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Are Your Gums Affected by your Blood Sugar Levels?

January 23rd, 2019

Diabetes, which impacts about 30 million people in the United States, surprisingly doesn't just affect your blood sugar. Research has consistently showed that gum disease, including both gingivitis and periodontitis, is linked with diabetes. The relationship between gum disease and diabetes works both ways: individuals with diabetes have a higher chance of developing gum disease, and people with severe gum disease are more prone to have issues controlling their blood glucose levels.

Early stages of gum problems begin as gingivitis, also described as inflammation of the gums. As bacteria invade the gum pockets and inflammation remains, gum recession and bone loss begin to occur in the more severe stages of gum disease, known as periodontitis.  People who have diabetes unfortunately have a a harder time clearing bacterial infections, which they are also more at risk for developing. That's why having good oral hygiene practices is so important, especially if you have diabetes or a current diagnosis of periodontal disease. Take a look at how you can manage your oral care with diabetes:

Diet & Exercise

If you're a diabetic, one of the best things to do to maintain overall health is to keep your blood sugar levels controlled. It is best to add exercise into your daily routine and to have a balanced diet. This will help you not only maintain a healthy mouth, but also help lower your risk of developing other complications associated with diabetes, including kidney disease and heart disease.

Regular Dental Visits & Oral Hygiene

Since people with diabetes have greater chances of developing oral infections, it is important to keep a strict routine of brushing, flossing, and rinsing. Also, be sure to clean any oral appliances that you have, such as dentures or retainers, as they often harbor bacteria and left over food particles that can contribute to tooth decay. Scheduling regular dental check-ups is also necessary to ensure that no infections have begun to develop.

Avoid smoking & Poor Oral Habits

Smoking puts you at risk for many health problems such as cancer. It is never too late to quit smoking! Avoiding tobacco products can help you improve your oral and overall health. It is also important to avoid habits like nail biting, as our fingernails harbor a lot of bacteria from the things we touch throughout the day.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.timesnownews.com/health/article/oral-care-for-diabetics-how-people-suffering-from-diabetes-can-protect-their-teeth-and-gums/346614

http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/oral-health-and-hygiene/diabetes-and-oral-health.html

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Experiencing Toothaches from Winter Weather?

January 13th, 2019

As you're walking outside this winter, do you ever feel a cringing pain in your teeth from the cold air? Not only can the cold cause dry skin, it can also cause some tooth sensitivity, especially if you already struggle with sensitive teeth. According to the Academy of General Dentistry, approximately 40 million Americans have sensitive teeth. This causes many people to avoid foods that are either very cold or very hot, such as ice-cream or soup. So, why does tooth sensitivity occur?

The bulk of your teeth are composed of dentin, which is covered but your enamel on the outside, your gums, and also by cementum on the roots. Inside the dentin is a lot of nerve endings, so once dentin is exposed your nerves respond painfully to hot and cold!

Numerous factors can cause your dentin to become exposed, take a look:

  • Periodontal disease: Gum disease is a common cause of tooth sensitivity. Over time if plaque builds up on your teeth, your gums can become inflamed leading to gingivitis. If not treated, periodontal disease can arise which leads to gum recession and exposed roots and dentin. Be sure to keep up with regular brushing twice a day, flossing, rinsing, and dental check-ups to ensure that your gums stay healthy.
  • Improper brushing techniques: It's true, there is a science to brushing! Brushing aggressively can cause your enamel to wear down and eventually expose your nerve endings within dentin. Make sure you have a soft bristled tooth brush and that you are brushing toward the gum line lightly to remove bacteria within your gum pockets. 
  • Teeth clenching and grinding:  Someone may have told you that you grind your teeth at night, or you may notice that you're clenching your teeth throughout the day. Clenching and grinding can cause your enamel to wear down and also cause headaches and cracks within your teeth. Let your dentist know if you are clenching or grinding and treatment options such as a night guard can be discussed.
  • Tooth decay: If you begin experiencing cold sensitivity on a regular basis, it is important to let your dentist know because it could be a sign of tooth decay. Tooth decay and fillings that have cracked can cause exposure of dentin and result in tooth sensitivity.
  • Tooth whitening/dental treatment: Sometime bleaching agents and recent dental procedures such as fillings and crowns can cause temporary sensitivity. Be sure to let your dentist know when you begin experiencing sensitivity.
  • Acidic diet: Foods and beverages with high acid content, including sodas, coffee, juice, pickles, etc., can cause enamel erosion and exposure of dentin.
To help your winter go smoothly, when going outside try breathing through your nose as much as possible so that the cold air has less contact with your teeth. Make sure that you are bundled up when going outside. Fluoride rinses and toothpastes geared to help with sensitivity can also help decrease your pain to cold. Your dentist may recommend root canal treatment if the pulp inside the tooth is infected, or a procedure to cover your root surfaces to help improve gum recession.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.guardiandirect.com/resources/articles/winter-and-sensitive-teeth

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/tooth-sensitivity/what-causes-sensitive-teeth-0714

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How Does Your Cold/Flu Affect Your Mouth?

January 6th, 2019

Catching a cold or the flu can be one of the worst things that come with the cold weather during winter. The (CDC) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that adults typically get a cold 2-3 times a year! A lot of challenges come with being sick, including trouble sleeping, eating, and just going about your normal daily activities. With a sore throat, stuffy or runny nose, and a box of tissues by your side, you may be looking to cough medicine and nasal decongestants to hide the symptoms. But, did you ever wonder how your cold or the medicines to treat them impact your teeth and mouth?  Here's some things to keep in mind in order to keep your body and mouth healthy while combatting a cold:

Stuffy Nose & Dry Mouth

It's a real struggle when you cannot breathe through your nose, especially when you're trying to get a good night's rest. As a result, you have to breathe through your mouth, which can cause you to experience dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is less saliva flow, which can also occur from taking nasal decongestants like sudafed to remedy your stuffy nose. Unfortunately, dry mouth not only makes it hard to swallow, it can also impact your mouth by promoting bacterial growth. So, when taking nasal decongestants to help your cold, stay hydrated with water and chewing xylitol-containing gum can help stimulate saliva flow. You can also try using a humidifier in the room you sleep in.

Sinus & Tooth Pain 

Another obstacle that you may face as a result of being sick is tenderness and pain around your sinuses as a result of sinusitis. This can cause you to feel like you have a toothache in your upper jaw since they are near your sinuses. Some signs of sinusitis include a yellow colored mucous drainage, and pressure near your mid-face. Fortunately, this experience should improve once your cold clears up.

Cough Drops/Syrup & Throat Lozenges

Here's the scoop on cough syrup, cough drops and sore throat lozenges:  most of the time these products contain sugar for flavor and can be damaging to your teeth as they are held in your mouth for long periods of time. Not to mention, cough syrups are sticky and can remain on teeth and cause harm to your enamel. Try to look for pills, sugar-free cough drops, and sore throat lozenges as these are best for your oral health! Be sure to also keep your regular oral care routine brushing, flossing, and rinsing.

Orange Juice

Orange juice is loaded with vitamin C to help your immune system fight your cold. Due to the acidity which can weaken your tooth enamel, try drinking orange juice in one sitting during a meal, and drink water afterwards to help protect your tooth from the acid.

As you fight a cold/flu keep your dental health in mind and replace your toothbrush once you feel better so you can start fresh!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/dry-mouth/how-the-common-cold-teeth-and-oral-health-are-connected-1215

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Merry and Bright Teeth for the Holidays!

December 21st, 2018

As the holidays approach, your dentist and teeth may not be high on your list of things to think about. But, it's important to keep your oral health in mind so that you can enter 2019 with a healthy start! Take a look at these tips so that you can enjoy the holidays while keeping your teeth and gums healthy and bright:

1. Don't forget your oral health routine

Be sure to keep up your routine of brushing at least twice a day for two minutes, rinsing, and flossing. If you're looking for stocking stuffer ideas, toothbrushes are a great option! Toothbrushes should be replaced once the bristles look worn or approximately every 3 to 4 months. When looking for toothpaste, make sure to buy toothpaste with the ADA Seal of Acceptance and fluoride to help prevent cavities. Also, if your due for your dental visit make sure to schedule!

2. Protect your teeth

It may be tempting to use your teeth for situations other than chewing and speaking. You may get the urge to bite your nails to relieve stress, or use your teeth to open packages or bottles, but avoid using your teeth as tools at all costs! Be sure to grab scissors or a bottle opener instead of your teeth. Poor habits can lead to jaw problems, facial pain, sensitive teeth, and can even lead to cracked or loss of teeth.

3. Stay hydrated

Keep water by your side during the holidays and avoid sodas, juices, and sports drinks as they contain high amounts of sugar and create acids that can weaken your tooth enamel. Water with fluoride in it can keep your teeth strong, which is particularly important as you may be indulging in sweet holiday treats! Drinking water can also help keep skin healthy and glowing, and help eliminate bad breath.

4. Avoid chewing hard candies or ice cubes

The sugar in hard candies is just one thing to worry about. Crunching on hard candy can cause chipped or cracked teeth. Also avoid chewing on ice cubes as they could cause chipped teeth or cold sensitivity. Instead, let the ice dissolve naturally and try to stay away from hard or sticky candies that can weaken your tooth enamel.

 

It may not be easy to stay away from sweets and goodies during the holiday, but try your best to keep your teeth a priority!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/babies-and-kids/holiday-healthy-teeth-tips

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Dentists Recommending Chewing Gum: Too Good to be True?

October 10th, 2018

October is National Dental Hygiene Month, which is the perfect time to spread awareness on good oral hygiene practices, including brushing, flossing, rinsing, and possibly to your surprise, chewing gum! This may sound alarming because gum, like candy, is known to cause tooth decay. However, chewing sugarless gum after eating can be beneficial to your teeth for many reasons. This is particularly the case when chewing sugar-free gum that is sweetened with the ingredient xylitol.

Chewing sugarless gum helps wipe away leftover food particles and stimulates saliva secretion. As a result, the proteins and minerals within saliva help neutralize harmful acids made by the bacteria found within plaque. Some studies have shown that people who chew sugar-free gum for 20 minutes after eating can help prevent cavities and strengthen tooth enamel.

A common ingredient in sugar-free gum is Xylitol (a natural sweetener), which helps blocks the growth of Streptococcus mutans, a common bacteria found in the mouth. This in turn helps prevent tooth decay. Some companies are starting to add casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), also known as Recaldent, to their chewing gum. Recaldent has been found to remineralize and strengthen tooth enamel.

Chewing gum is especially important if you experiences dry mouth due to a lack of saliva production. Dry mouth is associated with several oral health problems, including gum swelling, bad breath, and periodontal disease. However, if you are having any symptoms of jaw pain or temporomandibular disorder symptoms (TMD/TMJ), chewing gum is typically not recommended and be sure to let your dentist know.

Even though there is no substitute for brushing, flossing, or rinsing, chewing sugar-free gum after meals can be a nice addition that will freshen breath and keep your mouth healthy!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/gum-that-is-good-for-your-teeth-too-good-to-be-true-0213

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/gum-chewing.html

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It's not you, it's your morning breath!

June 15th, 2017

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Have you ever wondered why despite keeping good oral hygiene, brushing your teeth and tongue regularly, using a mouthwash and flossing before bed, you still wake up with an unpleasant odor coming from your mouth? Well, it's not you; bad breath in the morning is very common. The condition is also known as halitosis. It happens because during the supposed 8-hours of sleep at night, our mouth goes through a period of reduced salivary flow and no access to food and water. The main function of saliva is to 'rinse' and remove solid food particles which if not removed cause bad breath. And when there is no source of carbohydrates at night, your body ends up breaking down the proteins, the byproducts of which feed bacteria and lead to their growth in the mouth. But as you may have noticed, bad breath disappears after having breakfast and going through our morning dental routine, as most bacteria are removed.

Here are some things that you can do to help yourself and minimize the odor of your ‘morning breath’! Regular dental cleanings and check-ups should go without saying. Professional cleaning helps remove plaque from above and below the gum and places that are hard to reach, or we often neglect. Also, pay attention to the instructions and recommendations your dentist gives you for brushing, flossing, and rinsing. And your overall health matters as well! Try improving your diet, physical activity, and reduce work-load and stress. Remember that everything is interconnected.

morning breath tips

There are also conditions which cause oral malodor. Chronic oral malodor is a condition resulting from chronic dry mouth. Other medical conditions such as diabetes, GI disturbance and respiratory infections can also contribute to chronic malodor. It is important to consult your dentist if you experience dry mouth and they will refer you to a primary care physician in the case of medical conditions.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

Source: https://www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-education/articles/oral-malodor

Milk Helps Prevent Cavities

August 31st, 2016

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Many of us have heard the famous advertising campaign, "Got Milk?" Well, it's a good question to ask when speaking about oral health. Grabbing a glass of milk after consuming sugary foods can help reduce the risk of developing cavities, especially for children!

Tooth decay can arise when proper dental habits are not being practiced. Plaque then begins to form on tooth enamel and produces acids stimulated by the sugary foods and drinks that have been consumed leading to cavity formation.

Along with brushing, flossing, rinsing, and other necessary oral habits, milk can also help increase pH levels making the mouth less acidic. According to the Journal of the American Dental Association, researchers looked at the impact of  whole milk, apple juice, and tap water after 20 participants ate cereal. Participants were asked not to brush their teeth for 24 hours so that they could test the drinks on the plaque buildup. It was found that milk helped lower the acidic levels after the consuming cereal and helped strengthen tooth enamel.

So, the next time you indulge in a cookie or other sweet treat, be sure to have a glass of milk by your side. If you have any questions about foods and drinks beneficial to your child's oral health, your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.dentistrytoday.com/news/industrynews/item/1084-research-suggests-drinking-milk-after-sweet-snacks-to-fight-decay?hq_e=el&hq_m=1054420&hq_l=2&hq_v=7c40e2efa1

http://www.medicaldaily.com/no-more-tooth-decay-6-surprising-foods-and-drinks-help-prevent-cavities-248070

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Can Seaweed Help Fight Tooth Decay?

June 27th, 2014

Are your taste buds a fan of seaweed? It turns out that your teeth may love it too! According to studies conducted at Newcastle University's School of Dental Sciences, researchers have found a correlation between seaweed and tooth decay prevention.

Tooth decay is a common oral health problem that typically arises from a buildup of dental plaque on the surface of teeth. Dental plaque is a slimy layer of biofilm that contains many types of bacteria, which release acids that damage tooth enamel. The Newcastle University researchers discovered that an enzyme extracted from Bacillus licheniformis, a bacterium found on the surface of seaweed in marine ecosystems, attacks and removes plaque. The researchers initially began researching the bacterium to see if it could remove bacteria from ship hulls. Soon, they discovered that the enzyme from this bacterium could be a potential weapon in the fight against tooth decay!

The researchers believe that this discovery could lead to more effective oral hygiene products. Although toothpastes are effective, there are still spaces between teeth where the bacteria in plaque can hide, leading to cavities. Further research is being done to see if the enzyme found in seaweed could be used in toothpaste to help reduce such oral health problems. Researchers believe that seaweed-derived toothpaste may protect teeth in the spaces that are hard to reach with toothbrushes. More tests are being planned to verify if this product would be both effective and safe. Scientists have discovered that eating seaweed may even be effective in whitening teeth.

Not only is seaweed good for your oral health, but it also contains a wealth of nutrients that will improve your overall health. Seaweed is rich in iodine, calcium, iron, magnesium and vitamin C. It helps with digestive health and has cholesteral-lowering effects. Seaweed even contains anti-viral, anti-bacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties. In addition, eating seaweed can improve liver function, and stabilize blood sugar. Try adding seaweed to your diet! Seaweed leaves as well as seaweed sheets that are commonly used in sushi rolls are sold at many grocery stores, and can taste nicely in a sandwich, salad, or soup.

Ultimately, seaweed could have a variety of medical and dental applications. Yet, it is important not to forget that regularly brushing, rinsing, and flossing are also essential in the fight against tooth decay!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/seaweed-could-fight-toothdecay-7907620.html

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-18686179

http://www.thebestofrawfood.com/seaweed-health-benefits.html

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Prevent Gingivitis During Pregnancy!

May 31st, 2014

pregnant-with-diabetes-400x400Did you know that healthy gums might make your expected child healthier? Pregnancy can have a huge impact on oral health! Hormonal changes during pregnancy can make gum tissue more sensitive to dental plaque, as well as altering the body’s typical response to bacteria in the mouth. Inflammation of the gums, also known as gingivitis, can arise during pregnancy as a result of an increase in estrogen and progesterone. Pregnant women are also at an increased risk of developing gum disease, also known as periodontitis. If these oral health problems were already present before pregnancy, they are more likely to worsen during pregnancy. It is important to maintain good oral hygiene in order to improve your overall health.
Pregnancy gingivitis affects most women between the second and eighth month of pregnancy. As blood flow to gum tissues increases, the gums become more irritable and swollen.

Gingivitis can lead to gum disease, which is caused by a buildup of plaque. Tooth loss is often a result of gum disease. Symptoms include tooth sensitivity, bad breath, loose teeth, bleeding gums, and bright red or inflamed gums. When gums become infected, it is easier for bacteria to enter into the bloodstream through the gums, which can then travel to the uterus. According to the American Academy of Periodontology and the European Federation of Periodontology, gum disease and gingivitis in women have been linked to pre-mature births, or low-birth weight infants. Pre-maturely born children can suffer from growth complications.

Gingivitis and gum disease can be treated with proper oral health care. Brushing, flossing, and rinsing, are all critical oral habits during pregnancy. Brushing is particularly essential after morning sickness. Make sure to use soft toothbrushes, and be gentle when brushing and flossing. A good diet with nutritious foods is also essential in keeping the mouth clean and healthy. Make sure to intake foods or supplements with vitamins C and B12. Additional scheduled visits to the dentist for cleanings can also help prevent oral health problems.

Researchers have also found a correlation between pregnancy tumors and plaque buildup. Pregnancy tumors are inflammatory, non-cancerous growths that can develop between teeth when the gums are inflamed. These tumors usually disappear after labor. However, dental professionals can remove them if they begin to cause pain, or affect chewing and brushing.

Women during pregnancy are more susceptible to oral health problems. These symptoms, especially during pregnancy, should not be ignored. Thus, good oral care is essential during pregnancy, not only for your overall health, but also your expected child’s!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-09-Expectant-Moms-Need-Healthy-Gums.cvsp

http://americanpregnancy.org/pregnancyhealth/swollengums.html

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=c&iid=325&aid=4854

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/pregnancy-gingivitis-tumors

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