oral disease

What's the Scoop on Floss & Toxicity?

January 31st, 2019

Did you hear the news? It seems like floss was all the talk when news broke out about Oral-B Glide floss potentially containing toxic chemicals. A recent study published in the Journal of Exposure Science & Environmental Epidemiology claimed that flossing was not safe due to the Per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) found in certain floss brands. So what's PFAS? These chemicals have been linked to some health problems, but are used in a variety of products sold in the market, ranging from cooking appliances, electronics, clothing, and food wrappers for the purpose of adding water resistance and non-stick properties.

But, don't be so quick to quit flossing! Here's why:

Oral-B Glide does contain Teflon, which is within the family of PFAS. However, the study did not equate the presence of PFAS in floss to toxicity problems. The study measured chemicals in 178 middle-aged women and asked them about their exposure to certain products. The study did not link the amount of PFAS to any toxic effects, and also did not specify what product sources the PFAS directly came from. In fact, even though some the women who reported using Glide floss were found to have higher levels of PFAS, the manufacturer states that significant levels of PFAS were not found within the actual floss. Plus the data was too broad to yield conclusive results, because some individuals who used the floss had lower levels of PFAS found in their bloodstream than those who never used the floss. There was also no mention of how frequently the participants used the floss. Participants of the study were only asked if they "ever" or "never" used non-stick cookware, dental floss, or ate food from cardboard containers.

Not to mention, there is significant evidence that flossing does improve your overall health by helping to prevent oral disease. Flossing is a key step in keeping great dental health and is necessary to remove the microscopic bacterial plaque that is located between the tight contacts in-between our teeth. There are also a variety of flosses available that do not contain PFAS. So, make sure you don't give up on flossing, or else a whole new collection of problems can arise!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://mcgill.ca/oss/article/health/dental-floss-toxic

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Your House and Your Saliva: How on Earth Could they be Related?

August 12th, 2018

Normally, we may not be thinking about what saliva is doing for us in our mouths. But, saliva has an important role in helping us breakdown food and protect our teeth due to the proteins and minerals found within it. Turns out, according to new research, the combination of microorganisms in your saliva are mainly determined by your home environment rather than genetics. These organisms within saliva are found to have a great influence on our oral and overall health.

More research is showing that our microbiomes are related to our health. These microbes are perfectly normal to our bodies and help outside pathogens from establishing oral disease. Researchers at  UCL Genetics Institute looked at DNA and saliva extracted from an Ashkenazi Jewish family that lived in several different households across the world so that they could determine how the saliva microbiome varied in terms of environment versus genetics. In each of the DNA and saliva samples, they found that the majority of the salivary microbiome was composed of bacteria from the Streptococcus, Rothia, Neisseria, and Prevotella genera.

When analyzing the results, they also found that between factors including shared household, city, age, and genetics, the factor that determined who shared the most similar saliva microbes was household environment. Therefore, people in the same house share the most similar organisms within their saliva.

So, looks like genetics isn't the biggest factor in determining the makeup of our saliva as once thought according to recent research. This study concluded that a child's home environment plays a significant role in the community of bacteria found within their saliva. Since microbes can be transferred from one person to another, for instance via kissing or sharing utensils, it is important to maintain good oral hygiene, keep regular dental visits, and avoid being in close contact with others when having an active infection.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170912102810.htm

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Goodbye 2016, Hello 2017!

January 12th, 2017

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Some common new year's resolutions are exercising more or trying a new activity, but did you know that improving your oral health should also be one of your priorities for 2017? Healthy teeth is the key to your overall well-being! A few small improvements could lead to great rewards.

The first step to a healthier mouth is to have better brushing and flossing habits.

  • If you've had your toothbrush for more than three or four months, replace it! Worn bristles don't clean your teeth as well as a brand new toothbrush!
  • Brush at least two times a day with a fluoride toothpaste for two minutes every day. This is the best way to avoid bad breath, cavities, and infection!
  • Don't forget to floss at least once a day to get rid of the bacteria and food particles stuck between your teeth.
  • Use a fluoride mouthwash.

Another important part of maintaining your oral health is your diet.

  • Avoid acidic and sugary drinks to prevent tooth decay!
  • Try to limit snacking in between meals
  • Chew sugar-free gum or brush after meals
  • Drink water with fluoride

And last but not least, make sure to schedule regular appointments with your dentist!

  • You could prevent oral diseases or fix them at an early stage
  • You may need braces to fix abnormal bites, straighten your teeth, or enhance your smile
  • You could get whitening treatment to have a whiter smile
  • It's important for your overall health!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

https://www.smartpractice.com/Images/Products/PC/PhotoLg/LC03266.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/life-stages/adult-oral-care/article/a-new-years-you-dental-health-resolutions-0114

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/h/holiday-ideas

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