p. gingivalis

Tooth Decay -Genetic or Environmental?

September 4th, 2019

It’s easy to blame somethings on our parents, but recent research shows that you shouldn’t blame tooth decay on genetics. In the past it has been thought that our risk of developing cavities is similar to our family members. However, more research is showing that tooth decay boils down mainly to environmental factors rather than genetics. Although we can’t just easily point to our parents when we develop a cavity, this can be a good thing because tooth decay is largely preventable! Take a look at what influences your risk of tooth decay and how you can prevent it:

Interestingly enough, we are made up of good bacteria that help us survive. However, some of the bacteria found within the mouth can feed on sugars within the foods we eat and lead to tooth decay. These bacteria produce acids that wear down our tooth enamel and create what we all dread and know to be cavities. These bacteria often come after birth, and with more research specific bacteria are being found to play a role in creating cavities. While some bacteria we do inherit from our parents, others that have been linked to causing dental cavities are not found to be associated with genetics, including Streptococcus mutants, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The study conducted by the J. Craig Venter Institute in Maryland evaluated 485 pairs of identical and fraternal twins within the age range of 5 to 11 years old. When analyzing the study participants’ dental plaque and bacteria present within the mouth, they found that environmental factors played a significant role in the type of bacteria present that were associated with causing tooth decay. The bacteria responsible for causing tooth decay were mainly due to factors including diet and home care dental habits such as brushing and flossing. However, family history is important when looking at risks of tooth decay, for instance similar food diets shared between family members could increase or lower the risk of tooth decay.

What you may be able to blame genes for is the development of teeth. Such as the relationship between your teeth when biting together, the timing in which your teeth first appear, or even the size of teeth (macrodontia or microdontia).

So, while somethings you may get away with being able to blame your parents for, tooth decay is largely in part influenced by environmental factors. This is why it’s extremely important to get regular dental check-ups, and practice good oral hygiene care to ensure that your teeth are healthy and lasting lifetime!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.ameritasinsight.com/wellness/dental/mouth-bacteria-bad-teeth

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Bacteria's Pathway from Mouth to Brain

February 9th, 2019

It's very reasonable to think that gum disease will only impact your gums, and therefore only cause issues within your mouth. But, surprisingly, the bacteria associated with chronic gum disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), has been found in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

At the University of Louisville School of Dentistry, researchers found more convincing evidence on the association between  P. gingivalis with the development of Alzheimer's disease. They also found that a molecular therapy designed to potentially attack bad pathogens involved in Alzheimer's disease is also linked with periodontitis, a more severe form of gum disease. When studying animals, it was found that P. gingivalis found orally ended up colonizing the brain and increased the production of amyloid beta plaques that are commonly found in people with Alzheimer's disease. In addition, it was found that P. gingivalis releases a toxic enzyme known as gingipains into the neurons of people affected by Alzheimer's disease. Interestly, the researchers designed a molecule to block the harmful gingipains, which led to less P. gingivalis within the brain, a blockage of the production of amyloid beta plaques, less neuroinflammation, and a protective effect against neurons within the hippocampus, which is the part of the brain that is involved with memory. The research team is working on further research and clinical trials to determine a causal relationship between P. gingivalis and morbidity of Alzheimer's disease.

To maintain a healthy body it is thus imperative that our mouths remain healthy as well. There has been strong evidence linking bacteria within the mouth that can cause inflammation and damage systemically throughout the body. Gum disease can be prevented by keeping routine good oral hygiene habits.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/01/190123165002.htm

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Connection Between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

June 27th, 2015

 

It's no doubt that oral health is a window to overall health. There is a significant amount of research linking common oral problems to heart disease, diabetes, pneumoniaAlzheimer’s disease, and now rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints, which typically causes pain and stiffness. There is increasing interest in the relationship between oral health and inflammatory diseases. A recent study conducted in March of 2015 suggests that periodontitis, a type of inflammatory disease affecting the supportive structures of the teeth (such as bones and tissues), along with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and may trigger the development of rheumatoid arthritis.The study titled "Inflammation in the Mouth and Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis," was presented at the 93rd General Session and Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research. The study examined 8 chronic RA patients, 15 onset RA patients, and 20 individuals with neither periodontitis nor RA. Of the total 23 RA patients, 10 had gingivitis and 9 had periodontitis. In addition, 6 of the individuals with both periodontitis and RA also had P. gingivalis, a strain of bacterium in the oral cavity that is typically associated with the cause of periodontal disease.

Researchers also found that regardless of dental care, all RA patients showed oral inflammation. They suggest that P. gingivalis antibodies may help rheumatologists in distinguishing RA patients who may benefit from periodontal treatment.

Both RA and periodontal disease are similar in many ways. Smoking is a common risk factor of RA and periodontal disease and should be avoided. individuals with RA have a higher risk of developing periodontal disease and may experience more severe symptoms.

It is clear that inflammation and oral bacteria may go hand-in-hand. Take good care of your teeth, it can ultimately save your joints!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150312123526.htm

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Finding the Bacterial Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gum Disease

September 16th, 2013

Over the years, researchers have been able to demonstrate the importance of oral health in relation to systemic, or overall, health. Keeping up with oral hygiene has been shown to not only affect the oral cavity, but also various areas in the body. Oral health has been linked to the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and various other conditions. Researchers have been well aware of the strong association between oral health and these health conditions, but continue to look into the root cause and mechanisms that result in these links.

 

However, a research group at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry Oral Health and Systemic Diseases recently published their findings in PloS Pathogens, revealing the bacterium that is responsible for periodontal disease.  They found that the bacterium, Prophromonas gingivalis, leads to a faster progression of gum disease, increasing cartilage and bone destruction. Their research indicated that P. gingivalis produces an enzyme, peptidylarginine deiminanse (PAD), which increases collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). This enzyme makes the body believe that there are intruding proteins within the body, inducing an immune attack. This results in chronic inflammation, which accounts for the weakening of bone and cartilage within the joints.

 

This research group was able to show that there is a viable link between P. gingivalis periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis; however, more research needs to be done to verify these finds. Hopefully further research can bring about new strategies to prevent RA. These studies also should encourage individuals to maintain good oral hygiene. It is always important to keep in mind that brushing and flossing not only keeps the mouth clean, but also keeps the entire body healthy. Please feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130912203327.htm

http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/how-bad-gums-lead-to-arthritis/81248849/

http://arthritisbroadcastnetwork.org/2013/09/gum-disease-may-be-an-indication-of-rheumatoid-arthritis/

 

 

 

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