oral cancer

Take a Deep Breath: Vaping Effects On Your Lungs

October 20th, 2019

Many of us have been following the devastating news of young adult deaths related to vaping across the country. Vaping has recently become an epidemic and major public health issue. With Respiratory Care Week beginning today, October 20th-26th, and  Healthy Lung Month the entire month of October, we would like to highlight all of the necessary information needed to keep our lungs breathing well to last us an entire lifetime!

The statistics on lung disease are disheartening, with greater than 35 million Americans living with a chronic lung disease such as asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Not to mention, lung cancer is the #1 cause of death related to cancer for both women and men in the U.S. Many lung diseases have been a result of cigarette smoking. Cigarette use has decreased in comparison to the past, however the rise of e-cigarettes/vaping has drastically made its way into society, particularly with young adults. The use of e-cigarettes has been reported by approximately 20% of high school students in the U.S. within the last month. Surprisingly even 5% of middle school students in the U.S. have reported using e-cigarettes within the last month. In Massachusetts, the numbers are even higher: 40% of high school students and 10% of middle school students have used e-cigarettes within the past month. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 1000 people have become affected with respiratory issues as a result of vaping. As of today, the CDC reports that there have been 33 deaths in 24 states.

The use of e-cigarettes not only damages lungs and brain development, but also one’s oral health, and it is important to our caring team here at WDG to keep you in the loop and ensure your safety and health. Sadly, vaping has been marketed as a “healthy” alternative to smoking tobacco cigarettes. With research still ongoing, vaping can contain the addictive substance nicotine, and chemical particles within the vapor, including volatile organic compounds, flavoring agents, cancer-causing chemicals, and heavy metals which can all negatively impact your health. Plus, e-cigarettes can cause dry mouth, gum inflammation, and increase the amount of cavity-causing bacteria. Long-term effects of vaping are still being researched.

It is important to spread the word about the dangers of vaping and provide individuals who are vaping with the information and resources needed to quit, which can be found below:

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://nationaltoday.com/respiratory-care-week/

https://www.lung.org/about-us/mission-impact-and-history/our-impact.html

http://www.deltadentalma.com/The-Brush-Up/Blog/What-Dentists-Need-to-Know-About-the-Teen-Vaping-E

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Vaping: A Public Health Emergency

September 28th, 2019

You may have heard about the recent devastating health crisis in young adults: electronic cigarettes (e-cigarette) and vaping products causing severe lung disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and state health departments, are looking into the link between e-cigarette products and lung disease. As of September 24, 2019, Governor of Massachusetts, Charles D. Baker, declared a public health emergency on this issue and initiated a temporary four-month statewide ban on the sale of vaping products, including tobacco and marijuana, in stores and online until January 25, 2020. The latest news reports 805 cases of lung damage from 46 states in America, with 12 current deaths. According to the CDC, 67% of cases are aged 18 to 34 years old, 38% are under the age of 21 years old, 17 % are over 35 years old, and 16% are under the age of 18. A majority of the individuals reported using e-cigarette products with THC and nicotine. The direct cause of the lung problems is still being investigated.

E-cigarette use is also known as vaping, and works by warming up a liquid which becomes inhaled into the lungs. E-cigarettes have become increasingly advertised over the past few years. So much so that Juul, an electronic cigarette company, increased their sales by almost 800% from 2017 to 2018. Sadly, they have been marketed as “safer” alternatives to cigarette smoking, although in reality they carry many of the same risks as well as new risks.The inhaled liquids are often made up of nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, along with other substances. Each product, however, may contain a variation of other ingredients and concentrations, which may be toxic to the body.

Both cigarettes and vaping products are not only damaging for your lungs and body, but also are not good for your oral health. Nicotine has been found to prevent healthy blood flow within the gums, which can increase your risk of developing gingivitis and periodontitis. In addition, one of the ingredients found in vaping products, propylene glycol, has been found to cause dry mouth. Dry mouth plays a detrimental role in oral health because it can lead to tooth decay and oral thrush. Not to mention, e-cigarettes can contribute to DNA damage and result in oral cancer.

For your health and safety, avoid smoking all e-cigarettes/vaping products and use of tobacco cigarettes. The Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program offers information and resources that can help individuals quit. Massachusetts also partners with national resources for teens interested in quitting smoking or vaping via My Life, My QuitTM and This is Quitting powered by Truth® program.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.foxnews.com/health/vaping-harming-teeth-study

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/severe-lung-disease.html

https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/marijuana/2019/09/24/governor-baker-make-vaping-announcement-amid-spate-lung-illnesses/o8sO6mf3GOmX4mOpLLtcEL/story.html

https://www.mass.gov/guides/vaping-public-health-emergency#-information-for-providers-

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Why is my Tongue White?

August 6th, 2019

 

The human body is amazing in so many ways. Our bodies often try to tell us things about our health through triggering certain signs and signals. The oral cavity can be an easy spot to indicate signs of specific health conditions developing. For instance, the color and texture of your tongue could be a clue that something is going on within your body.

The normal anatomy of the tongue is comprised of tiny nodules known as papilla. The color is typically a shade of pink, although food debris may temporarily stain the tongue. An indicator of poor oral health or possibly an underlying health condition is the presence of a white tongue that remains for a prolonged period of time. A white tongue has been associated with mouth breathing, smoking, oral thrush (fungal candidiasis infection), infections, excessive alcohol use, medication side effects, and congenital heart disease.

Most frequently it is linked with dry mouth and dehydration, which increases the risk of developing tooth decay and infections. Saliva is crucial for helping us breakdown food and protecting our teeth due to the proteins and minerals found within it. Without it, the dry environment promotes bacteria and fungi growth and typically produces an odor.

Other conditions that have been known to cause white tongue include oral lichen planus, geographic tongue, oral cancer, and HIV/AIDs.

Although white tongue is typically harmless, if you notice any pain or persistence of white tongue for a prolonged time that does not respond to oral care, be sure to contact your dentist.

It is important to remember to brush your tongue with either a toothbrush or tongue scraper each day to remove all of the plaque and leftover food particles that become trapped between the papilla on the surface of the tongue. Also, staying hydrated is important, especially during these hot summer days!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319814.php

https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/white-tongue/basics/causes/sym-20050676

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Stop Oral Cancer- Be Aware!

April 24th, 2019

You may have noticed that your dentist checks for more than just cavities during your dental exam. This includes an oral cancer screening. In 2019, about 53,000 people in America will be diagnosed with oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Sadly, approximately one person every hour each day dies due to these cancers, and 40% of the individuals newly diagnosed with oral and oropharyngeal cancer do not survive longer than 5 years.  This notably high death rate is is mainly caused by late diagnoses of these cancer! Fortunately, when these cancers are found and treated early, the death rate and other health complications become less common.That's why this Oral Cancer Awareness month we are spreading the word that early detection saves lives! Luckily, maintaining your regular dental visits can help inform you of any harmful developments and cancers early, and keep your oral and overall health in check. Take a look at the common risk factors of oral and oropharyngeal factors and how you can lower your risk:

There are several factors that may influence the development of oral cancer. There has been a lot of research showing that heavy alcohol and tobacco users who are middle aged often present with oral cancers, but there is a current shift to younger individuals who are developing oral cancers due to the rise of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus 16 (HPV).

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

The CDC reports that there have been approximately 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer associated with HPV each year in America. Most of the cancers associated with this sexually transmitted disease occur at the back of the tongue or around the tonsils, with a majority of the cases being found in younger nonsmoking individuals. The death rate and chance of it reoccuring is often low, but detection is often late.

The signs of HPV-realted cancers often present as a painless swelling in the neck area, sore throat, trouble or pain when swallowing, ulcerations, and/or swelling in the tonsillar area that last for longer than 2-3 weeks.

Gender

Oral cancers are two times more prevalent in men than women.

Age

HPV related oral and oropharyngeal cancers are often seen in younger individuals, while a majority of cancers associated with other factors tend to be found in individuals aged 50 years or older.

Smoking

Tobacco in any form creates a higher risk for developing oral cancers, in addition to cancers found throughout the body. Individuals who use a pipe to smoke often develop cancer of the lips. Chewing tobacco can cause several problems in the oral cavity even in addition to cancer.

Alcohol

Alcohol is a significant risk factor for the development of oral cancer. The American Cancer Society states that 7 out of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers (An average of two drinks a day for men, and more than one drink a day for women). Smoking in combination with drinking also increases your risk significantly higher.

Be attentive to any signs or symptoms that appear abnormal to you and make sure you are regularly visiting your dentist and health care professional. 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.aaom.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=140:april-is-oral-cancer-awareness-month

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/Oral-Cancer-Slideshow?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=oral-cancer-awareness

https://oralcancerfoundation.org/events/oral-head-neck-cancer-awareness-month/

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Oral Cancer
Awareness

Is Vaping Really a Safer Alternative to Smoking?

August 26th, 2018

Electronic cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular, especially as they are constantly being advertised as a “safer alternative” to traditional cigarettes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that the use of e-cigarettes has increased from 1.5% in 2011 to over 16% in 2015 among high-school aged students. When it comes to oral health, however, new research suggests E-cigarettes could be just as bad as smoking.

E-cigarettes have a battery inside with a heating device that vaporizes a liquid that gets inhaled. Although this liquid does not contain tobacco, it does have nicotine and flavoring chemicals that are harmful to your body.  Nicotine in particular is a highly addictive component that can have a negative impact on  adolescent brain development. Not to mention, E-cigarettes can produce many oral health problems, such as oral cancer, tooth loss, and gum disease.

A study was conducted in South Korea involving a representative sample of middle-school and high-school aged students. 65,528 students were asked if during the past year they had experienced gingival pain, bleeding, tongue pain, inside cheek pain, a cracked tooth, or a combination of any of the above asked. They were also asked if they had ever used an E-Cigarette. The researchers found that 297 students (0.5%) used E-cigarettes daily, 1,259 (1.9%) used ECs 1 to 29 days in the past month, 3,848 (5.9%) were former EC users, and 60,124 (91.8%) never used E-cigarettes.

The study revealed that there were significantly higher chances of having experienced a cracked tooth, tongue pain, inside-cheek pain, or both among daily, within 1-29 days in the past month, and former E-cigarette users.

Another study looked at vapor-exposed epithelial cells under a microscope and discovered that there was a significant increase in epithelial cell death. They found that E-cigarette vapor destroyed 53% of cells within the mouth after 3 days. This suggests that the death of protective cells may lead to a higher risk of infection, gum disease, inflammation, and even possibly cancer.

Talk to your kids about the harms of E-cigarettes and smoking products, as well as the importance of maintaining your oral health to ensure overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://pages.ada.org/jada-specialty-scan/oral-pathology/oral-pathology-august-24-2018?utm_campaign=JADA%20Specialty%20Scan&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65440658&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8yc_SI07OAU_XhoSEngQA1QYRsc_1bMXptS802Wpvje1MWrzTPC7hgwm8P3TJs2uVJJQX4lCf7gQpm5oawtYGYfFPqZQ&_hsmi=65440658#article1

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314190.php

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/Quick-Facts-on-the-Risks-of-E-cigarettes-for-Kids-Teens-and-Young-Adults.html

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Turmeric: The Future Mouthwash?

November 19th, 2015

Mouthwash can be a beneficial solution for your oral health problems. However, did you know that turmeric, a yellow spice that is extracted from the root of the Curcuma longa plant that is a key ingredient in curry, also has good effects and can even be safer than the typical chemical mouthwash? Turmeric has been used since ancient times for health benefits and to treat oral diseases, including removing plaque from the mouth and killing oral cancer cells.

Turmeric has around three to four percent curcumin, which is a yellow polyphenol that is a natural alternative for chlorhexidine. Chlorhexidine is a common ingredient in mouthwash that treats gingivitis, or gum inflammation. Some of the typical symptoms of gingivitis include halitosis (bad breath) and bleeding or swollen gums. If not treated properly, gingivitis can develop into an extremely harmful form of periodontal disease. Although chlorhexidine is effective at preventing dental plaque, there have been issues in patient safety. In 2012, the UK's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) stated that chlrohexidine can provoke anaphylactic reactions, which are severe and life-threatening allergic reactions. Although these reactions are rare, if safer alternatives are more effective, they should be used instead.

A study published in the Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology in 2012 compared the effects of turmeric mouthwash (0.1% curcumin extract mouthwash and 0.01% eugenol) and chlorhexidine (0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate mouthwash) on subjects who had mild to moderate gingivitis. The results proved that the turmeric mouthwash was more effective than the chlorhexidine mouthwash in improving the oral health (in terms of the percentage reduction of the plaque index, gingival index, and bacterial activity) of the subjects. Furthermore, it was more effective at a concentration that was half of that of chlorhexidine. Further research has demonstrated that curcumin is an ideal alternative for chlorhexidine in plaque reduction and reduction in plaque-associated gum inflammation.

In addition, if one were to consume some of the curcumin-based mouthwash by accident, the consequences would not be as adverse as those that would result in swallowing chlorhexidine. Because of all the health benefits of turmeric, it may actually be beneficial. However, if you consider switching to turmeric mouthwash, make sure to consider the quality of the herb. Check whether it was produced organically and preserved in a way that eliminated mycotoxins and other microbial contaminants.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

Resources:

http://www.curejoy.com/content/turmeric-superior-chemical-mouthwash-oral-health/

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Secondhand Smoke Is No Joke To Oral Health

May 29th, 2015

As you may have heard before, "secondhand smoke kills." It sure does. Nearly 54,000 people die each year from secondhand smoke. A combined total of more than 480,000 deaths a year are caused from smoking and secondhand smoke. It can sometimes be easy to forget that even non-smokers are in danger of health problems as a result of cigarette smoke. Not to mention, children are at a high risk of developing several chronic diseases and health issues because of secondhand smoke.

There are many reasons to avoid smoking, and in this article, we'll offer you yet another reason. Believe it or not, secondhand smoke can negatively impact your oral health. Although more research is needed in the area, it is believed that children are at risk of developing tooth decay from secondhand smoke.

15 studies were conducted and reviewed in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health by researchers in Japan about the possible correlation between secondhand smoke and the development of cavities in children. The studies reported weak to moderate evidence that secondhand smoke causes cavities in primary teeth, yet, more information is needed to make a conclusive argument.

Further, Researchers now have concluded that smoking is one of the causes of periodontal disease because tobacco can damage gums and leave teeth susceptible to infection. This makes smokers more at risk for developing periodontal disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 47% of adults have either mild, moderate or severe periodontitis in the United States. The early stages of periodontal disease is gingivitis, which can eventually lead to periodontitis if untreated.

In a recent study funded by the National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, researchers investigated the link between serum cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, and periodontitis in U.S. non-smokers. The study found that non-smokers exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) had 1.45 times the odds of moderate/severe periodontitis as unexposed non-smokers.

In addition, smokers and non-smokers exposed to secondhand smoke are more prone to significant amounts of oral bone loss. For example, research in the Journal of Periodontology showed the correlation between secondhand smoke and oral bone loss in rats. The study concluded that rats with periodontitis that were exposed to secondhand smoke were at greater risk of experiencing oral bone loss and ultimately tooth loss.

Along with serious oral issues, secondhand smoke has caused oral cancer, breast cancer, middle ear infections in children, pregnancy problems, asthma, lung disease, heart disease, among many other health problems.

If you are a smoker, quitting is the best option to keep yourself and those around you healthy. Whether being exposed in homes, cars, offices, or other public places, secondhand smoke is severely detrimental to oral and overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.no-smoke.org/getthefacts.php?id=13

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/secondhand-smoke-and-cavities

http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/tobacco_related_mortality/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150313083627.htm

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New Year's Resolutions for Dental Health

December 31st, 2014

The start of the New Year is just a few hours away. 2015 is full of new beginnings and promises! The New Year is a great time to make a resolution’s list and make changes that will enhance your health! Oral health is extremely important, as it plays a huge role in our overall health. Make oral health a part of your New Year’s resolutions this upcoming year! Here are several ways to help keep your teeth healthy and strong in 2015:

1. Throw away old toothbrushes: Make sure to change your toothbrush! Worn bristles do not do an effective job of cleaning. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends switching your old toothbrush for a new one every three months. Sometimes the bristles can get worn down sooner than 3 months and should be tossed out when appropriate.

 

2.  Use Mouthguards for protection when involved in sports: Mouthguards should be used at all ages to protect your mouth, face, teeth, and jaws from injury, especially in contact sports. Mouthguards help prevent traumas including fractures, chipped teeth, tooth loss, and much more.

 

3. Eat healthy foods and less sugar: A healthy diet promotes strong teeth. Fruits and vegetables contain many antioxidants and vitamins that help improve teeth and gums by fighting bacteria and inflammation. Also, dairy contains vitamin B12 and calcium, which help remineralize teeth. Avoid sodas and other acidic and sugary drinks and foods, which damage the enamel on teeth. Added sugar in coffee and tea can also be a less obvious source of tooth decay.

 

4. Quit Smoking: Tobacco products negatively impact your overall health and oral health too! Smoking increases your risk for tooth discoloration, tooth decay, gum recession, periodontal disease, oral cancer, and other diseases.

 

5. Improve Brushing and Flossing Habits: Brushing and flossing keeps teeth protected from many oral health problems including tooth decay, gingivitis, and periodontal disease. Flossing is equally important as brushing because it removes plaque from teeth in hard-to-reach areas. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends brushing teeth at least twice a day for two minutes each time, and flossing at least once a day.

 

Healthy resolutions can keep your smile brighter and healthier in the coming year!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Personal/2014/January/article/SW-281474979258123.cvsp

http://www.nj.com/helpinghands/deltadental/index.ssf/2014/12/5_ways_to_put_oral_health_on_y.html

http://www.ada.org/en/about-the-ada/ada-positions-policies-and-statements/statement-on-toothbrush-care-cleaning-storage-and-

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Healing in the Form of Bone Growth

May 28th, 2014

140318093220-largeOral cancer has been seen to take a cruel toll on many individuals. It has silenced the voice of a famous film critic and even brought an NBA coach to tears.

Surgery has been a means to treat cancer that has spread to the salivary gland; however, complications have lead to significant loss of bone, and even in some patient, the entire lower jaw. While oral cancer is truly an ordeal to go through, the aftermath, beyond the treatment, can be just as devastating. Disfigurement is something that patients often have to face; it’s certainly not something that people easily can swallow.

However scientists have been looking into more ways to fight back and keep disfigurement from being what is inevitable for patients. Dentists have discovered a new method allowing for bone to repair. Bone repair isn’t an impossible task, but there are certain criteria that need to be fulfilled After a fracture, the fragments of bone are only able to come together and fuse of they are in close proximity to each other. The growth of bone involves connective tissue that later calcifies, which provides the platform that allows for the formation of functional bone.

When there is too big a gap between two bone fragments or when bones have been too damaged, the body has a harder time repairing. Researchers have found created synthetic bone material that has been successful at stimulating material in the bone. This artificial scaffolding is found to be as strong as real bone but is porous enough to allow bone tissue and blood vessels to grow. For the process to move along faster, the scientists incorporated stem cells that have received directions in creating bone.

Research has shown that this new method has been successful on various animals, and during this year, the researcher hope to take this to clinical studies on patients with serious gum disease or mandibular bone damage. This field of research fosters hope and provides patients with the opportunity to push back and move past cancer.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References:
http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/02/19/george.karl.throat.cancer/
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/03/140318093220.htm
http://www.esquire.com/features/roger-ebert-0310

How Exactly Does Smoking Affect Oral Health?

January 28th, 2014

While smoking has been found to lead to various unhealthy consequences, it also has been linked with resulting in poor oral health.

Smoking and tobacco-based products have been shown to result in gum disease. It damages bone and soft tissue of teeth and interferes with the functioning of gum tissue cells. This leaves smokers more susceptible to infections, including periodontal disease, and also tends to lessen blood flow to the gums, which would hinder wound healing.

The Journal of the American Dental Association published results showing that cigar smokers have experienced tooth loss and alveolar bone loss, which is the bone within the jawbone responsible for anchoring teeth. The rate at which bone and tooth are loss for cigar smokers are very similar to cigarette smokers. Pipe smokers also are in danger of tooth loss; moreover, they are also at risk for oral and pharyngeal (throat) cancer, even if the smoke is not inhaled. Other oral health consequences included halitosis, stained teeth, and gum disease.

While some smokers believe that using smokeless tobacco products tend to be safer, that is not the case. Similar to cigars and cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products, including chewing tobacco, contain at least 28 chemicals that have shown to increase the risk of oral cancer, along with cancer of the throat and esophagus. Smokeless tobacco can also irritate gum tissue, leading to the receding and pulling away of teeth. When gum tissue recedes, teeth roots are left more exposed, which increases the chance for tooth decay to occur. The Journal of the American Dental Association also showed that chewing tobacco users were four times more likely than nonusers to have tooth decay. Smokeless tobacco also contains sand and grit, which can easily wear down teeth.

Even though you may be a tobacco product user, it is never too late to quit. Studies have shown that 11 years after quitting, former smokers were found to have risks of developing gum disease that were not too different from those who had never smoked. Cutting out tobacco products can truly lead to healthier oral health. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

http://www.dentalplans.com/dentalhealtharticles/53837/smoking-tobacco-may-affect-oral-health.html

Consuming Cheese Can Prevent Cavities

January 20th, 2014

Happy National Cheese Lover's Day!

Dairy has been long known to be packed with a great amount of calcium, protein, and vitamin D in every serving. It has always been said that drinking milk and other dairy products will keep bones healthy and strong, but there has not been much research done on how beneficial dairy products are to oral health until recently. General Dentistry just published in their most recent journal issue that cheese and other dairy products have the potential of keeping cavities at bay.

Researchers that conducted the study looked at 68 participants between the ages of 12 and 15. The subjects had their dental plaque pH checked before eating cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. Previous studies indicate that a pH level below 5.5 makes an individual more susceptible to the wearing down of enamel, resulting in tooth erosion. The higher the pH level, the lower the chance an individual has of getting cavities.

The subjects were randomly split into three groups: one that ate cheddar cheese, another that drank milk, and a final group that ate sugar-free yogurt. After eating their chosen type of dairy for 3 minutes, the subjects were asked to rinse their mouth with water. The pH level of each subject’s mouth was then measured 10, 20, and 30 minutes the dairy product was consumed. The researchers found that the individuals who drank milk and ate sugar-free yogurt did not have a significant change in pH level; however, those who ate cheese showed a great increase in pH levels after each time interval, indicating that this particular dairy product may be the key to preventing cavities. The results suggest that because there is more of a need to chew when consuming cheese, there is an increase in saliva production, which also leads to an increase of pH levels. The researchers also found compounds inherent in cheese binds to tooth enamel, preventing acid from causing further damage.

This new finding gives us more of a reason to add a slice of cheese to a sandwich. Continue to make sure daily that your diet increases and strengthens oral health!

If you have any questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605130118.htm

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/6-reasons-to-get-your-diary

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57587876/cheesy-grins-may-protect-teeth-from-cavities/

Picture Credit: http://dailym.ai/17rk9ET

Local recommendation: Wasik Cheeseshop 

The Upcoming ‘Great American Smokeout'

November 19th, 2013

smokeoutWhile most people are aware of the dangers that smoking results in, it is surprising to most that dentists can have the ability to not only inform others on smoking effects on overall health, but also the damaging effects of smoking on oral health. Smoking and other tobacco products have been linked to periodontal, or gum, disease through affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to teeth. Along with increasing the risk of periodontal disease, smoking has been linked to specific cancers. There are toxins and carcinogens present in tobacco products, including cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, and chewing tobacco. The American Lung Association has found that cigarettes cause 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Smokers of cigars and pipes have an increased risk of cancer of the oral cavity as well as the overall body. Also, don’t be swayed into thinking that tobacco products are harmless; while they are “smokeless” options including chewing tobacco, there are still more than 28 cancer-causing chemicals found in this form of tobacco. Chewing tobacco can cause cancer in the cheek, gums and lips, and this cancer usually developed where the tobacco is held in the mouth. Regardless of what form of smoking, there is no doubt that smoking is harmful to the oral cavity and the overall health of the body.

 

The American Cancer Society is holds an event called Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November to encourage current smokers to use that day to make a solid plan to quit, or to start making plans prior to the event and to quit on the day of. The American Cancer Society explains that smokers are most successful in stopping the habit is to have access to smoking-cessation hotlines, stop-smoking groups, counseling, nicotine replacement products, online quit groups, and encourage and support from friends and family members. When smokers implement two or more of these sources, they have a better chance of quitting.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Great-American-Smokeout-Is-Nov-21.cvsp

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

 

http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/dental_care/oral_cancer_and_tobacco/Pages/index.aspx

 

Five Green Foods That Can Bring About Good Oral Health

June 4th, 2013

Have you been looking to get healthier and searching for how to change up your current diet? Here are a couple green healthy foods that can get you started on spicing up what you eat and also can be beneficial for your oral health!

Green tea: get ready to cut out sugary and carbonated beverages and look into a lighter and calming alternative. While green tea has been proven to reduce the risk of both stroke and oral cancer, it contains catechins, which are a type of antioxidants that also prevents cavities and gingivitis. Green tea also prevents halitosis by hindering bacterial growth. Make sure to read our blog to find out more about green tea health benefits!

Celery: these crunchy greens can help produce saliva, freshening up the mouth while neutralizing bacteria that results in cavities. Celery is also known to stimulate and massage gums during chewing and also cleanses areas between teeth.

Wasabi: the spicy Japanese horseradish not only adds flavor to sushi and sashimi, but can also be front line defense for teeth. What makes wasabi taste hot is a substance known as isothiocyanates, which also prevents the growth of bacteria in the mouth. Eating green paste can keep cavities away!

Parsley: these leaves can add flavor to a variety of dishes but can also help freshen up the mouth after a meal. These greens contain monoterpenes, which are substances that travel through the lungs and bloodstream; their odor ends up being released through one’s breath.

Kiwi: most fruits contain an assortment of vitamins, but kiwis are known to be jam-packed with Vitamin C, which allow maintains the collagen in gums, preventing tenderness and vulnerability to bacteria. Snacking on these sweet green fruits is another way to prevent cavities.

If you have any more questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/26/health/it-works-on-sushi-it-could-help-teeth-too.html

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/getting-your-vitamin-c-from-kiwi-fruit.html#b

Green Tea May Prevent the Onset of Oral Cancer

June 3rd, 2013

Green tea has been shown to a soothing drink that has the ability maintain healthy teeth and gums. Research also reveals that green tea extract can be used as a chemopreventative agent to fight oral cancer. The Daily Meal also reports that "Green tea has also been proven helpful to people who suffer from diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol and blood pressure, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as even skincare and tooth decay."

Cancer Prevention Research published online that out of the oral leukoplakia patients who took the green tea extra, more than half of them experienced a clinical response. Their preclinical models indicated that green tea is filled with polyphenols, which can prevent the progression of cancer. Researchers have noted that while these clinical trials may not show definitive proof that green tea can be used to prevent cancer, these results can lead to more studies focusing on patients who are at risk for oral cancer. Green tea has shown to be promising because of its nontoxic nature, which is essential to prevent further harm in individuals battling cancer.

In phase 2 of their study, oral leukoplakia patients were given either the green tea extract or a placebo at one of three dosage amounts. Participants ingested the tea or the extract for three times a day for three months. After these three months, the patients underwent oral tissue biopsies. These biopsies were able to reveal that green tea extract were beneficial to the patients but also lead the researchers to believe that antiangiogenetic effects (growth and development of tissue) were the mechanism of action.

Out of the patients that took the two highest doses ended up, 58.8% of the patients had a clinical response, compared to the 36.4% of patients that took the lowest dose of green tea extract. Although these results were not statistically significant, researchers noted that the extract was well received by the patients and only a few of the patients that took the highest extra dosage showed signs of insomnia and nervousness.

The researchers note that there were only a few patients that participated in their clinical trials and that more research needs to be done to see if green tea can conclusive prevent oral or other types of cancer. Green tea needs to be looked at to determine whether it can provide long-term prevention for patients. However, this research proves to be a promising stepping-stone for further studies.

Green tea is stimulatory in nature as it contains some caffeine, which will naturally boost your metabolism. Green tea is also an antioxidant that, like wine, cranberries, and dark chocolate, will target and scavenge for toxins that could lead to cancer, blood clots, and even atherosclerosis.

We recommend an oral cancer screening annually and this can be done at your next preventative visit. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12004708
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm
Photo Credit to http://www.thedailymeal.com/health-benefits-green-tea-could-save-your-life

Limited Knowledge of Cancers Caused by Smoking

July 16th, 2012

A study conducted in the UK found that more than 80% of people are ignorant to the types of cancers caused by smoking. The survey examined over 4,000 people.

Most people knew of the obvious cancers caused by smoking, such as oral, lung and esophageal, but a large number didn't know it is linked to cancers of the kidney, stomach, and bladder. Cigarette smoke itself contains numerous chemicals that are distributed throughout the bloodstream when inhaled.

What's alarming is that people know smoking is dangerous but still continue to do it for whatever reason. Nearly half of all smokers who smoke for a long period of time will die from either cancer or other illnesses brought on by this habit. You can read the article in full here.

Drs. Ali and Ali urge all of their patients who are smokers to consider quitting. Smoking increases the risk of oral cancer and many other related problems dramatically. Contact us today to learn more about how smoking impacts your oral health at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

Gum Disease, HPV Could Lead To Head, Neck Cancer

July 11th, 2012

New research is showing that chronic gum disease in conjunction with HPV may lead to head and neck cancer. The National Cancer Institute in the United States says that HPV is definitely a factor.

The study of 124 people who were diagnosed with squamous cell carcinomas showed that about 40% of tumors tested positive for HPV. These people were also more likely to have gum disease.

Gum disease is simple to detect and could help prevent the development of cancer in these patients.

The article is available in full here. If you have any questions, please contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

HPV and Oral Cancer

June 21st, 2010

This is a very informative video about the HPV link to oral cancers - definitely worth a watch.

In the June 2010 issue of AGD Impact,  an article by Eric K. Curtis, MA, MAGD called "Sex Ed: What Every Dentist Must Know About HPV,"  brought to attention some startling statistics regarding the human papillomavirus (HPV) and oral cancer.  HPV is a sexually transmitted disease.

One of those statistics, stemming from a report mentioned in the British Medical Journal (BMJ, March 2010) said that a U.S. study "found that approximately 60 to 80 percent of recent oral cancer biopsies were HPV positive - 10 years ago, only 40 percent of such biopsies were HPV-positive.  The BMJ report also suggested that HPV can be transmitted through oral sex." 

Curtis seems to believe that this report "reinforces the trend that the BMJ warns: patients with HPV- positive OSCC's (oral squamous cell carcinomas) are, on average, three to five years younger than patients with other OSCCs, and they are less likely to have a history of alcohol or tobacco use."

So in the past, when doctors looked for risk factors for oral cancer, they might have considered smoking and alcohol use at the top of the list - now, having an understanding of the HPV link to oral cancer will help doctors address the numbers of oral cancer cases among the younger population.

Dentists should continue to follow this information and perform regular oral cancer screenings on all patients age 18 and over.  If you have not had an oral cancer screening, it's time to ask your dentist for one. 

Oral cancer kills one person in the United States every hour of every day. For more information, please visit the Oral Cancer Foundation.

National Oral Cancer Awareness Month

April 1st, 2010

April is National Oral Cancer Awareness Month.  Did you know that over 35,000 new cases of oral cancer are predicted to be diagnosed this year? 

april_2010

Learn more about what you can do to prevent against oral cancer, as well as symptoms and causes at http://www.oralcancer.org.

Dr. Ejaz Ali and Dr. Femina Ali provide Vizilite Plus® Advanced oral cancer screenings at Wellesley Dental Group.  If your dentist is not currently checking your mouth, under your tongue, palpating your neck and cheeks, please ask him/her to perform an oral cancer screening on you at your next appointment.  Catching oral cancer in its earliest stages is crucial!

Please call us if you have any questions about proper screenings or resources for oral cancer survivors.

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