natural and exists in harmony with the rest of your body. However, when the bacterial balance becomes out of control, harmful bacteria can not only create problems for your teeth and gums, but also for other parts of your body such as your lungs. The study highlighted several research studies that suggest that bacterial infections were common in individuals with severe COVID-19 symptoms. For instance, a study by Zheng and colleagues found that 50% of patients within their conducted study with severe COVID-19 who passed away also had the presence of a secondary bacterial infection. In addition, a study by Liu and colleagues found similar results, revealing that over 80% of the severe cases of COVID-19 in their study had significantly high bacterial loads as a result of a bacterial superinfection.

The study authors note that tiny droplets of saliva containing oral bacteria that are linked to gum disease, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis)Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia), can contaminate other areas of your body, for instance the lungs. This can create an inflammatory response throughout the body and increase the risk of many developing other infections and complications. Thus, good oral hygiene practices and management of gum disease has been widely studied and associated with a reduction in the risk of respiratory infections. Not to mention, properly managing gum disease also plays a role in lowering the risks and complications associated with other systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

The authors of the study suggest that taking care of your oral health could particularly go a long way in lowering your risk of developing severe complications from COVID-19. The authors concluded, “We recommend that oral hygiene be maintained, if not improved, during a SARS-CoV-2 infection in order to reduce the bacterial load in the mouth and the potential risk of a bacterial superinfection. We recommend that poor oral hygiene be considered a risk to post-viral complications, particularly in patients already predisposed to altered biofilms due to diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Bacteria present in patients with severe COVID-19 are associated with the oral cavity and improved oral hygiene may play a part in reducing the risk of complications.” More research is needed to determine if there is a concrete connection between oral bacteria and COVID-19 complications, as well as the link between gum disease and the virus.

So, don’t forget that your mouth is connected to your entire body, which means keeping up with your overall health goes hand in hand with also maintaining your oral health! Continue to stay safe and healthy.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://decisionsindentistry.com/2020/08/paper-explores-connection-between-oral-hygiene-severity-covid/?inf_contact_key=de1345513d0cf654b8e4b4892fabc16109c74070ac2bf3cfa7869e3cfd4ff832

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7319209/#!po=12.5000

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7258848/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/symptoms-causes/syc-20479963#:~:text=%2D%20Pneumonia%20and%20trouble%20breathing,%2D%20Acute%20kidney%20injury.

https://www.vaildentistry.com/blog/whats-living-in-your-mouthand-whats-it-doing-to-your-heart/

https://hickorydentist.com/caring-for-your-oral-health-while-preventing-covid-19/

https://decisionsindentistry.com/covid-19/

COVID-19 and Gum Disease: A Link?

August 16th, 2020

As more research is being done on COVID-19, there has been a new link to gum disease and severe complications from this worrisome virus. Gum disease is caused by bacteria that causes persistent inflammation of the gums and surrounding structures. Gum disease includes an early stage, gingivitis, and a later stage with progression called periodontitis, which is more severe.

COVID-19 is a disease that is caused by the novel coronavirus named SARS-COV-2. This virus causes damage to the lungs and other organs. The Journal of  the California Dental Association has associated inflammation in the gums with the release of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 protein. These proteins cause systemic inflammation as they travel throughout the body. This occurs when fibroblasts within inflamed gingiva produce IL-6, causing an elevation in levels. The elevated levels of IL-6 then leads to bone loss and tissue destruction. Additionally, high levels of IL-6 within the body can hinder oxygen exchange between the blood and lungs.  This can cause severe breathing problems. The latest study from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology found that high levels of IL-6 are predictors for respiratory failure. Patients with high levels of IL-6 h are 22 times higher risk for respiratory complications.

So, you’re probably wondering what does this mean for you? Risk factors associated with gum disease include: smoking, diabetes, poor oral hygiene, medication, age, and obesity.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA) warning signs of gum disease are as follows:

  • Gums that are red a bleed easily
  • Gums that have pulled away from teeth
  • Loose teeth
  • Consistent bad breath or bad taste in mouth

How to prevent gum disease:

  • Brush twice a day
  • Floss daily
  • Visit your dentist for regular checkups and cleanings
  • Avoid smoking and or using tobacco products

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.dentalproductsreport.com/view/cdc-updates-infection-control-guidelines-for-dental-practices

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7303044/

https://ca.crest.com/en-ca/oral-care-topics/general-oral-hygiene/gum-disease-symptoms-causes-treatments

https://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(20)30685-0/fulltext

https://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Publications/Files/for_the_dental_patient_jan_2011.pdf

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8600401/Could-gum-disease-make-coronavirus-deadly.html

Bad Breath: A Possible Early Sign of Diabetes

August 1st, 2020

We Are Happy To Answer Your Bad Breath Questions | Katy, TX

With roughly 1.5 million Americans diagnosed each year, diabetes remains a silent killer, as early symptoms are often easy to miss. Interestingly, your breath could be warning you that something’s going on in your body. One of the many potential causes of bad breath, also known as halitosis, includes diabetes.

So, What is Diabetes?

The latest statistics noted by the American Diabetes Association reveal that approximately 34.2 million (10.5%) Americans had a diagnosis of diabetes in 2018. Plus, a whopping 88 million (34.5%) individuals aged 18 years or older have prediabetes in the U.S.

Diabetes is a metabolic disorder in which the body has too much blood sugar (glucose) within the bloodstream. Some of the most common types of diabetes that you may have heard of include Type 1 and Type 2. In Type 1 diabetes, the body is blocked from producing insulin, which is normally released by the pancreas to absorb the sugar from the foods you eat for energy. Therefore, treatment involves taking insulin each day to help keep blood sugar levels under control. Type 1 is believed to be caused by an autoimmune response. On the other hand, individuals with Type 2 diabetes suffer from inadequate amounts of insulin release, or their bodies no longer appropriately respond to the action of insulin. Fortunately, Type 2 diabetes can be prevented with healthy lifestyle habits, including exercise, a healthy diet, and practicing good oral hygiene! Diabetes can have a negative, and sometimes life-threatening impact on major organs, including your heart, kidneys, and eyes.

 

Diabetes and Your Oral Health - McOmie Family Dentistry

Bad breath, a possible early sign of diabetes?

Individuals with diabetes may experience bad breath for several reasons which may be detected early. Early diagnosis and treatment of pre-diabetes and diabetes is important for early management and to lower the risk of detrimental complications to your overall health. Some of the common causes of bad breath in pre-diabetic/diabetic patients can include periodontal disease or ketoacidosis:

Periodontal disease:

  • What some people may not know is that diabetes can impact your oral health, and vice versa! This two-way relationship has been shown in several studies revealing a significant link between uncontrolled diabetes and the more severe form of gum disease, periodontitis, as well as severe gum disease being associated with high blood sugar levels.
  • Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease that involves oral bacteria which attack the oral tissues and bone that surround your teeth. Other systemic diseases, like heart disease and strokes, are linked to both diabetes and periodontal disease. Bad breath is a common sign of periodontal disease, and is typically a result of the bacteria within the mouth that produce volatile sulfur compounds. If blood sugar levels are not controlled, periodontal disease can progress and lead to tooth loss.

Ketoacidosis (DKA):

  • One of the complications of diabetes is ketoacidosis. This condition occurs when the body does not have enough insulin, which leads to certain cells not receiving enough energy from the uptake of sugar.
  • This causes your body to break down fat for energy, which consequently makes a high amount of acids in the blood called ketones. A high amount of ketones in your body can lead to bad breath, and you may notice a smell similar to nail polish. Once reaching an unsafe level, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs, which can present with a sweet and fruity odor on your breath, frequent urination, trouble breathing, confusion, abdominal pain, nausea, and/or vomiting. This condition can be life-threatening, and immediate medical attention is necessary if you experience these symptoms.Common Causes of Bad Breath

Take a look at some of the other associations between diabetes, oral health, and bad breath:

Dry mouth:

  • Diabetics may experience dry mouth, which can also cause bad breath. Your saliva does more than you may think! Without saliva, acid produced by oral bacteria can attack the surfaces of your teeth and lead to tooth decay/cavities. Not to mention, saliva helps wash away leftover food particles that the bacteria feed on. To fight dry mouth, stay hydrated with water. Chewing xylitol sugar free gum can also help stimulate saliva production. Dry mouth may also be a result of certain medications, including those taken for diabetes. Be sure to keep your dentist in the loop regarding all of your current medications.

Greater Risk of Infections:

  • Individuals with diabetes are at a higher risk of developing infections due to a weakened immune system. Plus, uncontrolled diabetics may experience slow wound healing due to poor circulation from high blood sugar levels. It is especially important to stay healthy and keep your immune system strong during these unprecedented times. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), individuals with Type 2 diabetes are considered at a high risk for experiencing illness from COVID-19. Make sure to continue practicing social distancing, proper hand-washing and disinfecting, and wear a face covering to help fight coronavirus.
  • In addition, people with diabetes may be at a higher risk of developing an oral yeast infection, also known as oral thrush. Oral thrush often appears as a white coat on the tongue or inside of the cheeks and can result in uncomfortable mouth sores and ulcers, along with a foul odor and taste. Your dentist will be able to diagnose oral thrush and offer treatment recommendations.

Remember, your oral cavity is a window to the rest of your body so be sure to take care of it! Your body may be showing you small signs that relate to a bigger health issue. Keep up with your regular dental appointments and practice good oral hygiene at home. When tooth brushing, don’t forget to brush your tongue, which is a common ground for odor producing bacteria.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1312660/type-2-diabetes-signs-symptoms-diabetic-ketoacidosis-halitosis-blood-sugar

https://www.diabetes.org/resources/statistics/statistics-about-diabetes

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25342350/

https://www.shalby.org/blog/endocrinology-diabetology/diabetes-silent-killer/

https://www.healthline.com/health/diabetes/bad-breath

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/diabetes-and-other-endocrine-disorders/diabetes-and-dental-problems-0614

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/need-extra-precautions/people-with-medical-conditions.html?CDC_AA_refVal=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cdc.gov%2Fcoronavirus%2F2019-ncov%2Fneed-extra-precautions%2Fgroups-at-higher-risk.html#diabetes

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/diabetic-ketoacidosis/symptoms-causes/syc-20371551

https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmcomiedentistry.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2016%2F11%2Fdiabetes-oral-health-865x519.jpg&imgrefurl=https%3A%2F%2Fmcomiedentistry.com%2Fdiabetes-oral-health%2F&tbnid=wibCrzMbrsmcWM&vet=12ahUKEwi0utSJsPrqAhUXRFMKHcY_CisQMygAegUIARCqAQ..i&docid=us3xVHL0O5gD9M&w=865&h=519&q=diabetes%20oral%20health&ved=2ahUKEwi0utSJsPrqAhUXRFMKHcY_CisQMygAegUIARCqAQ

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.smilegeneration.com%2Fblog%2Fsmile-facts%2Fcommon-causes-of-bad-breath%2F&psig=AOvVaw2l2w6ICnsYwZEoznSI1gqT&ust=1596384118408000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJCQk7aw-uoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Flathropdentalcenter.com%2Fblog%2F2017%2F06%2Fwe-are-happy-to-answer-your-bad-breath-questions%2F&psig=AOvVaw2l2w6ICnsYwZEoznSI1gqT&ust=1596384118408000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJCQk7aw-uoCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAT

Proper Oral Hygiene Can Boost Your Immune System

June 22nd, 2020

Being sick...none of us have time for that. Luckily, our body's immune system is our defense mechanism against harmful bacteria, germs, allergens, and foreign particles that enter our body. That’s why keeping a strong and healthy immune system is key to fighting infectious diseases like COVID-19. Your immune system is a complex system made up of many cells, organs, and tissues that span throughout your entire body, including your oral cavity. In fact, your mouth is generally the first entry point to the rest of your body. Therefore, it’s important to maintain good oral health to help keep your immune system and overall health strong, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

When your immune system is functioning properly, normal oral bacteria and your natural microbiome aren’t typically a dangerous threat. However, when your oral health is not being maintained, bacteria can breakdown your pearly whites and lead to gum disease and inflammation, which can ultimately weaken your immune system. The early stages of gum disease is also known as gingivitis, which can be reversed with proper oral hygiene habits such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, healthy diet and stress maintenance, and regular dental visits for comprehensive care. Some signs of gingivitis include inflamed gums, presenting with swelling, redness, and possible bleeding. A more severe form of gum disease is known as periodontitis, and the damage is typically irreversible. In periodontal disease, the inflammatory response triggered by bacteria not only impacts your teeth and gums, but also attacks your surrounding oral tissues and bone that hold your teeth in place. If untreated, periodontal disease can lead to both bone and tooth loss. Consequently, your immune system begins to work extra hard to help fight gum disease, and may promote inflammation within other parts of your body. Sadly, an unhealthy mouth has been linked to many systemic health conditions and inflammatory diseases, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, preterm birth, and more! The case for having good oral hygiene undeniably keeps getting stronger. It’s important to keep your mouth healthy to help allow your immune system to be strong for taking care of the rest of your body!

During a pandemic, it’s important to do everything you can to strengthen your immune system. Here are some ways you can help your body stay healthy during these unprecedented times:

  • Minimize stress: Some research suggests that stress can exacerbate inflammatory disease such as gum disease. Try to stay active and keep a healthy diet to help relieve stress.
  • Exercise regularly and stay hydrated
  • Get adequate sleep: It is recommended that most adults need between 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best. Children and teens might need more sleep for their growing bodies.
  • Brush your teeth daily
  • Floss daily to remove bacteria between your teeth
  • Wash hands regularly
  • Disinfect high-touch surfaces including bathroom surfaces, toilets, faucets, sinks, tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones and keyboards
  • Wear a mask and practice social distancing
  • Eat a healthy diet heavy with fruits, vegetables, lean meats and healthy fat
  • Visit your dentist regularly for check-ups/professional cleanings/outstanding treatments

It's also important to avoid practices that are harmful to your teeth and body:

  • Avoid smoking
  • Avoid high sugar diets
  • Avoid acidic drinks like soda and energy drinks
  • Drink alcohol in moderation
  • Avoid nail biting, chewing on ice, and using your teeth to open bottles or objects

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19.  Our office follows the recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group. We look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors, and friends.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.guardiandirect.com/resources/articles/how-good-oral-health-may-help-you-keep-your-immune-system-strong

https://www.colgateprofessional.com/education/patient-education/topics/systemic/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body

living-with-an-immunocompromised-system-and-covid-19-722x406.jpg

WMJ_picture_file_for_Dental_Health_blog_post_6.5.png

Will Eating Yogurt Help Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer?

March 27th, 2020

Inflammation has been a common link to many systemic diseases. Inflammation is our body's way of fighting against potentially harmful pathogens. Gum disease, which includes periodontitis, is one of the most common inflammatory diseases and has been linked to several inflammatory conditions and cancers. Now, new research published in the journal Medical Hypotheses by Lancaster University is suggesting that one of causes of breast cancer may be due to inflammation in response to harmful bacteria. Although our body consists of more than10 billion bacterial cells, most of which are nontoxic, some can produce toxins that can initiate the inflammatory response within the body. But there is good news: The researchers recommend eating natural yogurt, as it contains the "good bacteria," also known as probiotics, that can help lessen the inflammatory response. It was found that the lactose fermenting bacteria within yogurt is remarkably similar to the bacteria /microflora found in a mother's breastmilk during lactation. They found that for each year of breast feeding, the risk of developing breast cancer is reduced by 4.3%!  Not to mention, the probiotics may also help to slow the growth of dental cavity causing bacteria.

Other studies have also suggested a positive link between consuming yogurt and a reduction in breast cancer risk, which researchers believe is because of the beneficial bacteria disrupting the harmful bacteria.

So, consuming yogurt may help lower your risk of breast cancer and help your gums. Plain yogurt is definitely tooth-friendly because of its high protein and calcium content, which help to keep your tooth enamel strong. Plus, yogurt helps make your mouth less acidic, which makes your oral environment one that bacteria have a hard time surviving in. By eliminating harmful bacteria that can produce smelly odors, this also can help to combat bad breath!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/01/200124073857.htm

7TM6MPLSM5GYDFI7W4IBLMRLAM

five-foods-that-are-great-for-your-teeth-1-638.jpg

DdXAdfpWAAAsEXk.jpg

Can a Toothpaste Help Prevent Heart Attacks or Strokes?

March 21st, 2020

Our immune response to illness and injury is pretty amazing. Inflammation is our body's defense mechanism to help our body heal, however, chronic inflammation can sometimes cause harm to our bodies. When arteries become blocked by a buildup of plaque, a composition of fat, cholesterol, calcium, and other substances, this can initiate an inflammatory response that can increase your risk of developing a heart attack or stroke. And, it's no secret that oral health has been connected with many systemic inflammatory diseases, as inflammation significantly affects the oral cavity. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) found that 47.2% of Americans over the age of 30 have some form of periodontal disease, which is a pathological inflammatory disease of the gums and oral tissues that surround the teeth. Inflammation within the body is measured by high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), which circulates throughout the blood and increases in response to inflammation. Doctor's can monitor the amount of hs-CRP in the blood to help lower the risk of having a heart attack or stroke.
Now, new research has suggested that the first toothpaste to identify dental plaque, Plaque HD®, may help to lower the risk of heart attacks and strokes by lowering C-reactive protein! The study, published in the American Journal of Medicine, conducted by researchers from Florida Atlantic University's Schmidt College of Medicine, Marshfield Clinic Research Institute, and the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health looked at whether or not the toothpaste Plaque HD® reduces hs-CRP in individuals. Plaque HD® helps make dental plaque visible on the surfaces of teeth in addition to weakening the dental plaque so that it can easily be removed with regular toothbrushing. Participants of the study were randomly split into groups, one group with Plaque HD® toothpaste, and the other group with a similar non-plaque identifying placebo toothpaste. The participants were monitored for 30 days. It was found that those who used Plaque HD® toothpaste had a statistically significant reduction in hs-CRP in comparison with the placebo group. However, more research is needed to determine if the Plaque HD® toothpaste directly correlates to a decrease in heart attacks or strokes.

Remember that it is important to take care of your teeth and practice good oral hygiene habits to help keep a healthy body.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/02/200224100554.htm

file-20190108-32145-17m7v5x.jpg

17feb2bcgregg_p01.png

Brush Your Teeth, Your Heart Will Thank You

November 11th, 2018

Who would have thought that your dentist would be telling you how to help prevent heart disease? It’s commonly known that smoking, a poor diet, lack of exercise, and an uncontrolled weight can impact your heart. However, did you know that brushing your teeth is linked with maintaining a healthy heart? Research published in Scotland revealed that brushing your teeth can lower your risk of experiencing a heart attack or other issues impacting your heart.

Heart disease is a serious problem that unfortunately impacts a lot of people. According to the American Heart Association, about 2,600 people in the United States die each day from a heart attack, heart failure, or stroke. The study looked at approximately 12,000 women and men and observed their oral health habits, daily exercise, and smoking habits. About 60% of the individuals reported seeing a dentist every 6 months, and approximately 70% reported brushing their teeth two times each day. Those who stated brushing their teeth less often were found to have a 70% increased risk of heart disease and had increased amounts of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen, which are found in the blood indicating inflammation. Inflammation is a significant finding related to poor oral hygiene and atherosclerosis (accumulation of fat substances around artery walls). Periodontal disease, which is a chronic condition impacting the gums and tissues around teeth, is a result of poor oral hygiene and adds to the inflammatory response. Some signs of periodontal disease include red and swollen gums, bleeding gums when eating or brushing and flossing, pus or infection around gums, poor taste in your mouth, and loose teeth.

The American Heart Association also conducted a recent study analyzing brushing frequency in 682 participants and the link to heart disease risk. Those who stated brushing their teeth less than two times a day for less than two minutes had a 3 times higher risk of developing heart disease than those brushing for the recommended two times a day for 2 minutes or more. More research is needed to determine whether or not the link is a cause and effect relationship.

Practicing good oral hygiene habits and scheduling regular dental visits can help not only keep your smile healthy but also help keep your heart and overall health in check.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/heart-disease/ada-06-consumer-news-heart-disease-tooth-brushing

https://www.cdapress.com/article/20181107/AP/311079959

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20050207/brush-your-teeth-help-your-heart#2

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20100527/brushing-teeth-may-keep-heart-disease-away

https://www.cigna.com/static/www-cigna-com/images/individuals-families/health-wellness/brush-teeth/brush-teeth-1-16x9-lg.jpg

https://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/atherosclerosis.htm

September Is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month

September 5th, 2018

What is National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month?

Did you know that over 23 million children are obese or overweight in the United States? National Childhood Obesity Awareness Month is a yearly campaign with the goal of letting individuals know the health hazards of obesity, particularly for children. Approximately one third of children in the U.S. are at risk of type-2 diabetes, high blood pressure, stroke and heart disease. But, with the knowledge and proper resources, we can make these statistics and the health of our children better. Several organizations and professionals will be joining together especially this month to raise money, conduct research, and provide treatment to help battle childhood obesity.

Childhood obesity is a serious public health problem that can have a lifelong impact on the overall health. Chronic conditions such as asthma, joint issues, Type 2 diabetes, and sleep apnea may develop at higher rates due to childhood obesity. Also, it has been found that children with obesity often are more likely to experience depression and lower self-esteem. Surprisingly, obesity is also linked with an increased risk of developing periodontal disease due to the body's inflammatory response.

Several factors play a role in childhood obesity, such as genetics, metabolism, your child's home and community environment, as well as eating behavior and level of physical activity. It is important to encourage your child to stay active, get regular sleep, and to have a tooth-friendly healthy diet. When your child's energy is balanced it allows for healthier growth.

Some ways to help prevent obesity include measuring your child's Body Mass Index (BMI). This can be done using the CDC’s Child and Teen BMI Calculator to help identify your child's risk for obesity. Most importantly, make sure your child is provided with nutritious meals that include fruits and vegetables. Now that school is starting up, make sure to pack healthy lunches, which will not only keep your teeth healthy, but also your body! Have your child avoid sugary foods and beverages. Allow a certain amount of time for your child to be involved in physical activity each day. Not to mention, be a role model by following the same guidelines!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/threats-to-dental-health/ada-09-september-is-national-childhood-obesity-awareness-month

https://www.cdc.gov/features/childhoodobesity/index.html

tips-on-childhood-obesity-awareness.jpg

1_Lunchbots_.jpg

Is Vaping Really a Safer Alternative to Smoking?

August 26th, 2018

Electronic cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular, especially as they are constantly being advertised as a “safer alternative” to traditional cigarettes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that the use of e-cigarettes has increased from 1.5% in 2011 to over 16% in 2015 among high-school aged students. When it comes to oral health, however, new research suggests E-cigarettes could be just as bad as smoking.

E-cigarettes have a battery inside with a heating device that vaporizes a liquid that gets inhaled. Although this liquid does not contain tobacco, it does have nicotine and flavoring chemicals that are harmful to your body.  Nicotine in particular is a highly addictive component that can have a negative impact on  adolescent brain development. Not to mention, E-cigarettes can produce many oral health problems, such as oral cancer, tooth loss, and gum disease.

A study was conducted in South Korea involving a representative sample of middle-school and high-school aged students. 65,528 students were asked if during the past year they had experienced gingival pain, bleeding, tongue pain, inside cheek pain, a cracked tooth, or a combination of any of the above asked. They were also asked if they had ever used an E-Cigarette. The researchers found that 297 students (0.5%) used E-cigarettes daily, 1,259 (1.9%) used ECs 1 to 29 days in the past month, 3,848 (5.9%) were former EC users, and 60,124 (91.8%) never used E-cigarettes.

The study revealed that there were significantly higher chances of having experienced a cracked tooth, tongue pain, inside-cheek pain, or both among daily, within 1-29 days in the past month, and former E-cigarette users.

Another study looked at vapor-exposed epithelial cells under a microscope and discovered that there was a significant increase in epithelial cell death. They found that E-cigarette vapor destroyed 53% of cells within the mouth after 3 days. This suggests that the death of protective cells may lead to a higher risk of infection, gum disease, inflammation, and even possibly cancer.

Talk to your kids about the harms of E-cigarettes and smoking products, as well as the importance of maintaining your oral health to ensure overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://pages.ada.org/jada-specialty-scan/oral-pathology/oral-pathology-august-24-2018?utm_campaign=JADA%20Specialty%20Scan&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65440658&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8yc_SI07OAU_XhoSEngQA1QYRsc_1bMXptS802Wpvje1MWrzTPC7hgwm8P3TJs2uVJJQX4lCf7gQpm5oawtYGYfFPqZQ&_hsmi=65440658#article1

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314190.php

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/Quick-Facts-on-the-Risks-of-E-cigarettes-for-Kids-Teens-and-Young-Adults.html

ecig_female_lips_smoke.png

Health Problems Linked To Gum Disease

November 17th, 2016

gum-disease

Did you know that gum disease, or periodontitis, is linked to many other health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's? Recently, researchers have found even more connections between periodontitis and health issues, including the following

1. Erectile Dysfunction

  • Connected by inflammation
  • Untreated bleeding gums and teeth can lead to tooth decay and loss
  • Bacteria can travel through the bloodstream and damage blood vessels
  • ED is caused by impaired blood flow in the penis
  • Gum disease is a causative clinical condition of ED
  • 53% of males with ED had severe periodontal disease, compared to the 23% of those who did not have ED

2. Low Testosterone Levels

  • Chronic periodontitis could have an impact on the reproductive health of men
  • Higher levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and an increase in osteoclastic activity result in lower testosterone
  • Gum disease causes increased immune-endocrine interactions
  • 65% of studies reported a positive correlation between chronic periodontitis and testosterone levels
  • More studies need to be done to confirm relationship

3. Obesity

  • Obesity increases inflammation levels
  • Gum disease is a chronic inflammatory disease
  • A family of cytokines (Interleukin-1 or IL-1) exacerbates the effect of obesity on the development periodontal disease
  • Obese patients who tested positive for IL-1 have a 70% higher chance of developing gum disease

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://healthland.time.com/2012/12/05/what-does-gum-disease-have-to-do-with-erectile-dysfunction/

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/todays-dental-news/item/1250-link-between-low-testosterone-and-periodontitis-bears-research?hq_e=el&hq_m=1085571&hq_l=4&hq_v=7c40e2efa1

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/todays-dental-news/item/1290-cytokines-may-tie-obesity-to-periodontal-disease?hq_e=el&hq_m=1090817&hq_l=2&hq_v=7c40e2efa1

Gum Disease Doesn't Just Affect Your Gums!

August 3rd, 2016

What do Arthritis, Alzheimer's, cancer, and diabetes have in common? If you have periodontal (gum) disease, your risk for all these diseases could increase.

People once thought that the mouth and the body had no relation each other, and dental care used to be the job of barbers in the Middle Ages! It wasn't until the 1700's that dentistry was finally recognized as its own science and the late 1990's that the connection between oral bacteria and heart disease was studied in animals.

When you don't brush or floss thoroughly, bacteria can become trapped between your teeth and your gums. This can cause plaque to accumulate, which can eventually lead to the break down of the gums and oral tissue and make other parts of the body prone to infection.

Preventing the buildup of plaque from reaching oxygen will cause it to favor anaerobic (without oxygen) bacteria, which can travel all throughout the body through the bloodstream.

When neutrophils (white blood cells) attempt to destroy the bacteria on the gums, they not only don't succeed in controlling the infection, but they also release enzymes that further deteriorate oral tissue.

Therefore, periodontal disease affects more than just your oral health; it could also affect the heart, the liver, the gut, and even your child if you're pregnant. Some studies have also shown a link between gum disease and increased bacteria in the brain and increased risk for tumors.

Make sure to take proper care of your teeth. Your body will thank you later!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/gum-disease-opens-body-host-infections

https://www.sciencenews.org/sites/default/files/2016/04/041616_gum_flowchart_730.png

http://newteethforme.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/gum-disease.jpg

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