mouth rinse

4 Easy Steps to a Healthy Mouth

October 5th, 2019

The work dental hygienists do is tremendously valuable, and worth celebrating every day! In fact, the month of October represents Dental Hygiene Month across the nation. Each October we are all reminded to promote healthy smiles. Practicing good oral health is necessary to keep strong teeth, healthy gums, and even a healthy overall body. The connections between periodontal disease (gum disease) and systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes is real. Unfortunately, the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) reports that approximately 75% of people in America have some form of periodontal disease, which is the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. This, however, is preventable with good oral hygiene practices.

With early starts to your day and a big to-do list, it can sometimes be easy to skip some of your oral hygiene routine. But, not to worry! The American Dental Hygienists Association and American Dental Association offer four essential , quick, and easy tips on how to keep a healthy and clean mouth, even when you're on-the-move: Brush. Floss. Rinse. Chew. Check it out:

Brushing:

Brushing your teeth is necessary twice daily for two minutes each time. Brushing is key to help eliminate the accumulation of food particles and plaque that oral bacteria feed off of leading to gum disease and tooth decay.

 

Flossing:

Flossing may seem tedious, but your oral health depends on it. Flossing is recommended once daily to help remove plaque and food in hard to reach areas between the teeth that the toothbrush cannot remove.

 

Rinsing:

Mouth rinses are not only good to help freshen breath, but also offer an antibacterial component that helps fight and prevent cavities. Be sure to purchase a  non-alcohol based mouthwash with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Mouthwash will help eliminate plaque and keep your gums healthy.

 

Chewing:

Sugar-free gum has been found to help improve your oral health by stimulating saliva to wash away remaining food particles. It also can help strengthen enamel by neutralizing the acids produced by oral bacteria and is recommended to chew for about 20 minutes after consuming meals.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adult-oral-care/ada-october-is-national-dental-hygiene-month

https://nationaltoday.com/national-dental-hygiene-month/

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Tips on Living Long and Healthy

September 16th, 2019

Now that we're into the month of September, it's time to focus our attention on how to improve our overall health in honor and celebration of Healthy Aging Month! This yearly observance focuses on highlighting tips to help individuals improve their physical and mental health as adults get older. This means also focusing on oral health, since the mouth is a window to the rest of the body. In fact, gum disease, which is common in older people, has been found to be linked with memory loss. Which means taking care of your mind may rely heavily on taking care of your mouth! It is important to realize that as we continue to age, there are changes that occur within the mouth that affect our teeth and the surrounding gums and bone. It is key to minimize damage to our oral cavity at any age by maintaining regular dental visits, and keeping up with good oral hygiene habits each day. Often, poor oral health becomes a factor that worsens existing chronic health problems that an individual may face, including heart disease and diabetes.

In addition, older adults may often be taking several medications daily, which can lead to dry mouth. Not only is the feeling of dry mouth annoying, but it also is harmful to your teeth because it can increase your risk of developing tooth decay due to less saliva being present within the mouth.

No matter what age we are, it is always a great time to start practicing healthy lifestyle habits. Take a look at these tips for healthy aging:

NIH Living Longer Infographic

1. Drink plenty of water!

Staying hydrated is very important for our bodies. Tap water is the best resource because it contains fluoride, which plays a major role in keeping your teeth healthy.

2. Healthy snacks are the way to go

We need to be a little picky with our food choices in order to have a diet that is healthy for our teeth and body. Snacks filled with protein including yogurt, cheese, and nuts make great healthy and tooth-friendly snacks. Also eating foods high in iron, such as spinach, meats, and beans, can help give you the energy you need for each day. Avoid eating sugary foods and candy, as these items aren't so tooth-friendly despite their tastiness.

3. Brushing and flossing habits at home

It is important to brush at least twice a day, and floss at least once a day to help wash away all of the food particles and bacteria within the mouth that could cause harm to your pearly whites. If you wear any oral appliances, such as a retainer or denture, be sure to clean these since bacteria can harbor themselves there too! Fluoride Mouthwash also makes for a good addition to your oral care habits. Not only does the mouth wash help make your breath smell nice and fresh, it also may contain beneficial fluoride and can easily be added to your night and/or morning time routine.

4. Be active

Exercise is essential for staying healthy as we get older. Adults are recommended to get at least 150 minutes of exercise each week.

5. Schedule your dental visit

Be sure that your are visiting your dentist for a regular check up at least twice a year to ensure that your teeth are healthy.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/oral-health/

https://www.deltadentalma.com/About-Us/News/2016/For-Healthy-Aging-Month,-know-your-mouth-may-hold

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/september-is-healthy-aging-month-10-tips-to-celebrate/

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/

GettyImages-579980625-56c667695f9b5879cc3e17ea.jpg

NIA Living Longer Infographic.png

My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

April 17th, 2019

It's that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that's not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children's teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here's how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

A recent study analyzing 40 children with asthma looked at the prevalence of dental cavities, gingival bleeding, the pH of saliva, composition of bacteria within the mouth, in addition to assessing their oral hygiene habits. It was found that the children with asthma experienced dry mouth, had at least 5-8 cavities, and a rapid formation of plaque. The children also had an increased acidity of pH within the mouth, which puts them at a higher risk of cavities and the fungal infection, candidiasis. Another study reported that individuals with asthma had approximately a 19% increased risk of suffering from periodontitis.

Fortunately, avoiding gum disease can be achieved by practicing proper oral hygiene techniques, including using a fluoride toothpaste, mouth rinse, brushing and flossing regularly, and making regular visits to the dentist. If you notice red puffy gums, bleeding with brushing or flossing, or persistent bad breath, these can be early signs of gum disease.  It is also important to always bring your inhaler to dental and medical appointments to ensure your safety in the case of an acute asthma attack.

The Effect of Asthma Medications

The medications taken to combat asthma also play a role in negatively impacting the oral cavity. This is because the protective mucous membrane within the mouth is less effective/reduced in individuals with asthma, lowering the body's immune system. Dry mouth is a major consequence of many medications, which allows for plaque build-up and bacteria accumulation that contribute to dental cavities, bad breath, and gum disease.

Inhaled corticosteroids, including Advair and Azmacort, may cause oral thrush, dental cavities, oral ulcers, and hoarseness. In addition, Albuterol, a medication used to treat bronchospasm, can have side effects including oral thrush, dry mouth, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, throat irritation, and nausea.

Tips for Managing Oral Health with Asthma

  • Rinsing with water after you using your inhaler can help avoid developing an oral fungal infection.
  • Stay hydrated in order to help combat dry mouth.
  • Keep your dentist informed about your medications and medical conditions. Make sure your dentist knows if you have asthma and what medications you are taking so that your health can be managed properly.
  • Manage allergies. Both asthma and allergies typically flare-up together. Managing both properly can help prevent mouth-breathing and dry mouth.
  • Practice good dental hygiene.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/asthma-found-to-increase-the-likelihood-of-gum-disease-by-a-fifth

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/asthma.html

http://www.thetotaldentistry.com/2018-07-dental-caries-in-asthmatic-children/

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Bright and Healthy Smiles for the Summer!

June 28th, 2017

It is summertime and you are finally ready to take on a good well-deserved vacation. You have finally freed up some space on your phone and are probably just ready for the limitless photo opportunities. But, is your smile also ready to steal the show?

Wherever you go this summer, remember that your smile is one of the first things that people notice about you. That is why the state of your teeth is a big contributor to your overall confidence.

Any diet that is high in acidic food or drinks leads to a weakening of the enamel which makes it more more likely to get stained and discolored. In addition, acid leads to the wearing away of your tooth enamel. The worn areas of your tooth expose the dentin, which is also yellow in color and adds to the dullness of your smile.

Here are a few things you can do yourself to keep a bright and healthy smile and prevent dental diseases and discoloration.

 

  • One of the easiest things you can do to have good oral health is to brush your teeth regularly, meaning at least twice a day, preferably after each meal; the mechanical motion of brushing your teeth helps you remove plaque.
  • Flossing and brushing go hand-in-hand. This helps you keep your teeth and gums healthy. Using a rubbing motion, go gently between each tooth and make sure that you also go under the gum line. So, floss after every meal, and snack, to prevent build-ups.
  • Rinsing with a good mouthwash also goes hand-in-hand with brushing your teeth and flossing. Rinsing with a mouthwash that could be either diluted hydrogen peroxide or fluoride based gives you an extra support when trying to remove bacteria, or strengthen your teeth and prevent cavities.
  • Healthy eating also plays a major role when it comes to your smile. Avoid consuming foods and beverages that cause stain. Blueberries, cherries, blackberries are popular fruits during the summer, but try rinsing your mouth with water after you snack on them. The same goes for coffee, iced tea, red or white wine, and fruity juices. One way you can consume those drinks is either by using a straw, or by having a glass of water and rinsing your mouth regularly.
  • The best help you can get for a healthy and white smile would be to visit a dental specialist for professional cleaning and whitening treatments.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

Is There Such a Thing as Too Much Fluoride?

January 28th, 2015

Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in water and many foods. It can also be applied to teeth through several dental products. Fluoride helps protect teeth from developing cavities by making the tooth more resistant to acids from plaque bacteria in the mouth. It also helps reverse early stages of tooth decay.

Fluoride intake is critical for infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 16 years, when primary and permanent teeth are developing. It is also beneficial for adults.

Intuitively, it may seem like the more fluoride, the better! However, this is not the case! Too much fluoride, particularly in young children can be damaging to tooth enamel. It can lead to a tooth discoloration called dental fluorosis.

Children 8 years of age and younger, when permanent teeth are forming underneath the gums, are at risk of dental fluorosis. Once permanent teeth have come in fully, fluoride will no longer cause dental fluorosis. Although fluorosis can be cosmetically treated, the stains left by fluorosis are permanent and may darken over time.

But how bad is it really? Dentists have rated the severity of fluorosis using the following degrees:

  • Questionable: The enamel may show a few white spots or lines.
  • Very mild: Less than 25% of the tooth surface is affected by small opaque white spots.
  • Mild: Less than 50% of the tooth surface is affected by white opaque areas . Research suggests that mild cases of fluorosis may actually be beneficial for children. A 2009 study published in The Journal of the American Dental Association suggests that molars with fluorosis are more resistant to cavities than normal molars.
  • Moderate: 50% of the enamel surface is affected by white opaque areas.
  • Severe: All enamel surfaces are affected. Teeth may also have pitting and are at risk of dental erosion.

Common sources of fluoride include tap water, toothpaste, mouth rinses, gels, beverages and foods, and prescription supplements. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 75% of individuals' fluoride intake is from drinking water and processed beverages. You can minimize the risk of your child developing dental fluorosis by monitoring their fluoride intake. Find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water at home. Recommendations for adequate fluoride levels in drinking water are 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter. According to the World Health Organization, fluoride levels above 1.5 mg/L can lead to dental fluorosis.

Fluoride in toothpaste is important to protect kids' teeth against tooth decay. However, the CDC recommends avoiding fluoride toothpaste at all until age 2. Only place a pea-sized amount on your child's toothbrush and monitor your child’s brushing to ensure that they are not swallowing the toothpaste. To promote spitting out toothpaste, avoid purchasing toothpastes containing flavors your child is likely to swallow. If a child ingests a large amount of fluoride in a short period of time, it may cause nausea, diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain.

If treatment is necessary for your child, most options vary from tooth whitening to veneers or full crowns. Make sure to keep all fluoride-containing products out of the reach of young children.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van Orenstein. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/dental-fluorosis-what-you-should-know.aspx

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19571049

http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/dental_fluorosis.htm

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/f/fluorosis

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/products/how-much-fluoride1.htm

http://www.webmd.com/children/fluorosis-symptoms-causes-treatments?page=3

http://images.goodfood.com.au/2012/12/24/3911889/smilewide-620x349.jpg

http://parentingpatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Fluoride-Supplements-for-Infants-Hot-Topic-Tuesday-Blog-Hop.jpg

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