Rheumatoid arthritis

Gum Disease could be Threatening your Life During COVID-19

March 28th, 2021

We all know how important taking care of our teeth are, but did you know that in doing so you could be lowering your risk of having severe complications from COVID-19? The human body is fascinating, and throughout the years research has been continuously proving the relationship between our oral conditions and the conditions that can develop throughout the entire body, particularly as a result of systemic inflammation. A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology reported that individuals with a severe form of gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, are 9 times more likely to die from infection with COVID-19. 

Periodontal disease has been found to be linked as a culprit of many detrimental health conditions, including diabetes, respiratory disease, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, just to name a few. In addition, periodontal disease can lead to oral problems such as bad breath, bone loss, and ultimately result in loss of teeth.

The Surprising Link Between Gum Disease and Systemic Disease - Millennium Dental Technologies, Inc.

More recently, it has been suggested that controlling periodontal gum inflammation could possibly help lower the chance of experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms

Another study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology also found that individuals with gum disease who become infected with COVID-19 are 3.5 times more likely to be in the intensive care unit (ICU) and 4.5 times more likely to require use of a ventilator. They found that the blood inflammatory markers were significantly higher in patient with gum disease.

Not to mention, a California Dental Association (CDA) Journal study looking at inflammatory markers and their relationship to COVID-19 complications found that pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other pulmonary complications linked to COVID-19 could result form the aspiration of oral bacteria. This is also supported by previous research that has found an association between periodontal disease and other common lung conditions such as asthma.

This is why many research authors and health professionals are highlighting the importance of prevention and avoiding the promotion of systemic inflammation to help decrease the chance of developing severe complications from the virus.

On a positive note, periodontal disease can be prevented and managed! Regular dental visits and proper oral hygiene practices are necessary to help prevent the disease from progressing. Your dentist may recommend non-surgical and/or surgical treatments.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://nypost.com/2021/02/08/covid-19-patients-with-gum-disease-more-likely-to-die-study/

https://www.beckersdental.com/clinical-leadership-infection-control/36224-routine-dental-care-may-prevent-severe-covid-19-complications-study-finds.html

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpe.13435

https://www.beckersdental.com/clinical-leadership-infection-control/36458-covid-19-patients-with-gum-disease-9-times-more-likely-to-die-from-the-virus-study-finds.html?origin=DentalE&utm_source=DentalE&utm_medium=email&utm_content=newsletter&oly_enc_id=7754I6987723B8B

https://www.cda.org/Home/News-and-Events/Newsroom/Article-Details/routine-dental-care-may-protect-against-severe-covid-19-related-complications#:~:text=Oral%20bacteria%20can%20be%20aspirated,to%20dentistry%20and%20COVID%2D19.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fleemingdental.com.au%2Fnew-studies-show-gum-disease-may-increase-severity-of-covid-19%2F&psig=AOvVaw2eU7rvXv9h5qjRprOqk-Bv&ust=1617025137826000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMDBpqeO0-8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lanap.com%2F2016%2F09%2F22%2Fsurprising-link-between-gum-disease-and-systemic-disease%2F&psig=AOvVaw2yP2PqAwAjz0-Wnp8RPUO8&ust=1617028498531000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJjskN-a0-8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAI

Snap, Crackle, Pop! How Rheumatoid Arthritis & Gum Disease are Related

June 15th, 2020

Snap, crackle, pop! Creaky joints can be a real pain, but who would have thought that it would have any connection to your mouth? Surprisingly, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis have a lot in common, as they both are chronic inflammatory diseases that involve the breakdown of bone and soft tissue.

What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? 

RA is both a chronic inflammatory and an autoimmune disease, and is often characterized by pain and stiffness. RA typically affects the joints, but can also affect the body's organs.

Periodontitis...What's that?

On the other hand, periodontitis is an advanced form of gum disease. Without  treatment, periodontitis can lead to loss of tooth-supporting bone, tissue, and even your actual teeth!  Periodontitis can impact anyone at any age, but can be preventable. Unfortunately, 47.2% of adults over the age of 30 have periodontitis in the United States. A major cause of periodontal disease is poor oral hygiene, which leads to bacterial plaque attacking your tooth enamel. Other risk factors of periodontitis include tobacco use, diabetes, certain medications, older age, genetics, poor nutrition and obesity, tooth grinding, and misaligned teeth, just to name a few.

Gum disease can be harder to recognize because of its typical pain-free nature. However, there are some common signs and symptoms of periodontitis to look for:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Loose permanent teeth/tooth loss
  • Changes in your bite
  • Receding gums
  • Changes in the fit of oral appliances (ex: partial dentures)

Yet, It is still possible to experience no signs or symptoms of gum disease. That's just one of many reasons why visiting your dentist regularly is essential to your oral and overall health, in addition to eating healthy, brushing at least twice a day, flossing daily, and practicing good oral hygiene habits at home. It is important to catch gum disease in the early stages to avoid irreversible damage to your pearly whites. Remember, prevention is key!

How are the two diseases linked?

Recent studies have supported the link between RA and periodontal disease. According to the Arthritis Foundation, researchers found that tooth loss, a common indicator of periodontal disease, may predict rheumatoid arthritis and its severity. Within the study, they found that the more teeth lost due to periodontal disease, the higher the risk of developing RA. Other research has also suggested that the bacteria commonly associated with periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), may play a role in onsetting RA.

Treating one disease may help improve the other!

Researchers at Case Western University found that individuals with both severe rheumatoid arthritis and gum disease experienced an improvement in their RA symptoms after successfully treating their gum disease.

Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis may face certain challenges in taking care of their oral health. It is important to inform your health care providers, who will help provide recommendations that will work best for you. To make brushing and flossing a little easier,  American Dental Association (ADA) recommendations include:

  • Make your toothbrush unique: To get a better grip of your toothbrush, add a tennis ball or bicycle grip to the handle.

  • Try different types of floss: Try floss holders, floss picks, or threaders.

  • Pump out your toothpaste: Toothpaste in a pump may be more comfortable than squeezing out of the tube.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/living-with/the-link-between-gum-disease-and-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.hopkinsrheumatology.org/2017/01/gum-disease-linked-to-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/g/gum-disease

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How Can Vitamin K2 Help My Health?

December 11th, 2019

As we approach the holidays, our hearts and tummies begin to prepare for the tasty meals enjoyed with loved ones. There are a lot of vitamins and minerals that exist in the foods we eat that are beneficial, and sometimes even essential for our body to function properly. Many of us have been told that milk builds strong bones due to calcium and vitamin D, which work together to help maintain your teeth and bones. But what about the less popular vitamins, such as vitamin K2? Check out how vitamin K2 may provide benefits for your general and dental health:

First, what exactly is Vitamin K? Vitamin K is a fat-soluble vitamin that is considered an essential nutrient necessary for blood clotting, calcium metabolism, bone health, and cardiovascular health. If your body is lacking vitamin K, your body's normal healing process may be impaired and you may be more likely to bleed.

Vitamin K has two main forms, K1 and K2. Vitamin K1 can be found in plant foods such as leafy greens and is made from the compound phylloquinone. On the other hand, vitamin K2 is found in animal and fermented foods, and from the normal bacteria within our human digestive system. Vitamin K2 is made from menaquinones. Not as popular in the Western diet, vitamin K2 can be found in Natto, a fermented soybean paste that is common in Japan, and in some cheeses. However, there is no recommendation for supplementation or daily intake of vitamin K2. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) describes vitamin K1 as the preferred form of the vitamin since it is less toxic, works faster, is stronger. However, vitamin K2 is also beneficial for our health for the reasons stated below.

Research suggests that vitamin K2 may protect your bones from osteoporosis and lower your risk of bone fractures. In addition, a research study published in Integrative Medicine: A Clinician's Journal found that vitamin K2 may contribute to keeping your blood vessel walls clear of calcium accumulation. Calcium deposits within blood vessels can lead to an increased risk of heart disease. Although more research needs to be conducted regarding vitamin K2 and its role in the oral cavity, some animal studies have suggested that it may play a role in lowering your risk of developing tooth decay. Vitamin K2 has been found to activate the protein osteocalcin, which is necessary for bone metabolism and the growth of new dentin within your teeth. it works together with vitamin D3 to carry calcium to your teeth and bones for normal absorption. It is also believed that vitamin K2 slows down the rate of tooth loss with age. Some studies have also suggested that vitamin K3 can help lower risk of developing diabetes, cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, kidney disease, and lower oxidative stress in the brain related to Alzheimer's disease.

Ultimately, it is important to have a balanced diet, and keep up with a regular oral care routine, by brushing with fluoride toothpaste at least twice a day for two minutes each time, flossing, and keeping regular dental appointments.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/what-to-know-about-vitamin-k2-benefits-for-teeth

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-k2#bottom-line

https://askthedentist.com/vitamin-k2-benefits/

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Connection Between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

June 27th, 2015

 

It's no doubt that oral health is a window to overall health. There is a significant amount of research linking common oral problems to heart disease, diabetes, pneumoniaAlzheimer’s disease, and now rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints, which typically causes pain and stiffness. There is increasing interest in the relationship between oral health and inflammatory diseases. A recent study conducted in March of 2015 suggests that periodontitis, a type of inflammatory disease affecting the supportive structures of the teeth (such as bones and tissues), along with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and may trigger the development of rheumatoid arthritis.The study titled "Inflammation in the Mouth and Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis," was presented at the 93rd General Session and Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research. The study examined 8 chronic RA patients, 15 onset RA patients, and 20 individuals with neither periodontitis nor RA. Of the total 23 RA patients, 10 had gingivitis and 9 had periodontitis. In addition, 6 of the individuals with both periodontitis and RA also had P. gingivalis, a strain of bacterium in the oral cavity that is typically associated with the cause of periodontal disease.

Researchers also found that regardless of dental care, all RA patients showed oral inflammation. They suggest that P. gingivalis antibodies may help rheumatologists in distinguishing RA patients who may benefit from periodontal treatment.

Both RA and periodontal disease are similar in many ways. Smoking is a common risk factor of RA and periodontal disease and should be avoided. individuals with RA have a higher risk of developing periodontal disease and may experience more severe symptoms.

It is clear that inflammation and oral bacteria may go hand-in-hand. Take good care of your teeth, it can ultimately save your joints!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150312123526.htm

http://www.cadentalgroup.com/wp-content/themes/custom-theme/img/slider/dentist-1.jpg

Finding the Bacterial Link Between Rheumatoid Arthritis and Gum Disease

September 16th, 2013

Over the years, researchers have been able to demonstrate the importance of oral health in relation to systemic, or overall, health. Keeping up with oral hygiene has been shown to not only affect the oral cavity, but also various areas in the body. Oral health has been linked to the prevalence of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), diabetes, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, and various other conditions. Researchers have been well aware of the strong association between oral health and these health conditions, but continue to look into the root cause and mechanisms that result in these links.

 

However, a research group at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry Oral Health and Systemic Diseases recently published their findings in PloS Pathogens, revealing the bacterium that is responsible for periodontal disease.  They found that the bacterium, Prophromonas gingivalis, leads to a faster progression of gum disease, increasing cartilage and bone destruction. Their research indicated that P. gingivalis produces an enzyme, peptidylarginine deiminanse (PAD), which increases collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). This enzyme makes the body believe that there are intruding proteins within the body, inducing an immune attack. This results in chronic inflammation, which accounts for the weakening of bone and cartilage within the joints.

 

This research group was able to show that there is a viable link between P. gingivalis periodontal infection and rheumatoid arthritis; however, more research needs to be done to verify these finds. Hopefully further research can bring about new strategies to prevent RA. These studies also should encourage individuals to maintain good oral hygiene. It is always important to keep in mind that brushing and flossing not only keeps the mouth clean, but also keeps the entire body healthy. Please feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/dental/DE00001

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130912203327.htm

http://www.genengnews.com/gen-news-highlights/how-bad-gums-lead-to-arthritis/81248849/

http://arthritisbroadcastnetwork.org/2013/09/gum-disease-may-be-an-indication-of-rheumatoid-arthritis/

 

 

 

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