pneumonia

Gum Disease could be Threatening your Life During COVID-19

March 28th, 2021

We all know how important taking care of our teeth are, but did you know that in doing so you could be lowering your risk of having severe complications from COVID-19? The human body is fascinating, and throughout the years research has been continuously proving the relationship between our oral conditions and the conditions that can develop throughout the entire body, particularly as a result of systemic inflammation. A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology reported that individuals with a severe form of gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, are 9 times more likely to die from infection with COVID-19. 

Periodontal disease has been found to be linked as a culprit of many detrimental health conditions, including diabetes, respiratory disease, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, just to name a few. In addition, periodontal disease can lead to oral problems such as bad breath, bone loss, and ultimately result in loss of teeth.

The Surprising Link Between Gum Disease and Systemic Disease - Millennium Dental Technologies, Inc.

More recently, it has been suggested that controlling periodontal gum inflammation could possibly help lower the chance of experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms

Another study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology also found that individuals with gum disease who become infected with COVID-19 are 3.5 times more likely to be in the intensive care unit (ICU) and 4.5 times more likely to require use of a ventilator. They found that the blood inflammatory markers were significantly higher in patient with gum disease.

Not to mention, a California Dental Association (CDA) Journal study looking at inflammatory markers and their relationship to COVID-19 complications found that pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other pulmonary complications linked to COVID-19 could result form the aspiration of oral bacteria. This is also supported by previous research that has found an association between periodontal disease and other common lung conditions such as asthma.

This is why many research authors and health professionals are highlighting the importance of prevention and avoiding the promotion of systemic inflammation to help decrease the chance of developing severe complications from the virus.

On a positive note, periodontal disease can be prevented and managed! Regular dental visits and proper oral hygiene practices are necessary to help prevent the disease from progressing. Your dentist may recommend non-surgical and/or surgical treatments.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://nypost.com/2021/02/08/covid-19-patients-with-gum-disease-more-likely-to-die-study/

https://www.beckersdental.com/clinical-leadership-infection-control/36224-routine-dental-care-may-prevent-severe-covid-19-complications-study-finds.html

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpe.13435

https://www.beckersdental.com/clinical-leadership-infection-control/36458-covid-19-patients-with-gum-disease-9-times-more-likely-to-die-from-the-virus-study-finds.html?origin=DentalE&utm_source=DentalE&utm_medium=email&utm_content=newsletter&oly_enc_id=7754I6987723B8B

https://www.cda.org/Home/News-and-Events/Newsroom/Article-Details/routine-dental-care-may-protect-against-severe-covid-19-related-complications#:~:text=Oral%20bacteria%20can%20be%20aspirated,to%20dentistry%20and%20COVID%2D19.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fleemingdental.com.au%2Fnew-studies-show-gum-disease-may-increase-severity-of-covid-19%2F&psig=AOvVaw2eU7rvXv9h5qjRprOqk-Bv&ust=1617025137826000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMDBpqeO0-8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lanap.com%2F2016%2F09%2F22%2Fsurprising-link-between-gum-disease-and-systemic-disease%2F&psig=AOvVaw2yP2PqAwAjz0-Wnp8RPUO8&ust=1617028498531000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJjskN-a0-8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAI

Does Oral Bacteria Impact COVID-19 Complications?

August 25th, 2020

Scientists and researchers across the globe are in full-force battle mode when it comes to finding out more information about COVID-19 to help beat the virus. Although COVID-19 has brought about many challenges, losses, and uncertainties, it has brought so many individuals and an abundance of knowledge from across the world together, even if simply virtually! This constantly evolving pandemic has helped fuel important research, all sharing a common goal of finding connections and solutions to bringing this outbreak to a close. In the United Kingdom, researchers have explored the potential connection between oral health and COVID-19. The study, “Could There Be a Link Between Oral Hygiene and the Severity of SARS-Cov-2 Infections?,” published in the British Dental Journal, aimed to determine whether health complications and deaths as a result of COVID-19 were linked to oral bacteria and periodontal disease (gum disease). Also, they hoped to learn more about whether or not the amount of bacteria present in the mouth plays a role in the severity of COVID-19, as well as how improving oral health could possibly lower the risk of individuals experiencing detrimental COVID-19 complications. As many researchers have found, COVID-19 seems to impact individuals in differing ways in terms of symptoms and severity of the disease. Some of the common severe complications of coronavirus include pneumonia, heart problems, blood clots, organ failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and acute kidney injury.

In a healthy mouth, the presence of oral bacteria is natural and exists in harmony with the rest of your body. However, when the bacterial balance becomes out of control, harmful bacteria can not only create problems for your teeth and gums, but also for other parts of your body such as your lungs. The study highlighted several research studies that suggest that bacterial infections were common in individuals with severe COVID-19 symptoms. For instance, a study by Zheng and colleagues found that 50% of patients within their conducted study with severe COVID-19 who passed away also had the presence of a secondary bacterial infection. In addition, a study by Liu and colleagues found similar results, revealing that over 80% of the severe cases of COVID-19 in their study had significantly high bacterial loads as a result of a bacterial superinfection.

The study authors note that tiny droplets of saliva containing oral bacteria that are linked to gum disease, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis)Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia), can contaminate other areas of your body, for instance the lungs. This can create an inflammatory response throughout the body and increase the risk of many developing other infections and complications. Thus, good oral hygiene practices and management of gum disease has been widely studied and associated with a reduction in the risk of respiratory infections. Not to mention, properly managing gum disease also plays a role in lowering the risks and complications associated with other systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

The authors of the study suggest that taking care of your oral health could particularly go a long way in lowering your risk of developing severe complications from COVID-19. The authors concluded, “We recommend that oral hygiene be maintained, if not improved, during a SARS-CoV-2 infection in order to reduce the bacterial load in the mouth and the potential risk of a bacterial superinfection. We recommend that poor oral hygiene be considered a risk to post-viral complications, particularly in patients already predisposed to altered biofilms due to diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Bacteria present in patients with severe COVID-19 are associated with the oral cavity and improved oral hygiene may play a part in reducing the risk of complications.” More research is needed to determine if there is a concrete connection between oral bacteria and COVID-19 complications, as well as the link between gum disease and the virus.

So, don’t forget that your mouth is connected to your entire body, which means keeping up with your overall health goes hand in hand with also maintaining your oral health! Continue to stay safe and healthy.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://decisionsindentistry.com/2020/08/paper-explores-connection-between-oral-hygiene-severity-covid/?inf_contact_key=de1345513d0cf654b8e4b4892fabc16109c74070ac2bf3cfa7869e3cfd4ff832

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7319209/#!po=12.5000

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7258848/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/symptoms-causes/syc-20479963#:~:text=%2D%20Pneumonia%20and%20trouble%20breathing,%2D%20Acute%20kidney%20injury.

https://www.vaildentistry.com/blog/whats-living-in-your-mouthand-whats-it-doing-to-your-heart/

https://hickorydentist.com/caring-for-your-oral-health-while-preventing-covid-19/

https://decisionsindentistry.com/covid-19/

Connection Between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

June 27th, 2015

 

It's no doubt that oral health is a window to overall health. There is a significant amount of research linking common oral problems to heart disease, diabetes, pneumoniaAlzheimer’s disease, and now rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints, which typically causes pain and stiffness. There is increasing interest in the relationship between oral health and inflammatory diseases. A recent study conducted in March of 2015 suggests that periodontitis, a type of inflammatory disease affecting the supportive structures of the teeth (such as bones and tissues), along with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and may trigger the development of rheumatoid arthritis.The study titled "Inflammation in the Mouth and Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis," was presented at the 93rd General Session and Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research. The study examined 8 chronic RA patients, 15 onset RA patients, and 20 individuals with neither periodontitis nor RA. Of the total 23 RA patients, 10 had gingivitis and 9 had periodontitis. In addition, 6 of the individuals with both periodontitis and RA also had P. gingivalis, a strain of bacterium in the oral cavity that is typically associated with the cause of periodontal disease.

Researchers also found that regardless of dental care, all RA patients showed oral inflammation. They suggest that P. gingivalis antibodies may help rheumatologists in distinguishing RA patients who may benefit from periodontal treatment.

Both RA and periodontal disease are similar in many ways. Smoking is a common risk factor of RA and periodontal disease and should be avoided. individuals with RA have a higher risk of developing periodontal disease and may experience more severe symptoms.

It is clear that inflammation and oral bacteria may go hand-in-hand. Take good care of your teeth, it can ultimately save your joints!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150312123526.htm

http://www.cadentalgroup.com/wp-content/themes/custom-theme/img/slider/dentist-1.jpg

Mind your Mouth and Body!

March 15th, 2015

In your body, since all of the organs are interconnected, your mouth health will impact your overall body health, and vice versa. In this article, we'll first describe connections between oral health problems and overall body problems. Next, we'll describe the nutritional and lifestyle decisions you can make to help not only your overall body, but your mouth too!

Health professionals have noticed connections between oral health problems, and other medical problems, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, pneumonia, and pregnancy complications. Gum disease and bacteria in your mouth can lead to clogged arteries and blood clots. Mouth bacteria can also cause inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries. This inflammation can lead to atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries, which can increase your risk of heart attacks or stroke.

Doctors have also found a link between diabetes and gum disease. Diabetes lowers your body's resistance to infection, thus making your mouth more susceptible to damage. Gum disease may also make it more difficult for you to control diabetes by causing insulin resistance.

Like diabetes, HIV/AIDS can lower your body's resistance to infection, thus exacerbating gum disease. There are even links between gum disease and pneumonia. If the mouth becomes infected, unhealthy bacteria can get aspirated into the lungs.

Additionally, gum disease is linked to premature and low-weight births. Gum disease can cause the release of toxins throughout the body, which enter the mother's placenta, and thus cause developmental problems for her baby.

It is important to establish healthy lifestyle and dietary habits for a healthy mouth and body. Nutrition is especially important to both your oral health and overall health. The month of March marks National Nutrition Month, making it the perfect time to implement healthy foods into your diet and spread the word about the benefits of good nutrition! Avoid sugary and acidic foods, as they can be damaging to tooth enamel. Tooth decay occurs when plaque come into contact with sugar, causing acid to harm the teeth. Also, make sure that your body intakes vital nutrients. If you lack certain nutrients, tissues in your mouth will have a more difficult time trying to resist infection. Eat a diet high in vegetables to make your entire body health, and you'll even reduce your risk of gum disease. Be sure to get proper nutrients into your body. If you're low on certain nutrients, your mouth may become an acidic environment, which can increase your risk of gum disease.

Links between medications and gum disease have also been found. Hundreds of medications have side effects that include dry mouth. Decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, and diuretics commonly reduce saliva flow. Saliva is an important part of your oral health because it helps prevent too many bacteria from thriving in your mouth. A dry mouth is more likely to have gum disease and tooth decay. Be sure to stay hydrated!

If you are a smoker, strive to quit the habit. Smoking can cause tooth decay, periodontal disease, and oral cancer.

As you keep your mouth healthy, you’ll keep the rest of your body healthy.  Making positive oral health choices will lead to a healthy mouth and body!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-education/articles/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body 

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/healthy-mouth-healthy-body.aspx

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/diet-and-dental-health

http://ricecreekdmd.com/wp-content/uploads/kidsplaying.gif

 

Sleeping in Dentures Linked to Pneumonia?

January 16th, 2015

Teeth are extremely important in helping us with day-to-day functions, including eating and speaking. Not to mention, they are important elements of our smiles! If you're missing your natural teeth, whether from tooth decay, periodontal disease, or other oral health problems, complete or partial dentures can be a great option to help improve your smile and health. Recently, poor oral health has been recognized as putting the elderly at a major risk for pneumonia.

Dentures are custom-made to resemble your natural teeth. Listed below are the different types of dentures:

  • Conventional dentures are both full and removable. It is made and usable once the remaining natural teeth are removed and tissues have healed.
  • Immediate dentures are also both full and removable, but can be inserted immediately once the remaining natural teeth are removed.
  • Overdentures are placed over a few remaining natural teeth, which help preserve your jawbone and offer stability for the denture.
  • Partial dentures are often used when a few natural teeth remain in the upper or lower jaw. They also help prevent other teeth from shifting.

In Japan, researchers at Nihon University School of Dentistry conducted a 3-year study examining oral health habits and incidents of pneumonia in 524 randomly selected elders of 85 years of age or older. According to the study, individuals who wore dentures during sleep tended to have poor oral health habits, fewer visits to the dentist, and plaque build-up. It was found that 48 deaths and hospitalization cases of pneumonia were identified. Of the 453 individuals who wore dentures, 40.8% who wore their dentures when sleeping were at higher risk for pneumonia than those who took their dentures before bed. This is approximately a 2.3-fold higher risk of the incidence of pneumonia.

Further, those who slept with their dentures were more likely to have tongue and denture plaque, gum inflammation, positive culture for Candida albicans (a form of yeast), and higher levels of  interleukin-6 (involved in inflammation and infection). It is recommended not to wear dentures during the night to avoid risk of these health problems.

It is important to practice good oral hygiene even if you wear dentures. Dentures should be rinsed and brushed daily just like regular teeth. It is easy for bacteria to collect, causing bad breath and damaging your gums. Brushing your gums, tongue and roof of your mouth before putting in dentures is essential for maintaining a healthy mouth!

When you go to sleep, don't forget to take your dentures out of your mouth and place them aside in a glass of water!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/10/141007144514.htm

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/Dentures

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-health-dentures

http://www.pazdental.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/Warrenton-Digital-Dentures-2.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2014/article/ADA-10-study-discourages-sleep-with-dentures.cvsp

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