menopause

Abnormal Tooth Enamel: Amelogenesis Imperfecta

March 17th, 2016

 enamelAmelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disorder in which tooth enamel forms abnormally. As a result, individuals with this condition are at a higher risk of developing cavities. It typically causes teeth to be smaller than usual, discolored, grooved, easily damaged, among other dental problems that can vary by the individual. Secondary effects could be early tooth loss, periodontal disease, tooth sensitivity, and jaw problems.

Unfortunately, Amelogenesis imperfecta can negatively impact both primary teeth and permanent teeth. Around 14 forms of this condition have been determined by researchers. It has also been found to affect approximately 1 in 700 people in northern Sweden to 1 in 14,000 people in the United States.

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Many cases of Amelogenesis imperfecta are a result of mutations in the AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and FAM83H genes, which are normally responsible for making proteins essential for normal tooth and enamel development (ameloblastin, enamelin, tuftelin and amelogenin). Tooth enamel is a hard outer layer rich in calcium that functions to protect the tooth. As a result of a mutation, tooth enamel becomes thin and weaker than normal, and may even appear yellow or brown in color. The genetic causes of other cases have not yet been identified.

This condition can be inherited in both an autosomal dominant pattern and autosomal recessive pattern. In an autosomal dominant pattern, once copy of the mutated gene in each cell can cause Amelogenesis imperfecta. An autosomal recessive pattern involves two mutated copies of the gene in each cell. Researchers found that around 5 percent of amelogenesis imperfecta cases are due to mutations in the AMELX gene and are inherited in an X-linked pattern. They also found that males with X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta have more severe dental problems than females with this form of the condition.

Preventive and restorative dental treatments can help make teeth impacted by this condition look normal and remain healthy. Full crown restorations are often used to treat this disorder. For severe cases, teeth may have to be extracted and implants or dentures may be required. If you feel like you have Amelogenesis imperfecta or any other enamel conditions, our very Dr. Ejaz Ali is an expert at fixing the issue, bringing the teeth back to ideal form, function, and esthetic. Dr. Ali was trained at Tufts School of Dental Medicine, and also did additional training at New York University’s in “Full Mouth Reconstruction: Advanced Principles and Practice for the GP” with special focus on Implants, Aesthetics, and Occlusion.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

Women 45 and Up: Get Your Annual Mammograms

November 21st, 2015

 


You may have previously heard that women should begin receiving mammograms when they turn 40, but based on new research, the American Cancer Society (ACS) now emphasizes the increase of the average risk for breast cancer near menopause. The ACS's new guidelines, published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, are more conservative than the previous ones. There are different recommendations for each age group:

  • Women between 40 and 44 years old: begin conversation on mammography with doctor and have the choice of receiving annual mammograms if they are at risk or if they would like to.
  • Women between 45 and 54 years old: receive mammography screening every year.
  • Women 55 years old or older: switch to getting mammograms every two years until their life expectancy is less than ten years.

According to ACS, this shift in guidelines was due to the cancer society's focus on breast cancer risk in five-year increments instead of ten-year increments. ACS discovered from mammography that women from ages 45 to 49 and women from ages 50 to 54 have similar risks of cancer and reductions in mortality.

The new guidelines are based on the considerable review of the results of current scientific studies, such as one conducted by the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium on 15,440 breast cancer patients ranging from age 40 to 85 that is being published in the journal Jama Oncology. This study demonstrated that it is better to receive annual mammograms  for women approaching menopause. Researchers claim that age is less important than menopausal status when determining when to receive mammograms, which is supported by biological evidence, because estrogen has a tendency to encourage the growth of tumors.

The ACS also discourages clinical breast exams, which involve a health professional inspecting and feeling a woman's breasts for cancer signs, instead of breast cancer screening for women of all ages. They believe that there was no strong evidence that clinical breast exams were effectively saving lives, and instead recommends mammography.

Despite the evidence that studies have shown, mammography is still a controversial topic. For instance, the American College of Radiology and the Society of Breast Imaging are still recommending annual mammograms for women beginning at age 40. Some doctors believe that increasing that age of beginning to receive annual mammograms may put younger women's lives at risk, since detecting signs of breast cancer early is crucial for increasing the chances of survival.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://consumer.healthday.com/cancer-information-5/mammography-news-460/women-should-get-annual-mammograms-starting-at-age-45-cancer-society-704388.html

http://thespiritscience.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/women-mammogram.jpg

 

Indulgence in Sugary Sodas Can Lead to Poor Oral Health & Cardiovascular Disease

January 24th, 2014

colaThe proven connection between poor oral heath and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should re-enforce the importance of new heath policy creation, focusing on reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks,  say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Poor oral hygiene and excess amount of sugar in the diet can cause periodontal disease and decay of the teeth-supporting bone. It is thought that chronic infection brought on by gym disease can lead to inflammation that will over time cause heart disease through atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. Despite sufficient evidence of the connection between the poor oral health and premature heart disease, the recent suggested UK national guidance on Cardiovascular disease prevention at population level does not suggest the strong need to reduce sugar consumption.

Dr Ahmed Rashid, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, who co-wrote the paper, said: "As well as having high levels of fats and salt, junk foods often contain a great deal of sugar and the effect this has on oral health may be an important additional mechanism by which junk food elevates risk of CVD." He added: "Among different types of junk food, soft drinks have raised particular concerns and are the main source of free sugar for many individuals."

The authors refer to the well-knows  New York 'soda ban' controversy which has brought a lot of attention to the issue. They stress more can be done about making the sugary sodas dominating the public areas in the United States. Dr Rashid said: "The UK population should be encouraged to reduce fizzy drink intake and improve oral hygiene. Reducing sugar consumption and managing dental problems early could help prevent heart problems later in life."

Reference: http://goo.gl/ppiqpM

Cholesterol Medication Can Help Decrease Gum Inflammation

December 12th, 2013

youngoldHeart disease is one of the leading health issues in the United States. Arteries within the body become inflamed and patients are often recommended to take medication that lowers cholesterol

Statins is a commonly prescribed medication that helps patients with heart disease. But what’s more is that a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology demonstrated that statins can also be beneficial for those suffering from gum disease.

Periodontal disease is marked by chronic gum inflammation that affects approximately half of the U.S. adult population. Dr. Ahmed Tawkol of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School notes that there is a connections between heart and gum disease: both periodontitis and atherosclerosis are driven by inflammation. These inflammatory conditions are often seen to occur together, indicating to researchers that their biologies may be related.

A study was administered to test this theory. Patients with either heart disease or considered to have high heart disease risk were asked to take 80 mg of statin or 10 mg of stain daily for 12 weeks. PET/CT scans were used to observe inflammation over the course of the study. Results indicated that the 59 patients in the study demonstrated a significant reduction in gum inflammation, some after only 4 weeks of treatment. The researchers also found that the improvement of inflammation in the gums related closely with the improvement seen in inflammation in the arteries.

This study provides strong evidence that links atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. This research opens doors to new methods of treatments. Because of the relationship between these two diseases, medications that originally targeted one of these diseases may also be beneficial for the other. These results also points to better and improved oral hygiene to reduce inflammation in the gums can also lead to reduced atherosclerosis.

This study again shows the strong relationship between oral health and overall systemic health. Maintaining proper oral care can really go a long way for the body as a whole. Keeping up with oral hygiene can truly lead to a healthier smile and a healthier you!

If you have any questions or concerns please don't hesitate to ask Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group or our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi. We would all be more than happy to help. Please contact us at (781)237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002185652.htm

http://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/statins-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too-680723.html

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20131002/cholesterol-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too

 http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

Menopause: Possible Mouth Changes to Watch Out For

October 28th, 2013

shutterstock_59839630Menopause is a season where women tend to feel the many changes that occur. Many focus on the bodily changes and usually overlook differences that could be found in the mouth, where hormones can lead to unfavorable consequences. While this process is completely natural, signaling the end of female fertility, women should be aware of the mouth changes they are experiencing. Here are some of the potential changes and problems that have been associated with menopause:

 

Dry mouth: Because of the hormone fluctuations that occur during the time of menopause, the decreased levels of estrogen can lead to mouth dryness. Without sufficient saliva in the oral cavity, teeth become more susceptible to tooth decay and other infections. Saliva also plays an important role in the chewing and breaking down of food, allowing nutrients to enter the body.

 

Burning mouth syndrome: This condition tends to affect the tongue, gums, and lips, and even inside the cheeks of the mouth. The burning sensation primarily comes forth from problems with taste and sensory nerves, but can also be the consequence of dry mouth, nutritional deficiency, and allergic reactions to certain foods and medications. It is important to look out for these symptoms and to consult a dentist on possible ways to ease the pain.

 

Periodontitis and mucosal changes: Gum disease is also something to look out for when hitting menopause. Mucosal changes can also results in changes in appearance of gums, where they tend to look more pale, dry and shiny. Gums also tend to bleed more due to these changes.

 

Eating disorders: Going through menopause can take a psychological toll on some women, resulting in inconsistent and improper eating habits. These eating habits can be very detrimental for teeth, leading to erosion of tooth enamel. When tooth enamel is stripped down, teeth become more sensitive to hot and cold foods and they are more susceptible to cavities.

 

While these are problems that may arise during menopause, it is always possible to discuss possible solutions to these issues. Dentists should be notified of these changes, and they can aid in alleviating these symptoms and suggesting viable treatment plans. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/cavities/DS00896/DSECTION=risk-factors

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

 

 

Feeling the burn

April 12th, 2013

The burning mouth syndrome (BMS) has been noted as a chronic and painful condition known by burning sensations in the tongue, lips, roof of the mouth, gums, insides of the cheeks, and also the back of the mouth or throat. While dentists are still puzzled by this condition, the burning mouth syndrome has shown to be seven times more frequent in women than in men. Studies have shown that, in general, those who have dealt with this syndrome are middle aged.

Symptoms that have been documented to be prominent for BMS includes a pain or burning sensation that starts out in the mornings, but progressively worsens throughout the day, eventually reaching its worst during the evenings. Some have reported to feel pain that continues to persist throughout the day and some even say that the pain comes in here and there.

Although the cause of BMS has not been fully uncovered, dentists have their hunches of what factors may be related to this burning sensation; here are just a few:

Nutritional deficiencies: individuals who lack proper amounts of iron, folate and vitamin B complex have be linked with the burning sensation in the mouth; to counter this effect, some dentists believe that supplementing with B vitamin’s and minerals such as zinc and iron my relieve some of the pain.

Dry mouth: those who experience dry mouth have also reported a burning sensation as well; to reduce dry mouth, it is recommended to continue to stay hydrated throughout the day to lessen the symptoms that comes with this condition.

Diabetes: diabetics are known to be more vulnerable when it comes to oral infections, which is a possible culprit to burning mouth sensations; diabetics should continue to be mindful of blood sugar levels as to prevent the start up of burning mouth and may potentially lessen the symptoms that are related to this condition.

Menopause: as stated earlier, dentists believe that women are more likely to suffer from BMS, and it’s been thought that menopause attributes to this reason. Hormonal changes are shown to trigger the burning sensation in middle-aged women; hormone replacement therapy has been shown to be effective in treating the burning sensation in certain patients.

While dentists continue to find appropriate methods to find a way to counter BMS, there are several tips that may relieve the burning sensation you may be experiencing:

  • Don’t use mouthwash that contains alcohol
  • Don’t use toothpaste that contains sodium lauryl sulfate
  • Keep away from alcoholic beverages
  • Keep away from beverages with high acidity (sodas, juices)
  • Continue to stay hydrated

If you believe that you are experiencing burning sensations in your mouth, it is important to visit your dentist to discuss the symptoms and possible reasons for why this condition started occurring. If you have more concerns about this issue, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

 

References:

Your Dentistry Guide

National Institute of Health

 

Women's Hormones and Gum Disease

June 5th, 2012

Did you know that a woman's hormones affect her oral health? It's true! Hormone level changes through a woman's life cycle affect her gums' reaction to plaque. Making sure your mouth is healthy is an easy way to avoid the development of other health problems.

Although the symptoms of gum disease can be very apparent, such as swollen, tender, or bleeding gums, there are times when it's not visible or painful.

Another complication that can arise from an unhealthy mouth is periodontal disease. This painless disease is a bacterial infection in the gums that eats away at your bone. Loss of tooth structure or complete tooth loss can result when left untreated.

Please read the full article here and make sure routine visits to the dentist are always made. Drs. Ali and Ali at Wellesley Dental Group are focused on prevention and will happily answer any questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

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