pH

My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

April 17th, 2019

It's that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that's not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children's teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here's how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

A recent study analyzing 40 children with asthma looked at the prevalence of dental cavities, gingival bleeding, the pH of saliva, composition of bacteria within the mouth, in addition to assessing their oral hygiene habits. It was found that the children with asthma experienced dry mouth, had at least 5-8 cavities, and a rapid formation of plaque. The children also had an increased acidity of pH within the mouth, which puts them at a higher risk of cavities and the fungal infection, candidiasis. Another study reported that individuals with asthma had approximately a 19% increased risk of suffering from periodontitis.

Fortunately, avoiding gum disease can be achieved by practicing proper oral hygiene techniques, including using a fluoride toothpaste, mouth rinse, brushing and flossing regularly, and making regular visits to the dentist. If you notice red puffy gums, bleeding with brushing or flossing, or persistent bad breath, these can be early signs of gum disease.  It is also important to always bring your inhaler to dental and medical appointments to ensure your safety in the case of an acute asthma attack.

The Effect of Asthma Medications

The medications taken to combat asthma also play a role in negatively impacting the oral cavity. This is because the protective mucous membrane within the mouth is less effective/reduced in individuals with asthma, lowering the body's immune system. Dry mouth is a major consequence of many medications, which allows for plaque build-up and bacteria accumulation that contribute to dental cavities, bad breath, and gum disease.

Inhaled corticosteroids, including Advair and Azmacort, may cause oral thrush, dental cavities, oral ulcers, and hoarseness. In addition, Albuterol, a medication used to treat bronchospasm, can have side effects including oral thrush, dry mouth, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, throat irritation, and nausea.

Tips for Managing Oral Health with Asthma

  • Rinsing with water after you using your inhaler can help avoid developing an oral fungal infection.
  • Stay hydrated in order to help combat dry mouth.
  • Keep your dentist informed about your medications and medical conditions. Make sure your dentist knows if you have asthma and what medications you are taking so that your health can be managed properly.
  • Manage allergies. Both asthma and allergies typically flare-up together. Managing both properly can help prevent mouth-breathing and dry mouth.
  • Practice good dental hygiene.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/asthma-found-to-increase-the-likelihood-of-gum-disease-by-a-fifth

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/asthma.html

http://www.thetotaldentistry.com/2018-07-dental-caries-in-asthmatic-children/

133-spring-sprung-asthma-triggers-735x0.jpg

dad_daughter_outside_playing.ashx

Say Cheese!

January 20th, 2017

Cheese-Deli14

Today, January 20th, is National Cheese Lover Day! Cheese isn't just a tasty snack, it's also gouda for your teeth.

Did you know about these cheesy facts?

  • There are over 1,000 types of cheese (differentiated by texture)
  • In the US, over 31 pounds of cheese are consumed each year
  • Cheese is best served at room temperature
  • Cheese was first made between 7,500 and 8,000 B.C.
  • The largest cheese weighed over 34,000 pounds and was displayed in 1964 at the New York World's Fair

Here are some ways cheese can benefit your health!

  • Cheese helps prevent cavities by raising pH levels of your mouth
  • Dairy products are crucial for bone health
  • It's a healthier alternative to other sugary, acidic, or unhealthy snacks

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.holidayinsights.com/moreholidays/January/national-cheese-lover-day.htm

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/cavities/article/ada-07-eating-cheese-may-prevent-cavities

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-2336850/Forget-gum-Eating-CHEESE-prevent-tooth-decay-neutralises-acid-mouth.html

http://www.starmarket.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Cheese-Deli14.jpg

The Olympics Are Here!

August 9th, 2016

August 5th marked the beginning of the 2016 Summer Olympics (or the Games of the XXXI Olympiad) with a stunning opening ceremony in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil!

Rio is the first South American city to become a host city for the Olympics. There are 33 venues in Rio de Janeiro, along with five venues at São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Salvador, Brasilia, and Manaus. The motto for the 2016 Olympics is: Um mondo novo (which means "a new world" in Portuguese, Brazil's official language).

There were many controversies leading up to the games, including the instability of Brazil's government, Zika virus concerns, pollution in the Guanabara Bay, and Russia's doping scandal that banned athletes from participating in this year's Olympics.

This year, over 11,000 athletes from 206 nations are participating in 28 Olympic sports (including recently added golf and rugby sevens). There are 306 sets of medals at stake! In addition, there are both refugee and independent athletes competing this year.

Sports that have always been part of the Olympics include athletics (track and field), aquatics (swimming), cycling, fencing, and gymnastics. All exciting sports to watch!

But...let's take a closer look at the teeth of the Olympic athletes. The Oral Health Foundation, which claims that elite athletes are more at risk for dental erosion than the average person, recommends that they pay more attention to their oral health.

Why? Athletes are more likely to develop cavities because of the high carbohydrate content of their diets, including sports drinks, gels, and bars that are highly acidic, with pH levels below 5.5.

Protecting your teeth will surely earn you a gold medal at the dentist's! Here are some suggestions for teeth-friendly snacks to munch on while watching sports events.

Make sure to catch some Olympic highlights before the closing ceremony on August 21st!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.travelandleisure.com/sites/default/files/styles/1600x1000/public/1455224409/rio-OLYMPICS0216.jpg?itok=yZqKSKfP

https://www.rio2016.com/en

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/industrynews/item/1149-olympic-athletes-at-greater-risk-of-poor-oral-health

Probiotic pills could prevent tooth decay!

June 28th, 2016

advanced-acidophilus-plus-review

Did you know that a supplement pill could be the answer to preventing tooth decay?

According to research done by scientists at the University of Florida (UF) College of Dentistry published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a probiotic treatment featuring a new strain of Streptococcus bacteria (A12) could prevent cavities by limiting the growth of bad bacteria and keeping a balanced pH in the mouth.

Robert Burne, PhD, one of the leaders of the study, explains that by implanting the A12 probiotic into a healthy child or adult who could develop cavities, one could limit the issue of poor oral health.

A12 maintains oral pH by neutralizing acid through arginine metabolism. Furthermore, it frequently kills or hinders an extremely harmful strain of bacteria, Streptococcus mutans.  Burne adds that when A12 and S. mutans are grown together, there is a decrease in the formation of dental plaque.

Imagine being able to avoid cavities with such a simple treatment!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://nootriment.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/advanced-acidophilus-plus-review.jpg

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/307810.php

Does the Word "Diet" Make Soda Any Healthier?

April 2nd, 2015

You know what they all say, “Sip All Day, Get Decay!” It's not only a catchy phrase, it's the truth! There is a clear correlation between soda consumption and tooth decay, as well as to other health complications including diabetes, kidney problems, and obesity. We all are familiar with the fact that bacteria in the mouth convert sugars and carbohydrates from the foods and beverages you consume to acids, which decays tooth enamel. What's even scarier is that the acids can remain in the mouth for 20 minutes after snacking or drinking.

To avoid this reality, many turn to diet soda thinking that there will be no consequences for their teeth. You may have even been asked at one point or another, "Which is better, Diet Coke or regular Coke?" It turns out that their damaging effects on teeth are roughly the same!

What many individuals may not realize is that diet soda is still acidic, which negatively impact the health of your teeth.  Research from the Minnesota Dental Association, the Missouri Dental Association, and the University of Cincinnati Biology Department shows the pH of a regular Coke is around 2.6, which is highly acidic. On the other hand, the pH of diet coke is about 3.2. For comparison, the pH of battery acid is 1, which isn't too far off from the pH values of soda! While diet soda may not be as bad as regular soda, they do contain acids, which can cause serious damage to teeth. Phosphoric acid and citric acid is often present in many diet sodas to add flavor to the drink. These acids can demineralize and decalcify teeth. Sometimes the damage may require fillings, root canals, dental crowns, dental implantsdentures or other dental procedures.

Not to mention, many beverages use artificial flavorers and sweeteners in place of sugar for the purpose of maintaining the flavor. Although they may not contain sugar, they can make beverages acidic and can cause many problems for your teeth.

In addition to having negative oral health effects, diet soda can have a significant impact on your kidneys. According to an 11-year study at Harvard Medical School with 3,000 women participants, researchers discovered that diet cola is linked with a two-fold increased risk for kidney failure. Kidney function began to decline as women drank two or more sodas a day.

A consistent consumption of both regular and diet soda is one of the leading causes of tooth decay. Children and young adults are most prone to tooth decay because their tooth enamel is not yet fully developed. Unfortunately, many children and young adults in the United States  have decreased their intake of milk  and increased their intake of soda. In fact, according to research in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, children are consuming it more than double the rate of the last 10 years. Soda consumption among adults has grown approximately 25 percent!

A healthy diet plays an important role in your overall health. It is essential to choose foods and beverages that provide vitamins and minerals for not only a healthy body, but also a healthy mouth. Avoid giving the label, "diet or sugar-free" the same meaning as, "healthy for teeth!" You can prevent tooth decay and other health problems by staying hydrated with water and implementing good oral health habits. If you are a soda-lover, make sure to drink in moderation. Also, limit your intake of carbonated beverages, including sports drinks and juice. Most importantly, make sure that you are not substituting acidic beverages for water.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/life-style/health-fitness/diet/Sugar-free-drinks-Are-they-safe-for-teeth/articleshow/46515368.cms

http://www.wda.org/your-oral-health/sip-all-day

http://www.myhousecallmd.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/diet-soda.jpg

Improper pH Levels in the Pool Can Lead to Tooth Decay!

April 27th, 2014

child-swimmingThe spring and summer aren’t the same without making a visit to the swimming pool! Pool safety topics, including the dangers of sun exposure, are usually reiterated as warm weather appears. Yet, many are unaware of the harmful chemicals in swimming pools that can affect your teeth! According to researchers at the New York University College of Dentistry, swimming pools can erode tooth enamel. Their research was conducted based on a case study of a 52 year-old man who had never examined or maintained the pH balance in his pool. Consequently, his oral health was significantly impacted. He developed extreme tooth sensitivity and tooth discoloration within a period of five months due to tooth enamel loss.

Chlorine and pH levels should be examined weekly in order to maintain a suitable swimming environment. If a pool is not properly maintained, your oral health can suffer dramatically. Whether you are cooling off in your own backyard pool, a friend’s pool, or a community pool, it is important to pay close attention to your oral health. An ideal pool pH level should fall between 7.2 and 7.8. Pool water below this range of pH levels is considered too acidic, which can erode tooth enamel in a short amount of time. The water can stain teeth and irritate your skin and eyes. Also, high pH levels can limit chlorine’s ability to sterilize water, which can cause environmental toxins and bacteria to enter your child’s system. These pools could be putting your family’s dental health at risk for permanent tooth damage.

Is your swimming pool safe for your family’s oral health? Worried about what chemicals might be swimming along with you in your local pool? No worries, there are ways to protect your family from exposure to harmful chemicals and keep your children healthy in the water.

Make sure that enjoying the pool isn’t harming your teeth. Here are a few tips:

  • Inform your family members to keep their mouths closed as much as possible when swimming.
  • Always brush your teeth after swimming to help restore your own pH levels within the mouth.
  • Only swim in a pool if the water looks clear. Cloudy water is a sign of a pool that's not being properly conserved.
  • Be aware of the pool lining and surrounding metal surfaces to see if there are spots of rust that show acid corrosion.
  • Purchase pool pH test strips at a local pool-supply store. These test strips are portable and easy to carry around to swimming pools and waterparks.
  • Hire a professional pool maintenance service can help ensure proper pH levels. Although the price of hiring a professional pool maintenance service can be costly, your family’s oral health will not pay the price!

Most people jump into swimming pools escape the heat or to burn calories. However, it is important to remember that chlorine not only causes stinging eyes, but also dental erosion!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2011/article/ADA-05-Swimming-Pools-can-cause-Enamel-Erosion-and-Tooth-Sensitivity.cvsp

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/features/summer-safety-protecting-your-family-from-environmental-health-risks

http://www.blackcelebkids.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/child-swimming.jpg

 

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