Oral burn

Indulgence in Sugary Sodas Can Lead to Poor Oral Health & Cardiovascular Disease

January 24th, 2014

colaThe proven connection between poor oral heath and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should re-enforce the importance of new heath policy creation, focusing on reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks,  say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Poor oral hygiene and excess amount of sugar in the diet can cause periodontal disease and decay of the teeth-supporting bone. It is thought that chronic infection brought on by gym disease can lead to inflammation that will over time cause heart disease through atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. Despite sufficient evidence of the connection between the poor oral health and premature heart disease, the recent suggested UK national guidance on Cardiovascular disease prevention at population level does not suggest the strong need to reduce sugar consumption.

Dr Ahmed Rashid, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, who co-wrote the paper, said: "As well as having high levels of fats and salt, junk foods often contain a great deal of sugar and the effect this has on oral health may be an important additional mechanism by which junk food elevates risk of CVD." He added: "Among different types of junk food, soft drinks have raised particular concerns and are the main source of free sugar for many individuals."

The authors refer to the well-knows  New York 'soda ban' controversy which has brought a lot of attention to the issue. They stress more can be done about making the sugary sodas dominating the public areas in the United States. Dr Rashid said: "The UK population should be encouraged to reduce fizzy drink intake and improve oral hygiene. Reducing sugar consumption and managing dental problems early could help prevent heart problems later in life."

Reference: http://goo.gl/ppiqpM

Cholesterol Medication Can Help Decrease Gum Inflammation

December 12th, 2013

youngoldHeart disease is one of the leading health issues in the United States. Arteries within the body become inflamed and patients are often recommended to take medication that lowers cholesterol

Statins is a commonly prescribed medication that helps patients with heart disease. But what’s more is that a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology demonstrated that statins can also be beneficial for those suffering from gum disease.

Periodontal disease is marked by chronic gum inflammation that affects approximately half of the U.S. adult population. Dr. Ahmed Tawkol of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School notes that there is a connections between heart and gum disease: both periodontitis and atherosclerosis are driven by inflammation. These inflammatory conditions are often seen to occur together, indicating to researchers that their biologies may be related.

A study was administered to test this theory. Patients with either heart disease or considered to have high heart disease risk were asked to take 80 mg of statin or 10 mg of stain daily for 12 weeks. PET/CT scans were used to observe inflammation over the course of the study. Results indicated that the 59 patients in the study demonstrated a significant reduction in gum inflammation, some after only 4 weeks of treatment. The researchers also found that the improvement of inflammation in the gums related closely with the improvement seen in inflammation in the arteries.

This study provides strong evidence that links atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. This research opens doors to new methods of treatments. Because of the relationship between these two diseases, medications that originally targeted one of these diseases may also be beneficial for the other. These results also points to better and improved oral hygiene to reduce inflammation in the gums can also lead to reduced atherosclerosis.

This study again shows the strong relationship between oral health and overall systemic health. Maintaining proper oral care can really go a long way for the body as a whole. Keeping up with oral hygiene can truly lead to a healthier smile and a healthier you!

If you have any questions or concerns please don't hesitate to ask Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group or our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi. We would all be more than happy to help. Please contact us at (781)237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002185652.htm

http://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/statins-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too-680723.html

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20131002/cholesterol-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too

 http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

December 11th, 2013

The elusive yet painful burning mouth syndrome!

Dentists and researchers have been scratching their heads for quite some time over a type of oral pain that seems to be plaguing a good amount of individuals. Patients’ chief complaint is that the mouth feels scalded; however, mouth and gums continue to appear normal. Because of this syndrome’s lack of visible symptoms (except for sensations of pain), it can take several visits before finally concluding that it is BMS. Over these years, it has come to be known as burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Because of its elusive symptoms, dental researchers have been looking into the burning mouth syndrome, hoping to find more clues to where the and why the pain originates.

Dr. Andres Pinto is the new chair in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine, and he is delving into reach on the burning mouth syndrome. BMS have spread to 2-5% of the population and mainly strikes women between the age of 50 and 70 and from three years before to 12 years after menopause. Earlier research on BMS has also paired their symptoms with psychogenic disorders. BMS is also mentioned as a secondary issue along with anemia, diabetes, vitamin deficiency, and thyroid disorders. Although an exact cause has yet to be found, burning mouth syndrome has been suspected to result from the deterioration of the nerves beneath the oral lining. Because the oral lining is not visible, this can explain the difficulty in diagnosing this disorder.

Dr. Pinto encourages individuals that continue to feel pain in their mouth to check for BMS these symptoms:

 

  • Persistent burning tongue and oral pain with no apparent dental cause
  • Abnormal taste or dry feeling in mouth
  • Symptoms that subside when eating
  • Burning sensations that migrate across various oral areas

 

Even when there is oral pain with no sign of these symptoms, it is advised to go in for a dental checkup. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/burning-mouth-syndrome/DS00462

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_53.pdf

 

 

Want To Brighten Your Smile For The Holidays?

December 6th, 2013

sinsational_gal_loIt’s that time of year again, gathering for family affairs and celebrating holidays as the year draws to a close. It definitely doesn’t hurt to have a set of pearly whites for the occasion! Here are a few tips to achieving a brighter smile:

Take a pass on the usual bag of chips and make a grab for fruits: while fruits boost many benefits for one’s overall health, fruits are also a great way to beginning removing stains from teeth. Some fruits, including apples and strawberries, contain malic acid, which has been shown to oxidize and remove stains from teeth. Crunchy fruits and vegetables also help whiten teeth by increasing saliva production, which neutralizes acids from other food such as tomatoes and wines.

Cutting out staining beverages is also a great way to cut down on the instances teeth are susceptible to stains. Drinks such as wine, coffee and various sodas are known to stain teeth; furthermore, beverages, such as soda, are extremely high in sugar content, leading to more bacteria production and more cavities. In the cases where these drinks are consumed, using a straw can really make a difference. The straw keeps the outer teeth from coming in contact with the beverage, preventing stains from forming.

And of course there are whitening strips. These strips are becoming more accessible and easy to use; some even simply dissolve in the mouth when applied! However, for individuals with more sensitive teeth, be mindful about the frequency of treatments used per week.

We also provide Sinsational in-office whitening. They procedure easily lightens your teeth and causes little to no sensitivity! It could be a great option for people who want a brighter smile without feeling any discomfort.

If strips are still a hassle, there are whitening toothpastes that are great for tackling hard to remove stains. While brushing teeth can lead to a brighter smile, it is still important to keep in mind the importance of daily brushing and flossing. Maintaining a bright smile should mean maintaining a healthy smile as well!

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group ; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References

 

http://www.3dwhite.com/teeth-whitening/teeth-whitening-kits/make-teeth-whiter.aspx

 

http://voices.yahoo.com/5-easy-ways-whiten-teeth-remove-stains-4616045.html

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/weighing-your-toothpaste-options

 

Ease Oral Burns With Innovative Strip!

December 5th, 2013

coffee_0

When hot, delicious food is placed before you, it is easy to quick to scarf down that plate of food. Or even in the morning, the goal is to quickly down that cup of coffee before getting to work. In the heat of the moment, the burning sensation is an afterthought, but once that gooey slice of pizza has been consumed or when you have stepped into your workplace, the pain begins to set in and feelings of regret for eating or drinking so quickly start to well up.

 

Pain from burns causing by consumption of hot foods and liquids tends to be an issue that everyone will likely face. Even though the pain eventually subsides, it still lingers for some time. A pharmaceutical, biomedical engineering research team may have found the solution to this problem. Dr. Jason McConville of New Mexico, along with researchers from the University of Texas from Austin, had presented on possible dissolvable strips to treat oral thermal burns. This strip would be applied directly to the affected part of the tongue, cheek or roof of the mouth. Scientists note that this adhesive will not hinder any normal day-to-day activities because of its quickly dissolving nature. These strips will look and act similarly to breath freshening strips that can be found in the local drugstore.

 

The strip would locally deliver anesthetic, benzocaine, and a therapeutic polymer. This film can instantly release benzocaine when it is placed on affected areas in the oral cavity and has shown to relieve pain significantly over an extended period of time. What’s more is all the materials used to create these dissolvable strips are relatively inexpensive. The team of scientists has proposed that this film could give way to instant, sustained, and affordable relief from oral burns.

 

There are high hopes for these dissolvable strips and it will be exciting to see this new product enter the market. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016125647.htm

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-02-scientists-develop-film-strip-to-treat-oral-burns.cvsp

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57535420/

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