Oral cavity

Snoring is a Culprit to Oral Health Issues

April 23rd, 2014

Stop-SnoringAre you often told that you snore in your sleep? If so, you are not alone! Snoring is a common problem that can be caused by many factors. According to the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons, approximately 30 to 50 percent of individuals within the United States snore during their lifetime. Snoring not only affects your physical health, but also your oral health!

Snoring happens when air struggles to move freely through the nose and mouth during sleep. Snoring is often a result of abnormalities of the soft tissues in the mouth. Narrowing of the airway during sleep could cause tissues at the top of the airway to hit each other, resulting in a vibration and a loud noise. This noise can range from a soft wheezing to loud whistling sounds and can suggest breathing problems that interrupt sleep.

Dry mouth is a direct result of snoring. Snoring causes a lack of salivary flow, which is essential for coating the oral tissues. According to the American Dental Association, A lack of saliva due to snoring can lead to several other oral health problems, including bad breath, burning mouth syndrome, infections, mouth sores, tooth decay, and periodontal disease. Saliva acts as a buffer by neutralizing the acids produced by plaque. Saliva helps wash away food particles, cleanse the oral cavity of dead cells that create odors, and eliminate bacteria within the mouth. Snoring can also be a symptom of sleep apnea, which has damaging effects on the body. Sleep apnea is a breathing disorder that involves short breaks of breathing during sleep.

Some common symptoms of sleep apnea include:

  • Gasping for air that causes a break in sleep
  • Fatigue
  • Morning headaches
  • Irritability
  • Mood changes
  • Sore throat
  • Dry mouth
  • Attention problems

To avoid such problems, dentists can be a good source of help! Snoring and sleep apnea can be treated by using dental devices. The mandibular advancement device, also referred to as oral appliance therapy, is widely used to treat sleep apnea and snoring. Resembling a sports mouth guard, it helps keep the lower jaw down, which helps to keep the breathing airway open. Dentists can perform a polysomnogram, also known as a sleep study, which analyzes your sleeping patterns throughout the night. Also, a tongue-retraining device helps to treat sleep apnea by positioning the tongue in order to keep the breathing airway open. Orthodontic treatments, including rapid maxillary expansion, can provide additional help, especially for those with a narrow upper jaw. This nonsurgical treatment will reduce nasal pressure by tightening the upper teeth with the application of a screw device on the upper jaw. These oral devices can be useful in reducing the frequency of snoring, thereby improving your sleep patterns and oral health.

It is important to practice good oral hygiene in order to reduce your risk of developing these oral health problems. With the support of a dental professional,  the issue of snoring issue and sleep problems can be resolved!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/June/article/SW-281474979163102.cvsp

http://finallyasleepco.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Stop-Snoring.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Personal/2013/July/article/SW-281474979158441.cvsp

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/11/using-oral-and-dental-devices-to-treat-snoring-and-sleep-apnea.html

Stress on Children: Dental Consequences

February 23rd, 2014

Copy of smile-familyStress is sometimes seen as an inevitable problem that is here to stay throughout a lifetime. There are many sources of stress, including school, work, family and friends. While it does not come as a surprise that adults deal with stress on a daily basis, but it must be kept in mind that children are not exempt from this fact.

School comes to mind as the main source of stress for children, but other events such as world events, natural disasters, familial issues, death, and even separation anxiety as a toddler can present as stressful situations. These occurrences can lead to a physical response in children that can adversely affect oral health.

Some tall tale signs of stress can reveal themselves in various forms in children. These include moodiness, lying, bullying, physical symptoms of headaches and stomach aches, changes in eating habits, and different sleeping schedules. These changes can lead to unhealthy habits, such as indulging in sugary food choices, resulting in higher rates of dental decay. Decay can lead to multiple dental visits for fillings and even abscesses, which are bacteria-induced infections resulting in a swelling.  A child suffering from stress can also go back to habits of thumb sucking, which interferes with proper forming and erupting of teeth.

As parents, it is important to recognize these signs of stress and to make active steps to alleviating it. Here are some tips to helping children cope with stress:

  • Spend quality time with them on a daily basis
  • Have conversations about their day and look for root causes of the stress
  • Help them keep up with a good amount of sleep and a healthy diet
  • Appointments for wellness visits and follow-up visits to the dentist can help ensure healthy teeth

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Glossary/Abscess.cvsp
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/September/article/SW-281474979201581.cvsp
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1009576213027#page-1

Indulgence in Sugary Sodas Can Lead to Poor Oral Health & Cardiovascular Disease

January 24th, 2014

colaThe proven connection between poor oral heath and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should re-enforce the importance of new heath policy creation, focusing on reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks,  say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Poor oral hygiene and excess amount of sugar in the diet can cause periodontal disease and decay of the teeth-supporting bone. It is thought that chronic infection brought on by gym disease can lead to inflammation that will over time cause heart disease through atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. Despite sufficient evidence of the connection between the poor oral health and premature heart disease, the recent suggested UK national guidance on Cardiovascular disease prevention at population level does not suggest the strong need to reduce sugar consumption.

Dr Ahmed Rashid, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, who co-wrote the paper, said: "As well as having high levels of fats and salt, junk foods often contain a great deal of sugar and the effect this has on oral health may be an important additional mechanism by which junk food elevates risk of CVD." He added: "Among different types of junk food, soft drinks have raised particular concerns and are the main source of free sugar for many individuals."

The authors refer to the well-knows  New York 'soda ban' controversy which has brought a lot of attention to the issue. They stress more can be done about making the sugary sodas dominating the public areas in the United States. Dr Rashid said: "The UK population should be encouraged to reduce fizzy drink intake and improve oral hygiene. Reducing sugar consumption and managing dental problems early could help prevent heart problems later in life."

Reference: http://goo.gl/ppiqpM

Cholesterol Medication Can Help Decrease Gum Inflammation

December 12th, 2013

youngoldHeart disease is one of the leading health issues in the United States. Arteries within the body become inflamed and patients are often recommended to take medication that lowers cholesterol

Statins is a commonly prescribed medication that helps patients with heart disease. But what’s more is that a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology demonstrated that statins can also be beneficial for those suffering from gum disease.

Periodontal disease is marked by chronic gum inflammation that affects approximately half of the U.S. adult population. Dr. Ahmed Tawkol of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School notes that there is a connections between heart and gum disease: both periodontitis and atherosclerosis are driven by inflammation. These inflammatory conditions are often seen to occur together, indicating to researchers that their biologies may be related.

A study was administered to test this theory. Patients with either heart disease or considered to have high heart disease risk were asked to take 80 mg of statin or 10 mg of stain daily for 12 weeks. PET/CT scans were used to observe inflammation over the course of the study. Results indicated that the 59 patients in the study demonstrated a significant reduction in gum inflammation, some after only 4 weeks of treatment. The researchers also found that the improvement of inflammation in the gums related closely with the improvement seen in inflammation in the arteries.

This study provides strong evidence that links atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. This research opens doors to new methods of treatments. Because of the relationship between these two diseases, medications that originally targeted one of these diseases may also be beneficial for the other. These results also points to better and improved oral hygiene to reduce inflammation in the gums can also lead to reduced atherosclerosis.

This study again shows the strong relationship between oral health and overall systemic health. Maintaining proper oral care can really go a long way for the body as a whole. Keeping up with oral hygiene can truly lead to a healthier smile and a healthier you!

If you have any questions or concerns please don't hesitate to ask Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group or our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi. We would all be more than happy to help. Please contact us at (781)237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002185652.htm

http://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/statins-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too-680723.html

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20131002/cholesterol-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too

 http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

December 11th, 2013

The elusive yet painful burning mouth syndrome!

Dentists and researchers have been scratching their heads for quite some time over a type of oral pain that seems to be plaguing a good amount of individuals. Patients’ chief complaint is that the mouth feels scalded; however, mouth and gums continue to appear normal. Because of this syndrome’s lack of visible symptoms (except for sensations of pain), it can take several visits before finally concluding that it is BMS. Over these years, it has come to be known as burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Because of its elusive symptoms, dental researchers have been looking into the burning mouth syndrome, hoping to find more clues to where the and why the pain originates.

Dr. Andres Pinto is the new chair in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine, and he is delving into reach on the burning mouth syndrome. BMS have spread to 2-5% of the population and mainly strikes women between the age of 50 and 70 and from three years before to 12 years after menopause. Earlier research on BMS has also paired their symptoms with psychogenic disorders. BMS is also mentioned as a secondary issue along with anemia, diabetes, vitamin deficiency, and thyroid disorders. Although an exact cause has yet to be found, burning mouth syndrome has been suspected to result from the deterioration of the nerves beneath the oral lining. Because the oral lining is not visible, this can explain the difficulty in diagnosing this disorder.

Dr. Pinto encourages individuals that continue to feel pain in their mouth to check for BMS these symptoms:

 

  • Persistent burning tongue and oral pain with no apparent dental cause
  • Abnormal taste or dry feeling in mouth
  • Symptoms that subside when eating
  • Burning sensations that migrate across various oral areas

 

Even when there is oral pain with no sign of these symptoms, it is advised to go in for a dental checkup. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/burning-mouth-syndrome/DS00462

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_53.pdf

 

 

Want To Brighten Your Smile For The Holidays?

December 6th, 2013

sinsational_gal_loIt’s that time of year again, gathering for family affairs and celebrating holidays as the year draws to a close. It definitely doesn’t hurt to have a set of pearly whites for the occasion! Here are a few tips to achieving a brighter smile:

Take a pass on the usual bag of chips and make a grab for fruits: while fruits boost many benefits for one’s overall health, fruits are also a great way to beginning removing stains from teeth. Some fruits, including apples and strawberries, contain malic acid, which has been shown to oxidize and remove stains from teeth. Crunchy fruits and vegetables also help whiten teeth by increasing saliva production, which neutralizes acids from other food such as tomatoes and wines.

Cutting out staining beverages is also a great way to cut down on the instances teeth are susceptible to stains. Drinks such as wine, coffee and various sodas are known to stain teeth; furthermore, beverages, such as soda, are extremely high in sugar content, leading to more bacteria production and more cavities. In the cases where these drinks are consumed, using a straw can really make a difference. The straw keeps the outer teeth from coming in contact with the beverage, preventing stains from forming.

And of course there are whitening strips. These strips are becoming more accessible and easy to use; some even simply dissolve in the mouth when applied! However, for individuals with more sensitive teeth, be mindful about the frequency of treatments used per week.

We also provide Sinsational in-office whitening. They procedure easily lightens your teeth and causes little to no sensitivity! It could be a great option for people who want a brighter smile without feeling any discomfort.

If strips are still a hassle, there are whitening toothpastes that are great for tackling hard to remove stains. While brushing teeth can lead to a brighter smile, it is still important to keep in mind the importance of daily brushing and flossing. Maintaining a bright smile should mean maintaining a healthy smile as well!

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group ; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References

 

http://www.3dwhite.com/teeth-whitening/teeth-whitening-kits/make-teeth-whiter.aspx

 

http://voices.yahoo.com/5-easy-ways-whiten-teeth-remove-stains-4616045.html

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/weighing-your-toothpaste-options

 

Ease Oral Burns With Innovative Strip!

December 5th, 2013

coffee_0

When hot, delicious food is placed before you, it is easy to quick to scarf down that plate of food. Or even in the morning, the goal is to quickly down that cup of coffee before getting to work. In the heat of the moment, the burning sensation is an afterthought, but once that gooey slice of pizza has been consumed or when you have stepped into your workplace, the pain begins to set in and feelings of regret for eating or drinking so quickly start to well up.

 

Pain from burns causing by consumption of hot foods and liquids tends to be an issue that everyone will likely face. Even though the pain eventually subsides, it still lingers for some time. A pharmaceutical, biomedical engineering research team may have found the solution to this problem. Dr. Jason McConville of New Mexico, along with researchers from the University of Texas from Austin, had presented on possible dissolvable strips to treat oral thermal burns. This strip would be applied directly to the affected part of the tongue, cheek or roof of the mouth. Scientists note that this adhesive will not hinder any normal day-to-day activities because of its quickly dissolving nature. These strips will look and act similarly to breath freshening strips that can be found in the local drugstore.

 

The strip would locally deliver anesthetic, benzocaine, and a therapeutic polymer. This film can instantly release benzocaine when it is placed on affected areas in the oral cavity and has shown to relieve pain significantly over an extended period of time. What’s more is all the materials used to create these dissolvable strips are relatively inexpensive. The team of scientists has proposed that this film could give way to instant, sustained, and affordable relief from oral burns.

 

There are high hopes for these dissolvable strips and it will be exciting to see this new product enter the market. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016125647.htm

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-02-scientists-develop-film-strip-to-treat-oral-burns.cvsp

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57535420/

Why Is Junk Food Bad?

December 4th, 2013

Even though junk foods are known to be unhealthy snack options, it is easy to look past health concerns and succumb to sodas, chips, and candies. But just how bad are junk foods an individual and how exactly are these foods harmful? The nature of junk foods suggests that a high level of intake of such foods can lead poor oral health, which is not surprising considering the amount sugar found in these foods. However, it is suggested that the level of sugar in junk foods, which indubitably has an effect on oral health, also ends up increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Past research has shown that high sugar intake along and poor oral hygiene have been linked to periodontal (gum) disease. In the case of periodontal disease, gums end up pulling away from teeth, leaving “pockets” that can end up becoming infected. The body ends up responding to this infection by breaking down bone and connective tissue that support the teeth. If these symptoms are left untreated, the bones eventually become destroyed, leaving teeth loose or in need to be removed.

However, the story does not stop here. Research also shows that chronic gum disease can trigger an inflammatory response, resulting in cardiovascular disease; this occurs through atherosclerosis, which is the process where arteries become hardened. Thus, the sugar in the junk food that is consumed not only affects the oral cavity, specifically the bones surrounding teeth, but can lead to unhealthy consequences for the heart as well.

It is important to keep in mind that the body is comprised of many interconnected parts. Do not hold the misconception that damage done to one area of the body is contained in only that region. Poor oral health choices can result in issues concerning other areas in the body. On the same token, consuming teeth-friendly foods not only is beneficial for the oral cavity but can also be favorable for the rest of the body.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202105301.htm

http://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/bad-foods-teeth

Saliva, a Potential Player In Detecting Systemic Diseases?

December 2nd, 2013

Through a lifetime, saliva proves to be integral for the breakdown and digestion of foods that are consumed. This watery liquid keeps the mouth moist and comfortable, while fighting germs in the mouth. Because of its proteins and minerals, teeth, specifically tooth enamel, is fortified and protected from tooth decay. Saliva has had a consistent function in the maintenance of good oral health, but researchers are now finding that it may have a significant role in revealing systemic diseases.

 

A group at the University of California Los Angeles School of Dentistry has been looking at biological markers derived from saliva that could potential test for the presence of stomach cancer and other deadly diseases. Dr. David Wong, the head of this five-year project, has high hopes of detecting cancer cells through capturing extracellular RNA, an important player in the production of proteins. The researchers hope to develop a method for using saliva to detect life-threatening diseases, such as pancreatic, breast and ovarian cancers. Currently, Dr. Wong’s team initially disordered salivary extracellular molecules and have strong evidence for detecting oral cancer with the biological markers they have created. The team also has successfully developed salivary extracellular RNA biomarkers for diseases such as salivary gland tumors and Sjögren’s syndrome.

 

While this research team continues to look for ways to genetically screen for these cancers, dentists have been able to start the process in detecting these systemic diseases during an oral exam. The initial symptoms of many diseases appear in the mouth. Diabetes, for example, is a complex disease that surprisingly shows many symptoms in the oral cavity. Thrush is an oral infection in the mouth that thrives when there are increased levels of blood glucose found in the saliva, which is an indication of diabetes. Dry mouth is another indicator of this disease, decreasing the production of saliva, leading to mouth soreness and tooth decay. Diabetes also increases the time for wound healing, which can be observed after an invasive dental procedure.  Saliva and the oral cavity as a whole continue to reveal much about an individual’s oral health simply through a check up. It is crucial to consistently make appointments with the dentist both to ensure good oral health and to screen for signs of systemic disease. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-09-Saliva-May-Hold-Key-To-Detecting-Deadly-Diseases-In-The-Body.cvsp

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2674509/

http://www.richmondinstitute.com/salivary-diagnostics-in-dentistry-and-medicine

 

Mealey, B. 2000. Diabetes and periodontal disease. Journal of Periodontology 71(4):664-678.

 


More Effective Pain Relief!

December 2nd, 2013

It can be quite unnerving when going in for dental surgery. Quick and effective pain relief is definitely on patients’ minds, and the hope is that their dentist will come through and prescribe drugs that will do the trick. While there are combinations of drugs that are effective in alleviating postoperative pain, they also come with a price, usually in form of side effects. However, there is new research showing an alternative solution, one involving safer over-the-counter drugs that may be just as, if not more, effective.

According to the Journal of the American Dental Association, taking ibuprofen and acetaminophen (APAP) together can help ease the pain after surgery without any significant side effects. Researchers have been advocating patients to take over-the-counter drugs, such as ibuprofen, APAP and naproxen after oral surgery. One of the most common combinations that patients take is APAP and an opioid, which is a prescription drug. However, the down side of this opioid-APAP combination is that patients may face potential adverse reactions linked with opioids. Most dentists and oral surgeons also frequently prescribe Vicodin, which is a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen for severe postoperative pain. While this form of pain relief is effective, it poses a risk for abuse and other adverse reactions.  Dentists are now advised to move towards the over-the-counter APAP and ibuprofen combination to keep side effects at bay.

Drs. Paul A. Moore from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, and Elliot V. Hersh from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine were able to determine whether this ibuprofen-APAP combination would be the better alternative to take over combinations including opioids. They were able to use the over-the-counter combination to manage the pain patients felt after they had their wisdom teeth removed. Their results indicated that the ibuprofen-APAP combination was more effective at reducing pain and had fewer side effects than many of the combinations including opioids. They also showed that the ibuprofen-APAP combination resulted in greater pain relief than using ibuprofen or APAP alone.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-08-Ibuprofen-And-Acetaminophen-Together-May-Give-Profound-Pain-Relief-With-Fewer-Side-Effects-After-Dental-Surgery.cvsp

 

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/8/898.abstract

 

Immune Cells: Potential Warriors In the Battle Against Gum Disease

November 22nd, 2013

perio diseasePeriodontal disease is one of the most prevalent oral diseases, affecting 78 million people in the United States. Periodontal disease (also known as gum disease) can range from gum inflammation to serious disease results in severe damage of the soft tissue and bones that support the teeth. While this oral disease remains an issue at large, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh may have found an innovative way to keep this disease at bay. They have discovered that certain immune system cells can be brought right to the inflamed tissues, resulting in effective treatment.

 

When dentists see that patients have symptoms of periodontal disease, the usual recommendation is proper oral hygiene. Through daily brushing and flossing, one is able to prevent plaque and eventually tartar from forming near the gum line.  These strategies aim to keep the growth of oral bacteria at bay. Dr. Charles Sfeir, the director of the Center Regeneration at the University’s School of Dental Medicine notes that these are ways to keep the bacteria from triggering sever inflammation in the oral cavity; however, there needs to be a method to prevent the underlying problem, which is the overreaction of the immune system that results in an adverse response to oral bacteria.

 

Within a healthy mouth, there is a response system between the immune system and bacteria that prevents infection without starting up inflammation. However, when there is too much bacteria in the oral cavity (due to lack maintenance of oral health), the immune system is on overdrive, leading to harmful consequences on oral tissues. The scientists have discovered that these disease tissues are low on a group of immune cells called the regulatory T-cells, which is responsible for informing immune cells to stand down, stopping the inflammatory response. These researchers believe that when more of these regulatory T-cells are brought back to the gums, the inflammatory response will be contained. The researchers are on their way in developing new technology that can deliver these immune cells to where they are lacking. With this new system, perhaps inflammation, thus periodontal disease may potentially be kept at bay.  If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group ; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131101112412.htm

 

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

 

http://www.yurovskydental.com/periodontaldisease.php

Why the Mouth Matters!

November 20th, 2013

[caption id="attachment_5914" align="alignleft" width="594"]Mouth Matters! Mouth Matters![/caption]

Even though the mouth is such an integral aspect of the human body, it’s easy to often take it for granted. It’s only when things go wrong when the oral cavity receives more attention and care. But why wait until those times in need? The mouth holds so many exciting facts that may very well be fascinating and sometimes even surprising. Here are a few interesting facts to keep you on your toes.

 

1. Teeth are the hardest substance in the human body. These mighty parts of your body are powerful tools of digestion and the break down of food. It’s easy to forget that individuals are able to enjoy and consume food only because of teeth! But what exactly keeps teeth so strong and resilient? Scientists have found that the human tooth enamel is composed of a basket-weave structure, which gives teeth their strength and also prevents any cracks that have formed from worsening and propagating through the enamel. Teeth can withstand an incredible amount of force, all due to their well-engineered core!

 

2. Some say that the mouth is the window to the body, but other than the fact that you can physically look into the oral cavity, dentists are able to see how well an individual is doing in terms of their overall health. 90% of life-threatening diseases have symptoms that show up within the mouth. Heart disease, respiratory disease, and even Alzheimer’s disease have been linked to oral health. Taking care of oral health is just as important (in fact it is related) to the body’s overall health.

 

3. Bad breath odors are definitely something that everyone wants to be kept far away from. In fact, more than a billion dollar a year has been spent on over-the-counter products to mask bad breath odors! In the United States, 65% of the population has been estimated to have bad breath, also known as halitosis. But no worries; there are many ways to treat bad breath. Cavities or gum disease have been shown to lead to bad breath, which are caused by lack of brushing and flossing. Always remember to keep up with healthy oral health habits; it may just say you from bad breath.

 

4.  Speaking of flossing, if individuals never make it to pulling some floss out and getting it in between teeth, they are actually missing 35% of their tooth surfaces. That’s quite a lot of tooth surface to be missing out on! When there is lack of proper flossing, bacteria are more than ready to take over these surfaces, foraging for leftover food to consume. The more leftover food, the more bacteria!

 

5. It’s been estimated that there are over 100 million bacteria in just one drop of saliva. But saliva is a big help in dealing with the amount of bacteria in the mouth. It is a major fighter of germs in the mouth and also prevents bad breath! Saliva has key proteins and minerals that fortify tooth enamel and prevent tooth decay. What’s more is that the average human produces 25,000 quarts of saliva in a lifetime, that’s enough to fill up 2 swimming pools!

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References:

 

Where I got inspiration from: http://visual.ly/your-mouth-matters-fun-dental-facts

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/factfiles/teeth/teeth.shtml

http://www.livescience.com/3498-mystery-tooth-strength-cracked.html

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/change-your-breath-from-bad-to-good

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva

http://naturalrevolution.org/natural-body/

 

The Upcoming ‘Great American Smokeout'

November 19th, 2013

smokeoutWhile most people are aware of the dangers that smoking results in, it is surprising to most that dentists can have the ability to not only inform others on smoking effects on overall health, but also the damaging effects of smoking on oral health. Smoking and other tobacco products have been linked to periodontal, or gum, disease through affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to teeth. Along with increasing the risk of periodontal disease, smoking has been linked to specific cancers. There are toxins and carcinogens present in tobacco products, including cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, and chewing tobacco. The American Lung Association has found that cigarettes cause 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Smokers of cigars and pipes have an increased risk of cancer of the oral cavity as well as the overall body. Also, don’t be swayed into thinking that tobacco products are harmless; while they are “smokeless” options including chewing tobacco, there are still more than 28 cancer-causing chemicals found in this form of tobacco. Chewing tobacco can cause cancer in the cheek, gums and lips, and this cancer usually developed where the tobacco is held in the mouth. Regardless of what form of smoking, there is no doubt that smoking is harmful to the oral cavity and the overall health of the body.

 

The American Cancer Society is holds an event called Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November to encourage current smokers to use that day to make a solid plan to quit, or to start making plans prior to the event and to quit on the day of. The American Cancer Society explains that smokers are most successful in stopping the habit is to have access to smoking-cessation hotlines, stop-smoking groups, counseling, nicotine replacement products, online quit groups, and encourage and support from friends and family members. When smokers implement two or more of these sources, they have a better chance of quitting.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Great-American-Smokeout-Is-Nov-21.cvsp

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

 

http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/dental_care/oral_cancer_and_tobacco/Pages/index.aspx

 

Request an
Appointment

patient
forms

read
our blog

Top