Journal of Dental Research

Obesity Linked to Bone Destruction?

December 12th, 2021

Managing weight can be easier said than done, and sadly obesity remains a serious public health threat in the United States. Obesity negatively impacts the entire body, and this includes the mouth. Several studies have suggested a link between obesity and gum disease. More recently, a study conducted at the University at Buffalo has added valuable knowledge regarding the potential association between these two major health issues. Their research suggests that chronic inflammation stimulated by obesity may influence the development of cells that destroy bone tissue – and this extends to the bone that surrounds your teeth.

The study was published in the Journal of Dental Research and conducted on mice. The researchers aimed to help advance the understanding between the relationship between obesity and periodontal disease, the advanced stage of gum disease. Periodontal disease plagues many adults in the United States, with numbers according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) approximating greater than 47% of adults 30 years and older. As you may know, one of the signs of advanced gum disease is bone loss. When bone loss progresses, this can lead to many oral health issues including tooth loss.

The mice were studied over a period of 16 weeks and were divided into two groups. One group of mice were fed a low-fat diet which derived 10% of energy from fat, while the other group was fed a high-fat diet that derived 45% of energy from fat.

The high-fat diet group was found to experience obesity, greater inflammation, a higher increase of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) known to play a role in developing cells that break down bone, greater quantity of osteoclasts (cells that breakdown bone), and more bone loss surrounding teeth when compared to the low-fat diet group of mice. They also discovered the high-fat diet group to have an increase in the expression of 27 genes that are linked to the production of osteoclasts. The authors of the study support the notion that obesity may increase the risk of periodontal bone loss.

Further research may even help improve our understanding of the potential connections between obesity and other chronic inflammatory diseases like arthritis and osteoporosis, suggests research investigator Keith Kirkwood, DDS, PhD, professor of oral biology in the UB School of Dental Medicine.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2021/11/211112083106.htm

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dreamstime.com%2Fbest-foods-bad-your-teeth-dental-care-concept-vector-illustration-flat-design-collection-placed-abstract-tooth-image173819390&psig=AOvVaw20B4T3TNmFePz5JiRHaYmq&ust=1639413894402000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAsQjRxqFwoTCIjJmOra3vQCFQAAAAAdAAAAABAa

Bioteeth: the Possibility of Biological Tooth Replacement

January 31st, 2014

man woman happy smile

Scientists have recently created a method for replacing missing teeth through the use of bio-engineered material developed from a person’s own gum cells. Up until now, dentists have been using implant-based methods to accommodate tooth loss. However, with this new breakthrough in dental research, perhaps patients may be able to receive a biological tooth replacement down the road!

Professor Paul Sharpe, a specialist in craniofacial development and stem cell biology King’s College London, published his findings in the Journal of Dental Research and was excited to present studies showing promising results on creating of “bio-teeth,” which is the generation of immature teeth that are similar those found in embryo. Professor Sharpe believes that these can be transplanted into adults and eventually develop to become perfectly functioning teeth. The team’s research showed that these embryonic immature teeth can grow normally in the adult mouth and may potentially be used clinically.

So far, the researchers have been able to isolate epithelial cells derived adult human gum tissue taken from patients at the Dental Institute at King’s College London. They were grown in the lab and then combined with mice cells that were known to form teeth. Through transplanting, Professor Sharpe and his team were created hybrid human/mouse teeth that had formed dentine and enamel, along with viable roots. This research shows that these easily accessible epithelial cells may be a feasible source for creating the human bio-tooth. Professor Sharpe explains there is still some ways to go in the progress of creating bio-teeth. Still more research needs to be done in identifying adult sources of specific epithelial cells, which are cells that line the surfaces of structures throughout the body; these cells may be the key in forming bio-tooth. Currently, scientists have only been able to create viable teeth through the use of embryonic cells; it is important for more research to be done to look for ways to manipulate adult human cells to develop into tooth. With more effort dedicated to this field of research, researches may one day be able to make bio-teeth a reality in patients needing teeth replacement!

But for now, patients have the opportunity to receive implants, which have been a successful method in dentistry to replace teeth. Usually made from titanium, implants are placed within the bone; quite amazingly, the bone in the jaw accepts the new structure and the implant readily fuses with the bone. Dentists have been using this method for restoring a single tooth and even a group of teeth that could have gone missing due to significant tooth decay or fracture.

If you believe that you may be in need of dental implants, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

Journal of Dental Research

WebMD

How Exactly Does Smoking Affect Oral Health?

January 28th, 2014

While smoking has been found to lead to various unhealthy consequences, it also has been linked with resulting in poor oral health.

Smoking and tobacco-based products have been shown to result in gum disease. It damages bone and soft tissue of teeth and interferes with the functioning of gum tissue cells. This leaves smokers more susceptible to infections, including periodontal disease, and also tends to lessen blood flow to the gums, which would hinder wound healing.

The Journal of the American Dental Association published results showing that cigar smokers have experienced tooth loss and alveolar bone loss, which is the bone within the jawbone responsible for anchoring teeth. The rate at which bone and tooth are loss for cigar smokers are very similar to cigarette smokers. Pipe smokers also are in danger of tooth loss; moreover, they are also at risk for oral and pharyngeal (throat) cancer, even if the smoke is not inhaled. Other oral health consequences included halitosis, stained teeth, and gum disease.

While some smokers believe that using smokeless tobacco products tend to be safer, that is not the case. Similar to cigars and cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products, including chewing tobacco, contain at least 28 chemicals that have shown to increase the risk of oral cancer, along with cancer of the throat and esophagus. Smokeless tobacco can also irritate gum tissue, leading to the receding and pulling away of teeth. When gum tissue recedes, teeth roots are left more exposed, which increases the chance for tooth decay to occur. The Journal of the American Dental Association also showed that chewing tobacco users were four times more likely than nonusers to have tooth decay. Smokeless tobacco also contains sand and grit, which can easily wear down teeth.

Even though you may be a tobacco product user, it is never too late to quit. Studies have shown that 11 years after quitting, former smokers were found to have risks of developing gum disease that were not too different from those who had never smoked. Cutting out tobacco products can truly lead to healthier oral health. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

http://www.dentalplans.com/dentalhealtharticles/53837/smoking-tobacco-may-affect-oral-health.html

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