porphyromonas gingivalis

Could Poor Oral Health be Related to Metabolic Syndrome? 

January 11th, 2021

Having swollen or bleeding gums? No one likes that. Gum disease can involve pesky symptoms such as swollen inflamed gums, gums that bleed easily, bad breath, and painful chewing, for instance. A main cause of gum disease is dental plaque, which with good oral health practices can be managed and prevented! When dental plaque adheres to the surfaces of your teeth and is not removed, this can lead to gum inflammation. Gingivitis can progress into periodontal disease, in which irreversible bone loss and tissue damage begins to occur. Unfortunately, gum disease can lead to permanent tooth loss. But, that's not all! Periodontal disease has also been found in many research studies to be linked with several other systemic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, and now also metabolic syndrome, according to a new study.

Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that a common bacteria known to cause periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), also has the capability to cause skeletal muscle metabolic dysfunction through changing an individual's gut microbiome.The purpose of their study, according to the study's author Kazuki Watanabe, was to determine how infection with periodontal bacteria may lead to metabolic changes in skeletal muscle and ultimately lead to metabolic syndrome. However, the study reports that a direct link between the periodontal bacteria and the metabolic function of skeletal muscle has not been proven yet.

The oral cavitiy is a true window into the rest of the body. Oral inflammation caused by periodontal bacteria can influence inflammation within other parts of the body, and the study reports that it can lead to increases in body weight and increased insulin resistance. The body's resistance to insulin is a huge part of type 2 diabetes, in addition to the development of metabolic syndrome.

What's Metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome consists of multiple conditions in association with each other, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, obesity, abnormal fat metabolism, and systemic inflammation.

The researchers studied individuals with metabolic syndrome and discovered that these individuals had high antibody titers against P. gingivalis, meaning they had likely been infected with the bacteria. In addition, they found a positive correlation between the antibody titers and increased insulin resistance. The researchers then observed mice given both a high fat diet, a common risk factor for developing metabolic syndrome, and P. gingivalis injected orally. As a result, they discovered that the mice developed an increased insulin resistance, fat infiltration, and lower uptake of sugar into the skeletal muscle creating metabolic dysfunction when compared to mice not infected with the bacteria. The researchers noted a significant difference in the gut microorganisms in the mice infected with P. gingivalis versus the mice that were not infected.

So, one important thing that the researchers noted in their study is how periodontal disease can impact other parts of the body, and not just the mouth. More research is needed to investigate the link between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201208111428.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20351916

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fflairzhealth.com%2Fwhat-is-the-metabolic-syndrome%2F&psig=AOvVaw2Cz9QHTUqmTqo55YxjB1dP&ust=1610405890584000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMiIksu7ku4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABA3

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dockeodental.com%2Fgum-disease%2F&psig=AOvVaw1fQ3ks6wQZmJ_Jv-DJufGS&ust=1610406249444000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLi0-vm8ku4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAp

Does Oral Bacteria Impact COVID-19 Complications?

August 25th, 2020

Scientists and researchers across the globe are in full-force battle mode when it comes to finding out more information about COVID-19 to help beat the virus. Although COVID-19 has brought about many challenges, losses, and uncertainties, it has brought so many individuals and an abundance of knowledge from across the world together, even if simply virtually! This constantly evolving pandemic has helped fuel important research, all sharing a common goal of finding connections and solutions to bringing this outbreak to a close. In the United Kingdom, researchers have explored the potential connection between oral health and COVID-19. The study, “Could There Be a Link Between Oral Hygiene and the Severity of SARS-Cov-2 Infections?,” published in the British Dental Journal, aimed to determine whether health complications and deaths as a result of COVID-19 were linked to oral bacteria and periodontal disease (gum disease). Also, they hoped to learn more about whether or not the amount of bacteria present in the mouth plays a role in the severity of COVID-19, as well as how improving oral health could possibly lower the risk of individuals experiencing detrimental COVID-19 complications. As many researchers have found, COVID-19 seems to impact individuals in differing ways in terms of symptoms and severity of the disease. Some of the common severe complications of coronavirus include pneumonia, heart problems, blood clots, organ failure, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and acute kidney injury.

In a healthy mouth, the presence of oral bacteria is natural and exists in harmony with the rest of your body. However, when the bacterial balance becomes out of control, harmful bacteria can not only create problems for your teeth and gums, but also for other parts of your body such as your lungs. The study highlighted several research studies that suggest that bacterial infections were common in individuals with severe COVID-19 symptoms. For instance, a study by Zheng and colleagues found that 50% of patients within their conducted study with severe COVID-19 who passed away also had the presence of a secondary bacterial infection. In addition, a study by Liu and colleagues found similar results, revealing that over 80% of the severe cases of COVID-19 in their study had significantly high bacterial loads as a result of a bacterial superinfection.

The study authors note that tiny droplets of saliva containing oral bacteria that are linked to gum disease, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis)Fusobacterium nucleatum (F. nucleatum) and Prevotella intermedia (P. intermedia), can contaminate other areas of your body, for instance the lungs. This can create an inflammatory response throughout the body and increase the risk of many developing other infections and complications. Thus, good oral hygiene practices and management of gum disease has been widely studied and associated with a reduction in the risk of respiratory infections. Not to mention, properly managing gum disease also plays a role in lowering the risks and complications associated with other systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

The authors of the study suggest that taking care of your oral health could particularly go a long way in lowering your risk of developing severe complications from COVID-19. The authors concluded, “We recommend that oral hygiene be maintained, if not improved, during a SARS-CoV-2 infection in order to reduce the bacterial load in the mouth and the potential risk of a bacterial superinfection. We recommend that poor oral hygiene be considered a risk to post-viral complications, particularly in patients already predisposed to altered biofilms due to diabetes, hypertension or cardiovascular disease. Bacteria present in patients with severe COVID-19 are associated with the oral cavity and improved oral hygiene may play a part in reducing the risk of complications.” More research is needed to determine if there is a concrete connection between oral bacteria and COVID-19 complications, as well as the link between gum disease and the virus.

So, don’t forget that your mouth is connected to your entire body, which means keeping up with your overall health goes hand in hand with also maintaining your oral health! Continue to stay safe and healthy.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://decisionsindentistry.com/2020/08/paper-explores-connection-between-oral-hygiene-severity-covid/?inf_contact_key=de1345513d0cf654b8e4b4892fabc16109c74070ac2bf3cfa7869e3cfd4ff832

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7319209/#!po=12.5000

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7258848/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/symptoms-causes/syc-20479963#:~:text=%2D%20Pneumonia%20and%20trouble%20breathing,%2D%20Acute%20kidney%20injury.

https://www.vaildentistry.com/blog/whats-living-in-your-mouthand-whats-it-doing-to-your-heart/

https://hickorydentist.com/caring-for-your-oral-health-while-preventing-covid-19/

https://decisionsindentistry.com/covid-19/

Snap, Crackle, Pop! How Rheumatoid Arthritis & Gum Disease are Related

June 15th, 2020

Snap, crackle, pop! Creaky joints can be a real pain, but who would have thought that it would have any connection to your mouth? Surprisingly, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis have a lot in common, as they both are chronic inflammatory diseases that involve the breakdown of bone and soft tissue.

What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? 

RA is both a chronic inflammatory and an autoimmune disease, and is often characterized by pain and stiffness. RA typically affects the joints, but can also affect the body's organs.

Periodontitis...What's that?

On the other hand, periodontitis is an advanced form of gum disease. Without  treatment, periodontitis can lead to loss of tooth-supporting bone, tissue, and even your actual teeth!  Periodontitis can impact anyone at any age, but can be preventable. Unfortunately, 47.2% of adults over the age of 30 have periodontitis in the United States. A major cause of periodontal disease is poor oral hygiene, which leads to bacterial plaque attacking your tooth enamel. Other risk factors of periodontitis include tobacco use, diabetes, certain medications, older age, genetics, poor nutrition and obesity, tooth grinding, and misaligned teeth, just to name a few.

Gum disease can be harder to recognize because of its typical pain-free nature. However, there are some common signs and symptoms of periodontitis to look for:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Loose permanent teeth/tooth loss
  • Changes in your bite
  • Receding gums
  • Changes in the fit of oral appliances (ex: partial dentures)

Yet, It is still possible to experience no signs or symptoms of gum disease. That's just one of many reasons why visiting your dentist regularly is essential to your oral and overall health, in addition to eating healthy, brushing at least twice a day, flossing daily, and practicing good oral hygiene habits at home. It is important to catch gum disease in the early stages to avoid irreversible damage to your pearly whites. Remember, prevention is key!

How are the two diseases linked?

Recent studies have supported the link between RA and periodontal disease. According to the Arthritis Foundation, researchers found that tooth loss, a common indicator of periodontal disease, may predict rheumatoid arthritis and its severity. Within the study, they found that the more teeth lost due to periodontal disease, the higher the risk of developing RA. Other research has also suggested that the bacteria commonly associated with periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), may play a role in onsetting RA.

Treating one disease may help improve the other!

Researchers at Case Western University found that individuals with both severe rheumatoid arthritis and gum disease experienced an improvement in their RA symptoms after successfully treating their gum disease.

Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis may face certain challenges in taking care of their oral health. It is important to inform your health care providers, who will help provide recommendations that will work best for you. To make brushing and flossing a little easier,  American Dental Association (ADA) recommendations include:

  • Make your toothbrush unique: To get a better grip of your toothbrush, add a tennis ball or bicycle grip to the handle.

  • Try different types of floss: Try floss holders, floss picks, or threaders.

  • Pump out your toothpaste: Toothpaste in a pump may be more comfortable than squeezing out of the tube.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/living-with/the-link-between-gum-disease-and-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.hopkinsrheumatology.org/2017/01/gum-disease-linked-to-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/g/gum-disease

gum-diseases.jpg

toothbrush-options-for-arthritis.jpg

periodontitis-chart-web.jpg

rBVaV1zYyXuAI_hfAAKxuL_yhmk632.jpg

Tooth Decay -Genetic or Environmental?

September 4th, 2019

It’s easy to blame somethings on our parents, but recent research shows that you shouldn’t blame tooth decay on genetics. In the past it has been thought that our risk of developing cavities is similar to our family members. However, more research is showing that tooth decay boils down mainly to environmental factors rather than genetics. Although we can’t just easily point to our parents when we develop a cavity, this can be a good thing because tooth decay is largely preventable! Take a look at what influences your risk of tooth decay and how you can prevent it:

Interestingly enough, we are made up of good bacteria that help us survive. However, some of the bacteria found within the mouth can feed on sugars within the foods we eat and lead to tooth decay. These bacteria produce acids that wear down our tooth enamel and create what we all dread and know to be cavities. These bacteria often come after birth, and with more research specific bacteria are being found to play a role in creating cavities. While some bacteria we do inherit from our parents, others that have been linked to causing dental cavities are not found to be associated with genetics, including Streptococcus mutants, and Porphyromonas gingivalis. The study conducted by the J. Craig Venter Institute in Maryland evaluated 485 pairs of identical and fraternal twins within the age range of 5 to 11 years old. When analyzing the study participants’ dental plaque and bacteria present within the mouth, they found that environmental factors played a significant role in the type of bacteria present that were associated with causing tooth decay. The bacteria responsible for causing tooth decay were mainly due to factors including diet and home care dental habits such as brushing and flossing. However, family history is important when looking at risks of tooth decay, for instance similar food diets shared between family members could increase or lower the risk of tooth decay.

What you may be able to blame genes for is the development of teeth. Such as the relationship between your teeth when biting together, the timing in which your teeth first appear, or even the size of teeth (macrodontia or microdontia).

So, while somethings you may get away with being able to blame your parents for, tooth decay is largely in part influenced by environmental factors. This is why it’s extremely important to get regular dental check-ups, and practice good oral hygiene care to ensure that your teeth are healthy and lasting lifetime!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.ameritasinsight.com/wellness/dental/mouth-bacteria-bad-teeth

tooth-decay-graphic-min-e1551288073666.jpg

00_beach_Amazing-Family-Beaches-You-Need-to-Visit-This-Summer_286469927_Tom-Wang_FT.jpg

Bacteria's Pathway from Mouth to Brain

February 9th, 2019

It's very reasonable to think that gum disease will only impact your gums, and therefore only cause issues within your mouth. But, surprisingly, the bacteria associated with chronic gum disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), has been found in the brains of individuals with Alzheimer's disease.

At the University of Louisville School of Dentistry, researchers found more convincing evidence on the association between  P. gingivalis with the development of Alzheimer's disease. They also found that a molecular therapy designed to potentially attack bad pathogens involved in Alzheimer's disease is also linked with periodontitis, a more severe form of gum disease. When studying animals, it was found that P. gingivalis found orally ended up colonizing the brain and increased the production of amyloid beta plaques that are commonly found in people with Alzheimer's disease. In addition, it was found that P. gingivalis releases a toxic enzyme known as gingipains into the neurons of people affected by Alzheimer's disease. Interestly, the researchers designed a molecule to block the harmful gingipains, which led to less P. gingivalis within the brain, a blockage of the production of amyloid beta plaques, less neuroinflammation, and a protective effect against neurons within the hippocampus, which is the part of the brain that is involved with memory. The research team is working on further research and clinical trials to determine a causal relationship between P. gingivalis and morbidity of Alzheimer's disease.

To maintain a healthy body it is thus imperative that our mouths remain healthy as well. There has been strong evidence linking bacteria within the mouth that can cause inflammation and damage systemically throughout the body. Gum disease can be prevented by keeping routine good oral hygiene habits.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/01/190123165002.htm

Teeth1-651736.jpg

image.axd

Connection Between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

June 27th, 2015

 

It's no doubt that oral health is a window to overall health. There is a significant amount of research linking common oral problems to heart disease, diabetes, pneumoniaAlzheimer’s disease, and now rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints, which typically causes pain and stiffness. There is increasing interest in the relationship between oral health and inflammatory diseases. A recent study conducted in March of 2015 suggests that periodontitis, a type of inflammatory disease affecting the supportive structures of the teeth (such as bones and tissues), along with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and may trigger the development of rheumatoid arthritis.The study titled "Inflammation in the Mouth and Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis," was presented at the 93rd General Session and Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research. The study examined 8 chronic RA patients, 15 onset RA patients, and 20 individuals with neither periodontitis nor RA. Of the total 23 RA patients, 10 had gingivitis and 9 had periodontitis. In addition, 6 of the individuals with both periodontitis and RA also had P. gingivalis, a strain of bacterium in the oral cavity that is typically associated with the cause of periodontal disease.

Researchers also found that regardless of dental care, all RA patients showed oral inflammation. They suggest that P. gingivalis antibodies may help rheumatologists in distinguishing RA patients who may benefit from periodontal treatment.

Both RA and periodontal disease are similar in many ways. Smoking is a common risk factor of RA and periodontal disease and should be avoided. individuals with RA have a higher risk of developing periodontal disease and may experience more severe symptoms.

It is clear that inflammation and oral bacteria may go hand-in-hand. Take good care of your teeth, it can ultimately save your joints!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150312123526.htm

http://www.cadentalgroup.com/wp-content/themes/custom-theme/img/slider/dentist-1.jpg

Link Between Alzheimer's Disease and Poor Oral Health

February 8th, 2014

cellsPorphyromonas gingivalis is a type of bacterium that is found in the brains of dementia patients.  Interestingly, this same strain of bacteria is usually found to cause chronic periodontal disease.  Chronic periodontal disease is an inflammatory disease that presents in both the soft and hard structures of a patient's oral cavity.  The inflammation occurs as a result of a chronic bacterial infection.  There are many risk factors for developing the disease including: genetics, smoking, age, and diet.  

Researchers from the University of Central Lancashire discovered this link between the two diseases by studying 10 dementia brain tissue samples and 10 non-dementia brain tissue samples.  The results of the study indeed confirmed the presence of porphyromonas gingivalis in the dementia brain tissue samples.

Often times, it is difficult to conceptualize the relationship between oral health and systemic health.  As the bacteria found in the oral cavity enters the blood stream, it can easily travel to the brain.  When the porphyromonas gingivalis bacteria reach the brain, the brain responds to the foreign body by releasing chemicals that could potentially destroy neurons.  The researchers hypothesize that this immune response may ultimately manifest in symptoms of confusion and loss of memory characteristic of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. 

References:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/264164.php
http://www.perio.org/newsroom/periodontal-disease-fact-sheet
http://www.computationalbioenergy.org/QSpec/MetaRef%20clade%20%20flavescens_files/relatedimg/Porphyromonas%20gingivalis%20W83%20%20%20(100mW%20500mW)/introduction.jpg

 

Request an
Appointment

patient
forms

read
our blog

Top