pacifier

How to Protect "Buck Teeth"

August 28th, 2019

We all try to play it safe and keep our teeth protected and healthy, but sometimes traumatic dental injuries can be inevitable, particularly for children. From sports activities to just having some good-ole fun playing outside, accidents can happen and hurt your little one’s teeth. Sadly, not only can it be traumatic for your little one, but it can also be costly. The risk of dental trauma is specifically increased for children with teeth that protrude outwards. This is often known as, “buck teeth.” Due to the positioning of the teeth, the teeth often extend beyond the protective lip, which can make their teeth more susceptible to injuries. Take a look at the latest research on protruding teeth and what you can do to help prevent damaging them:

According to a recent study performed at the University of Adelaide in Australia, a connection was found between the degree of protrusion of children’s teeth and risk of damaging teeth. The study analyzed 50,000 children under the age of 19 years old. The study concluded that kids up to the age of six years old with teeth protruding over 3 mm are three times as likely to suffer with dental trauma than kids without protruding teeth. In addition, they found that kids over the age of six with teeth protruding greater than 5 mm are twice as likely to experience dental trauma.

Great news is that this risk can be reduced! Regular dental check-ups are extrememly important for your child to help lower the chance of developing long-term dental issues. Protruding teeth can be caused by numerous things. This includes negative oral habits such as thumb-sucking, longterm pacifier use, and tongue-thrusting. Genetics may also play a role in the alignment of teeth. Your dentist can analyze the relationship of your teeth and come up with the right treatment options to help prevent their harm. Orthodontic treatment may be necessary to help correct protruding teeth. Also, be sure that your child always wears a properly fitting mouth guard when playing sports to help prevent dental trauma.

Remember, prevention is key! If teeth are knocked out or injured at an early stage, this can cause extra dental procedures including root canals or even extractions.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/05/190514090100.htm

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/cosmetic-dentistry/adult-orthodontics/buck-teeth-causes-0516-

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maloclussion_jmetio.jpg

Beware of BPA: Found to Damage Tooth Enamel

January 12th, 2014

girl looking in the mirrorThere has been much talk about the dangers of ingesting BPA through plastic sippy cups and even water bottles that we bring on the go. BPA, also known as bisphenol A, is a chemical found in hard plastics of food and drink containers and acts in a similar way to estrogen, and other hormones in the body.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had originally deemed BPA to be a safe substance, but recent studies have shown that this chemical has lead to disruption of normal hormone levels, possible brain and behavior problems in infants and young children, and an increased risk of cancer and heart problems.

Recently, researchers have tied enamel damage to early exposure to BPA. A team led by Ariane Berdal of the Universite Paris-Derot showed that rats that have been treated daily with low doses of BPA resulted in damaged enamel. The rats were observed during a 30-day development window where researchers exposed the rats to the doses of BPA. The earliest observations founds on the rats were white marks found on their incisors. On a macroscopic level, the teeth with white marks were found to have fragile and brittle BPA. On a microscopic level, the enamel showed a decreased level of crucial minerals, the teeth were more susceptible to cavities.

The damage found on the teeth of these rats is comparable to damaged tooth enamel found in 18% of children between the ages of 6 and 8. These researchers believe that enamel damage is another effect of BPA damage to the body. It is important to check products for a “BPA-free” label before they are bought. While the FDA has cracked down on plastics containing, be cautious when buying baby bottles, sippy cups, baby formula cans, and other products for young children. Our pediatric dentist, Dr. Pradhan and Drs. Ali & Ali at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

Resources:

http://children.webmd.com/environmental-exposure-head2toe/bpa

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130610133246.htm

http://www.voanews.com/content/bpa-teeth-13jun13/1681088.html

I’m pregnant! But what about oral health?

July 24th, 2013

During pregnancy, women tend to look towards an overall healthier way of living. Many primarily seek out medical professionals that can keep them on track with a good diet and care for the coming baby. However, many expecting mothers tend to put oral health on the back burner during pregnancy.

 

It is highly recommended that good oral health be maintained before, during and after pregnancy. Pregnancy is known to kick start hormonal changes that can increase the risk of gum disease, which can in turn affect the coming baby. Because dental procedures have the potential of influencing the baby’s growth and development, it is recommended that mothers should avoid dental treatments during critical times for the baby, notably the first trimester and second half of the third trimester. But, routine dental care can be done on mothers in their second trimester. This also means that expecting mothers should be extra careful in keeping up with good oral hygiene during these critical stages of pregnancy.

 

It is important to keep the dentist informed of all the drugs that are taken during pregnancy; this can range from medications and even prenatal vitamins that have been prescribed. Dentists can potential modify the dental treatment plan based off of the drugs that are ingested. There are key drugs, including tetracycline, which can influence the expecting child’s teeth and should be avoided during pregnancy.

 

With these pointers in mind, it is essential to understand that being pregnant does not mean that it is a ticket out of a dental appointment. In fact, it should be more of a reason to make a visit to the dentist. Regular gum exams are very important during this time, for hormonal changes increase the risk of periodontal disease. It is important to pay close attention to any changes in the gums, whether there are signs of swelling or even bleeding.

 

The months of pregnancy can be both an exciting and stressful time, but with proper maintenance of both oral and overall systemic health, expecting mothers are then set on a path to a smoother pregnancy.  If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-care-pregnancy

 

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=h&iid=325&aid=1309

 

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/forthedentalpatient_may_2011.pdf

 

Bleeding Gums: What Can This Mean?

July 23rd, 2013

When the topic of oral health is brought up, the focus is usually placed on teeth and the possibility of getting cavities. However, there is definitely more to the mouth! Gums can be a good indicator of oral health as well as one’s overall health! Individuals may find that after brushing their gums may look red and they may even start bleeding. Many tend to dismiss these signs and just attribute them to good and thorough brushing. But wait! This is not the case.

First things first, there is a misconception that to get clean teeth, brushing needs to be done vigorously to get all the grime off. While afterwards your teeth may feel clean, your gums are not too pleased.

Remember: gums are made of soft tissue and when aggravated they can become sore and red. When choosing a toothbrush, it is important to opt for soft nylon bristle with blunt ends. Stores may carry brushes with medium or hard bristles; however they may damage the enamel on teeth and can cause swollen gums. The idea of being gentle goes the same for flossing. The goal of flossing is to remove leftover food and plaque stuck between teeth; it does not mean these particles need to be forcefully taken out. It is important to refrain from forcing the floss in between teeth; instead, carefully slide the floss up and down, following the curve of each tooth.

Aside from proper brushing and flossing, bleeding gums is actually a sign of gum disease. When proper dental hygiene is not practiced, bacteria takes over and plaque starts forming. The same bacteria that jumpstarts the formation of cavities as makes gums irritated and swollen. Bleeding gums is an early sign of gum disease, also know as gingivitis, and symptoms can be reversed with good oral hygiene. But if these symptoms are ignored, gingivitis can get worse, eventually leading to tooth loss. Be on the lookout for these symptoms:

- deep pockets between teeth and gums
- changes in the way teeth come together
- gums that bleed during/after toothbrushing
- shifting teeth
- red, swollen, tender gums

If you experience these symptoms, be sure to set up an appointment with the dentist to determine the necessary steps to keep these symptoms from getting worse. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/gum-problem-basics-sore-swollen-and-bleeding-gums

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003062.htm

http://www.medicinenet.com/gum_problems/article.htm

Read more at http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=4564http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=3457

Stick with Mussels: they can help strengthen and rebuild teeth!

July 19th, 2013

Good news for all you seafood lovers out there. The Journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces have found something very special about mussels’ adhesive nature. Not only does it let these creatures hold fast to rocks in the ocean, researchers have found that they also can be beneficial for teeth.

Quan-Li Li, Chun Hung Chu, and other researchers noted that there are three out of four people who have teeth sensitive to hot, cold, sweet or sour foods and drinks. These scientists were determined to look for ways to rebuild enamel and dentin, which are important factors that determine tooth sensitivity. They found that mussel’s natural adhesive, which allows them to attach to rocks, can be a synthetic substance used to reform the eroded enamel and dentin. They worked under the hypothesis that the sticky substance in mussels would have the ability to keep essential minerals in contact with dentin long enough for reformation to occur.

In 2011, an international team of scientists that mussel’s adhesive proved to be a successful alternative to other coatings used in teeth. While most coatings tend to make teeth weak and brittle over time, the synthetic coating created from mussel adhesive had the ability to heal itself when damaged. The researchers also found that minerals in other coatings were only able to reform enamel while the synthetic adhesive was able to reform both enamel and dentin. Phil Messersmith of Northwestern University have taken into account mussels’ incredible adhesive properties and have created a polymer used in coating that can mend tears in just a matter of minutes!

While these scientists continue to incorporate this newfound adhesive to the clinical setting, there are still ways to battle sensitive teeth. Doctors continue to recommend that individuals practice good oral hygiene (brushing twice a day and making sure to floss carefully). Those with sensitive teeth can also be extra careful when consuming acidic foods such as juices, vinegar in salad dressings and soft drinks. A good way to protect teeth is to rinse the mouth with water after consuming these foods. Teeth grinding can also leave teeth susceptible to sensitivity; ask the dentist about a mouth guard for nighttime use to prevent teeth grinding.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

Sensodyne on sensitive teeth
ACS journal website
Science Daily website
Yahoo Health
http://www.empowher.com/dental-amp-oral-health/content/sticking-mussels-beneficial-sensitive-teeth

Safety First: Protecting Your Teeth in Sports

July 18th, 2013

When people go out for a game of basketball or soccer, many don’t usually think about teeth. Dentists recall numerous stories where patients have come in with chipped or even missing teeth due to an intense game on the court. In order children and a

dults, sports injuries tend to be common. It has been estimated that 13-39% of dental-related injuries happen when an individual is engaged in sports. About 80% of the injuries are located in the front teeth or even the tongue and cheek. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recognizes high rate of sports-related dental injuries in today’s youth and continues to look for means for prevention. 

Even if an individual takes one to the mouth and ends up with a missing tooth, a dentist is able to save the tooth. Cracks and chips in tooth can be repaired through using tooth-colored materials that are just as strong as the original tooth. Although dentists can easily come to the rescue, these injuries can turn out to be pretty serious and procedures are not a small cost. Dentists have strongly recommended the use of mouth guards for football players. With this movement, mouth guards have been able to prevent about 200,000 injuries annually.

There are various means of protection when playing a sport. Here are two types of protection that are recommended:

Mouth guards: like it was previously mentioned, mouth guards have done a great job in protecting sports players. They can prevent injury to one’s teeth, tongue and lips. Dentists tend to recommend athletes to get a custom-fit mouth guard; however, individuals can opt for ready-made mouth guards that can be found in sporting-goods stores.

Helmets
: people usually do not think that protecting their head means protecting their teeth as well. As a matter of fact, helmets are very effective in protecting both the head and the oral cavity in high speed and impact sports. These sports usually include hockey, football, bike riding, and skating. It is important to note that there are helmets specially made for a certain sport. When purchasing a helmet, be sure to check and see if the helmet fits correctly.

Sports are definitely a healthy way to distress and have some fun. But make sure that safety is first! If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

http://www.aapd.org/m

edia/Policies_Guidelines/P_Sports.pdf

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Dental-Emergencies/Sports-Safety/article/Sports-Safety-Avoiding-Tooth-and-Mouth-Injuries.cvsp

http://www.ada.org/news/6955.aspx

General and Oral Health Benefits of Breastfeeding

July 16th, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement back in 2012 stating that breastfeeding and the use of human milk have show to reduce health risks for infants, children, and mothers, also including advantages such as developmental, nutritional, immunological, and psychological benefits. The APP exclaims that breast milk is the best nutrient source for babies. It contains immunological agents, including secretory immunoglobulin (g) A and IgG, along with anti-inflammatory properties that act as protection for the infant’s immune system.

Researchers found that compared to formula-fed children, children who were breast-fed had a lower risk of diarrhea by coating intestinal lining and killing dangerous pathogens that leave babies prone to infection. Breast milk also combats severe lower respiratory infections, including pneumonia and virus bronchiolitis; a child’s risk of developing asthma is also reduced. The immunological and anti-inflammatory properties of breast milk controls to onset of infection and illnesses, reducing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Breastfed-children are also less likely to develop obesity, which is a prevalent disease that 12.5 million children and teens suffer from today. Breastfeeding helps protect against obesity by improving self-regulation of energy intake and recognizing when one is full. On top of these general health benefits, breast-fed children showed better occlusion, where their top and bottom teeth came together more favorably.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) suggests that parents should clean infants’ gums even if they do not have teeth. Parents can use a soft washcloth to clean the gums. The AAPD also recommends that breastfeeding should be exclusive for about the first six months of life; this should continue past six months with the gradual introduction of foods fit for the baby. If you have any concerns our pediatric dentist Dr. Pradhan, and Drs. Ali & Ali at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/2/143.full.pdf+html

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/2/143.short?rss=1&%3bssource=mfr

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gina-ciagne/how-to-become-a-healthier_b_697162.html

Sweet (But-Teeth Friendly) Desserts

June 18th, 2013

It’s summer time! The school year is finally winding down, and we are excited to make are way down to the beach and enjoy some time out in the sun. Summer also brings ice cream, popsicles, cotton candy, and a whole bunch of food that may be delicious, but are also definitely not doing your teeth a favor.

Every grocery store is bound to have a section of an aisle dedicated to frozen desserts, which can range from strawberry ice cream to jolly rancher-flavored popsicles. Your taste buds may think it’s an excellent idea to grab a few on the go, but your teeth will beg to differ. Popsicles tend to have high sugar content, which will leave teeth susceptible to cavities and tooth decay. These frozen sweets also contain artificial coloring dye, which has been shown to contain carcinogens and maybe contribute Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Instead of getting a pack of popsicles from the grocery store, here are some healthy and enjoyable alternatives.

Smoothies: Milk shakes tend to be a summer favorite after a long soccer practice. While they do contain dairy, which is wonderful for teeth, they also contain lots of sugar, which is wonderful for bacteria in the mouth, not so much for teeth. Bacteria love feeding on sugary residue left in the mouth, and definitely won’t hold back when they are offered a ton from milk shakes. Instead of making a trip to the local diner, start the blender and add in some low-fat milk, yogurt, bananas, strawberries, and blueberries. A yummy smoothie will result, chock full of calcium, antioxidants, and vitamins. Homemade smoothies will allow you to control the amount of sugar that goes into the drink, and sweet and healthy fruit will do just the trick! Here’s a quick and easy recipe (link: http://bit.ly/16upE68) that will satisfy sweet-tooths but will keep teeth happy.

Yogurt Pops: Yogurt, cheese, milk and other dairy products are great saliva generators, protecting teeth from tooth decay. Calcium and phosphates found in milk and other dairy products can put minerals back in teeth, making them healthy and stronger. Here’s ( http://bit.ly/112tASF ) a great recipe for these delicious pops that will make the kids wanting more!

Remember: Desserts can be delicious and healthy at the same time; there’s always great foods out there that are also a treat for teeth as well. Here’s to a summer of healthy choices and yummy eats! If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/rachelhennessey/2012/08/27/living-in-color-the-potential-dangers-of-artificial-dyes/

The Link Between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

June 13th, 2013

26 million adults are known to be affected by diabetes. Statistics show that 1 out of 10 healthcare dollars are spent on diabetes. The link between periodontal disease and diabetes has been extensively studied over the past 50 years. There is strong evidence that diabetes is a risk factor for periodontitis and gingivitis. A study dating back to more than 30 years ago has already shown that children suffering from type 1 diabetes had a higher prevalence of gingival inflammation. Ervasti et al. examined patients with gingival bleeding and determined that there was greater amount of bleeding in patients with poorly controlled diabetes when compared to subjects that do not have diabetes and subjects with well-controlled diabetes. Research has also shown that types with type 2 diabetes also tend to have more gingival inflammation than the control group in the study.

Studies also show that the risk of developing periodontitis is increased when one has diabetes. Teenagers with type 1 diabetes have been found to be five times more likely to develop periodontitis. Research also supports the idea that there may be more bone loss linked to adults with diabetes. Subjects suffering from type 2 diabetes are three times more likely to develop periodontitis compared to subjects without diabetes.

Doctors were able to pinpoint the root cause of this relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. There is a protein known as the c-reactive protein (CRP), which is found in the blood stream. CRP levels rise with inflammation of blood vessels, which has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Researchers have also shown that CRP is continuously produced in the presence of periodontal diseases. It is important to note that an individual cannot keep diabetes under control if he or she is also suffering from periodontal disease. It is absolutely crucial that diabetic patients maintain good oral health to keep CRP at bay.

Periodontal disease can affect your general health; read more here.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! They can assess the risk of periodontal disease and if need be our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi, can help.Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

Cianciola L, Park B, Bruck E, Mosovich L, Genco R. Prevalence of periodontal disease
in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (juvenile diabetes). JADA
1982;104(5):653-60.

Ervasti L, Knuuttila M, Pohjamo L, Haukipuro K. Relation between control of
diabetes and gingival bleeding. J Periodontol 1985;56(3):154-7.

http://www.diabetes.org/news-research/research/access-diabetes-research/greenfield-protein.html

http://www.ada.org/sections/professionalResources/pdfs/Perio_diabetes.pdf

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Can playing a musical instrument effect oral health?

June 11th, 2013

It has been widely accepted that playing a musical instrument can increase and nourish intelligence in children, but playing a used instrument can be a health risk as well.

General Dentistry published a clinical study that revealed that woodwind and brass instruments that have been previously used were found to be ridden with various bacteria and fungi some that have been linked to serious infectious and allergic diseases, which can further lead to conditions such as mouth breathing. Click here to read more about mouth breathing. Children who are involved with their school band or orchestra typically rent their instrument for over the course of the year. These instruments have already been played by other students and without proper cleaning, bacteria an fungi have been indubitably thriving in the instrument. The same growth has been seen in dentures, athletic mouth guards, and tooth brushes.

In the clinical study, 117 instrumental pieces, including mouthpieces, internal chambers, and cases were tested on 13 previously used instruments. There were 442 different bacteria found on the instruments, along with 58 molds and 19 yeasts. Mold can lead to the increased likelihood of developing asthma, while yeasts found on the instruments can lead to skin infections around the mouth and lips. These bacteria, fungi, mold, and yeast that are presence on these instruments are highly resistant to the antibiotics that are normally prescribed, which highlights the importance of sterilizing instruments that have been previously played. It is essential to wipe areas that come in contact with the skin and mouth frequently. Instruments should be cleaned on a regular basis with cleaning cloths and solution.

If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/142/5/490.3.fullv

The Importance for Teens to Balance a Fast-Paced Life and Oral Health

June 10th, 2013

Once that alarm starts going off in the morning, teens are on a jam-packed schedule, shuffling through classes, extracurricular activities, and sometimes even part-time jobs. In order to keep up with the pace, teens often make a grab for quick meals in form of carbonated beverages and “nutrition bars” to keep them on edge and alert for all of their obligations; however, this kind of lifestyle may leave teens with permanent damage to oral and overall health.

In a 2003 issue of General Dentistry, studies have shown that teens that constantly indulge in sugary drinks can result in premature loss of tooth enamel and the weakening of overall tooth structure. While research has deemed carbonated beverages and energy drinks detrimental for oral health, these sugary drinks can also affect overall bone growth in teens. Read more here. Adolescence is the known time period of optimal bone growth, when more nutrient-packed calories are necessary to fuel growing bodies and to strengthen teeth and bones. These calories tend to be counteracted when teens continue to take in high-carbohydrate foods, which are instead replacing healthy foods such as milk, vegetables, and fruits.

Reports have shown that these beverages are the main causes of increases cavities and obesity in teens today. Unfortunately, researchers expect obesity to remain a major issue as more pre-school-aged children continue to become more addicted to caffeine and sugar. The various acids found in sodas and energy drinks breakdown tooth enamel around cavity sealants and previously done restorations, which leads to more necessary dental treatment to prevent tooth loss.

Phosphoric acid in many carbonated drinks limits calcium absorption, influencing body density. By age 16, girls have acquired 90-96% of their bone mass, making adequate calcium intake extremely important. However, national statistics indicate that only 19% of girls ages 9-19 are receiving the recommended 1,3000 mg of calcium per day. The lack of calcium intake indubitably affects bone structure of the mouth, which can lead to complications such as periodontal bone loss.

While it is important for teens to work hard and strive to do their best, it is just as essential for them to watch what they consume and maintain a healthy lifestyle. If you have more questions, be sure to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=T&iid=333&aid=1335
http://www.healthywomen.org/condition/oral-health

Pacifiers:Do They Boost or Weaken Your Child’s Health?

June 7th, 2013

Many parents have been taught that sharing utensils or sucking on pacifiers to clean them can help a child build immunity. The journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics has even published a study detailing the immunological benefits of adult saliva. However there has been much debate about whether parents should follow this rule of thumb.

The American Dental Association (ADA) was quick to follow up this study with their respond, explaining that this may not be a good idea. ADA noted that the adult saliva contains a whole host of microorganisms that may be harmful to a child health. The transfer of saliva may end up increasing a baby’s chance of developing tooth decay in the future. Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, who is a spokesperson for the ADA, points to Streptococcus mutans as a bacteria present in adult saliva that my end up doing some serious damage to teeth.

However, there are others that continue to support the American Academy of Pediatrics. While they understand the risks of being more susceptible to bacteria, proponents of adult saliva transfer believe that should not be the main concern at hand. It has been argued that certain adults may not even have these harmful microorganisms present in their oral cavity. What should be priority is parents’ responsibility to provide good oral hygiene for their child. These dentists argue that no matter what, babies will continue to be exposed to different harmful microorganisms, whether it Is from what they consume or touch throughout the day. The key to limiting the progression of child tooth decay is to keep up with proper oral care. Parents need to be reminded of the importance of proper brushing, rinsing, and flossing for their child. Dentists believe that this aspect of oral health takes precedent over staying away from microorganisms that can harm the child.

Our pediatric Dentist, Dr. Pradhan, will more than willing to take care of your child's dental needs. Also, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts, questions,or concerns; they will be happy to answer them! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ada.org/news/8582.aspx

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/04/30/peds.2012-3345

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/260144.php

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