research

Your House and Your Saliva: How on Earth Could they be Related?

August 12th, 2018

Normally, we may not be thinking about what saliva is doing for us in our mouths. But, saliva has an important role in helping us breakdown food and protect our teeth due to the proteins and minerals found within it. Turns out, according to new research, the combination of microorganisms in your saliva are mainly determined by your home environment rather than genetics. These organisms within saliva are found to have a great influence on our oral and overall health.

More research is showing that our microbiomes are related to our health. These microbes are perfectly normal to our bodies and help outside pathogens from establishing oral disease. Researchers at  UCL Genetics Institute looked at DNA and saliva extracted from an Ashkenazi Jewish family that lived in several different households across the world so that they could determine how the saliva microbiome varied in terms of environment versus genetics. In each of the DNA and saliva samples, they found that the majority of the salivary microbiome was composed of bacteria from the Streptococcus, Rothia, Neisseria, and Prevotella genera.

When analyzing the results, they also found that between factors including shared household, city, age, and genetics, the factor that determined who shared the most similar saliva microbes was household environment. Therefore, people in the same house share the most similar organisms within their saliva.

So, looks like genetics isn't the biggest factor in determining the makeup of our saliva as once thought according to recent research. This study concluded that a child's home environment plays a significant role in the community of bacteria found within their saliva. Since microbes can be transferred from one person to another, for instance via kissing or sharing utensils, it is important to maintain good oral hygiene, keep regular dental visits, and avoid being in close contact with others when having an active infection.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170912102810.htm

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Leeming-dental-Oral-education-supervision-BLOG-785x490.jpg

Gum Disease and Asthma

August 27th, 2016

Did you know that asthma is one of the many health problems you could develop if you have gum disease?

According to a new study published in the Journal of Periodontology, those with gum disease are five times more likely to develop asthma!

Therefore, by trying your best to avoid gum disease, you're also actively protecting your body from other illnesses or diseases.

Proper oral health care is especially important for middle-aged men who don't exercise regularly: they have a higher risk of developing gum disease.

Want to prevent gum disease? Follow these tips:

1. Brush your teeth (and tongue) two times a day

2. Floss at least once a day

3. Use a mouthwash to reduce plaque

4. Avoid smoking

5. Exercise regularly

6. Maintain a healthy diet

A healthy diet, BMI, and lifestyle, combined with a regular exercise routine, can reduce the risk for gum disease by forty percent!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://az616578.vo.msecnd.net/files/2016/04/02/635951642805742415114442452_Asthma.jpg

http://dentistrytoday.com/todays-dental-news/9856-gum-disease-may-cause-higher-risk-of-asthma

https://www.perio.org/consumer/prevent-gum-disease

http://dentistrytoday.com/todays-dental-news/9878-middle-aged-men-may-have-higher-risk-of-gum-disease

Cavities Can Hinder Growth in Children!

August 7th, 2016

Tooth decay doesn't just affect your oral health, it can even decrease growth rate! Therefore, it's especially important for your children to protect their teeth, since they're still in the process of growing.

The results of a recent study conducted at University College London and King Fahad Armed Forces Hospital in Saudi Arabia suggest that tooth decay could delay growth in children.

Researchers examined the relationship between the heights and weights of Saudi Arabian children between six and eight years old. They discovered that children with more severe cavities were at a higher risk for being underweight and shorter than average.

Here are some ways to keep your children healthy and cavity-free:

  1. Ensure that they brush for two minutes two times a day
  2. Take proper care of your own oral health to set a good example
  3. Schedule dental appointments early on
  4. Watch what they eat (avoid sugary foods and drinks)

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.motherpedia.com.au/images/directoryimages/68429/kids-growing__large.jpg

http://dentistrytoday.com/todays-dental-news/9936-tooth-decay-may-prohibit-growth-in-children

Keep flossing!

August 6th, 2016

flossing_0

You may have recently seen on the news or on social media sites that there isn't scientific research to demonstrate the oral health benefits of flossing. However,  many professional dental associations such as the ADA (American Dental Association) have confirmed that floss and interdental cleaners are essential for maintaining proper oral health.

Despite the fact that flossing was removed from the 2015 U.S. Dietary Guidelines, the government has not changed its perspective on flossing. Instead, the Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee (DGAC) decided to focus on reducing sugar intake and nutrition. Furthermore, other health agencies have continually recommended cleaning between teeth daily. For instance, the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) suggests including flossing daily in your oral hygiene routine.

Dentists and oral health professionals, who understand the oral health conditions and history of their patients, are among the most qualified to give advice on flossing. Just because there isn't solid proof doesn't mean that flossing is ineffective. If you don't clean between your teeth, you could experience tooth decay, gum disease, or plaque buildup. Floss and interdental cleaners help remove plaque, debris, and bacteria.

Therefore, remember to use interdental cleaners once a day in addition to brushing two minutes twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste!

Resources:

http://dentistrytoday.com/news/industrynews/item/1143-professional-groups-defend-flossing-s-effectiveness

http://www.ada.org/en/press-room/news-releases/2016-archive/august/statement-from-the-american-dental-association-about-interdental-cleaners?source=PromoSpots&medium=ADAHomeRotator&content=Flossing

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/sites/womenshealthmag.com/files/images/flossing_0.jpg

Sleep Apnea and Permanent Tooth Extraction

April 12th, 2016

sleep

Sleep apnea is common condition that can lead to trouble sleeping and cause tiredness throughout the day even after a full night's rest. Individuals with sleep apnea experience one or more pauses in breathing during their sleep that can last from seconds to minutes. Aside from excessive daytime sleepiness, signs of sleep apnea also include dry mouth, headache, and snoring, just to name a few.

Research has found that sleep apnea may increase the risk of of high blood pressure, heart problems, stroke, obesity, and diabetes, and the chance of getting into a car accident.

So, you may be wondering how this condition plays a role in dentistry. Some studies suggest that getting teeth extracted for braces can increase one's risk for developing sleep apnea.Orthodontic treatment is the perfect solution to correcting crowded teeth, protruding teeth, gapped teeth, and jaw problems. For well over 50 years and still today, dentists have debated the treatment of extracting permanent teeth for orthodontic treatment. Some dentists extract permanent teeth because it's easier to create more space between teeth, while others use alternative methods, such as palate expansion or headgear to correct one's smile.

Some argue that pre-orthodontic tooth extraction makes the jaw narrower and forces the tongue to lay further back into the mouth and restrict the airway. Also, some believe that extractions can lead to changes in one's facial appearance and temporomandibular joint disorder (TMD). TMD is a condition that results in oral issues including chewing problems and jaw pain. However, further research is needed because it is unclear whether these notions are actually the case.

Others counter these arguments and claim that the jaw doesn't necessarily become narrowed and can even become widened depending on various factors. In addition, some argue that extractions can be beneficial for individuals with lip strain or thin gums.

Studies observing patients who've had teeth extracted for orthodontic treatment are inclusive in their findings. These studies often only offer a limited assessment of the patient's airway to see what's actually occurring.  Two studies of patients found no change in the pharyngeal airway as well as a third study.  However, three other studies found a reduction in the airway size of some patients. Researchers believe that the difference in findings could be due to racial differences in the response of the airway to movement of the teeth.

Overall, its unclear whether or not extractions lead to sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is a complex condition and further research is needed to explain its association with permanent tooth extractions. If you feel that you are excessively sleepy during the day you may want to contact a sleep specialist so that they can conduct a sleep study. If you are in need of any orthodontic treatment or have questions regarding permanent tooth extractions,  Dr. Emad is happy to help. Dr. Emad Abdallah is a faculty member at Tufts Craniofacial Pain Center.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/sleepapnea

http://www.naturalhealingnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/iStock_000002751438Medium.jpg

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24963245

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20677956

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24963245

 

Reap the Potential Benefits of Coconut Oil

February 11th, 2016

cYou may have heard about oil pulling in the news, on blogs, or from friends. This latest trend is actually an old Indian oral therapy dating back 3,000 years! It's an inexpensive practice that involves the gentle swishing of approximately 1 tablespoon of oil through the teeth for about 10 minutes daily before rinsing out. However, it should be well noted that this procedure should never replace brushing, flossing, and other daily dental habits.

Research has found that coconut oil may be effective in keeping our mouths healthy. It was tested against strains of Streptococcus bacteria, which are often found in the oral cavity and aid in producing acids that cause tooth decay. The study reported that the oil was able to fight off cavity-causing bacteria in the mouth. A beneficial ingredient of coconut oil is lauric acid, which is well-known for its anti-microbial agents that help defeat gingivitis, plaque, and microbes that cause bad breath.

Not to mention, recently, there has been news of individuals using coconut oil as toothpaste (for both humans and pets!). The suggested reasons behind this trend are that coconut oil does not contain harmful antibacterial chemicals, for example triclosan, which are sometimes found in traditional toothpastes. These harmful chemicals have raised concerns about antibiotic resistance and endocrine disruption. In addition, coconut oil is believed to help maintain a healthier balance of lipids on your tongue in comparison to some toothpastes. Toothpastes often contain chemicals that create the foam-like texture of the toothpaste, including sodium laureth sulfate (SLS), or sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES). These chemicals interfere with phospholipids found on the tongue, which as a result can create a bitter taste in your mouth. Research has found that SLS may even negatively impact the health of individuals with recurring canker sores. However, further research is needed to prove the effectiveness of using coconut oil as toothpaste.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.yahoo.com/health/the-4-best-uses-for-coconut-1343871427731510.html

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/features/oil-pulling

Save Your Heart: American Heart Month

February 5th, 2016

American-Heart-Month

All throughout February we're celebrating American Heart Month! This national awareness month provides WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, and the American Heart Association the opportunity to make others across the world aware about cardiovascular disease. These organizations help organize, educate, and fund medical research on cardiovascular disease and its prevention.

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure, is the NUMBER ONE killer of both women and men in the United States. So much so that it's responsible for one out of every three deaths each year. Over 6 million American women are impacted by heart disease, while another 37 million women are at risk of developing heart disease.

This annual campaign was initiated in 1964 by the American Heart Association and has continued to heighten awareness across the nation. However, the number of individuals impacted by cardiovascular disease is predicted to grow more than 23.6 million by the year 2030. Unfortunately, nearly half of all Americans have at least one major risk factor, but are unaware of it. It's important to also know the warning signs, including chest discomfort, shortness of breath, or sudden lack of responsiveness. To spot a stroke, think F.A.S.T: Face drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty, time to call the police.

Becoming aware of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease, for instance obesity and diabetes, is key to understanding what needs to be done to lower your risk. Eating a healthy diet, not smoking, exercising, and picking up other positive health habits will help keep your heart pumping!

President Obama wrote, “We have lost devoted mothers and fathers, loved siblings, and cherished friends to this devastating epidemic. During American Heart Month, as we honor their memories, let us recommit to improving our heart health and continuing the fight against this deadly disease, for ourselves and our families.”

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://newsroom.heart.org/events/happy-heart-month-2830575

http://www.cchdmt.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/American-Heart-Month.jpg

http://www.womenheart.org/?programs_heartmo2016

Appreciate the Relatively Unpainful Methods of Modern-Day Dentistry!

October 2nd, 2015

teethhGoing to the dentist’s may not be your favorite activity, but you might appreciate it a little more after reading Danny Gallagher’s article about how painless modern-day dentistry is compared to dental processes from around 14,000 years ago!

You’d think that there wouldn’t be time for practicing dental repair during the Paleolithic era. However, a recent study from University of Bologna in Italy  published by the journal “Scientific Reportsshows that people started to treat cavities a long time ago. Researchers disvovered dental evidence from an ancient molar found at a dig site in northern Italy in 1988.Tests dated the tooth to the Late Upper Paleolithic era, which was approximately 13,820 to 14,160 years ago. Although the tooth was found in 1988, it was not until 25 years later that researchers noticed the oldest piece of evidence throughout dentistry history, says paleoanthropologist Stefano Benazzi, co-author of this study from the University of Bologna.

There was considerable enamel chipping made in the tooth’s cavity before the specimen died at around 25 years. Researchers carried out an experiment which involved scratching at the enamel of the molar with tools made out of different materials (wood, bone, stone, etc.). They tested these different implements in order to attempt to recreate this 14,000 year old dental procedure. The results of this experiment demonstrated that the person who operated on the tooth probably used tools created from sharpened flint. Ouch! Think about how painful that would be!

The University of Bologna’s study is not the only proof that humans from ancient eras have tried to repair teeth with extremely painful methods. For instance, an article on LiveScience stated that there was evidence of the use of beeswax for filling a cracked, canine tooth from a human jaw that was discovered in a Slovenian cave more than a hundred years ago. Another New York Times article claims that human molars from 4,000-7,000 BC that were drilled with stone tools were found in western Pakistan.

Don’t you just want to hug the inventor of anesthetics?

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.cnet.com/news/14000-year-old-tooth-shows-oldest-and-probably-most-painful-form-of-dentistry/?ftag=YHRbd38a98

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/03376/teeth_3376286b.jpg

Are Redheads More Sensitive to Dental Pain?

August 23rd, 2015

red

Does your hair color have an impact on your desire to visit the dentist for your routinely check-up? According to recent research, redheads may share dental anxiety as a result of sensitivity. Individuals with red hair are often resistant to local pain fighters such as Novocain. Discoveries have also shown that redheads tend to need larger doses of anesthesia. 

Despite their fiery appearance, redheads may be more sensitive to pain than others. Consequently, according to the Journal of American Dental Association, they are twice as likely to avoid going to the dentist and often experience more anxiety when it comes to dental procedures than individuals with other hair colors. In addition, redheads have an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease (Disorder of the nervous system that affects the motor system), skin cancer, and endometriosis (Condition where tissue from the uterus grows outside of the uterus).

This news led Dr. Daniel Sessler, an Outcomes Research Department chair at The Cleveland Clinic, to produce two studies. In 2004, the study showed that people with red hair require 20 percent more general anesthesia than blondes and brunettes. In the 2005 study, it was found that redheads have a greater resistance to local anesthesia and are more sensitive to thermal pain than others.

Researchers hypothesize that variants of the melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R gene), which produces melanin, may be a contributing factor. play a role. Melanin functions to give skin, hair, and eyes their color. However, redheads do not produce melanin due to a mutation of the MC1R gene, which is responsible for their freckles, fair skin color, and red hair. In fact, redhead genes are thought to date back 20,000 to 40,000 years. Although not completely understood, MC1R receptors in the brain may influence pain sensitivity. Even though this may not be the best discovery in the world for redheads, it has inspired research that may lead to new and safer drug prescriptions.

Not all redheads experience sensitivity. Yet, individuals without red hair can also carry a variant of the MC1R gene, and thus experience more anxiety than those without the MC1R gene. According to a study, the MC1R gene was found in 20 of 77 participants with brown or black hair.

Patients who have experienced pain should inform their dentists. Dental anxiety should never get in the way of maintaining your oral health. Here are steps that you can take to help relieve your stress or even conquer your dental fear.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/why-dental-visits-are-hairraising-if-youre-a-redhead-7584589.html

http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/07/30/redhead.pain.dentist/

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/PainManagement/dentists-tread-gingerly-redheads/story?id=8293620&singlePage=true

http://www.livescience.com/39095-redhead-health-risks.html

 http://www.smilesbydocford.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Fort-Myers-Dentist-Redhead-Pain.jpg

The Success of Dental Implants in Women with Osteoporosis

August 13th, 2015

Aging can be a beautiful process. Yet, with age, we can expect for gradual changes within the body to occur. For instance, post-menopausal women with osteoporosis often have a greater risk of losing their teeth. New research has found that dental implants can help improve the lives of women suffering from osteoporosis.Both osteoporosis and dental implants are more connected than you may think. Osteoporosis is a condition involving one's bones, where the bones become thinner and brittle due to a loss of calcium. As a result, the  bones become more prone to fractures. It is important to note that this condition does not only affect the spine and bones within the core of the body. It can also have an impact on bones within the jaw, and thus contribute to tooth loss. Bone loss in the jaw can lead to a change in the shape of a person's face and loss of function in keeping teeth secure.

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine studied over 200 women with osteoporosis. In addition, all of the women had at least two adjacent teeth missing. Some women had dental implants, fixed partial dentures, or removable dentures, while others had no restoration work done. The study titled, "Dental Implant Supported Restorations Improve the Quality of Life in Osteoporotic Women," was published in the Journal of International DentistryEach participant was given a survey which questioned their satisfaction with replacement teeth and how it impacted their lives socially and emotionally. Participants who had dental implants reported the highest overall satisfaction with the quality of their lives, followed by individuals with fixed dentures, false teeth, and no dental restoration work, respectively. This study may indicate that dental implants provide individuals with the highest satisfaction after losing teeth.

Along the same lines, a different study observed over 600 dental implants in approximately 200 patients over the age of 50. The study found that dental implants had a 94% success rate. The success rate was also high for individuals taking osteoporosis medications. If you have osteoporosis, it's important to let your dentist know what medications you are taking and how long that you've been taking them to ensure the success of dental implants.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150611131517.htm

http://downtowndentalsc.com/the-connection-between-dental-implants-and-osteoporosis-a-quick-look/

http://womensbrainhealth.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/o-OLDER-WOMAN-facebook.jpg

Prostate Trouble? Your Dentist Can Help

August 2nd, 2015

man

Researchers are finding even more connections between oral health and the health of your body. Periodontal health for men and women is crucial as it can influence several other health factors.

Current research suggests that there is a higher prevalence of periodontal disease in men (56.4%) than in women (38.4%). Researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Departments of Urology and Pathology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center found a link between gum disease and prostatitis, a disease that causes inflammation of the prostate gland in men.  Since the prostate gland is located between the bladder and the penis, inflammation of this gland can make urination difficult. Inflammation of the prostate gland also causes prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels to rise above normal amounts. Research has shown that men with signs of periodontal disease and prostatitis have higher levels of PSA than men with only one of the conditions.

The study included 27 men with prostatitis, who were 21 years of age and older. Of the 27 participants, all experienced moderate to severe gum disease. Each of the participants received treatment for only periodontal disease and were tested again weeks later. Even without prostate treatment, 21 of the 27 participants showed significant improvement in prostate health and periodontal health. Six of the participants showed no changes. The article, "Periodontal Treatment Improves Prostate Symptoms and Lowers Serum PSA in Men with High PSA and Chronic Periodontitis," was published in the journal DentistryDr. Nabil Bissada, chair of periodontics at Case Western Reserve University, explained, "This study shows that if we treat the gum disease, it can improve the symptoms of prostatitis and the quality of life for those who have the disease."

Inflammation associated with periodontal disease does not just affect the mouth. Studies have also shown that chronic inflammatory conditions such as periodontal disease may increase your risk of cardiovascular disease, impotence, and even cancer. Maintaining oral health is essential, particularly for the sake of your overall health!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150505102437.htm

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20150522/treating-gum-disease-might-help-prostate-symptoms-study

https://www.perio.org/consumer/men

http://drperrone.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/Marielaina-Perrone-DDS-Mens-Dental-Health-2-680x350.jpg

Consuming Cheese Can Prevent Cavities

January 20th, 2014

Happy National Cheese Lover's Day!

Dairy has been long known to be packed with a great amount of calcium, protein, and vitamin D in every serving. It has always been said that drinking milk and other dairy products will keep bones healthy and strong, but there has not been much research done on how beneficial dairy products are to oral health until recently. General Dentistry just published in their most recent journal issue that cheese and other dairy products have the potential of keeping cavities at bay.

Researchers that conducted the study looked at 68 participants between the ages of 12 and 15. The subjects had their dental plaque pH checked before eating cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. Previous studies indicate that a pH level below 5.5 makes an individual more susceptible to the wearing down of enamel, resulting in tooth erosion. The higher the pH level, the lower the chance an individual has of getting cavities.

The subjects were randomly split into three groups: one that ate cheddar cheese, another that drank milk, and a final group that ate sugar-free yogurt. After eating their chosen type of dairy for 3 minutes, the subjects were asked to rinse their mouth with water. The pH level of each subject’s mouth was then measured 10, 20, and 30 minutes the dairy product was consumed. The researchers found that the individuals who drank milk and ate sugar-free yogurt did not have a significant change in pH level; however, those who ate cheese showed a great increase in pH levels after each time interval, indicating that this particular dairy product may be the key to preventing cavities. The results suggest that because there is more of a need to chew when consuming cheese, there is an increase in saliva production, which also leads to an increase of pH levels. The researchers also found compounds inherent in cheese binds to tooth enamel, preventing acid from causing further damage.

This new finding gives us more of a reason to add a slice of cheese to a sandwich. Continue to make sure daily that your diet increases and strengthens oral health!

If you have any questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605130118.htm

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/6-reasons-to-get-your-diary

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57587876/cheesy-grins-may-protect-teeth-from-cavities/

Picture Credit: http://dailym.ai/17rk9ET

Local recommendation: Wasik Cheeseshop 

Link Found Between Poor Oral Health and HPV

September 9th, 2013

There has been a recent studying showing a relationship between poor oral health and the human papillomavirus (HPV). HPV is a sexually transmitted virus that has been shown to cause cancer of the cervix, mouth and throat. Cancer Prevention Research has been the first group to document this link. While this association has been made, it is still too early to say that flossing and brushing on a regular basis can prevent oral HPV infection.

 

Research done at the University of Texas health Science Center have looked over data on both low-risk and high-risk oral HPV infection and health in 3,439 adults between the ages of 30 and 69. The original study found that males who smoke cigarettes and having multiple oral sex partners have an increased risk of developing oral HPV infection. Researchers then controlled for smoking and the number of oral sex partners and found that self-rated poor oral health was an independent risk for this oral infection. It was shown that those with poor oral health were 56% more likely to contract the oral HPV infection, compared to those with fair oral health. It was also found that gum disease was linked to a 51% higher oral HPV risk and general dental problems were linked with a 28% increased prevalence of this infection. While there still has not been conclusive evidence revealing this, researcher believe that people who lack of good oral health, such as those suffering from ulcers, sores or lesions, and gum inflammation, give way to more openings in the mouth, providing more locations for HPV to enter.

 

Even though there is not enough evidence to decisively show the link between poor oral health and HPV, it never hurts to maintain good oral health. While more research needs to be done in this topic, there have been many more relationships shown, linking oral health to the body’s overall health. Good oral hygiene should become a lifestyle, a personal habit that individuals should hold up to. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://cancerpreventionresearch.aacrjournals.org/

 

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/08/21/study-ties-poor-oral-hygiene-to-cancer-causing-virus/?_r=0

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/08/21/oral-health-hpv-risk-_n_3790205.html

 

Five Green Foods That Can Bring About Good Oral Health

June 4th, 2013

Have you been looking to get healthier and searching for how to change up your current diet? Here are a couple green healthy foods that can get you started on spicing up what you eat and also can be beneficial for your oral health!

Green tea: get ready to cut out sugary and carbonated beverages and look into a lighter and calming alternative. While green tea has been proven to reduce the risk of both stroke and oral cancer, it contains catechins, which are a type of antioxidants that also prevents cavities and gingivitis. Green tea also prevents halitosis by hindering bacterial growth. Make sure to read our blog to find out more about green tea health benefits!

Celery: these crunchy greens can help produce saliva, freshening up the mouth while neutralizing bacteria that results in cavities. Celery is also known to stimulate and massage gums during chewing and also cleanses areas between teeth.

Wasabi: the spicy Japanese horseradish not only adds flavor to sushi and sashimi, but can also be front line defense for teeth. What makes wasabi taste hot is a substance known as isothiocyanates, which also prevents the growth of bacteria in the mouth. Eating green paste can keep cavities away!

Parsley: these leaves can add flavor to a variety of dishes but can also help freshen up the mouth after a meal. These greens contain monoterpenes, which are substances that travel through the lungs and bloodstream; their odor ends up being released through one’s breath.

Kiwi: most fruits contain an assortment of vitamins, but kiwis are known to be jam-packed with Vitamin C, which allow maintains the collagen in gums, preventing tenderness and vulnerability to bacteria. Snacking on these sweet green fruits is another way to prevent cavities.

If you have any more questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/26/health/it-works-on-sushi-it-could-help-teeth-too.html

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/getting-your-vitamin-c-from-kiwi-fruit.html#b

Green Tea May Prevent the Onset of Oral Cancer

June 3rd, 2013

Green tea has been shown to a soothing drink that has the ability maintain healthy teeth and gums. Research also reveals that green tea extract can be used as a chemopreventative agent to fight oral cancer. The Daily Meal also reports that "Green tea has also been proven helpful to people who suffer from diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol and blood pressure, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as even skincare and tooth decay."

Cancer Prevention Research published online that out of the oral leukoplakia patients who took the green tea extra, more than half of them experienced a clinical response. Their preclinical models indicated that green tea is filled with polyphenols, which can prevent the progression of cancer. Researchers have noted that while these clinical trials may not show definitive proof that green tea can be used to prevent cancer, these results can lead to more studies focusing on patients who are at risk for oral cancer. Green tea has shown to be promising because of its nontoxic nature, which is essential to prevent further harm in individuals battling cancer.

In phase 2 of their study, oral leukoplakia patients were given either the green tea extract or a placebo at one of three dosage amounts. Participants ingested the tea or the extract for three times a day for three months. After these three months, the patients underwent oral tissue biopsies. These biopsies were able to reveal that green tea extract were beneficial to the patients but also lead the researchers to believe that antiangiogenetic effects (growth and development of tissue) were the mechanism of action.

Out of the patients that took the two highest doses ended up, 58.8% of the patients had a clinical response, compared to the 36.4% of patients that took the lowest dose of green tea extract. Although these results were not statistically significant, researchers noted that the extract was well received by the patients and only a few of the patients that took the highest extra dosage showed signs of insomnia and nervousness.

The researchers note that there were only a few patients that participated in their clinical trials and that more research needs to be done to see if green tea can conclusive prevent oral or other types of cancer. Green tea needs to be looked at to determine whether it can provide long-term prevention for patients. However, this research proves to be a promising stepping-stone for further studies.

Green tea is stimulatory in nature as it contains some caffeine, which will naturally boost your metabolism. Green tea is also an antioxidant that, like wine, cranberries, and dark chocolate, will target and scavenge for toxins that could lead to cancer, blood clots, and even atherosclerosis.

We recommend an oral cancer screening annually and this can be done at your next preventative visit. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12004708
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm
Photo Credit to http://www.thedailymeal.com/health-benefits-green-tea-could-save-your-life

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