ovarian cancer

Why Is Junk Food Bad?

December 4th, 2013

Even though junk foods are known to be unhealthy snack options, it is easy to look past health concerns and succumb to sodas, chips, and candies. But just how bad are junk foods an individual and how exactly are these foods harmful? The nature of junk foods suggests that a high level of intake of such foods can lead poor oral health, which is not surprising considering the amount sugar found in these foods. However, it is suggested that the level of sugar in junk foods, which indubitably has an effect on oral health, also ends up increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Past research has shown that high sugar intake along and poor oral hygiene have been linked to periodontal (gum) disease. In the case of periodontal disease, gums end up pulling away from teeth, leaving “pockets” that can end up becoming infected. The body ends up responding to this infection by breaking down bone and connective tissue that support the teeth. If these symptoms are left untreated, the bones eventually become destroyed, leaving teeth loose or in need to be removed.

However, the story does not stop here. Research also shows that chronic gum disease can trigger an inflammatory response, resulting in cardiovascular disease; this occurs through atherosclerosis, which is the process where arteries become hardened. Thus, the sugar in the junk food that is consumed not only affects the oral cavity, specifically the bones surrounding teeth, but can lead to unhealthy consequences for the heart as well.

It is important to keep in mind that the body is comprised of many interconnected parts. Do not hold the misconception that damage done to one area of the body is contained in only that region. Poor oral health choices can result in issues concerning other areas in the body. On the same token, consuming teeth-friendly foods not only is beneficial for the oral cavity but can also be favorable for the rest of the body.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202105301.htm

http://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/bad-foods-teeth

Saliva, a Potential Player In Detecting Systemic Diseases?

December 2nd, 2013

Through a lifetime, saliva proves to be integral for the breakdown and digestion of foods that are consumed. This watery liquid keeps the mouth moist and comfortable, while fighting germs in the mouth. Because of its proteins and minerals, teeth, specifically tooth enamel, is fortified and protected from tooth decay. Saliva has had a consistent function in the maintenance of good oral health, but researchers are now finding that it may have a significant role in revealing systemic diseases.

 

A group at the University of California Los Angeles School of Dentistry has been looking at biological markers derived from saliva that could potential test for the presence of stomach cancer and other deadly diseases. Dr. David Wong, the head of this five-year project, has high hopes of detecting cancer cells through capturing extracellular RNA, an important player in the production of proteins. The researchers hope to develop a method for using saliva to detect life-threatening diseases, such as pancreatic, breast and ovarian cancers. Currently, Dr. Wong’s team initially disordered salivary extracellular molecules and have strong evidence for detecting oral cancer with the biological markers they have created. The team also has successfully developed salivary extracellular RNA biomarkers for diseases such as salivary gland tumors and Sjögren’s syndrome.

 

While this research team continues to look for ways to genetically screen for these cancers, dentists have been able to start the process in detecting these systemic diseases during an oral exam. The initial symptoms of many diseases appear in the mouth. Diabetes, for example, is a complex disease that surprisingly shows many symptoms in the oral cavity. Thrush is an oral infection in the mouth that thrives when there are increased levels of blood glucose found in the saliva, which is an indication of diabetes. Dry mouth is another indicator of this disease, decreasing the production of saliva, leading to mouth soreness and tooth decay. Diabetes also increases the time for wound healing, which can be observed after an invasive dental procedure.  Saliva and the oral cavity as a whole continue to reveal much about an individual’s oral health simply through a check up. It is crucial to consistently make appointments with the dentist both to ensure good oral health and to screen for signs of systemic disease. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-09-Saliva-May-Hold-Key-To-Detecting-Deadly-Diseases-In-The-Body.cvsp

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2674509/

http://www.richmondinstitute.com/salivary-diagnostics-in-dentistry-and-medicine

 

Mealey, B. 2000. Diabetes and periodontal disease. Journal of Periodontology 71(4):664-678.

 


Limited Knowledge of Cancers Caused by Smoking

July 16th, 2012

A study conducted in the UK found that more than 80% of people are ignorant to the types of cancers caused by smoking. The survey examined over 4,000 people.

Most people knew of the obvious cancers caused by smoking, such as oral, lung and esophageal, but a large number didn't know it is linked to cancers of the kidney, stomach, and bladder. Cigarette smoke itself contains numerous chemicals that are distributed throughout the bloodstream when inhaled.

What's alarming is that people know smoking is dangerous but still continue to do it for whatever reason. Nearly half of all smokers who smoke for a long period of time will die from either cancer or other illnesses brought on by this habit. You can read the article in full here.

Drs. Ali and Ali urge all of their patients who are smokers to consider quitting. Smoking increases the risk of oral cancer and many other related problems dramatically. Contact us today to learn more about how smoking impacts your oral health at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

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