permanent teeth

Sleep Apnea and Permanent Tooth Extraction

April 12th, 2016

sleep

Sleep apnea is common condition that can lead to trouble sleeping and cause tiredness throughout the day even after a full night's rest. Individuals with sleep apnea experience one or more pauses in breathing during their sleep that can last from seconds to minutes. Aside from excessive daytime sleepiness, signs of sleep apnea also include dry mouth, headache, and snoring, just to name a few.

Research has found that sleep apnea may increase the risk of of high blood pressure, heart problems, stroke, obesity, and diabetes, and the chance of getting into a car accident.

So, you may be wondering how this condition plays a role in dentistry. Some studies suggest that getting teeth extracted for braces can increase one's risk for developing sleep apnea.Orthodontic treatment is the perfect solution to correcting crowded teeth, protruding teeth, gapped teeth, and jaw problems. For well over 50 years and still today, dentists have debated the treatment of extracting permanent teeth for orthodontic treatment. Some dentists extract permanent teeth because it's easier to create more space between teeth, while others use alternative methods, such as palate expansion or headgear to correct one's smile.

Some argue that pre-orthodontic tooth extraction makes the jaw narrower and forces the tongue to lay further back into the mouth and restrict the airway. Also, some believe that extractions can lead to changes in one's facial appearance and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). TMD is a condition that results in oral issues including chewing problems and jaw pain. However, further research is needed because it is unclear whether these notions are actually the case.

Others counter these arguments and claim that the jaw doesn't necessarily become narrowed and can even become widened depending on various factors. In addition, some argue that extractions can be beneficial for individuals with lip strain or thin gums.

Studies observing patients who've had teeth extracted for orthodontic treatment are inclusive in their findings. These studies often only offer a limited assessment of the patient's airway to see what's actually occurring.  Two studies of patients found no change in the pharyngeal airway as well as a third study.  However, three other studies found a reduction in the airway size of some patients. Researchers believe that the difference in findings could be due to racial differences in the response of the airway to movement of the teeth.

Overall, its unclear whether or not extractions lead to sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a complex condition and further research is needed to explain its association with permanent tooth extractions. If you feel that you are excessively sleepy during the day you may want to contact a sleep specialist so that they can conduct a sleep study. If you are in need of any orthodontic treatment or have questions regarding permanent tooth extractions,  Dr. Emad is happy to help. Dr. Emad Abdallah is a faculty member at Tufts Craniofacial Pain Center.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea

http://www.naturalhealingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/iStock_000002751438Medium.jpg

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24963245

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20677956

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24963245

 

Abnormal Tooth Enamel: Amelogenesis Imperfecta

March 17th, 2016

 enamelAmelogenesis imperfecta is an inherited disorder in which tooth enamel forms abnormally. As a result, individuals with this condition are at a higher risk of developing cavities. It typically causes teeth to be smaller than usual, discolored, grooved, easily damaged, among other dental problems that can vary by the individual. Secondary effects could be early tooth loss, periodontal disease, tooth sensitivity, and jaw problems.

Unfortunately, Amelogenesis imperfecta can negatively impact both primary teeth and permanent teeth. Around 14 forms of this condition have been determined by researchers. It has also been found to affect approximately 1 in 700 people in northern Sweden to 1 in 14,000 people in the United States.

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Many cases of Amelogenesis imperfecta are a result of mutations in the AMELX, ENAM, MMP20, and FAM83H genes, which are normally responsible for making proteins essential for normal tooth and enamel development (ameloblastin, enamelin, tuftelin and amelogenin). Tooth enamel is a hard outer layer rich in calcium that functions to protect the tooth. As a result of a mutation, tooth enamel becomes thin and weaker than normal, and may even appear yellow or brown in color. The genetic causes of other cases have not yet been identified.

This condition can be inherited in both an autosomal dominant pattern and autosomal recessive pattern. In an autosomal dominant pattern, once copy of the mutated gene in each cell can cause Amelogenesis imperfecta. An autosomal recessive pattern involves two mutated copies of the gene in each cell. Researchers found that around 5 percent of amelogenesis imperfecta cases are due to mutations in the AMELX gene and are inherited in an X-linked pattern. They also found that males with X-linked amelogenesis imperfecta have more severe dental problems than females with this form of the condition.

Preventive and restorative dental treatments can help make teeth impacted by this condition look normal and remain healthy. Full crown restorations are often used to treat this disorder. For severe cases, teeth may have to be extracted and implants or dentures may be required. If you feel like you have Amelogenesis imperfecta or any other enamel conditions, our very Dr. Ejaz Ali is an expert at fixing the issue, bringing the teeth back to ideal form, function, and esthetic. Dr. Ali was trained at Tufts School of Dental Medicine, and also did additional training at New York University’s in “Full Mouth Reconstruction: Advanced Principles and Practice for the GP” with special focus on Implants, Aesthetics, and Occlusion.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

National Children's Dental Health Month 2015

February 2nd, 2015

The month of February marks National Children’s Dental Health Month! Sponsored by the American Dental Association (ADA), this celebration is the perfect time for children to learn about the importance of oral health as their teeth start to grow. Tooth decay is the #1 childhood disease around the world! Surprisingly, more than 51 million school hours are lost each year in the United States due to children missing school for dental-related problems. The good news is that it's preventable with proper oral health habits!

The campaign slogan this year is, "Defeat Monster Mouth!" The ADA provides many free resources, including games, puzzles, cool coloring sheets and posters for a wide range of age groups that can help in promoting the advantages of practicing good oral health habits.

According to the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD), childhood caries can lead to malnutrition and life-threatening infections. In addition, poor oral health habits not only affect children's teeth and smile, but also their school performance, social development, and overall health. Dental health plays a major role in maintaining overall health, making it extremely important to take care of  your children’s teeth and initiate healthy habits early.

Although primary teeth eventually are replaced by permanent teeth, maintaining them is particularly important to your child's oral health and the health of the developing permanent teeth. Primary teeth can impact your child's speech development and facial structure by ensuring permanent teeth develop in their normal positions.  Although baby teeth are eventually replaced with permanent teeth, it is essential to keep them healthy.

Make oral health fun, and remember, children learn by example! As we celebrate this month and throughout the year, encourage children to drink water, brush at least twice a day, floss, rinse, and practice good oral health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van Orenstein. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.ada.org/en/public-programs/national-childrens-dental-health-month/

http://www.redbluffdailynews.com/lifestyle/20150128/month-celebrates-childrens-dental-health

http://www.ncohf.org/resources/tooth-decay-facts

http://dustina.pbworks.com/f/1296782963/diverse%20children.jpg

Is There Such a Thing as Too Much Fluoride?

January 28th, 2015

Fluoride is a mineral that occurs naturally in water and many foods. It can also be applied to teeth through several dental products. Fluoride helps protect teeth from developing cavities by making the tooth more resistant to acids from plaque bacteria in the mouth. It also helps reverse early stages of tooth decay.

Fluoride intake is critical for infants and children between the ages of 6 months and 16 years, when primary and permanent teeth are developing. It is also beneficial for adults.

Intuitively, it may seem like the more fluoride, the better! However, this is not the case! Too much fluoride, particularly in young children can be damaging to tooth enamel. It can lead to a tooth discoloration called dental fluorosis.

Children 8 years of age and younger, when permanent teeth are forming underneath the gums, are at risk of dental fluorosis. Once permanent teeth have come in fully, fluoride will no longer cause dental fluorosis. Although fluorosis can be cosmetically treated, the stains left by fluorosis are permanent and may darken over time.

But how bad is it really? Dentists have rated the severity of fluorosis using the following degrees:

  • Questionable: The enamel may show a few white spots or lines.
  • Very mild: Less than 25% of the tooth surface is affected by small opaque white spots.
  • Mild: Less than 50% of the tooth surface is affected by white opaque areas . Research suggests that mild cases of fluorosis may actually be beneficial for children. A 2009 study published in The Journal of the American Dental Association suggests that molars with fluorosis are more resistant to cavities than normal molars.
  • Moderate: 50% of the enamel surface is affected by white opaque areas.
  • Severe: All enamel surfaces are affected. Teeth may also have pitting and are at risk of dental erosion.

Common sources of fluoride include tap water, toothpaste, mouth rinses, gels, beverages and foods, and prescription supplements. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 75% of individuals' fluoride intake is from drinking water and processed beverages. You can minimize the risk of your child developing dental fluorosis by monitoring their fluoride intake. Find out how much fluoride is in your drinking water at home. Recommendations for adequate fluoride levels in drinking water are 0.7 to 1.2 milligrams per liter. According to the World Health Organization, fluoride levels above 1.5 mg/L can lead to dental fluorosis.

Fluoride in toothpaste is important to protect kids' teeth against tooth decay. However, the CDC recommends avoiding fluoride toothpaste at all until age 2. Only place a pea-sized amount on your child's toothbrush and monitor your child’s brushing to ensure that they are not swallowing the toothpaste. To promote spitting out toothpaste, avoid purchasing toothpastes containing flavors your child is likely to swallow. If a child ingests a large amount of fluoride in a short period of time, it may cause nausea, diarrhea, vomiting or abdominal pain.

If treatment is necessary for your child, most options vary from tooth whitening to veneers or full crowns. Make sure to keep all fluoride-containing products out of the reach of young children.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van Orenstein. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/dental-fluorosis-what-you-should-know.aspx

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19571049

http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/safety/dental_fluorosis.htm

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/f/fluorosis

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/products/how-much-fluoride1.htm

http://www.webmd.com/children/fluorosis-symptoms-causes-treatments?page=3

http://images.goodfood.com.au/2012/12/24/3911889/smilewide-620x349.jpg

http://parentingpatch.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Fluoride-Supplements-for-Infants-Hot-Topic-Tuesday-Blog-Hop.jpg

Books Kids Can Sink Their Teeth Into!

October 9th, 2014

There are several ways to teach and get your child excited about proper dental care. Yet, sometimes the lesson can be learned from simply reading a story. Children tend to enjoy stories that highlight characters and creative illustrations that they can relate to, which is also the same when it comes to books about dental health!

Losing teeth is a rite of passage for children. Many kids are generally excited when they reach this milestone, while some are nervous and concerned about feeling pain with the loss of a tooth. Your child’s first lost tooth can stir up a lot of questions from your little one. Questions that range from “Why did my tooth fall out?” to “Will I talk or look funny when my tooth comes out?” They may even ask, “What replaces the tooth?” or “Is the tooth-fairy real?”

A good way to answer some of these questions and reassure your child that losing primary teeth is a natural part of growing up is to introduce them to books about teeth! A great number of books contain well-known characters and fun pictures that can get them enthused about taking care of their teeth.

It is important to remind your child that even though primary teeth are expected to fall out, they still must be properly cared for in order to have healthy permanent teeth. If primary teeth are lost prematurely as a result of tooth decay, permanent teeth may not come into their sockets properly, leading to other oral health problems. Unfortunately, tooth decay is currently the number one disease that affects children. It's estimated that 40% of children have experienced tooth decay before starting kindergarten. A step toward defeating cavities is to teach good oral habits.

Help your kids appreciate the importance of dental health with these good reads:

  • Brush Your Teeth Please by Leslie McGuire
  • The Tooth Book by Dr. Seuss
  • Franklin and the Tooth Fairy by Paulette Bourgeois
  • Clifford’s Loose Tooth by John Kurtz
  • Little Bill: A Visit to the Dentist by Bill Cosby
  • The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist by Stan Berenstain
  • Show Me Your Smile!: A Visit to the Dentist (Dora the Explorer) by Christine Ricci
  • Caraboose: The Tooth Fairy Moose by Lynn Swanson
  • Little Rabbit’s Loose Tooth by Lucy Bate
  • Truman’s Loose Tooth by Kristine Warm
  • The Berenstain Bears Visit the Dentist by Stan Berenstain and Jan Berenstain
  • Going to the Dentist by Anne Civardi
  • ABC Dentist: Healthy Teeth from A to Z by Harriet Ziefert
  • Behold, No Cavities!: A Visit to the Dentist (Sponge Bob Square Pants) by Sarah Willson

These books not only include stories about losing teeth, but also about trips to the dentist, good oral hygiene habits, and the famous tooth-fairy tale. Although some books can be targeted for a specific age group, there are plenty of stories for just about any child.

In addition to books, online games that incorporate dental health can also be great resources for teaching. The American Dental Association offers an animated online book, Visit the Dentist with MartyHealthyTeeth.org also offers fun experiments and activities for elementary age kids.

Developing good oral health habits at an early age is vital for a lifetime of healthy teeth. Not only will children have practice reading, but also the importance of dental health can be instilled in them simultaneously!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.readingrockets.org/articles/books/c928

http://www.aapd.org/media/Policies_Guidelines/G_infantOralHealthCare.pdf

http://www.sheknows.com/parenting/articles/950463/teaching-kids-about-dental-health

http://www.castledental.com/our-blog/books-teach-kids-about-teeth-and-dentists

http://www.cityofsafford.us/images/pages/N440/kidsreading2.jpg

Do You Have a Teething Toddler?

August 3rd, 2014

The teething process is often an uncomfortable and challenging experience for toddlers. However, for some toddlers, teething can be painless! The severity of teething symptoms often varies from child to child. In general, your child’s first teeth may arrive any time between 3 months and 12 months of age. The first teeth to come in are usually the two lower front teeth, also known as the central incisors. In about 1 to 2 months following the lower front teeth, the four front upper teeth, also known as the central and lateral incisors, typically appear. When your child reaches about 3 years old, all 20 primary teeth may be present!

Primary teeth may seem insignificant because they’re temporary, but they're key in the development of healthy permanent teeth. Your child’s primary teeth not only help  with chewing, but also with speaking clearly! It is important to start taking care of your child’s primary teeth as soon as they become visible.

Certain symptoms of teething are common during the arrival of your child’s first teeth.  It’s normal for them to drool excessively, and have a desire to chew on hard objects to relieve pain. To reduce your child’s risk of developing a rash or experiencing irritation from the drool, wipe your baby’s mouth regularly.  Also, it is important to keep hazardous objects out of their reach and to keep their toys sanitized. To prevent your child from putting unsanitary items in their mouth, offer teething rings, cold vegetables, or a cold washcloth. Also, make sure to wash your child’s hands regularly, just in case they decide to put them in their mouth too!

Some toddlers may become irritable and out of sorts as their teeth arrive. This pain may result in more crying, and disrupted sleep and eating patterns. Although inflamed gums could cause a slight raise in your child’s temperature, check with your physician if your child has a severe fever or diarrhea, as they are not considered typical symptoms of teething.

No need to worry! Teething is a normal process that can be made less painful. Here are some tips on how to ease your child's discomfort and keep their primary teeth healthy:

 

Gently rub your child's gums.  

Using a cold spoon or washcloth to gently wipe your child's gums can ease some of their pain. It is especially important to wipe your child's gums after they've eaten and before going to sleep to prevent from tooth-decay.

 

Provide your child with cold foods.  

Try feeding your child cold and soft foods that don’t involve chewing, such as yogurt and applesauce.

 

Avoid filling your baby's bottle with fruit juices or other sugary beverages.

It is extremely important to keep your child hydrated! However, stay away from acidic and sugary drinks, as they can lead to baby bottle tooth decay! Prevent cavities by filling your baby's bottle with breast milk or water.

 

Use a toothbrush and water once the first tooth arrives. 

Choose a soft toothbrush to gently brush your child's primary teeth.

 

Schedule regular dental visits for your child.

Typically, a child’s first dental visit should be within six months after the first tooth arrives, but no later than the child’s first birthday.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/teething

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Family/2014/February/article/SW-281474979270690.cvsp

Image credit: http://www.blisstree.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/shutterstock-toddler.jpg

Tooth 911: What To Do When A Tooth Is Knocked Out

August 2nd, 2014

Like any accident, losing a tooth prematurely is something no one expects to happen. Surprisingly, more than 5 million teeth in children and adults are knocked out every year! Losing a tooth unexpectedly can be scary, however, there is no need to worry. Knowing what to do when a dental emergency occurs can help lead to a quick resolution. With proper action, a tooth that has been knocked out can be reinserted into the tooth socket.

Whether the cause was sports-related, or an accidental fall, saving you or your child’s knocked out tooth is important. When a tooth is lost unintentionally, there are a few important tips to help save your smile:

Act Quickly! 

The longer you wait, the less chance the tooth will be retained for life. To avoid infection and pain, seek immediate dental help when a tooth is broken or knocked out.. If a dentist isn't available, go to a hospital emergency room. According to recent studies, replanting a tooth in the range of five minutes to an hour is optimal.

Handle the Tooth Gently.

When a tooth is knocked out, carefully pick up the tooth by the crown. The root of the tooth can be damaged and contaminated easily and should not be touched when picking up the tooth.

Properly Clean the Tooth.

After carefully picking up the tooth, gently rinse the tooth with milk or water.

  • Do not use soap or chemicals.
  • Do not scrub or scrape the tooth.
  • Do not dry the tooth.
  • Do not wrap it in a tissue.
  • Do not brush or clean the tooth with alcohol or peroxide.

If Possible, Try Reinserting the Tooth.

If the damage is not severe, try carefully pushing the tooth into the socket with fingers. Hold the tooth in place with gauze until seen by a dentist.

Store the Tooth in Cold Milk.

If the tooth cannot be placed back into the mouth, store the tooth in a container of cold whole milk. You can also obtain a Emergency tooth preservation kit. Bathing the tooth in your own saliva will protect your teeth until you reach the dentist. It is important to keep the tooth moist to help keep it alive. Do not store the tooth in water because water can damage root surface cells.

Primary Teeth Should Not be Replanted.

If your child's primary tooth is knocked out, it should not be reinserted into the tooth socket. Reinserting a primary tooth can damage developing permanent teeth.

Teeth Lost to Periodontal Disease Can't Be Saved.

Be sure to take preventative measures to help reduce your risk of periodontal disease. Unfortunately, the tips above will not help save a tooth that has fallen out due to periodontal disease.

To help prevent this dental emergency, make sure that your child wears protective gear, including a mouth guard and helmet when playing any contact sport. Also, avoid hard foods and using teeth as tools to open things!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/February/article/SW-281474979065127.cvsp

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/000058.htm

http://www.sportsdentistry.com/tooth.html

http://www.aae.org/patients/symptoms/knocked-out-teeth.aspx

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-m0UOuuMQwR0/T79Xgz23I4I/AAAAAAAAABY/bJczPmHC4k4/s1600/Kids+teeth+image.jpg

 

 

Bottled Water: Friend or Foe?

June 29th, 2014

In many homes, bottled water has become a common grocery list item. So common, that currently people drink approximately 21 gallons of bottled water a year. In addition, according to a recent study in the Archives of Pediatrics, about 45 percent of parents give their children bottled water instead of tap water. Bottled water is easy to grab-and-go, and will help you stay hydrated throughout the day! What’s not to love? Surprisingly, bottled water may be the culprit of rising rates of tooth decay, especially in young children. Bottled water typically lacks the important natural mineral, fluoride! As bottled water becomes more popular,  fewer of them receive enough fluoride to prevent cavities.

Along with many dentists and government health officials, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cautions that “bottled water may not have a sufficient amount of fluoride, which is important for preventing tooth decay and promoting oral health.” Fluoride is present in many brands of toothpaste, rinses, and gels used by consumers every day. Fluoride helps strengthen tooth structure, especially in children’s growing teeth, and prevents bacteria from producing acids that erode tooth enamel.

Bottled water companies have the power to decide whether to add or not add fluoride to their bottled water. Typically, many individual manufactures choose not to add fluoride. In a study, more than 65 percent of parents buying bottled water were unaware of the fluoride levels it contained. It is important to check the labels on bottled water for their levels of fluoride. Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, an American Dental Association spokesman and pediatric dentist, said "most bottled waters have less than 0.3 parts per million of fluoride, well below the accepted level for optimally fluoridated drinking water."

Although the link between bottled water and tooth decay has not yet been scientifically proven, experts have found that fluoridated tap water has reduced the risk of tooth decay by approximately 25 percent. Try not to miss the decay-preventive benefits of fluoride!

Don't forget that the common suspects, such as junk foods, sodas, and candy are also still playing a role in the prevalence of children's tooth decay. Help remind your child of the importance of maintaining a healthy diet and practicing good oral health habits. Inadequate brushing, flossing, and rinsing habits, along with delayed dental visits are all likely to increase risks of tooth decay.

Make sure your child’s dental health is a priority. It is important to start caring for their teeth early! The health of your child’s primary teeth can impact their permanent teeth. As soon as your child’s primary teeth arrive, they are susceptible to decay.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References:

http://health.usnews.com/health-news/news/articles/2012/08/01/too-much-bottled-water-might-harm-kids-teeth

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/01/does-drinking-too-much-bottled-water-harm-your-teeth/

http://vitals.nbcnews.com/_news/2012/03/21/10778671-bottled-water-may-boost-kids-tooth-decay-dentists-say

http://www.cdc.gov/fluoridation/faqs/bottled_water.htm

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2013/03/11/water-americas-favorite-drink/1978959/

http://www.ivstatic.com/files/et/imagecache/400x300/files/blog_articles/bottled-water-1024.jpg

Get Your Child Excited About Losing Baby Teeth

May 19th, 2014

your-childs-first-loose-toothIs it time for the tooth fairy to make their first visit to your household? Losing primary teeth can be an exciting and memorable experience for your child. At about age six, children usually have their first loose tooth and can often be anxious about losing their teeth. Reassure your child that everything will be okay, and that the process of loosing primary teeth is a normal part of growing up. If your child is frightened once their tooth falls out, show them how proud you are of them for being brave. Yet, many children are excited and view the experience of losing a tooth as a sign that they are growing up. No matter the case, it is important to make the moment special and memorable, and to inform them of the value of good oral health habits as their permanent teeth begin to arrive.

Even though your child’s primary teeth will eventually fall out, it is important to remember that primary teeth are significantly important to your child’s oral health. Once your child’s tooth becomes loose, encourage them to continue brushing and rinsing well, as food particles may be hiding under the tooth. Also, offer them soft foods to avoid pain when chewing.

Here are some tips about several ways to celebrate this significant moment:

  • Make your child excited about the tooth fairy. Most children will be excited about receiving some cash to collect on their own. Consider having your child create a tooth fairy mailbox as a craft activity. The mailbox can be placed outside of their door for the tooth fairy to drop their treasure.
  • Help your child create a tooth chart that tracks when they loose teeth. Teach them about the 32 permanent teeth that they will soon have, and how important it will be to take good care of them.
  • Create a scrapbook and note the date when your child loses their first tooth. Take pictures before and after to remind your child of this huge accomplishment. By showing pride in maintaining good oral health, your child will be prepared to take care of their permanent teeth.
  • Create a small craft party. Print out tooth coloring sheets or whip up a batch of tooth shaped cupcakes to excite your child. Also, you could help them create a homemade picture frame out of popsicle sticks, glue, and glitter. This frame can hold a picture of their new and bright smile after they loose their tooth.
  • After your child loses a tooth, take them to pick out their own new toothbrush, floss, and mouthwash. Have them choose their favorite toothbrush color and toothpaste flavor to boost their excitement!
  • Host a healthy snack party to help inform your kids of healthy foods for healthy permanent teeth. Bring apples, carrots, celery sticks, and other healthy snacks to the party, and discuss why they’re better for permanent teeth than junk food.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/September/article/SW-281474979199403.cvsp

http://www.babycenter.com/0_losing-baby-teeth-what-to-expect-and-when_3658971.bc

http://3.everyday-families.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/your-childs-first-loose-tooth.jpg

Sports Mouthguards: Necessary Protection for Your Child

April 29th, 2014

mouthguardDoes your child participate in youth sports? If so, their oral health is at risk without the use of a mouthguard! According to the American Dental Association, 10-20% of all sports related injuries are maxillofacial injuries.

The advantages of using a mouthguard during sports are tremendous.  Mouthguards are essential for both contact and non-contact sports. They can reduce the risk of injuries to your teeth, lips, tongue, and soft tissues of your mouth. Usually these injuries will result in permanent damage to oral structures. Mouthguards can prevent nerve damage to a tooth, and even tooth loss! It is also important to remember that infection and damage to primary teeth can indeed impact permanent teeth!

Here are some different kinds of custom mouthguards for your child’s sport:

Football:

Football is a high impact sport that needs a mouthguard that supports the mouth and jaws from tackles.

  • Gel max- contains a high impact shock absorption and is customized to fit each individual.
  • GAMEguard Plus-a Boil-n-Bite?style for heavy contact sports. Includes  padded cushion for additional protection.

Baseball and Softball:

A bad fall or catch could result in serious dental injuries, and can easily be prevented with a light protective mouthguard.

  • Nano 3D- a small and light weight mouthguard that makes speaking and breathing easy. Has a high impact shock absorption and customized gel fit.

Hockey:

The sport of hockey  can involve swinging sticks and human collisions that can lead to several oral injuries.

  • BIOguard III-this custom fit mouthguard specifically protects the jaw, and has three layers of padded protection?.

Wrestling and Boxing:

Mouthguards are essential for these high impact sports. Sturdy mouthguards with a thick lining are beneficial for wrestling and boxing.

  • CustomSSD Plus-protects the jaw with additional layers and is particularly good for heavy contact sports.

Basketball:

Even though basketball is considered a non-contact sport, it can be a physically aggressive sport. When playing defense, an elbow or arm can accidentally cause a serious injury to the face and mouth.

  • Nano 3D

Karate/Martial Arts:

Protect the mouth from a kick to the head or face when battling opponents.

  • PEPguard- helps prevent the clenching of teeth and is optimal for protection of the jaw during training and games.

Lacrosse:

Much like hockey, a flying stick or a elbow to the face is not uncommon when playing lacrosse.

  • Ultra 2 STC-provides comfort and easy speaking ability. Has a high impact shock absorption and a customized gel fit.

Soccer:

A ball or knee to the face can negatively impact your child's oral health. Having the right mouthguard is essential for top performance!

  •  SAFEguard-contains a single layer of cushion about  2mm ?wide.

Without the protection of a mouthguard your child is at risk of several dental injuries:

  • Root Fractures: Also classified as a chipped tooth. Tooth fragments can be preserved in milk and should be taken immediately to the dentist.
  • Avulsion: The entire tooth is knocked out, including the root.
  • Luxation: The tooth is displaced within the gums. The tooth could be pushed back or pulled forward due to trauma.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sportsguard.com/mouthguards/basketball-mouthguards.htm

https://www.shockdoctor.com/products/mouthguards

http://prod.static.colts.clubs.nfl.com/assets/images/sponsor/deltadental/mouthguard.jpg

 

Seal Out Decay!

March 4th, 2014

no worry girl

Worried about your child’s oral health? Childhood tooth decay is often a common concern. Sealants can help calm your worries!

Dental sealants are plastic coatings, which usually are placed on premolars and molars for the purpose of preventing tooth decay. Your child’s primary and permanent molars have grooves on them where plaque accumulates, and thus are more susceptible to decay. Sealants provide an extra layer of protection by forming a smooth surface along the grooved areas.

Children are great candidates for sealants! Since sealants can protect the teeth from decay for up to 10 years, a good time for your child to get sealants is around the ages of 5 and 7 when their permanent molars and premolars begin to grow in. Sealants are both simple and painless to apply. Balanced with daily brushing, a healthy diet, and regular dental visits, sealants are an effective tool in preventing cavities! Sealants need to be checked for wear at regular dental check-ups, and can be easily replaced. If you can prevent tooth decay in your child’s teeth early, you can easily help them to avoid treatments for decay later in life!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

References:
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/dental-sealants
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Checkups-and-Dental-Procedures/Sealants/article/Dental-Sealants.cvsp
http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=C&iid=296&aid=1189
http://www.redorbit.com/media/uploads/2011/02/5cf25331e7e0bfe86deaf70663469aa81-617x404.jpg

Good Oral Health Starts with Primary Teeth

February 22nd, 2014

Small baby girl is learning to brush her teeth. Isolated on white

A lifetime of good oral health begins at an early age with the formation of “baby teeth!” As a newborn, the crowns of primary teeth are present, yet hidden from view. All 20 primary teeth, which erupt through the gums typically by the age of three, are extremely significant.

During this teething stage, it can be painful and distressing for your child. To alleviate some of the pain, offer your child a cold washcloth, or cold foods such as applesauce. The importance of primary teeth is often overlooked due to the fact that they will eventually fall out and be replaced by permanent teeth.

Primary teeth not only help children to chew food and communicate, but they also help guide permanent teeth into position. According to the American Dental Association, they are key in the development of the oral cavity and facial muscles. Primary teeth can decay from the first moment they are visible within the mouth. It is important to take care of your child’s primary teeth because if they are to decay due to insufficient care, permanent teeth can become infected and damaged from underneath them. When a primary tooth decays, the permanent teeth can shift into the empty space and alter the placement of other permanent teeth. Establishing good oral hygiene is essential as soon as your child is born.

Take preventative measure to ensure your child’s primary teeth are healthy!

  • Schedule your child’s first dental visit shortly after the presence of their first primary tooth
  • Clean your child’s gums after feeding even before primary teeth arrive
  • When primary teeth arrive, brush your child’s teeth twice a day with a toothbrush and toothpaste, making sure to also brush the gum line
  • Eliminate bad habits such as thumb sucking
  • Most importantly, encourage your child to develop good oral health by making them excited to brush every day!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:
http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_56.pdf
http://www.dentist.net/dn-article141.asp
http://www.sfgate.com/blogs/images/sfgate/sfmoms/2008/12/13/baby_tooth_brushing.jpg

 

Does the Toothpaste Expire?

February 21st, 2014

toothpaste brushSometimes we keep things in the bathroom cabinet for years. Do you ever wonder if your toothpaste expired? If it is, do you throw it away?

Using expired toothpaste is not dangerous, says Dr. Joel H. Berg, chairman of pediatric dentistry at the University of Washington in Seattle and a representative of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry.

You might be surprised to find out that ADA requires that any toothpaste containing fluoride carries a expiration date. Typically, it's two years after the manufacture date. Pass that time the toothpaste looses its effectiveness, because the fluoride in the toothpaste becomes less effective as it does not do a good job binding to tooth enamel and hardening it against the acid that causes cavities. Ingredients may separate, including the flavoring, so it can become quite unpleasant to brush your teeth with that toothpaste.

When you got a tube of old toothpaste, you can toss it or use it at places outside of your mouth:

Clean the bathroom sink – Toothpaste contains tiny, natural abrasives, such as silica that work great on shining up your sink, including the faucet.

Remove odor from hands – The same ingredient that freshens your breath will also remove unpleasant odors from your hands. Just use it that same way you would use hand soap.

Remove crayon marks from walls – The mark of every home with a toddler, crayons on the wall. No problem, just squirt a little toothpaste on the walls and scrub with a brush or micro-fiber cloth. Viola – gone.

Clean a clothes iron – To clean that gummy residue that occasionally builds up on your iron, just scrub it with some toothpaste. Those little abrasives come in handy again. Just make sure to do this on a cool iron.

Remove scuffs from leather shoes – Out of shoe polish right before the big date? No problem, just grab your toothpaste, put a dab on your shoes.  Rub with a soft cloth then remove with a damp cloth. Your shoes will look brand new.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.
Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.Pradhan. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://toothpaste.com/toothpaste-tips/toothpaste-expiration
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/11/18/science/18qna.html?fta=y&_r=1&
http://dentistandoverma.com/expiration-date-toothpaste
http://www.doorcountydentistry.com/toothpaste-expire

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