nail biting

Are Your Gums Affected by your Blood Sugar Levels?

January 23rd, 2019

Diabetes, which impacts about 30 million people in the United States, surprisingly doesn't just affect your blood sugar. Research has consistently showed that gum disease, including both gingivitis and periodontitis, is linked with diabetes. The relationship between gum disease and diabetes works both ways: individuals with diabetes have a higher chance of developing gum disease, and people with severe gum disease are more prone to have issues controlling their blood glucose levels.

Early stages of gum problems begin as gingivitis, also described as inflammation of the gums. As bacteria invade the gum pockets and inflammation remains, gum recession and bone loss begin to occur in the more severe stages of gum disease, known as periodontitis.  People who have diabetes unfortunately have a a harder time clearing bacterial infections, which they are also more at risk for developing. That's why having good oral hygiene practices is so important, especially if you have diabetes or a current diagnosis of periodontal disease. Take a look at how you can manage your oral care with diabetes:

Diet & Exercise

If you're a diabetic, one of the best things to do to maintain overall health is to keep your blood sugar levels controlled. It is best to add exercise into your daily routine and to have a balanced diet. This will help you not only maintain a healthy mouth, but also help lower your risk of developing other complications associated with diabetes, including kidney disease and heart disease.

Regular Dental Visits & Oral Hygiene

Since people with diabetes have greater chances of developing oral infections, it is important to keep a strict routine of brushing, flossing, and rinsing. Also, be sure to clean any oral appliances that you have, such as dentures or retainers, as they often harbor bacteria and left over food particles that can contribute to tooth decay. Scheduling regular dental check-ups is also necessary to ensure that no infections have begun to develop.

Avoid smoking & Poor Oral Habits

Smoking puts you at risk for many health problems such as cancer. It is never too late to quit smoking! Avoiding tobacco products can help you improve your oral and overall health. It is also important to avoid habits like nail biting, as our fingernails harbor a lot of bacteria from the things we touch throughout the day.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.timesnownews.com/health/article/oral-care-for-diabetics-how-people-suffering-from-diabetes-can-protect-their-teeth-and-gums/346614

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/diabetes-and-oral-health.html

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Merry and Bright Teeth for the Holidays!

December 21st, 2018

As the holidays approach, your dentist and teeth may not be high on your list of things to think about. But, it's important to keep your oral health in mind so that you can enter 2019 with a healthy start! Take a look at these tips so that you can enjoy the holidays while keeping your teeth and gums healthy and bright:

1. Don't forget your oral health routine

Be sure to keep up your routine of brushing at least twice a day for two minutes, rinsing, and flossing. If you're looking for stocking stuffer ideas, toothbrushes are a great option! Toothbrushes should be replaced once the bristles look worn or approximately every 3 to 4 months. When looking for toothpaste, make sure to buy toothpaste with the ADA Seal of Acceptance and fluoride to help prevent cavities. Also, if your due for your dental visit make sure to schedule!

2. Protect your teeth

It may be tempting to use your teeth for situations other than chewing and speaking. You may get the urge to bite your nails to relieve stress, or use your teeth to open packages or bottles, but avoid using your teeth as tools at all costs! Be sure to grab scissors or a bottle opener instead of your teeth. Poor habits can lead to jaw problems, facial pain, sensitive teeth, and can even lead to cracked or loss of teeth.

3. Stay hydrated

Keep water by your side during the holidays and avoid sodas, juices, and sports drinks as they contain high amounts of sugar and create acids that can weaken your tooth enamel. Water with fluoride in it can keep your teeth strong, which is particularly important as you may be indulging in sweet holiday treats! Drinking water can also help keep skin healthy and glowing, and help eliminate bad breath.

4. Avoid chewing hard candies or ice cubes

The sugar in hard candies is just one thing to worry about. Crunching on hard candy can cause chipped or cracked teeth. Also avoid chewing on ice cubes as they could cause chipped teeth or cold sensitivity. Instead, let the ice dissolve naturally and try to stay away from hard or sticky candies that can weaken your tooth enamel.

 

It may not be easy to stay away from sweets and goodies during the holiday, but try your best to keep your teeth a priority!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/babies-and-kids/holiday-healthy-teeth-tips

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Do you have a TMJ disorder?

June 9th, 2016

Is it painful or difficult for you to open and close your mouth? If the answer is yes, you might have a TMJ (temporomandibular joints) disorder.

The temporomandibular joints include the joints, muscles, ligaments, bones that are responsible for not only the opening and closing of your mouth, but also chewing, speaking, and swallowing. They also control the movement of the mandible (the lower jaw).

Between the ball and socket is a disc for each joint. This disc allows the jaw to open wide, rotate, or glide by acting as a cushion. If the TMJ system fails to work properly, it may lead to a disorder that can cause pain or discomfort.

Some causes of TMJ disorder are:

  1. arthritis
  2. dislocation
  3. injury
  4. tooth/jaw alignment
  5. stress
  6. teeth grinding

Ways to alleviate the pain and treat the disorder include:

  1. avoid hard foods and stick to softer foods
  2. don't chew gum
  3. don't bite your nails
  4. relieve pain through heat packs
  5. relaxation techniques for jaw tension (biofeedback, meditation, etc.)
  6. jaw muscle strengthening exercises
  7. medications (muscle relaxants, analgesics, anti-anxiety/anti-inflammatory drugs)
  8. night guard/bite plate to help stop clenching or teeth grinding

If you would like to run a diagnosis or are interested in treatment for orofacial pain, we would happy to assist you here at Wellesley Dental Group. Our specialist, Dr. Emad Abdallah, received a Master of Science in TMJ and orofacial pain from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine in Boston.

Resources:

http://img.webmd.com/dtmcms/live/webmd/consumer_assets/site_images/article_thumbnails/video/the_basics_tmj_causes_treatments_video/375x321_the_basics_tmj_causes_treatments_video.jpg

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/tmj

http://www.wellesleydentalgroup.com/meet-dr-abdallah

https://www.tuftsmedicalcenter.org/patient-care-services/Conditions-We-Treat/T/Temporomandibular-Joint-Dysfunction.aspx

 

Dental Habits to Break in the New Year

December 30th, 2015

new-years-eve

Do you have your New Year's resolutions list ready for 2016? As we countdown to the New Year, it's time to put our best foot forward and leave behind any negative habits. This also applies to dental care. Consider breaking these dental habits in 2016 that are harmful to your teeth:

Nail Biting

Finger nails often contain many germs. Nail biting puts you at a high risk for developing a cold or other health problems by introducing these germs into your mouth. Nail biting can not only negatively take a toll on the health of your body, but also can impact your teeth. It is typically a nervous habit, and can chip teeth and impact your jaw. Avoid nail biting at all costs, and instead opt for better stress-coping mechanisms. Try painting your nails or holding something to keep your fingers busy to let go of a nail biting habit.

Brushing Too Hard

It may seem weird, but there is such a thing as brushing too hard. It's definitely important to brush for two minutes twice a day, but gently! Brushing with a hard toothbrush can damage both teeth and gums. Try using your non-dominant hand for brushing, or purchasing a soft toothbrush. Applying proper pressure when brushing is important for your mouth's sake!

Grinding and Clenching

Grinding and clenching teeth often occurs during stressful situations. This can lead to chipped or cracked teeth. It can also cause mouth pains and trouble chewing foods. Sometimes it occurs during sleep, in which you should notify your partner or family member if this is noticed. Mouthguards and relaxation exercises can help knock out this harmful dental habit!

Chewing Ice Cubes

Teeth can be fragile, and it is important not to wear them down by chewing hard substances. Chewing ice cubes can break or chip teeth, as well as damage fillings and other dental appliances in the mouth. Try drinking with a straw or drinking cold beverages without ice to prevent any temptation of chewing on ice cubes.

Snacking

Snacking, especially on sugary foods and drinks, increases your risk of developing cavities. Instead, opt for well balanced and filling meals to keep your teeth healthy. If you indulge in an occasional sugary treat, make sure to drink water to wash away any left over food particles.

Using Your Teeth As Tools

Using your teeth to open items, cut things, or complete other rough actions can wear down your teeth. This puts you at a higher risk of cracking and damaging your teeth, as well as injuring your jaw. Always make sure you have an actual tool on hand, such as scissors or a bottle opener to do the job -your mouth will thank you!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://richardwiseman.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/new-years-eve.jpg

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/bad-habits?source=facebook&content=6_habits_to_break

Nail Biting: A Habit Worse for Teeth Than for Nails

June 7th, 2015

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We rely on our teeth to help us speak, chew, and to spread a smile. But, what our teeth shouldn’t be used for is biting nails. Nail biting is a common habit for many, and it’s approximated that half of all humans bite their nails. There are several beliefs as to why people bite their nails, but many come to the conclusion that the bad habit is stress related or is a behavior that’s learned during childhood.

For some, it can be hard not to resort to nail biting. However, it is important to understand that your dental health is at a much greater risk than just your manicure.

Here is a list of some of the many negative effects that nail biting can have on your oral health:

Biting your nails can lead to chipped or cracked teeth. Chewing on tough and sharp fingernails can have a heavy impact on your teeth. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, nail biting can crack, chip, or wear down front teeth as a result of the pressure applied from continuously biting.

Nail biting can create a gap between your two front teeth (known as diastama). Nail biting from a very early age is believed to cause a gap between two teeth.

Nail biting can weaken the roots of your teeth. Individuals with braces are particularly at risk for root resorption, or shortening of the roots, which can weaken the roots of teeth and can lead to tooth loss.

Nail biting is germy! Fingernails can be full of germs and bacteria, especially since they are hard to reach and clean. They're almost twice as germy as hands! This makes nail biters at an increased risk for transferring germs and bacteria into the body. Biting your nails is an easy way to transfer a virus, cold, or other illness. It can also cause paronychia, which is a skin infection that surrounds the nail.

Biting your nails can cause TMJ Disorder. Nail biting can be damaging to your jaw. The constant biting can cause TMJ Disorder, which can also cause pain, headaches, and jaw alignment issues.

Nail biting can damage gums.

Jagged and sharp fingernails can damage gums tissue and cause gingivitis. When the gum tissue becomes torn, bacteria from fingernails can spread into the bloodstream and throughout the body.

Biting your fingernails can cause you to spend a lot of money. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, individuals who bite their nails spend approximately $4,000 more on dental expenses in their lifetime than those who don't bite their nails.

 

Teeth should also not be used as tools, such as to open a bottle or chew on a pencil. These poor habits can put you at greater risk for bruxism (teeth-grinding), which can cause tooth sensitivity, tooth loss, recessed gums, and many more oral problems.

Wearing a mouth guard may be a great way to avoid nail biting and thus help prevent further damage to your teeth. Also, try keeping your nails trimmed short to prevent the urge to bite them.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.oralanswers.com/biting-finger-nails-teeth/

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2008/article/ADA-06-Nail-Biting-Can-Be-Harmful-To-Teeth.cvsp

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/18/nail-biting-bad-for-you_n_5675467.html

http://www.whiteheadortho.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/how-to-stop-nail-biting.jpg

How Nail Biting Affects Your Teeth

April 8th, 2014

4_2What’s so bad about nail biting? Nail biting is damaging to your teeth and oral health! Nail biting is a common habit across all age groups, including primarily children and young adults, and tends to lessen with age. This detrimental habit is often induced by stress and anxiety. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, biting your nails could crack, or wear down your front teeth.

When you or your child are tempted to bite your nails, consider the following:

  • Biting your nails can lead to a greater risk for bruxism. Sharp fingernails can result in sore and torn gum tissue. Unintended teeth grinding or clenching also creates stress in your oral cavity that can cause facial pain, headaches, tooth sensitivity, and recessed gums.
  • Nail biting can contribute to teeth misalignment. If your child has braces, the additional pressure from nail biting could lead to weakening the roots of their teeth, or even tooth loss!
  • Nail biting is also bad for your jaw. It can contribute to Temporomandibular (TM) disorder, resulting in pain and several problems with jaw movement.
  • Nail biting is unsanitary. Fingernails often carry more dirt and germs than your fingers. Germs and bacteria from underneath your nails can cause infection and sickness that transfer from your hands to your mouth. Bitten fingernails can be sharp, and may cut the gums, allowing bacteria to easily enter the bloodstream.

In order to stop biting your nails, become more conscious of the habit. Inform your child of the unfavorable consequences of nail biting. Also, try keeping your nails trimmed and polished to prevent the temptation. Break the bad habit of nail biting so that your dental health won't suffer!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help. References: http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2008/article/ADA-06-Nail-Biting-Can-Be-Harmful-To-Teeth.cvsp http://www.imdayak.am/files/pages/4_2.jpg

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