saliva

Tips on Living Long and Healthy

September 16th, 2019

Now that we're into the month of September, it's time to focus our attention on how to improve our overall health in honor and celebration of Healthy Aging Month! This yearly observance focuses on highlighting tips to help individuals improve their physical and mental health as adults get older. This means also focusing on oral health, since the mouth is a window to the rest of the body. In fact, gum disease, which is common in older people, has been found to be linked with memory loss. Which means taking care of your mind may rely heavily on taking care of your mouth! It is important to realize that as we continue to age, there are changes that occur within the mouth that affect our teeth and the surrounding gums and bone. It is key to minimize damage to our oral cavity at any age by maintaining regular dental visits, and keeping up with good oral hygiene habits each day. Often, poor oral health becomes a factor that worsens existing chronic health problems that an individual may face, including heart disease and diabetes.

In addition, older adults may often be taking several medications daily, which can lead to dry mouth. Not only is the feeling of dry mouth annoying, but it also is harmful to your teeth because it can increase your risk of developing tooth decay due to less saliva being present within the mouth.

No matter what age we are, it is always a great time to start practicing healthy lifestyle habits. Take a look at these tips for healthy aging:

NIH Living Longer Infographic

1. Drink plenty of water!

Staying hydrated is very important for our bodies. Tap water is the best resource because it contains fluoride, which plays a major role in keeping your teeth healthy.

2. Healthy snacks are the way to go

We need to be a little picky with our food choices in order to have a diet that is healthy for our teeth and body. Snacks filled with protein including yogurt, cheese, and nuts make great healthy and tooth-friendly snacks. Also eating foods high in iron, such as spinach, meats, and beans, can help give you the energy you need for each day. Avoid eating sugary foods and candy, as these items aren't so tooth-friendly despite their tastiness.

3. Brushing and flossing habits at home

It is important to brush at least twice a day, and floss at least once a day to help wash away all of the food particles and bacteria within the mouth that could cause harm to your pearly whites. If you wear any oral appliances, such as a retainer or denture, be sure to clean these since bacteria can harbor themselves there too! Fluoride Mouthwash also makes for a good addition to your oral care habits. Not only does the mouth wash help make your breath smell nice and fresh, it also may contain beneficial fluoride and can easily be added to your night and/or morning time routine.

4. Be active

Exercise is essential for staying healthy as we get older. Adults are recommended to get at least 150 minutes of exercise each week.

5. Schedule your dental visit

Be sure that your are visiting your dentist for a regular check up at least twice a year to ensure that your teeth are healthy.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/oral-health/

https://www.deltadentalma.com/About-Us/News/2016/For-Healthy-Aging-Month,-know-your-mouth-may-hold

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/september-is-healthy-aging-month-10-tips-to-celebrate/

https://healthyaging.net/healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/

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Healthy Start to the School Year

August 21st, 2019

Sometimes we often forget just how important our food choices are for our bodies. Especially when we are craving that most-delicious sweet that we all cannot resist! Things like candy and soda both typically fill our hearts desires, but as we all know they’re not on our good side. But, we truly do need to be more careful about what we eat, not only for your health but also for your pearly whites. Now that summer is soon coming to an end and school is approaching, it’s important to review what should be included on you and your child’s plate. Take a look at these healthy foods that can help satisfy your taste, and keep your mind, body, and teeth in good shape!

Dairy

Dairy products like cheese, milk, and yogurt make great tooth-friendly snacks. Cheese can help lower the risk of tooth decay by raising the pH, making the mouth less acidic. Not to mention, dairy is often full of protein and nutrients that help keep your enamel strong, like calcium. Yogurt contains healthy bacteria, also known as probiotics, which are known to help with digestion and fight off bad bacteria. Dairy is also typically low in sugar, making it a great pick for your lunch.

Nuts

 

Nuts are low in sugar, and are full of protein and minerals that are great for your overall health. Plus, chewing nuts helps trigger saliva production, which can lower your risk for tooth decay. Try tossing them in salads, or grab a bag of them to add to your lunchbox.

 

Hight Fiber Foods/Vegetables

Foods high in fiber such as leafy greens are the way to go when looking for something healthy! It aids digestion, promotes good cholesterol levels, and enhances saliva production necessary for protecting your teeth. Not only are they low in calories, but they're also loaded with vitamins and minerals.

Water

Staying hydrated with water, particularly fluoridated water, is key for keeping your body healthy. Fluoride is an important component as it helps remineralize tooth enamel and makes teeth more resistant to decay.

Apples

An apple a day can actually be good for your health and smile! Apples contain a great amount of fiber and water, and help act similarly to a toothbrush by helping to remove food particles from your teeth.

Carrots

Crunchy carrots also help stimulate saliva production and are a great source of fiber and vitamin A. They make a great snack by themselves or added to salad.

Cranberries

Cranberries have been found to protect your smile by helping keep plaque from sticking to teeth with the help of polyphenols.

Sugarless gum

For all of the gum lovers, sugar-free gum is the best option for your pearly whites. Chewing sugarless gum helps increase saliva production and helps wash away leftover food particles that bacteria feed on.

Prevention is the best way to keep your body and smile in tip-top shape. One method of prevention is to carefully choose healthy foods full of essential nutrients.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/healthy-foods-list-seven-best-foods-for-your-teeth-0214

https://www.livescience.com/44111-foods-healthy-teeth-bad-breath.html

Images:

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Why is my Tongue White?

August 6th, 2019

 

The human body is amazing in so many ways. Our bodies often try to tell us things about our health through triggering certain signs and signals. The oral cavity can be an easy spot to indicate signs of specific health conditions developing. For instance, the color and texture of your tongue could be a clue that something is going on within your body.

The normal anatomy of the tongue is comprised of tiny nodules known as papilla. The color is typically a shade of pink, although food debris may temporarily stain the tongue. An indicator of poor oral health or possibly an underlying health condition is the presence of a white tongue that remains for a prolonged period of time. A white tongue has been associated with mouth breathing, smoking, oral thrush (fungal candidiasis infection), infections, excessive alcohol use, medication side effects, and congenital heart disease.

Most frequently it is linked with dry mouth and dehydration, which increases the risk of developing tooth decay and infections. Saliva is crucial for helping us breakdown food and protecting our teeth due to the proteins and minerals found within it. Without it, the dry environment promotes bacteria and fungi growth and typically produces an odor.

Other conditions that have been known to cause white tongue include oral lichen planus, geographic tongue, oral cancer, and HIV/AIDs.

Although white tongue is typically harmless, if you notice any pain or persistence of white tongue for a prolonged time that does not respond to oral care, be sure to contact your dentist.

It is important to remember to brush your tongue with either a toothbrush or tongue scraper each day to remove all of the plaque and leftover food particles that become trapped between the papilla on the surface of the tongue. Also, staying hydrated is important, especially during these hot summer days!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319814.php

https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/white-tongue/basics/causes/sym-20050676

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My Lungs, Mouth, and Inhaler: What to Know

April 17th, 2019

It's that time of the year where blooming flowers and warm breezes take over and are welcomed by many. However, for some, this time of the year triggers asthma and allergies! Unfortunately, individuals with asthma may not share the same joy in this seasonal change. Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that is characterized by airway obstruction, coughing, and wheezing caused by constriction of the lung bronchi. But, that's not all! Since the body is all interconnected, this respiratory condition also has been found to increase your risk of developing gum disease (gingivitis and periodontal disease), tooth decay, malocclusion (overbite, overate, posterior crossbite), oral candidiasis, dry mouth, and oral sores. In particular, these conditions are often more prominent and aggressive in children. A contributing factor is that children's teeth have thinner enamel than adults, and consequently are more susceptible to harm and breakdown caused by bacteria that cause cavities. Here's how you can lower these risks and keep your mouth healthy so that it can last you a lifetime:

A recent study analyzing 40 children with asthma looked at the prevalence of dental cavities, gingival bleeding, the pH of saliva, composition of bacteria within the mouth, in addition to assessing their oral hygiene habits. It was found that the children with asthma experienced dry mouth, had at least 5-8 cavities, and a rapid formation of plaque. The children also had an increased acidity of pH within the mouth, which puts them at a higher risk of cavities and the fungal infection, candidiasis. Another study reported that individuals with asthma had approximately a 19% increased risk of suffering from periodontitis.

Fortunately, avoiding gum disease can be achieved by practicing proper oral hygiene techniques, including using a fluoride toothpaste, mouth rinse, brushing and flossing regularly, and making regular visits to the dentist. If you notice red puffy gums, bleeding with brushing or flossing, or persistent bad breath, these can be early signs of gum disease.  It is also important to always bring your inhaler to dental and medical appointments to ensure your safety in the case of an acute asthma attack.

The Effect of Asthma Medications

The medications taken to combat asthma also play a role in negatively impacting the oral cavity. This is because the protective mucous membrane within the mouth is less effective/reduced in individuals with asthma, lowering the body's immune system. Dry mouth is a major consequence of many medications, which allows for plaque build-up and bacteria accumulation that contribute to dental cavities, bad breath, and gum disease.

Inhaled corticosteroids, including Advair and Azmacort, may cause oral thrush, dental cavities, oral ulcers, and hoarseness. In addition, Albuterol, a medication used to treat bronchospasm, can have side effects including oral thrush, dry mouth, increased heart rate, high blood pressure, throat irritation, and nausea.

Tips for Managing Oral Health with Asthma

  • Rinsing with water after you using your inhaler can help avoid developing an oral fungal infection.
  • Stay hydrated in order to help combat dry mouth.
  • Keep your dentist informed about your medications and medical conditions. Make sure your dentist knows if you have asthma and what medications you are taking so that your health can be managed properly.
  • Manage allergies. Both asthma and allergies typically flare-up together. Managing both properly can help prevent mouth-breathing and dry mouth.
  • Practice good dental hygiene.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/asthma-found-to-increase-the-likelihood-of-gum-disease-by-a-fifth

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/asthma.html

http://www.thetotaldentistry.com/2018-07-dental-caries-in-asthmatic-children/

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Save your Child from the Most Common Chronic Childhood Disease

March 16th, 2019

Parents try their hardest to keep their kids from experiencing harm and pain. It can be heartbreaking to see your child or loved one suffer from tooth aches and tooth decay. No matter the age, babies, kids, teens, adults, and elders can unfortunately develop dental cavities. It is commonly known that tooth decay develops as bacteria feed off of the left-over food particles on our teeth by producing acids that wear down tooth enamel. But, you may be wondering, "how is tooth decay possible for babies who aren't even consuming solid foods?" You may have heard of the term, baby bottle tooth decay, which is a leading factor for a high rate of cavities in babies who particularly go to sleep with a bottle of milk or juice in their crib.  Milk, which we know to be good for bone growth and development, does contain sugar so when it is constantly in contact on baby teeth throughout the night, it can lead to the development of cavities and future oral health problems for little ones. Baby bottle tooth decay can also be a sign that nutrients and natural healthy bacteria that help fight cavities may be out of balance in your child. When baby teeth become decayed, not only can it affect incoming permanent teeth, but also can negatively impact chewing, drinking, speaking, and the growth of the mouth. The decay may present itself with this appearance:

It is therefore important to develop good oral hygiene habits and nutritional diet from a early age.  Our oral microbiome, or the normal friendly bacteria within our mouths, are needed to help us fight infections and keep the harmful bacteria from attacking our immune system. For instance, Streptococcus mutans, is typically the main bacterial culprit in causing tooth decay. Babies often get a load of healthy probiotics through breastfeeding and gains vitamins including A, D, and K through breastmilk.

We must encourage our children to eat healthy and also monitor their brushing and oral habits to help ensure strong teeth and a healthier overall body. For children under the age of 3, a smear of fluoride toothpaste on a child sized toothbrush is recommended for toothbrushing.

It is recommended that your child have their first dental visit by age 1 or within 6 months of their first baby tooth erupting. This is very important as the enamel of baby teeth is not as strong as adult's. Be sure to see if the community you live in has fluoridated water. Fluoride, which can be applied at dental visits, and found in toothpastes, and natural water, helps fight tooth decay and remineralize tooth enamel. In addition, try to switch your child from a bottle to a regular cup as soon as possible because the liquid is less likely to sit for a long time on teeth.

If your child has extensive tooth decay but the tooth is still deemed restorable by the dentist, stainless steel crowns are the recommended treatment option by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Otherwise, extraction and space maintenance may be required.  Losing a baby tooth earlier than expected can lead to crowding when the permanent teeth come in, as well as other oral issues. Tooth decay can also surprisingly be passed from the mother or caregiver to an infant or child through saliva. Be sure to keep feeding utensils and pacifiers clean.

Save your child from experiencing tooth pain, trouble sleeping, oral infections, growth issues, and time away from school for additional dental treatments that could be prevented.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/infant-oral-care/treatment-for-baby-bottle-tooth-decay-0414

https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/baby/teething-tooth-care/Pages/How-to-Prevent-Tooth-Decay-in-Your-Baby.aspx

https://www.khaleejtimes.com/news/uae-health/save-your-kid-from-tooth-decay

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Your Pet's Smile Matters, Too!

March 5th, 2019

Pets, otherwise known as the cute protectors and furry additions to the family, face some of the same dental problems that we do as humans. In fact, oral disease is the most common major health problem of cats and dogs. According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, more than 70% of cats and 80% of dogs exhibit signs of oral disease by the age of 3. Although tooth decay remains the top oral problem that humans experience, pets primarily develop periodontal disease and fractures of teeth.

The same rules of dental disease that apply to us also apply to our furry companions. It may be easy to forget that your pet's teeth are also a part of their overall health and well-being. Dogs and cats in particular often experience a buildup of tartar, a form of hardened dental plaque caused by bacteria, when their teeth are not cleaned overtime. This buildup of tartar eventually leads to gum irritation and bone loss that exposes the roots of their teeth. The harmful bacteria can then enter the bloodstream and affect systemic organs, including the heart, kidneys, and liver.

Your pet may be dealing with pain that you may not have noticed before. Some of the signs of dental disease that your pet may experience can include:

    • Lethargy or inactivity
    • Excessive salivation
    • Decreased or loss of appetite
    • Weight loss
    • Problems eating
    • Mouth sores
    • Facial swelling
    • Discharge from the nose or eyes
    • Pawing at the face
    • Teeth becoming loose or falling out

On the bright side, gum disease and oral health problems can be prevented in pets! According to the American Veterinary Dental College, here is what you may see in each stage of progressive periodontal disease in your furry loved one and steps you can take to prevent and manage dental disease:

1.Stage 0 and Stage 1 Periodontal Disease:

The American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA) recommends regular oral exams with X-rays and dental cleanings at least once a year beginning at the age of 1 for cats and small-breed dogs, and at 2 years old for larger-breed dogs. In addition, daily tooth brushing with a regular soft-bristled human tooth brush is recommended or a minimum of 3-4 times per week. It may take some patience because it can take your pet some time for them to get accustomed to the practice too!

2. Stage 2 Periodontal Disease:

It is important to take your pet to get their teeth professionally cleaned as soon as possible in order to prevent further bone loss and to reduce the gum swelling and infection.

3. Stage 3 Periodontal Disease:

There is now moderate bone loss and gum inflammation. The treatment options at this stage may include tooth extraction or advanced procedures done by the veterinary dentist, along with regular dental home care.

4. Stage 4 Periodontal Disease:

Advanced bone loss greater than 50% and tartar buildup which will require tooth extractions.

Other tips include selecting quality food (look for a Veterinary Oral Health Council  (VOHC)-approved stamp on the bag). Also try to avoid hard toys or treats to help prevent tooth fractures.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://avdc.org/AFD/five-stages-of-pet-periodontal-disease/

http://csu-cvmbs.colostate.edu/vth/small-animal/community-practice/Pages/pet-dental-health.aspx

https://pets.webmd.com/dogs/features/perlis-gum-disease-dogs#3

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The Perfect Smile for Valentine's Day

February 14th, 2019

Today on Valentine's Day we are reminded of all of the love that surrounds us. Pink and red flowers, cards, and treats may also make an appearance on this holiday. As we celebrate, make sure you're showing your smile some love too! Here's some tips on how you can keep your pearly whites glistening on your special date or day with loved ones:

Cavities and Kissing:

Did you know cavities can be contagious? Bacteria that cause tooth decay can transmit from one mouth to another through kissing or sharing utensils. The good news is, kissing helps stimulate saliva, which is necessary to wash away leftover foods and fight cavities. But, to prevent swapping germs, it is important to brush your teeth 2x a day for at least 2 minutes and floss for a healthy and cavity-free smile.

Bad Breath Be Gone!

Bad breath can be a burden, but there are a lot of things that can be done to help prevent it.  Bad breath is often a result of bacteria, so good hygiene habits like brushing and flossing are the easiest things to do to keep your breath smelling fresh. A lot of plaque and bacteria are hiding between teeth and on the surface of your tongue so don't forget these areas! There are also a variety of mouth rinses available in the store that are anti-microbial and help get rid of bacteria and bad breath. Not to mention, chewing xylitol gum can help stimulate saliva and keep your breath fresh.

Brighten Smiles with Whitening

Looking to get rid of stains or not as confident with the color of your teeth? If you'd like to brighten your smile, our in-office ZOOM! Whitening is the way to go, and also could be a great gift to surprise your loved one with.

Avoid Smoking

Smoking is not only bad for your lungs, it also has a negative impact on your mouth. It can cause oral cancer, bad breath, and stain your pearly whites.

Sweet Treats

One of the fun aspects of Valentine's Day is the sweet treats and desserts that you may indulge in. If you happen to have some goodies, just be sure to keep your teeth in mind. Avoid hard candies, or candies that are sticky such as caramels or gummies as they can be damaging to your enamel. Also be sure to rinse with water and try eating the sweets with a meal so that your saliva flow can help wash away the sugars that cause tooth decay.

We wish you a Happy Valentine's Day!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/adults-under-40/healthy-habits/valentines-day

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How Does Your Cold/Flu Affect Your Mouth?

January 6th, 2019

Catching a cold or the flu can be one of the worst things that come with the cold weather during winter. The (CDC) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that adults typically get a cold 2-3 times a year! A lot of challenges come with being sick, including trouble sleeping, eating, and just going about your normal daily activities. With a sore throat, stuffy or runny nose, and a box of tissues by your side, you may be looking to cough medicine and nasal decongestants to hide the symptoms. But, did you ever wonder how your cold or the medicines to treat them impact your teeth and mouth?  Here's some things to keep in mind in order to keep your body and mouth healthy while combatting a cold:

Stuffy Nose & Dry Mouth

It's a real struggle when you cannot breathe through your nose, especially when you're trying to get a good night's rest. As a result, you have to breathe through your mouth, which can cause you to experience dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is less saliva flow, which can also occur from taking nasal decongestants like sudafed to remedy your stuffy nose. Unfortunately, dry mouth not only makes it hard to swallow, it can also impact your mouth by promoting bacterial growth. So, when taking nasal decongestants to help your cold, stay hydrated with water and chewing xylitol-containing gum can help stimulate saliva flow. You can also try using a humidifier in the room you sleep in.

Sinus & Tooth Pain 

Another obstacle that you may face as a result of being sick is tenderness and pain around your sinuses as a result of sinusitis. This can cause you to feel like you have a toothache in your upper jaw since they are near your sinuses. Some signs of sinusitis include a yellow colored mucous drainage, and pressure near your mid-face. Fortunately, this experience should improve once your cold clears up.

Cough Drops/Syrup & Throat Lozenges

Here's the scoop on cough syrup, cough drops and sore throat lozenges:  most of the time these products contain sugar for flavor and can be damaging to your teeth as they are held in your mouth for long periods of time. Not to mention, cough syrups are sticky and can remain on teeth and cause harm to your enamel. Try to look for pills, sugar-free cough drops, and sore throat lozenges as these are best for your oral health! Be sure to also keep your regular oral care routine brushing, flossing, and rinsing.

Orange Juice

Orange juice is loaded with vitamin C to help your immune system fight your cold. Due to the acidity which can weaken your tooth enamel, try drinking orange juice in one sitting during a meal, and drink water afterwards to help protect your tooth from the acid.

As you fight a cold/flu keep your dental health in mind and replace your toothbrush once you feel better so you can start fresh!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/dry-mouth/how-the-common-cold-teeth-and-oral-health-are-connected-1215

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Festive Stress Taking a Toll on Your Mouth?

December 15th, 2018

As we approach the holidays, it can be an exciting, yet stressful time as we prepare to decorate, shop, and entertain for our loved ones. Even traveling, finances, or just having a large to-do list can add stress to your body and oral health. Sometimes you may not notice the negative impact that stress is causing to your teeth. Take a look at these common stressors and how they could be harmful to your smile:

Snoring

Snoring does not only cause loud noises at night time-It could also be causing issues with your oral health! Snoring occurs when there is not enough air moving through the throat and nose while sleeping. Snoring could be a result of many conditions, and some risk factors include being male, 40 years of age or older, family history of snoring, and pregnancy. A main complication of snoring is dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is a lack of saliva, which is necessary for neutralizing acids made by bacteria within the mouth, and for moistening your gums and teeth. When there is a lack of saliva you may develop oral problems such as bad breath (halitosis), burning mouth syndrome, cavities, gingivitis, or mouth sores. Depending on the cause, interventions can include an oral appliance, weight loss, or a reduction in alcohol or smoking.

Tooth Grinding

A commonly known issue impacting your teeth is called bruxism, also known as tooth grinding. This often occurs during your sleep which can make it hard for you not to notice. In addition, jaw clenching can also cause similar effects including wearing your enamel down, gum recession, and weakening the supporting structures in your mouth that keep your teeth in place. Not to mention, it can also break or chip existing fillings in your mouth. Grinding and clenching are often due to anxiety or stress, but can also be caused by an abnormal bite. Some of the signs that can clue you in that you may be clenching or grinding include a sore jaw when you wake up in the morning, or your partner may notice clicking sounds during your sleep. Not to worry though, there are treatment options that can fix this. A night guard may be suggested, or relaxation methods including exercise or other stress management interventions may be advised by your dentist to prevent damaging your pearly whites.

Depression

Depression is a common condition for many individuals, and it can come and go in spurts during a person's life. It is important to talk with a Doctor or someone who can help if it begins to interfere with daily life including with the care of your oral and overall health.

Holiday stressors are real! Stay stress-free this holiday and be sure to keep up on health. Brushing, flossing, and making sure your scheduling your regular dental check-ups is particularly important during the holidays when lots of sweets are involved!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

getty_134936674_2000133320009280167_75133.jpg

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/what-causes-snoring-its-effect-on-oral-health-0713

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/stress-teeth#1

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/bruxism

Will Your Teeth Thank You This Thanksgiving?

November 22nd, 2018

Today’s the long awaited day for gathering with family and friends for a day of feasting and possibly even football. We would like to wish you and your family a safe and happy Thanksgiving from our caring team at Wellesley Dental Group. Thanksgiving day has been a tradition dating back to 1621 in celebration of the Pilgrims’ first harvest. Most people will be focused on the delicious and flavorful assortment of foods without thinking about the feast certain bacteria within the mouth will be having that can impact teeth. Not all foods are created equally when it comes to your oral health, so here’s what you need to know to have a tooth-friendly holiday:

Turkey:

The star of the holiday is the tasty turkey, which luckily is full of protein. Our body relies on protein to help build and heal tissues. Be sure to have some floss ready though, it's easy for turkey to get stuck in-between teeth and cause harm to your teeth.

Cranberry Sauce:

The Thanksgiving turkey is often accompanied by cranberry sauce.  Normally, cranberries have been found to fight against Streptococcus Mutans (S. mutans), the bacteria primarily involved in causing cavities. However, when sugar is added to create this tasty side dish, the stickiness and acidity can damage your teeth. Be sure to brush and floss once you've recovered from your
Thanksgiving meal!

Macaroni & Cheese:

There's good and bad news to this dish. Dairy products including milk and cheese which are found in this recipe provide calcium which helps strengthen tooth enamel. Yet, starches like white pasta can give bacteria within the mouth a food source to thrive on and lead to the process of making cavities.

Pumpkin Pie:

Pumpkins are rich in Vitamin A, which is good for strengthening tooth enamel. But, pies and whipped cream toppings typically contain a lot of added sugar which are not so good for your enamel. Eating desserts shortly after meal time is best to ensure that saliva is flowing to wash away any leftover sweets.

Wine:

Good news! Red wine has been found to have ingredients that fight cavities by blocking S. mutans.

Mashed Potatoes and Gravy:

Mashed potatoes are loaded with vitamin C, B6 and potassium, which our diets require. Unfortunately for our teeth, potatoes and gravy contain starch for bacteria to feed off of making it not so tooth-friendly.

Sweet Potatoes:

This dish can be tooth-friendly, but it depends on how it is prepared. Sweet potatoes naturally contain vitamins A and C, which are beneficial for keeping teeth healthy. However, the famous candied yam recipe that has most of our mouths watering often calls for marshmallows that can stick to teeth and breakdown tooth enamel.

So, overall, be sure to drink a lot of water with your Thanksgiving feast to wash away any sticky foods, and remember to brush and floss to keep your smile healthy after the holidays. Most of all, enjoy your meal and time spent with loved ones!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/thanksgiving-slideshow

https://www.idahostatejournal.com/news/local/is-your-thanksgiving-feast-good-for-your-teeth/article_652a7693-8abc-5216-8c0a-bffbdb738795.html

https://www.gustotv.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/10/Jamie-Oliver’s-biggest-tips-on-how-to-make-a-foolproof-Thanksgiving-dinner-479x269.jpg

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Treats are Tricky: Tips for Halloween

October 25th, 2018

Halloween can be a scary time of year. There's lots of spooky costumes and decorations that can give us all the chills. Not to mention the famous question, "Trick or Treat?" Most people opt for the delicious treats and often have a huge stash of candy that lasts beyond the holiday. But, what you may not have been aware of is the scary effects of all the treats being passed out that can impact your teeth! Normal bacteria in the mouth thrive off of the sugar within Halloween candy and in turn produce acid that cause tooth decay. Not to worry though, it's okay to indulge in a little Halloween candy but make sure you know these tips and tricks to help you and your family keep your pearly whites healthy. With your leftover candy, we'd love for you to come participate in our 11th Annual Candy Drive from November 1st to 8th at the Wellesley Dental Group (5 Seaward Road, Wellesley). We are gathering our communities together to collect thousands of pounds of candy, a ton of thoughtful messages, and oral hygiene kits, which will be sent to the U.S. troops as a thanks for all that they do to keep us safe. Check out our flyer here. We will be hosting a community and press event on the November 9th, from 10 am to 11 am, also at our office in Wellesley where a cash prize will be given to the PTO of the school that contributes the highest amount of candy. If you have questions or queries about how you can join hands with us for this great cause, or to RSVP for the community event, send us an email at candydrive@wellesleydentalgroup.com, or call us at 781-237-9071.

1. Eat Halloween candy with meals

Interestingly, the timing of when you eat candy makes a difference. It's better to eat Halloween candy with meals or shortly after eating a meal because there is more saliva production. Saliva helps wash away food particles and neutralize the acids produced by bacteria. Chewing sugarless gum can also help increase saliva flow and wash out leftover foods in the mouth.

2. Pick and choose your candy

It's better to stay away from hard and sticky candies (ex: caramels, gummy bears) that can linger in your mouth for long periods of time. The longer sugary foods are in your mouth, the greater risk of tooth decay. Chocolate is often a better option as it is washed away quickly in the mouth.

3. Stay hydrated with water

Consuming fluoridated water can help prevent tooth decay and is especially good to rinse with after consuming candy.

Most importantly, make sure to practice good oral hygiene by brushing, flossing, and visiting the dentist regularly.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/h/halloween-candy-survival-guide

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/ada-10-tooth-friendly-halloween

Dentists Recommending Chewing Gum: Too Good to be True?

October 10th, 2018

October is National Dental Hygiene Month, which is the perfect time to spread awareness on good oral hygiene practices, including brushing, flossing, rinsing, and possibly to your surprise, chewing gum! This may sound alarming because gum, like candy, is known to cause tooth decay. However, chewing sugarless gum after eating can be beneficial to your teeth for many reasons. This is particularly the case when chewing sugar-free gum that is sweetened with the ingredient xylitol.

Chewing sugarless gum helps wipe away leftover food particles and stimulates saliva secretion. As a result, the proteins and minerals within saliva help neutralize harmful acids made by the bacteria found within plaque. Some studies have shown that people who chew sugar-free gum for 20 minutes after eating can help prevent cavities and strengthen tooth enamel.

A common ingredient in sugar-free gum is Xylitol (a natural sweetener), which helps blocks the growth of Streptococcus mutans, a common bacteria found in the mouth. This in turn helps prevent tooth decay. Some companies are starting to add casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP), also known as Recaldent, to their chewing gum. Recaldent has been found to remineralize and strengthen tooth enamel.

Chewing gum is especially important if you experiences dry mouth due to a lack of saliva production. Dry mouth is associated with several oral health problems, including gum swelling, bad breath, and periodontal disease. However, if you are having any symptoms of jaw pain or temporomandibular disorder symptoms (TMD/TMJ), chewing gum is typically not recommended and be sure to let your dentist know.

Even though there is no substitute for brushing, flossing, or rinsing, chewing sugar-free gum after meals can be a nice addition that will freshen breath and keep your mouth healthy!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/gum-that-is-good-for-your-teeth-too-good-to-be-true-0213

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/gum-chewing.html

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Everything You Need to Know about Fluoride Varnish

September 29th, 2018

"My child's baby teeth are going to fall out eventually anyway, so what's the point in taking care of them?" This is a common question that many parents face. Baby teeth are necessary for a variety of reasons, including guiding permanent teeth into their proper positions. You also want to make sure that they remain healthy in order to prevent your child from developing a systemic infection, an abscess, or from experiencing pain. As soon as your child's baby teeth appear, make sure that you are brushing them and scheduling regular dental visits. As they become older, make learning how to brush fun through singing songs, brushing alongside your child, or even using toothbrushes and cool flavors of toothpaste that they pick out themselves.

Fluoride varnish is an important part of dental treatment as research shows that it helps prevent and stop the progression of cavities in baby teeth. It does this by remineralizing tooth enamel. Cavities form when bacteria found within dental plaque produce acid that eats away teeth. Since enamel is more sensitive in baby teeth than in permanent teeth, children are especially susceptible to developing cavities.

Applying fluoride varnish on your child is safe, quick, and painless! Fluoride varnish is brushed around the surfaces of each tooth and becomes a hard layer once saliva interacts with it. Once applied, food and beverages can be consumed with the exception of extremely hot or cold items. For 4-6 hours avoid brushing or flossing.

It's also important to note that fluoride treatments are not just for children. Individuals at a high risk for developing cavities should have fluoride! Fluoride is found in many toothpastes, most community water supply's, and several other products.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/04/180426102840.htm

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Your House and Your Saliva: How on Earth Could they be Related?

August 12th, 2018

Normally, we may not be thinking about what saliva is doing for us in our mouths. But, saliva has an important role in helping us breakdown food and protect our teeth due to the proteins and minerals found within it. Turns out, according to new research, the combination of microorganisms in your saliva are mainly determined by your home environment rather than genetics. These organisms within saliva are found to have a great influence on our oral and overall health.

More research is showing that our microbiomes are related to our health. These microbes are perfectly normal to our bodies and help outside pathogens from establishing oral disease. Researchers at  UCL Genetics Institute looked at DNA and saliva extracted from an Ashkenazi Jewish family that lived in several different households across the world so that they could determine how the saliva microbiome varied in terms of environment versus genetics. In each of the DNA and saliva samples, they found that the majority of the salivary microbiome was composed of bacteria from the Streptococcus, Rothia, Neisseria, and Prevotella genera.

When analyzing the results, they also found that between factors including shared household, city, age, and genetics, the factor that determined who shared the most similar saliva microbes was household environment. Therefore, people in the same house share the most similar organisms within their saliva.

So, looks like genetics isn't the biggest factor in determining the makeup of our saliva as once thought according to recent research. This study concluded that a child's home environment plays a significant role in the community of bacteria found within their saliva. Since microbes can be transferred from one person to another, for instance via kissing or sharing utensils, it is important to maintain good oral hygiene, keep regular dental visits, and avoid being in close contact with others when having an active infection.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/09/170912102810.htm

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It's not you, it's your morning breath!

June 15th, 2017

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Have you ever wondered why despite keeping good oral hygiene, brushing your teeth and tongue regularly, using a mouthwash and flossing before bed, you still wake up with an unpleasant odor coming from your mouth? Well, it's not you; bad breath in the morning is very common. The condition is also known as halitosis. It happens because during the supposed 8-hours of sleep at night, our mouth goes through a period of reduced salivary flow and no access to food and water. The main function of saliva is to 'rinse' and remove solid food particles which if not removed cause bad breath. And when there is no source of carbohydrates at night, your body ends up breaking down the proteins, the byproducts of which feed bacteria and lead to their growth in the mouth. But as you may have noticed, bad breath disappears after having breakfast and going through our morning dental routine, as most bacteria are removed.

Here are some things that you can do to help yourself and minimize the odor of your ‘morning breath’! Regular dental cleanings and check-ups should go without saying. Professional cleaning helps remove plaque from above and below the gum and places that are hard to reach, or we often neglect. Also, pay attention to the instructions and recommendations your dentist gives you for brushing, flossing, and rinsing. And your overall health matters as well! Try improving your diet, physical activity, and reduce work-load and stress. Remember that everything is interconnected.

morning breath tips

There are also conditions which cause oral malodor. Chronic oral malodor is a condition resulting from chronic dry mouth. Other medical conditions such as diabetes, GI disturbance and respiratory infections can also contribute to chronic malodor. It is important to consult your dentist if you experience dry mouth and they will refer you to a primary care physician in the case of medical conditions.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

 

Source: https://www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-education/articles/oral-malodor

Protect Your Smile in the Cold!

January 8th, 2017

Baby, it's cold outside! Since having healthy teeth is important for self-confidence and the prevention of diseases or pains (such as canker sores or cold sores), we need to make sure to take care of our teeth as the temperatures drop. This is especially important if your teeth are sensitive.

If you have sensitive teeth in cold weather, it may be due to several reasons. For instance, you could have cracked teeth, weakened enamel, gum recession, gingivitis, or an infection. Make sure not to brush too hard or clench or grind your teeth, because these habits could make your teeth even more sensitive.

However, teeth sensitivity problems can be easily resolved. Just maintain proper oral hygiene habits and make an effort to protect your teeth! Brush with a soft toothbrush after meals, floss, and use densensitizing toothpaste.

Maintaining a healthy diet and staying hydrated is just as important. Drink at least two liters of water per day to ensure moist gums and teeth and adequate saliva production (and don't forget to apply a lip balm to avoid cracked lips!). Avoid beverages with high sugar content and acidic foods.

If you can, try to limit your time outside as well. Sudden changes in temperature can result in the formation of teeth fractures, so if you have to be outside, wear a scarf and cover your mouth!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.imgion.com/images/01/Playing-in-Winter-.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/mouth-sores-and-infections/article/winter-tips-for-a-healthy-mouth-dealing-with-common-winter-mouth-woes-0115

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rahis-saifi/5-dental-health-tips-on-h_b_12457368.html?utm_hp_ref=dental-health

The Risks of Oral Piercings

August 18th, 2016

smilieOral piercings has become a popular expression of self, however, there are several health risks that come along with them. It is important to be aware of the common infections and problems that may occur as a result of oral piercings. tongue, lip, uvula, and other oral piercings can not only change your speech, chewing or swallowing, it can also cause infections, nerve damage, and much more! Here are just a few of the issues that can arise due to oral piercings:

Dental pain and infection

  • Since the mouth is home to many food particles and bacteria, piercings can quickly become infected and lead to dangerous consequences if not treated properly. Swelling can also occur, which could restrict airway passages.

Gums, teeth and fillings can be destroyed

  • Whether you know it or not, piercings can lead to cracked teeth, sensitive teeth, and damaged fillings when biting down or as a result of an accident. They can also injure your gums and cause an infection. If active in sports, make sure to remove oral jewelry and use a mouthguard to protect your oral health.

Reaction to metal jewelry

  • Allergic reactions to piercing jewelry may occur and lead to infections.

Nerve damage

  • Nerve damage may result after a piercing and could be temporary or sometimes even permanent. This damage can impact your tastebuds and mouth movement.

Excessive Saliva

  • Oral piercings often increase saliva production and can lead to drooling.

Dental appointment difficulties

  • Piercing jewelry can block the way of necessary dental care procedures, including X-rays.

If you have oral piercings, please be sure to contact your dentist or physician if you have any signs of pain at or around the side of the piercing. It is also important to constantly clean the pierced site and avoid biting down on the jewelry to prevent damage to teeth and gums. Be sure to see your dentist regularly and maintain proper dental hygiene habits. If you're considering getting an oral piercing, please take these facts into consideration and talk to your dentist for more information.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/o/oral-piercings

http://www.adrenalinetoronto.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/smilie.jpg

Stock Up on Sugar-free Gum!

July 6th, 2016

Sugar-free gum isn't just fun to chew - it can do the important job of preventing tooth decay as well!

The British Dental Health Foundation claims that chewing sugar-free gum after eating and drinking along with a proper brushing routing can both neutralize plaque acids and decrease the risk for cavities. The American Dental Association (ADA) suggests chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals to reduce plaque and gingivitis as well.

What are some reasons why sugar-free gum is so beneficial for your oral health? It promotes saliva production, (which breaks down food particles and washes away acids) and the remineralization of tooth enamel.

So stock up on sugarless gum next time you go out!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/sites/womenshealthmag.com/files/images/sugar-free-gum.jpg

https://www.dentalhealth.org/news/details/901

http://www.ada.org/en/science-research/ada-seal-of-acceptance/product-category-information/chewing-gum

Depression Is a Threat to Oral Health

May 23rd, 2016

Did you know that depression, a common serious mental health and mood disorder, is linked to poor oral health care? If you suffer from depression, you may have a lack of motivation to take care of yourself and experience decreased salivation, which can directly impact oral health. Risk factors for depression include: personal or family history, major stress, and certain illnesses or side effects of medications.

Some signs and symptoms of depression are:

  • lasting feelings of sadness, anxiousness, emptiness, hopelessness, or pessimism
  • irritability
  • lack of energy/motivation
  • no interest in activities
  • guilt, worthlessness, etc.
  • difficulty concentrating or sleeping

There are many different types of depression, including:

  • persistent depression disorder (dysthymia): depressive symptoms for at least two years
  • perinatal depression: major depression during or after pregnancy (postpartum)
  • psychotic depression: severe depression and psychosis (delusions, hallucinations, etc.)
  • seasonal affective disorder: depression during the winter months

Depression is directly linked to oral health, because its consequences include xerostomia (dry mouth), a cariogenic diet (diet composed of sweets), and a poor immune system that can lead to oral infections. Risk for cardiovascular diseases also increases with depression.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://dualdiagnosis.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/bigstock-Girl-Sits-In-A-Depression-On-T-52227706-300x207.jpg

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2016/03/how-depression-threatens-oral-health-and-other-oral-systemic-links.html

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/depression/index.shtml

Tips For Cavity-Free Holidays!

December 29th, 2015

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The holiday break is in full swing as we closely approach New Years! With time off from work, school, and other obligations, there's more time to relax and enjoy the company of family and friends. During this time, however, it's easy to develop a sweet-tooth. From wines to chocolates to decorated cookies and cakes, there's a lot of holiday treats that can harm your smile if you're not careful. Here are some things to keep in mind this holiday season:

1. Timing is important

It can be fine to indulge in sweets every now and then, but it's important to practice proper dental habits. Timing is also important. It helps to eat sweets and other sugary foods with meals because more saliva is produced. Saliva production is essential for washing away food particles and neutralizing acids produced by oral bacteria.

2. Avoid sticky foods

It's okay to be picky this holiday and choose foods that don't cling to teeth. Dried fruits are often a holiday favorite, but tend to stay on teeth longer than other foods. When eating sticky items, make sure to rinse and brush carefully.

3. Limit alcohol intake

Many of us are soon going to toast to the New Year! Be sure to limit your alcohol intake. Red wines can easily stain teeth. Also, too much alcohol can dry out your mouth.

4. Go easy on the hard candies

Hard candies can be more harmful for your teeth than other candies. In addition to containing a high amount of sugar, consuming hard candies puts your teeth at a higher risk for chipping or breaking.

5. Starchy foods may not be the best

Starchy foods often get trapped in your teeth. Take extra care of your teeth if you indulge in chips, cakes, and other starchy foods by flossing to remove all the food particles that can lead to plaque accumulation.

6. You can still have fun

Keep these hints in mind as you enjoy the holidays. Make conscious and tooth-friendly food choices, such as lean beef, fish, and whole grains. The holidays and the New Year are a great times to start planning healthier habits.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/holiday-foods?source=facebook&content=6_tips_cavity_free_holidays

http://cwspi3qoj94m3t5a1dwwupr6z.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/holiday-sweets-620x350.jpg

The Fantastic Four of Dental Hygiene

December 12th, 2015

Want to become a dental hygiene superhero? Make sure to follow these four steps of fun recommended by the American Dental Hygienists' Association and the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program!

1. Brush twice daily!

Brushing your teeth properly for a full two minutes twice a day is the key to excellent oral health. It can prevent both gum disease and tooth decay, which are the two most common causes of loosing teeth. Brushing is effective in limiting oral bacterial growth.

However, in order to ensure that your brushing is as optimal as it can be, make sure to switch to a new toothbrush every few months and to use a toothpaste that has fluoride in it (to prevent cavities).

2. Floss, floss, floss!

Flossing is crucial for cleaning those spots in your mouth that your toothbrush can't reach, such as spaces between teeth and gum pockets. In order to maintain healthy teeth, floss at least once daily.

Proper flossing technique includes digging deep into the pockets between your gums and teeth and refraining from snapping floss against your gums, which could lead to bleeding and irritation. Furthermore, use plenty of floss to ensure that there is a clean piece for every space between your teeth.

3. Use an antimicrobial mouthwash!

Mouthwashes can do a lot more than simply making your breath smell more pleasant. Their property of killing germs associated with gum disease, tooth decay, and bad breath is essential to having good oral health. However, make sure you pick out a mouthwash that is alcohol-free, because alcohol tends to dry out the mouth. According to the American  Dental Hygienists' Association, you should rinse once per day.

4. Chew sugar-free gum!

Chewing sugar-free gum is a fun and effective way to help decrease your risk of getting cavities. The act of chewing and the gum's flavor help produce saliva, which can wash away debris and bacteria that could cause cavities. Increased saliva flow also helps minerals that strengthen and rebuild enamel travel to the teeth.

Finally, make sure to schedule regular dental checkups!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.wrigleyoralhealth.com/

https://healthycompanyalliance.com/library/assets/Toothpaste-Toothbrushes-and-Mouthwash.jpg

 

Fall in Love with These Healthy Fall Foods!

October 15th, 2015

fall-foodFall is finally here! From the beautiful leaves to the abundance of pumpkin spice products, there are so many reasons to love fall. And here’s another one: your favorite fall foods can also be super beneficial for your oral health!

Here are some delicious foods that may lead to better results at your next dental appointment!

  1. Apples

You’ve probably heard the saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” This saying is so well-known for a reason: this delicious fruit that comes in so many varieties has many health benefits. They have antioxidants, which can help prevent slow aging and chronic illnesses.  Furthermore, quercetin, a compound that is found in the skin of apples, can reduce risks of cancer, heart attacks, and asthma attacks. Apples have plenty of water in them, which does wonders for your teeth because water stimulates production of saliva. They also help wash food and neutralize acids from the surfaces of your teeth. The crunch in apples even helps remove dental plaque by loosening particles of food between teeth.

 

  1. Bone Broth

Everybody loves a good soup full of vegetables, broth, herbs, and spices. Bone broth is great for your immune system and digestive system. It’s also packed with calcium, phosphorous, and magnesium, which all do wonders for your teeth.

 

  1. Fish

If you love eating fish, you’re in luck. According to the Journal of Dietetic Association, fish oil can help fight gum disease. Salmon is especially beneficial for your teeth, because it can treat and prevent periodontitis.

 

  1. Cranberries

Best enjoyed October through November, cranberries not only ward off urinary tract infections, but they also restrain cancer growth and prevent oral diseases. 

 

  1. Pumpkins and Squash

Nutritionists at the National Institute of Health claim that foods rich in carotenoids, such as pumpkins and squash, can lower the risk of certain types of cancer. Pumpkins can also lead to healthy vision and cell growth, because they are great sources of alpha- and beta-carotene . Their seeds contain alpha-linolenic acid, which controls heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

If you’re craving dessert, try pumpkin pie (without the crust, which is high in fat and cholesterol). This classic fall treat contains a ton of vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber, and iron. The boost of iron will keep you away from tooth decay and tongue inflammation. Pumpkin spice, a combination of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves, is also especially beneficial for your health. These spices all have phytonutrients, which are anti-inflammatory plant compounds that promote healing in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Cloves fight cancer and blood clots, but they are also used for oral health. They have anaesthetic and antibacterial properties, which can relieve toothache and infections.

 

  1. Raw Dairy

Raw dairy (raw milk, cheese, butter, yogurt) that isn’t pasteurized or homogenized is a great source of calcium, which prevents tooth decay and gum disease.

 

  1. Green Tea

Containing natural catechins, green tea reduces plaque and by destroying plaque-causing bacteria. Enjoy a cup, but don’t forget to chew sugar-free gum afterwards to avoid teeth staining.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/oral-care-tips-and-advice/best-nutritious-fall-foods-20798/

http://greatist.com/health/healthiest-fruits-and-vegetables-fall

http://www.myprimetimenews.com/spice-it-up-for-fall/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17296290

http://naturallysavvy.com/care/dental-care-the-benefits-of-cloves

http://realfoodreallocalinstitute.org/huntington-wva/wp-content/uploads/sites/9/2013/10/fall-food.jpg

October Marks National Dental Hygiene Month

October 11th, 2015

teNot only does October represent the beginning of new season, colorful leaves, and plenty of pumpkins, it also marks National Dental Hygiene Month. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program (WOHP) are teaming together for the sixth year to highlight the importance of practicing good oral health habits and maintaining a healthy smile.

It is important to note that a healthy daily dental routine not only benefits your oral health, but also improves your overall health! Being aware of this can help prevent diseases such as diabetes, cancers, and cardiovascular diseases, which are commonly linked to condition of your oral health.

National Dental Hygiene Month was created in order to spread awareness on the necessities of brushing teeth at least twice daily, flossing every day, rinsing with antimicrobial mouthwashes, and chewing sugar-free gum. Take a look at how these essential habits can keep your teeth and body healthy for a lifetime:

Follow the 2 x 2 rule!

Brushing your teeth for 2 minutes, twice a day is one of the most important ways to get rid of plaque and prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and other oral health issues. Also, don't forget about your tongue! Many bacteria hide out on the surface of your tongue, which often produces a smelly aroma contributing to bad breath. Stay tuned on our social media for our weekly #ToothbrushingTipTuesday to help you find out more about how to brush your way to a healthier smile.

Make flossing a daily habit

Sometimes, remembering to floss can be hard. However, flossing is very important for removing plaque and food particles that are located in hard-to-reach areas that your toothbrush skips over.

Use mouthwash to improve oral health

Using a anti-microbial mouth rinse is an additional healthy step that you can take to prevent common oral health problems. There are many mouth rinses available that you can choose from to tailor to your needs, including those specialized for whitening, tooth sensitivity, and more!

Chewing sugar-free gum may be beneficial to your oral health

Chewing sugar-free gum after meals may help protect your teeth and stimulate saliva production to help wash away leftover food particles. Saliva production can also help neutralize plaque acids on teeth, reducing your risk of developing tooth decay.

Keep these tips in mind as you celebrate National Dental Hygiene Month, and don't forget to spread the word!

hygFeel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.adha.org/national-dental-hygiene-month

http://tranquilityparkdental.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/1391667_643421852344598_1516155769_n-332x332.jpg

http://www.tnstate.edu/dentalhygiene/documents/dental-hygienist-lv-350x260.jpg

 

Listen up, Kids: Dental Care for Children

October 9th, 2015

kidBelieve it or not, a third of children today have tooth decay before even starting school. According to statistics published by the Health & Social Care Information Centre, tooth decay is one of the main causes of hospital visits for children in elementary school. Surprisingly, 25,812 children ranging from ages 5 to 9 went to the hospital for tooth extractions in the last year alone.

Here are some tips below on how to protect your child’s teeth to make sure that your child doesn’t become part of these statistics!

  1. Drink less fruit juice!

Just because fruit juice is nutritious and often rich in vitamin C does not mean that it’s also beneficial for your teeth! Many juices have around the same amount of sugar as that in sodas, or even more. For instance, NPR states that apple juice contains 65.8 grams of sugar per liter, while cola contains 62.5 grams of sugar per liter. This copious amount of sugar leads to tooth decay. Furthermore, the acid from the juice destroys the enamel of teeth, which can cause teeth to deteriorate. Even the British Dental Association claims that 50% of children ranging from four to 18 years old show these signs.

Because of these harmful effects of fruit juice, dentists recommend water and milk as healthy beverage alternatives for children. If your child is still craving fruit juice, try to dilute it as much as possible and make sure that your child has a meal with it. Also, try your best to avoid letting your child have too much contact time with the cup and his or her teeth and instead opt for using a straw.

 

  1. Avoid dried fruit !

Dried fruit isn’t a good replacement for candy it has a great deal of sugar, and even worse, its sticky texture clings onto your child’s teeth. Due to these unhealthy properties, dried fruit can ruin enamel and rot your little one’s molars. Although chocolate isn’t a great option, dark chocolate is known to  be rich in antioxidants that help prevent the spread of tooth-decay causing bacteria.

Whole fruit can be a better option than dried fruit and fruit juice because it contains water and fibers that help wash away sugar from teeth. However, try not to feed your child more than one or two low-sugar fruit pieces (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, kiwis, peaches, and pears) instead of high-sugar fruit pieces (grapes or pineapple) per day. Incorporate fruit into meals rather than simply having them as snacksBreadsticks, toast, cheese, nuts, or seeds are some healthier snack alternatives.

 

  1. Baby teeth matter!

It's important not to presume that just because baby teeth are not permanent, that they should not be taken care of! Your child’s permanent teeth are at a higher risk of decay and other dental problems when primary teeth decay. Baby tooth decay could lead children to experience dental anxiety, which could make them less likely to visit the dentist later on.

 

  1. Help your child brush his/her teeth!

Depending on how mature your child is, you should help brush your child’s teeth until at least age seven to ensure that they are using proper brushing techniques. 

 

  1. Proper brushing techniques!
  • Don’t let your child brush his/her teeth right after eating, particularly after eating or drinking something acidic. Doing so will brush the enamel away! Your child should either brush before eating breakfast or wait an hour after the meal. Chewing sugar-free gum can also be an effective way to clean teeth, because it produces saliva, which defends against decay, and brings mouths back to a neutral pH level.
  • It doesn’t matter if your child uses a manual or electric toothbrush. What’s important is that the brushing lasts for at least two minutes! Electric toothbrushes often have built-in timers, so this feature can be effective.
  • Don’t let your child rinse the toothpaste away right after brushing! The fluoride in the toothpaste can keep protecting his or her teeth for 30 minutes. Children under three should use toothpaste with 1,000 fluoride parts per million, while children over three should use adult toothpaste that contains 1,450 fluoride parts per million.

For many parents, the first time they took their children to the dentist was when their children were at least one year old. However, parents should set their first appointment for when their children’s teeth begin to come out, which is around five to six months old. Further oral health tips for children can be found here.

This past spring, we welcomed Dr. Van, our Pediatric Dentist, onto our caring team at the Wellesley Dental Group! Dr. Van strongly believes in the importance of creating a fun and welcoming atmosphere for patients as well as parents. One of his goals is to introduce good dental habits to our youth, preventing dental diseases later on in life.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://mouafaqbtc.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/b4054a_0d4b9e685762e624649fbf8898f77c87.jpg

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/609471/Children-dental-care-truths-myths

http://www.thedentistar.com/images/import/images/glenview-kids-dentist.jpg

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/06/09/319230765/fruit-juice-vs-soda-both-beverages-pack-in-sugar-and-health-risk

Healthy Teeth, Healthy Aging

October 1st, 2015

National Healthy Aging Month emphasizes the importance of practicing good health habits as age increases. In the United States, the current life expectancy for men and women is nearly 85 years. With continuing advances in public health, medical technology, and greater access to health insurance, people are living healthier and longer than preceding generations. With that said, oral health, regardless of age, plays a significant role in the overall health of your body! Especially as you get older, ignoring the health of your teeth and mouth can lead to more serious consequences than just a cavity.

As your age changes, your mouth also changes and it is even more vital to take care of your teeth. It is commonly believed that losing your teeth when you get older is inevitable. However, this is a misconception! If teeth are properly taken care of, they can last a lifetime!

Help your teeth age elegantly with you by keeping these few tips in mind:

Brush at least twice a day

Brushing your teeth is an essential oral health habit that applies in all stages of life. Brushing helps eliminate plaque, which contributes to tooth decay.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately one-third of older adults have untreated tooth decay. When brushing, remember to brush along the gumline and tongue. With age, gums may begin to wear away or recede, leaving the root of the tooth exposed. Tooth decay is more likely to develop around the softer root or old filling.

Floss daily

Taking care of your gums is just as important as taking care of your teeth! Flossing helps prevent plaque from building up between teeth and below the gum line, where decay and periodontal (gum) disease often develop. Many adults in the United States show mild or severe signs of gum disease. It is this disease, and not the progression of aging, that is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. Unfortunately, periodontal disease affects about 23 percent of adults aged 65 to 74, according to the CDC. Recent studies have concluded that the health of your gums may correlate to some chronic disease, including  Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Establish a balanced and nutritious diet

What you eat can not only help improve the health your body, but also keep your teeth healthy. Vitamins and other nutrients found in certain fruits and vegetables can improve your body’s ability to destroy bacteria and protect your teeth and gums.

Schedule regular dental visits

Regular dental check-ups and cleanings are an essential part of maintaining good oral health as you age. With age, the risk of developing chronic diseases increases. The dentist can diagnose and watch for oral problems that may point to other health problems.

Avoid smoking

Not only does smoking increase your risk for lung cancer, it also increases your risk for periodontal disease, mouth pain, gum recession, tooth decay, tooth loss and other oral health problems. According to two 30-year studies at Tufts University, smokers are approximately twice as likely to lose their teeth as non-smokers.  Also, a study conducted by the Journal of Dental Research shows that smokers are nearly twice as likely as non-smokers to need a root canal.

The use of medications also increases with age, many of which can negatively impact oral health. Some medications may cause dry mouth, which will lead to a decrease in saliva production and possibly lead to tooth decay. Saliva is critical for oral health, as it helps wash away bacteria and food particles. Also, if you wear full or partial dentures, remember to clean them daily! Food can become stuck between teeth, causing gum problems or halitosis (bad breath). By keeping your teeth healthy and strong, you might be surprised at what a difference a healthy mouth makes!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://healthyaging.net/september-is-healthy-aging-month/

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/a/aging-and-dental-health

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/problems/5-oral-care-need-to-knows-aging.htm#page=0

http://www.ssa.gov/planners/lifeexpectancy.htm

http://www.worldwidehealth.com/images/article/smallest/3680.jpg

 

Skipping Breakfast May Lead To Bad Breath

July 25th, 2015

200398313-006

 

Many of us have heard the saying, "Breakfast is one of the most important meal of the day." It's true. Breakfast provides both children and adults the energy necessary to perform their best throughout the day. Children especially need breakfast as their bodies and minds continue to develop. Breakfast has also been shown as an important factor in maintaining a healthy body weight. Individuals who skip breakfast often have a hard time fulfilling the daily recommended vitamin and nutrients that come with a healthy breakfast. Not to mention, missing a meal can leave you hungry throughout the day and lead to snacking and eating higher portions at lunch and dinner.

Along with these reasons not to miss out on breakfast, did you know that skipping this meal can have a negative impact on your oral health? New research shows that missing breakfast can lead to bad breath (halitosis). Some people wake up in the morning with morning breath. Morning breath is often caused by a decrease in saliva production during sleep, which allows smelly bacteria to flourish in the mouth. Eating breakfast can help stimulate saliva production and wash away odor-causing bacteria, along with brushing and flossing of course.

A study published in the International Journal of Dental Hygiene involving teenage participants found that when compared to teenagers who ate breakfast, those who did not were twice as likely to suffer from bad breath. Approximately  1/5 of the participants admitted that they had skipped breakfast. Of these participants, 36% experienced bad breath, which was significantly more than those who ate breakfast. It is also important to brush your the tongue, which often houses a lot of bacteria that can cause bad breath. Bad breath can also be a result of conditions including diabetes, sinus infections, and other problems.

Many studies have linked eating breakfast to a healthy body and mouth. Make sure to eat something healthy before rushing out of the house in the morning!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://i.huffpost.com/gen/1486179/images/o-BREAKFAST-facebook.jpg

http://www.jhsph.edu/offices-and-services/student-affairs/_documents/breakfast

http://www.onemk.co.uk/news/2015/7/missing-breakfast-cause-bad-breath-says-new-26821853.html

http://blog.therabreath.com/2010/12/missing-breakfast-helps-cause-bad-breath/

Is Mouthwash Necessary?

June 18th, 2015

As your walking down the isles in a drug store, it's easy to find a row full of mouthwashes.  From cosmetic to therapeutic mouthwashes, there are several types that can cater to your oral health needs. But, are they really necessary?

Although mouthwash should not be used as a substitute for brushing and flossing, it can be a positive habit to help improve oral health.

 Mouthwashes can be useful for both adults and children when used after brushing and flossing. They can provide many advantages, including:

  • Preventing Cavities

Mouthwashes containing fluoride can help reduce your risk of developing cavities. After swishing for approximately one minute, a small amount of fluoride sticks to teeth and is then quickly washed away by saliva.

  • Freshening Breath

There are many mouthwashes available that can help mask bad breath. These mouthwashes typically contain natural and artificial flavors that help give your mouth a fresh aroma. Rinsing can also help get rid of food particles left on teeth that have their own smelly scents. However, it is important to note that masking bad breath doesn't fix the underlying cause. Bad breath, or halitosis, may be a result of an infection, tooth decay, or other health issues.

  • Whitening Teeth

Some cosmetic mouthwashes contain a low concentration of the active ingredient, hydrogen peroxide, which is believed to help whiten teeth.

  • Preventing Dry mouth, Periodontal Disease, and Sensitivity

Mouth rinses can act as a therapeutic and help sooth canker sores. Many therapeutic mouthwashes contain xylitol, which may help prevent tooth decay. Some rinses help kill germs that can lead to gingivitis and periodontal disease. In addition, some can even help individuals with dry mouth produce more saliva.

 

A common myth about mouthwash is that the flavor or color offers additional benefits to oral health, however, it is mainly for atheistic purposes to attract consumers to buy the product. Once you've found the right mouthwash that addresses your needs, make sure to rinse according to the directions. For example, it is best to gargle and rinse twice a day with mouthwashes aimed to remove debris from teeth.

Incorporating mouthwash into your daily routine can help remove dental plaque, prevent tartar buildup, and left behind food particles from your teeth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-03-mouthwash.html

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/specialist/jacobs/need-to-use-mouthwash.aspx

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Travel/Pix/pictures/2011/8/27/1314438844663/Mouth-wash-007.jpg

Summertime in the City: What's Healthy and What's Not

June 2nd, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-06-01 at 12.31.25 PM

June is finally here and it will be hard for many of us to resist a cold drink on a hot summer day. With the many family barbecues and outings, you're sure to be in for a treat this summer. During the warmer months, there are many tasty foods and drinks at our convenience. However, some of these items aren’t so tooth-friendly. As we all know, it is important to limit the amount of sugary foods and drinks we intake to ensure a healthy smile. For the health of your mouth, which links to your overall health, try adding these healthy options to your plate and glass this summer:

Drink, Drink, and Drink more water:

A nice glass of water can be a refreshing drink as you relax by the poolside. Water is important for staying hydrated, especially when your active and the sun is shining. Your smile will also thank you if you rinse your mouth with water after meals. Water, particularly tap water, even has the benefit of containing fluoride.

Watermelon:

Watermelon, made of 92% water, is another tasty  and healthy snack that will keep you hydrated this summer. It contains  lycopene, which helps keep skin protected. Also, many foods that are mainly composed of water have fewer calories. Your kids may even enjoy making watermelon popsicles!

Milk:

Milk is a great alternative to sugary drinks because it has been found to reduce levels of acid produced by plaque bacteria. Milk helps remineralize teeth by providing calcium to keep your teeth strong.

Sugar-Free Gum:

Chewing sugar-free gum can help to stimulate saliva flow and ultimately help to wash away left behind foods. However, it is not clear whether or not xylitol, commonly found in sugar-free gum, actually lowers the risk of developing dental cavities.

Strawberries:

Strawberries are in season and packed with healthy ingredients. Strawberries contain malic acid, which is known to whiten enamel. They also contain many antioxidants and vitamin C, which can help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, and promote eye health.

Cheese:

Cheese is full of calcium, the protein casein, and vitamin D, all good for the health of your teeth. Researchers have discovered that cheese helps increases the pH levels of dental plaque, helping to reduce tooth decay.

Pears:

Pears contain a wealth of fiber that will benefit your teeth. They help to produce saliva and lower plaque levels in the mouth.

Apples:

Crispy apples are full of vitamins and nutrients. Full of water and lots of fiber, apples help to scrub and clean the surface of your teeth.

Vegetables:

Veggies ranging from carrots rich in Vitamin A to dark leafy greens rich in iron, can make a great snack to chew on. Including vegetables in your diet is essential for the health of your teeth and body.

Cranberries:

Research has suggested that cranberries help lower the risk of cavities by helping to keep plaque from sticking to teeth. But, you may want to pay attention to the labels on cranberry products, as many of them can contain added sugars to compensate for their naturally tart flavor.

 

Some foods and drinks that are hard-to-resist, but should be avoided to keep strong and healthy teeth, include:

 

Soft Drinks, Sports Drinks, Sweet Tea, and Juice: Drinking a cold soda may sound refreshing, but it is damaging to tooth enamel. It can also dehydrate your body and make you feel more thirsty. Even sports drinks, artificially sweetened drinks, and concentrated fruit juice contain sugars for the bacteria in dental plaque to feed on and produce harmful acids. The acid then tears away at tooth enamel and can eventually lead to tooth decay. Highly acidic drinks can even cause heartburn and stomach pain. Sipping on these drinks throughout the day rather than at meal times should also be avoided because saliva production is not at its peak. Saliva is important for washing away bacteria and food particles.

Ice Cream:

The many flavors of ice cream are delicious, but unfortunately is full of sugar. Some individuals may also experience tooth sensitivity. Sensitive teeth results when the dentin underneath tooth enamel becomes exposed. This can cause pain, but can be treated. If you do have a taste for ice cream, try and select ice cream with less sugar.

Citrus Fruits:

As we all know, limes, lemons, oranges, and grapefruits are very acidic. These fruits contain citric acid and can be damaging to teeth if consumed frequently.

Vinegar:

A common practice, but an unhealthy one, is to mix vegetables with vinegar. This acidic combination can erode tooth enamel. Pickles are also very acidic.

Granola and Energy Bars:

These items may appear to be good for teeth, but often the dried fruit and other ingredients can be sticky, chewy, and hard to get off of teeth.

Candy: 

We all know that candy contains a lot of sugar, and should be avoided for the protection of your smile.

 

It is important to remember that if you do choose some of the not-so-healthy foods and beverages, consume them in moderation. Also, avoid snacking between meals, as acids can stick around for up to 20 minutes after eating. Not to mention, be mindful of the dyes used in many foods and beverages that can cause tooth discoloration. Practice good oral health habits and lean more towards a tooth-friendly diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/blog/fresh-breath-happenings/teeth-friendly-summer-food-ideas-34659.asp

http://greatist.com/health/healthy-teeth-foods

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-watermelon-popsicles-10713

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dwBqWs6_udQ/UBYvQhjW5TI/AAAAAAAACBY/YdNg1weBEVk/s1600/watermelon+popsicles.JPG

Can Yoga Improve Your Oral Health?

April 30th, 2015

 

 

Stressed out? Your dentist can usually tell! Stress can have a significant impact on your oral health.  In fact, dentists can detect oral symptoms of stress, including canker sores, teeth grinding (bruxism), gum diseasetemporomandibular disorders (TMD), burning mouth syndrome, and dry mouth, just to name a few. Luckily, many studies have shown that yoga can help people relieve stress, anxiety, and believe it or not, dental troubles!

Many studies have revealed that individuals who are stressed are more likely to neglect their oral care. As mentioned above, the tension in jaw muscles can lead to jaw clenching and teeth grinding. The good news is that along with alleviating stress, yoga improves posture. Poor posture not only affects your body, but also your mouth. It can cause the jaw to shift and affect the alignment of teeth. This can lead to Temporo-Mandibular Joint disorders (TMJ), which can cause pain chewing, nerve inflammation, headaches, and more!

Stress can also lead to dry mouth, which occurs due to low amounts of saliva production. Saliva flow is essential in helping get rid of germs in the mouth. Dry mouth leads to bad breath (halitosis), and can eventually develop into tooth decay and periodontal disease. Further, stress has been shown to increase inflammation in the mouth and  body. Bacteria in your mouth can cause gum inflammation, which plays a huge part in gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Although yoga may not fight cavities, it can improve the condition of your mouth and the health of your body by eliminating tension and stress. Yoga is a popular form of exercise that dates years and years back from India. Yoga incorporates both physical and mental disciplines for the purpose of achieving a peaceful balance between body and mind.  It promotes relaxation and can boost your mood, which can help you live longer and age-well. It also can reduce your blood pressure.

Another great thing about yoga is that it encourages a healthy lifestyle. It typically prompts people to practice better oral hygiene habits, implement healthier diets, and to get rid of poor oral health habits, including smoking.

So why not enjoy the many health benefits of yoga? There are plenty more, including:

  • Improving flexibility
  • Increasing muscle strength 
  • Preventing cartilage and joint breakdown 
  • Boosting immunity
  • Lowering blood sugar
  • Helping you focus
  • Improving your balance
  • Helping you sleep better
  • Increasing your self-esteem 
  • Benefiting your relationships

Yoga may not have been the first thing that you thought of when discussing how to maintain a healthy mouth. However, few methods of stress relief compare to that of yoga! Eliminating stress through practicing yoga may be a great option for preventing pain and oral health problems.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://lacunaloft.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Kids-Yoga-Portrait.jpg

http://awomanshealth.com/stress-and-oral-health/

http://yoganonymous.com/practice-for-the-teeth-3-ways-yoga-improves-dental-health

http://www.medicinenet.com/temporomandibular_joint_syndrome_tmj/article.htm

http://www.yogajournal.com/article/health/count-yoga-38-ways-yoga-keeps-fit/

Mind your Mouth and Body!

March 15th, 2015

In your body, since all of the organs are interconnected, your mouth health will impact your overall body health, and vice versa. In this article, we'll first describe connections between oral health problems and overall body problems. Next, we'll describe the nutritional and lifestyle decisions you can make to help not only your overall body, but your mouth too!

Health professionals have noticed connections between oral health problems, and other medical problems, including cardiovascular disease, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, pneumonia, and pregnancy complications. Gum disease and bacteria in your mouth can lead to clogged arteries and blood clots. Mouth bacteria can also cause inflammation throughout the body, including the arteries. This inflammation can lead to atherosclerotic plaques in the arteries, which can increase your risk of heart attacks or stroke.

Doctors have also found a link between diabetes and gum disease. Diabetes lowers your body's resistance to infection, thus making your mouth more susceptible to damage. Gum disease may also make it more difficult for you to control diabetes by causing insulin resistance.

Like diabetes, HIV/AIDS can lower your body's resistance to infection, thus exacerbating gum disease. There are even links between gum disease and pneumonia. If the mouth becomes infected, unhealthy bacteria can get aspirated into the lungs.

Additionally, gum disease is linked to premature and low-weight births. Gum disease can cause the release of toxins throughout the body, which enter the mother's placenta, and thus cause developmental problems for her baby.

It is important to establish healthy lifestyle and dietary habits for a healthy mouth and body. Nutrition is especially important to both your oral health and overall health. The month of March marks National Nutrition Month, making it the perfect time to implement healthy foods into your diet and spread the word about the benefits of good nutrition! Avoid sugary and acidic foods, as they can be damaging to tooth enamel. Tooth decay occurs when plaque come into contact with sugar, causing acid to harm the teeth. Also, make sure that your body intakes vital nutrients. If you lack certain nutrients, tissues in your mouth will have a more difficult time trying to resist infection. Eat a diet high in vegetables to make your entire body health, and you'll even reduce your risk of gum disease. Be sure to get proper nutrients into your body. If you're low on certain nutrients, your mouth may become an acidic environment, which can increase your risk of gum disease.

Links between medications and gum disease have also been found. Hundreds of medications have side effects that include dry mouth. Decongestants, antihistamines, painkillers, and diuretics commonly reduce saliva flow. Saliva is an important part of your oral health because it helps prevent too many bacteria from thriving in your mouth. A dry mouth is more likely to have gum disease and tooth decay. Be sure to stay hydrated!

If you are a smoker, strive to quit the habit. Smoking can cause tooth decay, periodontal disease, and oral cancer.

As you keep your mouth healthy, you’ll keep the rest of your body healthy.  Making positive oral health choices will lead to a healthy mouth and body!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.colgateprofessional.com/patient-education/articles/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body 

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/101/healthy-mouth-healthy-body.aspx

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/adult-health/in-depth/dental/art-20047475

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/d/diet-and-dental-health

http://ricecreekdmd.com/wp-content/uploads/kidsplaying.gif

 

Do Love Bugs Exist?

January 22nd, 2015

With Valentine's Day quickly approaching, love is definitely in the air! Many may not realize the role kissing plays in oral health. Kissing increases saliva production in your mouth, which helps to neutralize acids and wash away plaque that can lead to tooth decay. Kissing is also beneficial for your overall health, as it can reduce blood pressure, relieve cramps and headaches, boost self-esteem, and even help you burn calories! However, kissing has consequences too. Did you know that a single ten-second French kiss can transfer an average of 80 million bacteria from one mouth to another? 

According to a study conducted by researchers at Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research, it's true! The study examined tongue-swabs from 21 couples in Amsterdam. Some volunteers were also given a probiotic yogurt drink that contained a marker bacteria, and then asked to kiss their partners. Researchers found that a quick peck transferred an average of 1,000 bacteria, and a more intimate kiss transferred an average of 80 million bacteria from one mouth to another. It was also found that the more often a couple kissed, the more similar their saliva was in comparison to strangers.

Other studies have shown that cavity-causing bacteria can even be transmitted from a mother’s mouth to her baby.

According to the Micropia Museum, there are more than 700 different kinds of bacteria in the mouth. Although not all bacteria is bad, bacteria can produce acids and increase your risks of developing cavities. kissing is often a common way to spread cavity-causing bacteria, colds, cold sores, and the flu, especially if good oral health habits aren't regularly practiced by you and your partner! It is important to brush, rinse, and floss daily. Don't forget to brush your tongue and the roof of your mouth!

To reduce the risk of transferring or catching an infection while kissing, avoid kissing when you or your partner are sick or have active cold sores. Maintain good oral hygiene and schedule regular visits to the dentist.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.latimes.com/science/sciencenow/la-sci-sn-kissing-bacteria-exchange-20141118-story.html

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/11/17/bacteria-kiss-how-many-transfer_n_6171034.html

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2014/01/30/8-kissing-benefits.aspx

http://www.national-awareness-days.com/images/international-kissing-day.jpg

Is “An Apple a Day” Good for your Teeth?

September 18th, 2014

5083649844_afe8e9e1ac_zWill an apple a day only keep the doctor away? What about the dentist? Apples are not only recognized for their health benefits, but they also have an impact on teeth!

With school starting up again, the easiest way to lead children away from candies and other sugary foods is to offer healthy snack alternatives. Eating fresh fruit is a good alternative to drinking fruit juices, which have a high level of acidity and sugar. Apples make great healthy snacks that are easy to throw into your child’s lunchbox. Apples contain a wealth of vitamins and nutrients, which are important for maintaining strong teeth.Apples and other crunchy foods, including vegetables, can act as nature’s toothbrush by helping to remove stains and brighten teeth. The tough texture of apples helps stimulate the gums, clean teeth, and fight bacteria. Yet, it is important to note that they certainly do not replace brushing and flossing! Chewing on an apple also increases the production of saliva. The more saliva, the better! Saliva helps wash away food particles and keep plaque from forming. In addition, apples are packed with fiber and a high water content, which helps to neutralize acids that destroy tooth enamel.

On the other hand, it is important to remember that apples do contain sugar and acid, which can erode teeth. To counteract this effect, brushing and rinsing your mouth afterward is essential in preventing erosion and other oral problems.

Indeed, a healthy diet does have an effect on dental health. Fruits containing Vitamin C can help promote a healthy smile. Individuals that lack vitamin C are at an increased risk of experiencing bleeding gums. Carrots, celery, and dark leafy vegetables also make good snacks because they are loaded with vitamin A, vitamin C, beta carotene, phosphorus, calcium and magnesium.

An apple a day can be great, but good oral habits must also be implemented. A balanced diet that includes grains, fruits, vegetables, meat, fish, and dairy is essential in maintaining healthy teeth. Although a healthy diet can “keep the dentist away” with unnecessary oral health problems, it is still necessary to visit the dentist for regular checkups and cleanings!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim.

References:

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Video-Library/Apples-And-Oral-Health.cvsp

https://www.nutritionmasterfoods.com/WHY-EAT-THESE-INGREDIENTS

https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4147/5083649844_afe8e9e1ac_z.jpg

Do You Have a Teething Toddler?

August 3rd, 2014

The teething process is often an uncomfortable and challenging experience for toddlers. However, for some toddlers, teething can be painless! The severity of teething symptoms often varies from child to child. In general, your child’s first teeth may arrive any time between 3 months and 12 months of age. The first teeth to come in are usually the two lower front teeth, also known as the central incisors. In about 1 to 2 months following the lower front teeth, the four front upper teeth, also known as the central and lateral incisors, typically appear. When your child reaches about 3 years old, all 20 primary teeth may be present!

Primary teeth may seem insignificant because they’re temporary, but they're key in the development of healthy permanent teeth. Your child’s primary teeth not only help  with chewing, but also with speaking clearly! It is important to start taking care of your child’s primary teeth as soon as they become visible.

Certain symptoms of teething are common during the arrival of your child’s first teeth.  It’s normal for them to drool excessively, and have a desire to chew on hard objects to relieve pain. To reduce your child’s risk of developing a rash or experiencing irritation from the drool, wipe your baby’s mouth regularly.  Also, it is important to keep hazardous objects out of their reach and to keep their toys sanitized. To prevent your child from putting unsanitary items in their mouth, offer teething rings, cold vegetables, or a cold washcloth. Also, make sure to wash your child’s hands regularly, just in case they decide to put them in their mouth too!

Some toddlers may become irritable and out of sorts as their teeth arrive. This pain may result in more crying, and disrupted sleep and eating patterns. Although inflamed gums could cause a slight raise in your child’s temperature, check with your physician if your child has a severe fever or diarrhea, as they are not considered typical symptoms of teething.

No need to worry! Teething is a normal process that can be made less painful. Here are some tips on how to ease your child's discomfort and keep their primary teeth healthy:

 

Gently rub your child's gums.  

Using a cold spoon or washcloth to gently wipe your child's gums can ease some of their pain. It is especially important to wipe your child's gums after they've eaten and before going to sleep to prevent from tooth-decay.

 

Provide your child with cold foods.  

Try feeding your child cold and soft foods that don’t involve chewing, such as yogurt and applesauce.

 

Avoid filling your baby's bottle with fruit juices or other sugary beverages.

It is extremely important to keep your child hydrated! However, stay away from acidic and sugary drinks, as they can lead to baby bottle tooth decay! Prevent cavities by filling your baby's bottle with breast milk or water.

 

Use a toothbrush and water once the first tooth arrives. 

Choose a soft toothbrush to gently brush your child's primary teeth.

 

Schedule regular dental visits for your child.

Typically, a child’s first dental visit should be within six months after the first tooth arrives, but no later than the child’s first birthday.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/teething

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Family/2014/February/article/SW-281474979270690.cvsp

Image credit: http://www.blisstree.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/shutterstock-toddler.jpg

Shy Away from Morning Breath!

May 26th, 2014

bluenessDo you wake up in the morning with an unpleasant taste in your mouth? You may be experiencing a case of bad breath, also known as halitosis. Bad breath can not only harm relationships, but more importantly your oral health! Morning breath is typically a result of plaque buildup in the mouth that causes inflammation and a release of bad odors. However, common medical problems including diabetes, bronchitis, liver disease, acid reflux, and respiratory tract infections can also cause bad breath.

Saliva plays a key role in preventing bad breath by killing bacteria in the mouth and washing away food particles. As you are asleep, the production of saliva steadily decreases. Thus, the cleansing process of food particles and bacteria is limited during sleep. Going to sleep without implementing good oral health habits, such as brushing and flossing, can not only lead to bad breath, but also tooth decay, cavities, and gum disease.

In order to help increase saliva production and ultimately prevent morning breath, here are a few things to remember:

  • Some medications can result in a dry mouth overnight, worsening morning breath.

  • Smoking is not only bad for your lungs, but it can also lead to a dry mouth and morning breath.

  • Mucus from allergies or sickness can cause halitosis. The odor-causing bacteria thrive on mucus and can multiply within the mouth.

  • Use a non-alcoholic mouthwash before going to sleep in order to prevent a dry mouth.

  • Clear your nasal passages before going to bed to avoid breathing through your mouth.

Sometimes it can be hard to tell whether or not your breath smells. Looking at your dental floss after flossing to see if the floss smells or if your gums are bleeding can be a good indication of the presence of odors within your mouth. Don’t forget to brush your tongue, which holds odor-causing bacteria!

There is no need to be worried or embarrassed! Halitosis is treatable and easy to eliminate. It is important to have a healthy diet and to drink water. Make sure to carefully rinse, floss, and brush after your morning breakfast. Avoid diets and foods that lack nutrition and have strong odors. When food particles and plaque are not quickly removed from your teeth, bacteria multiply and create unpleasant odors. Stay away from acidic foods, as they provide a favorable environment for bacteria to thrive.

You can lower the amount of bacteria in your mouth by practicing proper oral health care on a daily basis!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.everydayhealth.com/dental-health/why-do-we-have-morning-breath.aspx

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/change-your-breath-from-bad-to-good

http://www.breathmd.com/bad-morning-breath.php

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Common-Concerns/Bad-Breath/article/What-Causes-My-Bad-Breath.cvsp

http://madisonweeklynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/blueness.jpg

 

How Much Water Should I Drink?

April 15th, 2014

womandrinkingwaterWe are all made up primarily of water.  In fact, about 60% of our body weight is water.  Water is crucial in the proper functioning of all of our physiological systems from flushing out harmful toxins to facilitating the travel of nutrients from one location to another.  We are constantly losing water through processes like sweating, breathing, and excretion.

The Institute of Medicine advises men to drink about 3 liters (13 cups) of water daily while women should drink about 2.2 liters (9 cups) of water daily.  Another way to calculate how much water you should drink, is to use the "half your body weight" rule.  For example, if you weigh 150 pounds, you should drink half that number in ounces (75 ounces of water).  One cup is defined as 8 ounces of water.  So, a 100 pound person should drink about 9.4 cups of water daily.  However, these guidelines for adequate intake of water will varying depending on individual lifestyles.  For example, an athlete that is constantly exercising or a person that lives in a hot, humid environment will need more water on a daily basis.  Intuitively, this makes sense.  You are losing fluids and electrolytes more quickly as you sweat more.

Surprisingly, thirst and dry mouth should not be used as accurate indicators of when to drink.  In fact, once you already feel these symptoms, your body is already dehydrated.  Dehydration can lead to a host of negative symptoms including: fatigue, headaches, dizziness, and weak muscles.  One effective way of determining whether or not you are drinking enough water is to examine the color of your urine.  A dark yellow color indicates dehydration while a clearer, lighter color indicates proper hydration.

The wide-range of benefits of drinking water are well-known.  Research has shown that sufficient water intake results in a better balance of body fluids, weight loss, healthier looking skin, and better bowel function.  Water is also beneficial for your teeth.  Water can wash away food debris and acidic residue left behind on teeth which keeps saliva levels high.  High saliva levels are necessary for combating cavities.  Furthermore, water can dilute high-sugar drinks and mitigate some of its harmful effects.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Sources:
http://healthyeating.sfgate.com/not-drinking-enough-water-per-day-2786.html
http://healthy-alkaline-water.com/side-effects-of-not-drinking-enough-water/
http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-living/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/water/art-20044256
http://www.joybauer.com/photo-gallery/5-fortifying-foods-for-your-teeth/Water.aspx
http://health.usnews.com/health-news/blogs/eat-run/2013/09/13/the-truth-about-how-much-water-you-should-really-drink

Image credit: http://www.wellness.uci.edu/images/womandrinkingwater.jpg

Stress on Children: Dental Consequences

February 23rd, 2014

Copy of smile-familyStress is sometimes seen as an inevitable problem that is here to stay throughout a lifetime. There are many sources of stress, including school, work, family and friends. While it does not come as a surprise that adults deal with stress on a daily basis, but it must be kept in mind that children are not exempt from this fact.

School comes to mind as the main source of stress for children, but other events such as world events, natural disasters, familial issues, death, and even separation anxiety as a toddler can present as stressful situations. These occurrences can lead to a physical response in children that can adversely affect oral health.

Some tall tale signs of stress can reveal themselves in various forms in children. These include moodiness, lying, bullying, physical symptoms of headaches and stomach aches, changes in eating habits, and different sleeping schedules. These changes can lead to unhealthy habits, such as indulging in sugary food choices, resulting in higher rates of dental decay. Decay can lead to multiple dental visits for fillings and even abscesses, which are bacteria-induced infections resulting in a swelling.  A child suffering from stress can also go back to habits of thumb sucking, which interferes with proper forming and erupting of teeth.

As parents, it is important to recognize these signs of stress and to make active steps to alleviating it. Here are some tips to helping children cope with stress:

  • Spend quality time with them on a daily basis
  • Have conversations about their day and look for root causes of the stress
  • Help them keep up with a good amount of sleep and a healthy diet
  • Appointments for wellness visits and follow-up visits to the dentist can help ensure healthy teeth

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Glossary/Abscess.cvsp
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/September/article/SW-281474979201581.cvsp
http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1009576213027#page-1

Indulgence in Sugary Sodas Can Lead to Poor Oral Health & Cardiovascular Disease

January 24th, 2014

colaThe proven connection between poor oral heath and increased risk of cardiovascular disease should re-enforce the importance of new heath policy creation, focusing on reduction of sugars such as those contained in junk food, particularly fizzy drinks,  say experts writing in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

Poor oral hygiene and excess amount of sugar in the diet can cause periodontal disease and decay of the teeth-supporting bone. It is thought that chronic infection brought on by gym disease can lead to inflammation that will over time cause heart disease through atherosclerosis, hardening of the arteries. Despite sufficient evidence of the connection between the poor oral health and premature heart disease, the recent suggested UK national guidance on Cardiovascular disease prevention at population level does not suggest the strong need to reduce sugar consumption.

Dr Ahmed Rashid, Department of Public Health and Primary Care, University of Cambridge, who co-wrote the paper, said: "As well as having high levels of fats and salt, junk foods often contain a great deal of sugar and the effect this has on oral health may be an important additional mechanism by which junk food elevates risk of CVD." He added: "Among different types of junk food, soft drinks have raised particular concerns and are the main source of free sugar for many individuals."

The authors refer to the well-knows  New York 'soda ban' controversy which has brought a lot of attention to the issue. They stress more can be done about making the sugary sodas dominating the public areas in the United States. Dr Rashid said: "The UK population should be encouraged to reduce fizzy drink intake and improve oral hygiene. Reducing sugar consumption and managing dental problems early could help prevent heart problems later in life."

Reference: http://goo.gl/ppiqpM

Consuming Cheese Can Prevent Cavities

January 20th, 2014

Happy National Cheese Lover's Day!

Dairy has been long known to be packed with a great amount of calcium, protein, and vitamin D in every serving. It has always been said that drinking milk and other dairy products will keep bones healthy and strong, but there has not been much research done on how beneficial dairy products are to oral health until recently. General Dentistry just published in their most recent journal issue that cheese and other dairy products have the potential of keeping cavities at bay.

Researchers that conducted the study looked at 68 participants between the ages of 12 and 15. The subjects had their dental plaque pH checked before eating cheese, milk, or sugar-free yogurt. Previous studies indicate that a pH level below 5.5 makes an individual more susceptible to the wearing down of enamel, resulting in tooth erosion. The higher the pH level, the lower the chance an individual has of getting cavities.

The subjects were randomly split into three groups: one that ate cheddar cheese, another that drank milk, and a final group that ate sugar-free yogurt. After eating their chosen type of dairy for 3 minutes, the subjects were asked to rinse their mouth with water. The pH level of each subject’s mouth was then measured 10, 20, and 30 minutes the dairy product was consumed. The researchers found that the individuals who drank milk and ate sugar-free yogurt did not have a significant change in pH level; however, those who ate cheese showed a great increase in pH levels after each time interval, indicating that this particular dairy product may be the key to preventing cavities. The results suggest that because there is more of a need to chew when consuming cheese, there is an increase in saliva production, which also leads to an increase of pH levels. The researchers also found compounds inherent in cheese binds to tooth enamel, preventing acid from causing further damage.

This new finding gives us more of a reason to add a slice of cheese to a sandwich. Continue to make sure daily that your diet increases and strengthens oral health!

If you have any questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130605130118.htm

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/6-reasons-to-get-your-diary

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57587876/cheesy-grins-may-protect-teeth-from-cavities/

Picture Credit: http://dailym.ai/17rk9ET

Local recommendation: Wasik Cheeseshop 

Vitamins: Key to Healing after Oral Surgery

January 13th, 2014

While vitamin C is a great way to boost your immune system, vitamins can also play a major role in timely recovery after oral surgery.

The Academy of General Dentistry explained that patients lacking in vitamin C have shown to recover at a slower rate. Appropriate amounts of vitamin C, along with other vitamins, minerals, fats, and protein, were reported to be essential for the growth and regeneration of normal tissues. Nutrients work both individually and cooperatively to move along the healing process. Tissue maintenance and repair requires the help of carbohydrates, fat and protein. Recovery of these tissues involves vitamin C, along with vitamins such as vitamins E, B and K.

Vitamin C is responsible for the making collagen (connective tissue) that strengthens skin muscles and blood vessels; this is key to proper wound healing.

Vitamin E has the ability to...thin blood, preventing blood platelets from clumping. It also speed up cell regeneration and promotes blood circulation, strengthening capillary walls while nourishing cells.

Vitamin B is crucial for carbohydrate metabolism and energy production. It facilitates energy-releasing reactions and can also help deliver oxygen and nutrients, allowing energy pathways to run smoothly.

Vitamin K promotes blood clotting and prevents bleeding; this is can be used to prevent post-surgery bruising.

Without these important nutrients, patients are more prone to infection and healing time can be further delayed. Researchers note that severely underweight or overweight patients, or those who take steroids, immunosuppressant, or chemotherapeutic agents may experience poor recovery after oral surgery. It is crucial to maintain a healthy balance of vitamins before going into surgery.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=N&iid=315&aid=1277

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/003042208290295X

http://www.livestrong.com/article/470706-nutrition-related-to-the-oral-cavity/

Beware of BPA: Found to Damage Tooth Enamel

January 12th, 2014

girl looking in the mirrorThere has been much talk about the dangers of ingesting BPA through plastic sippy cups and even water bottles that we bring on the go. BPA, also known as bisphenol A, is a chemical found in hard plastics of food and drink containers and acts in a similar way to estrogen, and other hormones in the body.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) had originally deemed BPA to be a safe substance, but recent studies have shown that this chemical has lead to disruption of normal hormone levels, possible brain and behavior problems in infants and young children, and an increased risk of cancer and heart problems.

Recently, researchers have tied enamel damage to early exposure to BPA. A team led by Ariane Berdal of the Universite Paris-Derot showed that rats that have been treated daily with low doses of BPA resulted in damaged enamel. The rats were observed during a 30-day development window where researchers exposed the rats to the doses of BPA. The earliest observations founds on the rats were white marks found on their incisors. On a macroscopic level, the teeth with white marks were found to have fragile and brittle BPA. On a microscopic level, the enamel showed a decreased level of crucial minerals, the teeth were more susceptible to cavities.

The damage found on the teeth of these rats is comparable to damaged tooth enamel found in 18% of children between the ages of 6 and 8. These researchers believe that enamel damage is another effect of BPA damage to the body. It is important to check products for a “BPA-free” label before they are bought. While the FDA has cracked down on plastics containing, be cautious when buying baby bottles, sippy cups, baby formula cans, and other products for young children. Our pediatric dentist, Dr. Pradhan and Drs. Ali & Ali at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

Resources:

http://children.webmd.com/environmental-exposure-head2toe/bpa

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/06/130610133246.htm

http://www.voanews.com/content/bpa-teeth-13jun13/1681088.html

Cholesterol Medication Can Help Decrease Gum Inflammation

December 12th, 2013

youngoldHeart disease is one of the leading health issues in the United States. Arteries within the body become inflamed and patients are often recommended to take medication that lowers cholesterol

Statins is a commonly prescribed medication that helps patients with heart disease. But what’s more is that a new study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology demonstrated that statins can also be beneficial for those suffering from gum disease.

Periodontal disease is marked by chronic gum inflammation that affects approximately half of the U.S. adult population. Dr. Ahmed Tawkol of Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School notes that there is a connections between heart and gum disease: both periodontitis and atherosclerosis are driven by inflammation. These inflammatory conditions are often seen to occur together, indicating to researchers that their biologies may be related.

A study was administered to test this theory. Patients with either heart disease or considered to have high heart disease risk were asked to take 80 mg of statin or 10 mg of stain daily for 12 weeks. PET/CT scans were used to observe inflammation over the course of the study. Results indicated that the 59 patients in the study demonstrated a significant reduction in gum inflammation, some after only 4 weeks of treatment. The researchers also found that the improvement of inflammation in the gums related closely with the improvement seen in inflammation in the arteries.

This study provides strong evidence that links atherosclerosis and periodontal disease. This research opens doors to new methods of treatments. Because of the relationship between these two diseases, medications that originally targeted one of these diseases may also be beneficial for the other. These results also points to better and improved oral hygiene to reduce inflammation in the gums can also lead to reduced atherosclerosis.

This study again shows the strong relationship between oral health and overall systemic health. Maintaining proper oral care can really go a long way for the body as a whole. Keeping up with oral hygiene can truly lead to a healthier smile and a healthier you!

If you have any questions or concerns please don't hesitate to ask Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group or our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi. We would all be more than happy to help. Please contact us at (781)237-9071 or email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131002185652.htm

http://consumer.healthday.com/dental-and-oral-information-9/misc-dental-problem-news-174/statins-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too-680723.html

http://www.webmd.com/cholesterol-management/news/20131002/cholesterol-drugs-may-boost-your-gums-health-too

 http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Mouth-Changes-May-Be-Related-To-Menopause.cvsp

 

What is Burning Mouth Syndrome?

December 11th, 2013

The elusive yet painful burning mouth syndrome!

Dentists and researchers have been scratching their heads for quite some time over a type of oral pain that seems to be plaguing a good amount of individuals. Patients’ chief complaint is that the mouth feels scalded; however, mouth and gums continue to appear normal. Because of this syndrome’s lack of visible symptoms (except for sensations of pain), it can take several visits before finally concluding that it is BMS. Over these years, it has come to be known as burning mouth syndrome (BMS). Because of its elusive symptoms, dental researchers have been looking into the burning mouth syndrome, hoping to find more clues to where the and why the pain originates.

Dr. Andres Pinto is the new chair in the Department of Oral Diagnosis and Radiology at Case Western Reserve University’s School of Dental Medicine, and he is delving into reach on the burning mouth syndrome. BMS have spread to 2-5% of the population and mainly strikes women between the age of 50 and 70 and from three years before to 12 years after menopause. Earlier research on BMS has also paired their symptoms with psychogenic disorders. BMS is also mentioned as a secondary issue along with anemia, diabetes, vitamin deficiency, and thyroid disorders. Although an exact cause has yet to be found, burning mouth syndrome has been suspected to result from the deterioration of the nerves beneath the oral lining. Because the oral lining is not visible, this can explain the difficulty in diagnosing this disorder.

Dr. Pinto encourages individuals that continue to feel pain in their mouth to check for BMS these symptoms:

 

  • Persistent burning tongue and oral pain with no apparent dental cause
  • Abnormal taste or dry feeling in mouth
  • Symptoms that subside when eating
  • Burning sensations that migrate across various oral areas

 

Even when there is oral pain with no sign of these symptoms, it is advised to go in for a dental checkup. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131023100957.htm

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/burning-mouth-syndrome/DS00462

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/patient_53.pdf

 

 

Want To Brighten Your Smile For The Holidays?

December 6th, 2013

sinsational_gal_loIt’s that time of year again, gathering for family affairs and celebrating holidays as the year draws to a close. It definitely doesn’t hurt to have a set of pearly whites for the occasion! Here are a few tips to achieving a brighter smile:

Take a pass on the usual bag of chips and make a grab for fruits: while fruits boost many benefits for one’s overall health, fruits are also a great way to beginning removing stains from teeth. Some fruits, including apples and strawberries, contain malic acid, which has been shown to oxidize and remove stains from teeth. Crunchy fruits and vegetables also help whiten teeth by increasing saliva production, which neutralizes acids from other food such as tomatoes and wines.

Cutting out staining beverages is also a great way to cut down on the instances teeth are susceptible to stains. Drinks such as wine, coffee and various sodas are known to stain teeth; furthermore, beverages, such as soda, are extremely high in sugar content, leading to more bacteria production and more cavities. In the cases where these drinks are consumed, using a straw can really make a difference. The straw keeps the outer teeth from coming in contact with the beverage, preventing stains from forming.

And of course there are whitening strips. These strips are becoming more accessible and easy to use; some even simply dissolve in the mouth when applied! However, for individuals with more sensitive teeth, be mindful about the frequency of treatments used per week.

We also provide Sinsational in-office whitening. They procedure easily lightens your teeth and causes little to no sensitivity! It could be a great option for people who want a brighter smile without feeling any discomfort.

If strips are still a hassle, there are whitening toothpastes that are great for tackling hard to remove stains. While brushing teeth can lead to a brighter smile, it is still important to keep in mind the importance of daily brushing and flossing. Maintaining a bright smile should mean maintaining a healthy smile as well!

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group ; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References

 

http://www.3dwhite.com/teeth-whitening/teeth-whitening-kits/make-teeth-whiter.aspx

 

http://voices.yahoo.com/5-easy-ways-whiten-teeth-remove-stains-4616045.html

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/weighing-your-toothpaste-options

 

Ease Oral Burns With Innovative Strip!

December 5th, 2013

coffee_0

When hot, delicious food is placed before you, it is easy to quick to scarf down that plate of food. Or even in the morning, the goal is to quickly down that cup of coffee before getting to work. In the heat of the moment, the burning sensation is an afterthought, but once that gooey slice of pizza has been consumed or when you have stepped into your workplace, the pain begins to set in and feelings of regret for eating or drinking so quickly start to well up.

 

Pain from burns causing by consumption of hot foods and liquids tends to be an issue that everyone will likely face. Even though the pain eventually subsides, it still lingers for some time. A pharmaceutical, biomedical engineering research team may have found the solution to this problem. Dr. Jason McConville of New Mexico, along with researchers from the University of Texas from Austin, had presented on possible dissolvable strips to treat oral thermal burns. This strip would be applied directly to the affected part of the tongue, cheek or roof of the mouth. Scientists note that this adhesive will not hinder any normal day-to-day activities because of its quickly dissolving nature. These strips will look and act similarly to breath freshening strips that can be found in the local drugstore.

 

The strip would locally deliver anesthetic, benzocaine, and a therapeutic polymer. This film can instantly release benzocaine when it is placed on affected areas in the oral cavity and has shown to relieve pain significantly over an extended period of time. What’s more is all the materials used to create these dissolvable strips are relatively inexpensive. The team of scientists has proposed that this film could give way to instant, sustained, and affordable relief from oral burns.

 

There are high hopes for these dissolvable strips and it will be exciting to see this new product enter the market. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121016125647.htm

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-02-scientists-develop-film-strip-to-treat-oral-burns.cvsp

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57535420/

Why Is Junk Food Bad?

December 4th, 2013

Even though junk foods are known to be unhealthy snack options, it is easy to look past health concerns and succumb to sodas, chips, and candies. But just how bad are junk foods an individual and how exactly are these foods harmful? The nature of junk foods suggests that a high level of intake of such foods can lead poor oral health, which is not surprising considering the amount sugar found in these foods. However, it is suggested that the level of sugar in junk foods, which indubitably has an effect on oral health, also ends up increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease.

Past research has shown that high sugar intake along and poor oral hygiene have been linked to periodontal (gum) disease. In the case of periodontal disease, gums end up pulling away from teeth, leaving “pockets” that can end up becoming infected. The body ends up responding to this infection by breaking down bone and connective tissue that support the teeth. If these symptoms are left untreated, the bones eventually become destroyed, leaving teeth loose or in need to be removed.

However, the story does not stop here. Research also shows that chronic gum disease can trigger an inflammatory response, resulting in cardiovascular disease; this occurs through atherosclerosis, which is the process where arteries become hardened. Thus, the sugar in the junk food that is consumed not only affects the oral cavity, specifically the bones surrounding teeth, but can lead to unhealthy consequences for the heart as well.

It is important to keep in mind that the body is comprised of many interconnected parts. Do not hold the misconception that damage done to one area of the body is contained in only that region. Poor oral health choices can result in issues concerning other areas in the body. On the same token, consuming teeth-friendly foods not only is beneficial for the oral cavity but can also be favorable for the rest of the body.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131202105301.htm

http://www.menshealth.com/nutrition/bad-foods-teeth

Saliva, a Potential Player In Detecting Systemic Diseases?

December 2nd, 2013

Through a lifetime, saliva proves to be integral for the breakdown and digestion of foods that are consumed. This watery liquid keeps the mouth moist and comfortable, while fighting germs in the mouth. Because of its proteins and minerals, teeth, specifically tooth enamel, is fortified and protected from tooth decay. Saliva has had a consistent function in the maintenance of good oral health, but researchers are now finding that it may have a significant role in revealing systemic diseases.

 

A group at the University of California Los Angeles School of Dentistry has been looking at biological markers derived from saliva that could potential test for the presence of stomach cancer and other deadly diseases. Dr. David Wong, the head of this five-year project, has high hopes of detecting cancer cells through capturing extracellular RNA, an important player in the production of proteins. The researchers hope to develop a method for using saliva to detect life-threatening diseases, such as pancreatic, breast and ovarian cancers. Currently, Dr. Wong’s team initially disordered salivary extracellular molecules and have strong evidence for detecting oral cancer with the biological markers they have created. The team also has successfully developed salivary extracellular RNA biomarkers for diseases such as salivary gland tumors and Sjögren’s syndrome.

 

While this research team continues to look for ways to genetically screen for these cancers, dentists have been able to start the process in detecting these systemic diseases during an oral exam. The initial symptoms of many diseases appear in the mouth. Diabetes, for example, is a complex disease that surprisingly shows many symptoms in the oral cavity. Thrush is an oral infection in the mouth that thrives when there are increased levels of blood glucose found in the saliva, which is an indication of diabetes. Dry mouth is another indicator of this disease, decreasing the production of saliva, leading to mouth soreness and tooth decay. Diabetes also increases the time for wound healing, which can be observed after an invasive dental procedure.  Saliva and the oral cavity as a whole continue to reveal much about an individual’s oral health simply through a check up. It is crucial to consistently make appointments with the dentist both to ensure good oral health and to screen for signs of systemic disease. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

 

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-09-Saliva-May-Hold-Key-To-Detecting-Deadly-Diseases-In-The-Body.cvsp

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2674509/

http://www.richmondinstitute.com/salivary-diagnostics-in-dentistry-and-medicine

 

Mealey, B. 2000. Diabetes and periodontal disease. Journal of Periodontology 71(4):664-678.

 


More Effective Pain Relief!

December 2nd, 2013

It can be quite unnerving when going in for dental surgery. Quick and effective pain relief is definitely on patients’ minds, and the hope is that their dentist will come through and prescribe drugs that will do the trick. While there are combinations of drugs that are effective in alleviating postoperative pain, they also come with a price, usually in form of side effects. However, there is new research showing an alternative solution, one involving safer over-the-counter drugs that may be just as, if not more, effective.

According to the Journal of the American Dental Association, taking ibuprofen and acetaminophen (APAP) together can help ease the pain after surgery without any significant side effects. Researchers have been advocating patients to take over-the-counter drugs, such as ibuprofen, APAP and naproxen after oral surgery. One of the most common combinations that patients take is APAP and an opioid, which is a prescription drug. However, the down side of this opioid-APAP combination is that patients may face potential adverse reactions linked with opioids. Most dentists and oral surgeons also frequently prescribe Vicodin, which is a combination of hydrocodone and acetaminophen for severe postoperative pain. While this form of pain relief is effective, it poses a risk for abuse and other adverse reactions.  Dentists are now advised to move towards the over-the-counter APAP and ibuprofen combination to keep side effects at bay.

Drs. Paul A. Moore from the University of Pittsburgh School of Dental Medicine, and Elliot V. Hersh from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine were able to determine whether this ibuprofen-APAP combination would be the better alternative to take over combinations including opioids. They were able to use the over-the-counter combination to manage the pain patients felt after they had their wisdom teeth removed. Their results indicated that the ibuprofen-APAP combination was more effective at reducing pain and had fewer side effects than many of the combinations including opioids. They also showed that the ibuprofen-APAP combination resulted in greater pain relief than using ibuprofen or APAP alone.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-08-Ibuprofen-And-Acetaminophen-Together-May-Give-Profound-Pain-Relief-With-Fewer-Side-Effects-After-Dental-Surgery.cvsp

 

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/8/898.abstract

 

Immune Cells: Potential Warriors In the Battle Against Gum Disease

November 22nd, 2013

perio diseasePeriodontal disease is one of the most prevalent oral diseases, affecting 78 million people in the United States. Periodontal disease (also known as gum disease) can range from gum inflammation to serious disease results in severe damage of the soft tissue and bones that support the teeth. While this oral disease remains an issue at large, researchers at the University of Pittsburgh may have found an innovative way to keep this disease at bay. They have discovered that certain immune system cells can be brought right to the inflamed tissues, resulting in effective treatment.

 

When dentists see that patients have symptoms of periodontal disease, the usual recommendation is proper oral hygiene. Through daily brushing and flossing, one is able to prevent plaque and eventually tartar from forming near the gum line.  These strategies aim to keep the growth of oral bacteria at bay. Dr. Charles Sfeir, the director of the Center Regeneration at the University’s School of Dental Medicine notes that these are ways to keep the bacteria from triggering sever inflammation in the oral cavity; however, there needs to be a method to prevent the underlying problem, which is the overreaction of the immune system that results in an adverse response to oral bacteria.

 

Within a healthy mouth, there is a response system between the immune system and bacteria that prevents infection without starting up inflammation. However, when there is too much bacteria in the oral cavity (due to lack maintenance of oral health), the immune system is on overdrive, leading to harmful consequences on oral tissues. The scientists have discovered that these disease tissues are low on a group of immune cells called the regulatory T-cells, which is responsible for informing immune cells to stand down, stopping the inflammatory response. These researchers believe that when more of these regulatory T-cells are brought back to the gums, the inflammatory response will be contained. The researchers are on their way in developing new technology that can deliver these immune cells to where they are lacking. With this new system, perhaps inflammation, thus periodontal disease may potentially be kept at bay.  If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group ; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/11/131101112412.htm

 

http://www.nidcr.nih.gov/OralHealth/Topics/GumDiseases/PeriodontalGumDisease.htm

 

http://www.yurovskydental.com/periodontaldisease.php

Why the Mouth Matters!

November 20th, 2013

[caption id="attachment_5914" align="alignleft" width="594"]Mouth Matters! Mouth Matters![/caption]

Even though the mouth is such an integral aspect of the human body, it’s easy to often take it for granted. It’s only when things go wrong when the oral cavity receives more attention and care. But why wait until those times in need? The mouth holds so many exciting facts that may very well be fascinating and sometimes even surprising. Here are a few interesting facts to keep you on your toes.

 

1. Teeth are the hardest substance in the human body. These mighty parts of your body are powerful tools of digestion and the break down of food. It’s easy to forget that individuals are able to enjoy and consume food only because of teeth! But what exactly keeps teeth so strong and resilient? Scientists have found that the human tooth enamel is composed of a basket-weave structure, which gives teeth their strength and also prevents any cracks that have formed from worsening and propagating through the enamel. Teeth can withstand an incredible amount of force, all due to their well-engineered core!

 

2. Some say that the mouth is the window to the body, but other than the fact that you can physically look into the oral cavity, dentists are able to see how well an individual is doing in terms of their overall health. 90% of life-threatening diseases have symptoms that show up within the mouth. Heart disease, respiratory disease, and even Alzheimer’s disease have been linked to oral health. Taking care of oral health is just as important (in fact it is related) to the body’s overall health.

 

3. Bad breath odors are definitely something that everyone wants to be kept far away from. In fact, more than a billion dollar a year has been spent on over-the-counter products to mask bad breath odors! In the United States, 65% of the population has been estimated to have bad breath, also known as halitosis. But no worries; there are many ways to treat bad breath. Cavities or gum disease have been shown to lead to bad breath, which are caused by lack of brushing and flossing. Always remember to keep up with healthy oral health habits; it may just say you from bad breath.

 

4.  Speaking of flossing, if individuals never make it to pulling some floss out and getting it in between teeth, they are actually missing 35% of their tooth surfaces. That’s quite a lot of tooth surface to be missing out on! When there is lack of proper flossing, bacteria are more than ready to take over these surfaces, foraging for leftover food to consume. The more leftover food, the more bacteria!

 

5. It’s been estimated that there are over 100 million bacteria in just one drop of saliva. But saliva is a big help in dealing with the amount of bacteria in the mouth. It is a major fighter of germs in the mouth and also prevents bad breath! Saliva has key proteins and minerals that fortify tooth enamel and prevent tooth decay. What’s more is that the average human produces 25,000 quarts of saliva in a lifetime, that’s enough to fill up 2 swimming pools!

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

References:

 

Where I got inspiration from: http://visual.ly/your-mouth-matters-fun-dental-facts

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/science/humanbody/body/factfiles/teeth/teeth.shtml

http://www.livescience.com/3498-mystery-tooth-strength-cracked.html

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/change-your-breath-from-bad-to-good

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/what-is-saliva

http://naturalrevolution.org/natural-body/

 

Are toothbrushes actually clean?

July 29th, 2013

Researchers at England’s University of Manchester have looked into the various kinds of germs found in bacteria, and they found that toothbrushes are crawling with them! They discovered that a toothbrush could harbor more than 100 million bacteria, with the likes of diarrhea-causing E. coli and skin-infecting staphylococci bacteria. This may sound completely unsanitary, but wait! The mouth isn't the cleanest place to begin with. There are hundreds of microorganisms in the mouth on a daily basis. Medical professionals note that this is perfectly normal and it is not something to sweat over. But what individuals need to worry about is when there is an unhealthy balance of bacteria in the mouth. Many people forget that the plaque that develops inside the mouth (if proper brushing is not taking place) is, in fact, bacteria. Toothbrushes are continuously introduced to bacteria every time it is placed into the mouth.

 

So if there are constantly bacteria on toothbrushes, can they make people sick? Researchers think that it’s not likely. Considering there are already bacteria in the mouth, the body’s natural defenses make it difficult for an infection to occur just from brushing teeth. However, one should not take the body’s ability to defend itself for granted. There are still ways to keep fewer bacteria from entering the mouth. In many homes the bathroom sink is in close vicinity to the toilet. But that should not be the excuse for placing toothbrushes near where flushing occurs! Every time the toilet flushes, it sends sprays of bacteria into the air. Try to place toothbrushes as far as possible from the toilet, giving bacteria less of a chance in getting into the mouth.

 

Bacteria love moist environments and it is important that the brush dries through and through between each brushing. Try to avoid covers that enclose the brush, which would leave the toothbrush moist and bacteria-friendly. It is also a good idea to keep the toothbrush upright in a holder, instead of lying it down. Also, no matter how clean your sister or any of your other members of your family, don’t ever use each other’s brushes. Don’t even place toothbrushes in the same cup! Whenever toothbrushes come in contact with each other, they can easily exchange bacteria.

We recommend that you replace your toothbrush every season(3 months) to help prevent bacterial growth and to maintain oral hygiene.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/the-ugly-truth-about-your-toothbrush

 

http://www.ada.org/1887.aspx

 

3 Tips On Keeping Your Breath Fresh!

July 26th, 2013

Are you worried about the prospect of having breath? Don’t worry you’re not alone; according to the American Dental Hygienists’ Association, there are 40 millions Americans that suffer from bad breath. However, it doesn't need to be this way! Here are a few ideas on how to go about your day without worrying about halitosis.

1. Keep up with brushing and flossing

After a big meal, people are bound to have food caught in between the many crevices of their mouths. Food that has been left behind can break down, resulting in sticky build-up known as plaque. To keep this plaque build-up from happening, try brushing and flossing after meals, which can keep the mouth clean and breath fresh.

 

2. Don’t forget the tongue!
After brushing and flossing at night, many people just turn off the bathroom lights and hit the hay. But wait; the tongue can harbor tons of bad-smelling bacteria! Without proper maintenance, a white layer can form on the tongue. People tend to find toothbrushes to big to reach to back end of the tongue without causing discomfort. Dentists suggest using tongue scrapers, which can easily maneuver the tongue, getting rid of bacteria, leftover food, and even dead cells that brushing can’t take away.

3. Pass on the onions and garlic
Although they are undeniably great additions to a great sandwich, these two food ingredients are infamous bad-breath causers. Unfortunately, brushing after consuming garlic and onions does not do the trick; substances within these foods actually travel down the blood stream and into the lungs, where they constantly get breathed out. If you know fresh breath is necessary for a certain social meeting, save onions and garlic for another time!

 

These are simple tips to keep in mind, but they do go a long way. Always maintain good oral health and soon enough, you’ll be able to say goodbye to bad breath! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/healthy-teeth-2/get-rid-bad-breath

http://www.uihealthcare.org/Adam/?/HIE%20Multimedia/1/003058

Tips to Conquer Dental Fear!

July 25th, 2013

Let’s be honest: many people tend to be scared or nervous before a visit to the dentist’s office. Dental phobia is something that people continually cope with; however, it doesn’t always have to be this way! Here are a few tips on how to beat dental fear.

 

Look for a dentist that you feel most comfortable working with. There are many dentists out there with different personalities, and finding one that suits an individual can be key in feeling less anxious and nervous during an appointment. Dentists are willing to work through fears and are happy to go slow if need be.

 

Ask the dentist to go through the procedure beforehand. Having a dentist go through the steps can allow individuals to prepare for what is to come. Patients always have the right to know what kind of work their dentist will be doing on them.

 

Don’t be afraid to let the dentist know when the procedure is uncomfortable. Patients are able to establish “stop” signals with dentists. This allows the patient to take breaks when needed and can allow them to relax before proceeding.

 

Breathing exercises are also a great way to calm the nerves and prepare for a dental procedure. Here are six breathing exercises (hyperlink six breathing exercises and use: http://healthland.time.com/2012/10/08/6-breathing-exercises-to-relax-in-10-minutes-or-less/ ) that can bring about relaxation. Turning up your favorite music can also help turn down the anxiety. When sitting in the waiting room, pop in your earphones and listen to calming music or even music that you love. There are also dental offices that have TV monitors in the exam rooms. This is also a great way to take your mind off of the fear and anxiety and to tune into a great show.

 

There are medications that allow patients to relax. Dentists recommend nitration oxide, anti-anxiety medicine or sedation for patients who can become extremely nervous during an appointment. If you believe that medication can help cope with a dental visit, find a dentist that can cater to your needs.

 

Here at the Wellesley Dental Group, we need to make our patients feel as comfortable as possible. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://psychcentral.com/library/phobia_dentist.htm

http://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/dental-fear-our-readers-suggest-coping-techniques-20100825327

http://healthland.time.com/2012/10/08/6-breathing-exercises-to-relax-in-10-minutes-or-less/

READ MORE HERE!!!

http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=1981

http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=600

I’m pregnant! But what about oral health?

July 24th, 2013

During pregnancy, women tend to look towards an overall healthier way of living. Many primarily seek out medical professionals that can keep them on track with a good diet and care for the coming baby. However, many expecting mothers tend to put oral health on the back burner during pregnancy.

 

It is highly recommended that good oral health be maintained before, during and after pregnancy. Pregnancy is known to kick start hormonal changes that can increase the risk of gum disease, which can in turn affect the coming baby. Because dental procedures have the potential of influencing the baby’s growth and development, it is recommended that mothers should avoid dental treatments during critical times for the baby, notably the first trimester and second half of the third trimester. But, routine dental care can be done on mothers in their second trimester. This also means that expecting mothers should be extra careful in keeping up with good oral hygiene during these critical stages of pregnancy.

 

It is important to keep the dentist informed of all the drugs that are taken during pregnancy; this can range from medications and even prenatal vitamins that have been prescribed. Dentists can potential modify the dental treatment plan based off of the drugs that are ingested. There are key drugs, including tetracycline, which can influence the expecting child’s teeth and should be avoided during pregnancy.

 

With these pointers in mind, it is essential to understand that being pregnant does not mean that it is a ticket out of a dental appointment. In fact, it should be more of a reason to make a visit to the dentist. Regular gum exams are very important during this time, for hormonal changes increase the risk of periodontal disease. It is important to pay close attention to any changes in the gums, whether there are signs of swelling or even bleeding.

 

The months of pregnancy can be both an exciting and stressful time, but with proper maintenance of both oral and overall systemic health, expecting mothers are then set on a path to a smoother pregnancy.  If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/dental-care-pregnancy

 

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=h&iid=325&aid=1309

 

http://www.ada.org/sections/scienceAndResearch/pdfs/forthedentalpatient_may_2011.pdf

 

Bleeding Gums: What Can This Mean?

July 23rd, 2013

When the topic of oral health is brought up, the focus is usually placed on teeth and the possibility of getting cavities. However, there is definitely more to the mouth! Gums can be a good indicator of oral health as well as one’s overall health! Individuals may find that after brushing their gums may look red and they may even start bleeding. Many tend to dismiss these signs and just attribute them to good and thorough brushing. But wait! This is not the case.

First things first, there is a misconception that to get clean teeth, brushing needs to be done vigorously to get all the grime off. While afterwards your teeth may feel clean, your gums are not too pleased.

Remember: gums are made of soft tissue and when aggravated they can become sore and red. When choosing a toothbrush, it is important to opt for soft nylon bristle with blunt ends. Stores may carry brushes with medium or hard bristles; however they may damage the enamel on teeth and can cause swollen gums. The idea of being gentle goes the same for flossing. The goal of flossing is to remove leftover food and plaque stuck between teeth; it does not mean these particles need to be forcefully taken out. It is important to refrain from forcing the floss in between teeth; instead, carefully slide the floss up and down, following the curve of each tooth.

Aside from proper brushing and flossing, bleeding gums is actually a sign of gum disease. When proper dental hygiene is not practiced, bacteria takes over and plaque starts forming. The same bacteria that jumpstarts the formation of cavities as makes gums irritated and swollen. Bleeding gums is an early sign of gum disease, also know as gingivitis, and symptoms can be reversed with good oral hygiene. But if these symptoms are ignored, gingivitis can get worse, eventually leading to tooth loss. Be on the lookout for these symptoms:

- deep pockets between teeth and gums
- changes in the way teeth come together
- gums that bleed during/after toothbrushing
- shifting teeth
- red, swollen, tender gums

If you experience these symptoms, be sure to set up an appointment with the dentist to determine the necessary steps to keep these symptoms from getting worse. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/gum-problem-basics-sore-swollen-and-bleeding-gums

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003062.htm

http://www.medicinenet.com/gum_problems/article.htm

Read more at http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=4564http://wellesleydentalgroup.com/blog/?p=3457

Stick with Mussels: they can help strengthen and rebuild teeth!

July 19th, 2013

Good news for all you seafood lovers out there. The Journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces have found something very special about mussels’ adhesive nature. Not only does it let these creatures hold fast to rocks in the ocean, researchers have found that they also can be beneficial for teeth.

Quan-Li Li, Chun Hung Chu, and other researchers noted that there are three out of four people who have teeth sensitive to hot, cold, sweet or sour foods and drinks. These scientists were determined to look for ways to rebuild enamel and dentin, which are important factors that determine tooth sensitivity. They found that mussel’s natural adhesive, which allows them to attach to rocks, can be a synthetic substance used to reform the eroded enamel and dentin. They worked under the hypothesis that the sticky substance in mussels would have the ability to keep essential minerals in contact with dentin long enough for reformation to occur.

In 2011, an international team of scientists that mussel’s adhesive proved to be a successful alternative to other coatings used in teeth. While most coatings tend to make teeth weak and brittle over time, the synthetic coating created from mussel adhesive had the ability to heal itself when damaged. The researchers also found that minerals in other coatings were only able to reform enamel while the synthetic adhesive was able to reform both enamel and dentin. Phil Messersmith of Northwestern University have taken into account mussels’ incredible adhesive properties and have created a polymer used in coating that can mend tears in just a matter of minutes!

While these scientists continue to incorporate this newfound adhesive to the clinical setting, there are still ways to battle sensitive teeth. Doctors continue to recommend that individuals practice good oral hygiene (brushing twice a day and making sure to floss carefully). Those with sensitive teeth can also be extra careful when consuming acidic foods such as juices, vinegar in salad dressings and soft drinks. A good way to protect teeth is to rinse the mouth with water after consuming these foods. Teeth grinding can also leave teeth susceptible to sensitivity; ask the dentist about a mouth guard for nighttime use to prevent teeth grinding.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

Sensodyne on sensitive teeth
ACS journal website
Science Daily website
Yahoo Health
http://www.empowher.com/dental-amp-oral-health/content/sticking-mussels-beneficial-sensitive-teeth

Safety First: Protecting Your Teeth in Sports

July 18th, 2013

When people go out for a game of basketball or soccer, many don’t usually think about teeth. Dentists recall numerous stories where patients have come in with chipped or even missing teeth due to an intense game on the court. In order children and a

dults, sports injuries tend to be common. It has been estimated that 13-39% of dental-related injuries happen when an individual is engaged in sports. About 80% of the injuries are located in the front teeth or even the tongue and cheek. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recognizes high rate of sports-related dental injuries in today’s youth and continues to look for means for prevention. 

Even if an individual takes one to the mouth and ends up with a missing tooth, a dentist is able to save the tooth. Cracks and chips in tooth can be repaired through using tooth-colored materials that are just as strong as the original tooth. Although dentists can easily come to the rescue, these injuries can turn out to be pretty serious and procedures are not a small cost. Dentists have strongly recommended the use of mouth guards for football players. With this movement, mouth guards have been able to prevent about 200,000 injuries annually.

There are various means of protection when playing a sport. Here are two types of protection that are recommended:

Mouth guards: like it was previously mentioned, mouth guards have done a great job in protecting sports players. They can prevent injury to one’s teeth, tongue and lips. Dentists tend to recommend athletes to get a custom-fit mouth guard; however, individuals can opt for ready-made mouth guards that can be found in sporting-goods stores.

Helmets
: people usually do not think that protecting their head means protecting their teeth as well. As a matter of fact, helmets are very effective in protecting both the head and the oral cavity in high speed and impact sports. These sports usually include hockey, football, bike riding, and skating. It is important to note that there are helmets specially made for a certain sport. When purchasing a helmet, be sure to check and see if the helmet fits correctly.

Sports are definitely a healthy way to distress and have some fun. But make sure that safety is first! If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

http://www.aapd.org/m

edia/Policies_Guidelines/P_Sports.pdf

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Oral-and-Dental-Health-Basics/Dental-Emergencies/Sports-Safety/article/Sports-Safety-Avoiding-Tooth-and-Mouth-Injuries.cvsp

http://www.ada.org/news/6955.aspx

General and Oral Health Benefits of Breastfeeding

July 16th, 2013

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a policy statement back in 2012 stating that breastfeeding and the use of human milk have show to reduce health risks for infants, children, and mothers, also including advantages such as developmental, nutritional, immunological, and psychological benefits. The APP exclaims that breast milk is the best nutrient source for babies. It contains immunological agents, including secretory immunoglobulin (g) A and IgG, along with anti-inflammatory properties that act as protection for the infant’s immune system.

Researchers found that compared to formula-fed children, children who were breast-fed had a lower risk of diarrhea by coating intestinal lining and killing dangerous pathogens that leave babies prone to infection. Breast milk also combats severe lower respiratory infections, including pneumonia and virus bronchiolitis; a child’s risk of developing asthma is also reduced. The immunological and anti-inflammatory properties of breast milk controls to onset of infection and illnesses, reducing sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Breastfed-children are also less likely to develop obesity, which is a prevalent disease that 12.5 million children and teens suffer from today. Breastfeeding helps protect against obesity by improving self-regulation of energy intake and recognizing when one is full. On top of these general health benefits, breast-fed children showed better occlusion, where their top and bottom teeth came together more favorably.

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) suggests that parents should clean infants’ gums even if they do not have teeth. Parents can use a soft washcloth to clean the gums. The AAPD also recommends that breastfeeding should be exclusive for about the first six months of life; this should continue past six months with the gradual introduction of foods fit for the baby. If you have any concerns our pediatric dentist Dr. Pradhan, and Drs. Ali & Ali at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/2/143.full.pdf+html

http://jada.ada.org/content/144/2/143.short?rss=1&%3bssource=mfr

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/gina-ciagne/how-to-become-a-healthier_b_697162.html

Healthy Lifestyle = Good Oral Health!

July 9th, 2013

A study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the German Institute of Human Nutrition reported that adult men and women who never smoked, kept a healthy diet, maintained physical activity, and had a body mass index (BMI) under 30 were 78% less likely to develop chronic conditions, including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, cancer and stroke. Those who stuck it out with only one of these four healthy lifestyle factors lowered their chronic disease risk by almost 50%, and risk levels decreased as individuals adapted more of these healthy behaviors.

So how does this connect to dentistry and oral health? Well, when looking these healthy factors from the flip side, poor eating habits, tobacco use, and excess body weight have strong correlations with oral health, especially periodontal disease, along with other health conditions, such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

The participants in the study ranged from ages 35-65 and at the start of the study, each individual’s weight and height were measured. Participant’s health history, physical activity and eating habits were also recorded. They were tracked for almost 8 years and their health was tracked throughout that time. Out of the participants that actively exhibited all four healthy behaviors, they had a 93% reduced risk for diabetes, 81% reduced risk for heart disease, 50% reduced risk for stroke, and 36% reduced risk for cancer.

Dentists continue to back up the importance of eating healthy, getting enough physical activity, and limiting tobacco use. Dental research continues to document oral health benefits that come with tobacco cessation, leading a healthy diet, and maintaining a healthy weight. Dentists continue to push for less frequent exposure to soft drinks and beverages with a high sugar content, which can lead to both tooth decay and an unhealthy increase in body mass index.

Remember: monitoring what you eat not only benefits your oral health but also benefit your overall body. Continue to be mindful of how much you exercise and what you decide to put in your mouth. Your teeth and your entire body will thank you! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ada.org/3127.aspx
http://archinte.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=1108507

Things To Do On July 4th!

June 28th, 2013

I bet everyone is so excited with July 4th right around the corner. Now that the Summer is here I know everyone has vacations, desserts, beaches, and other fun things on their mind.  If not, trust me, we will find plenty of things for you to enjoy whether it may be a cozy evening indoors or an active day outdoors. Here are a list of things to do in the following areas:

LOCAL:

NEEDHAM - The Fireworks have been promised to be better than ever and our Grand Parade will feature special guests and new musical groups.   The Fireworks will be at Memorial Park on Wednesday evening, July 3rd.   The evening will begin with food, ponyrides, face painting and other family entertainment followed byFireworks.  The Grand Parade will start at 9 am on Thursday, July 4th.   After the Parade on Thursday there will be more food, a flea market, an old fashioned baseball game, children’s games and much more!

NEWTON - At Newton Centre Playground at Tyler Terrace
For children 3 – 12 (Cancelled in the event of rain) from 10 AM – Noon Enjoy the following:Grande Pet Parade, Teddy Bear Parade, Decorated Doll Carriage Promenade, and Foot Races. At the Russell J. Halloran Field & Sports Complex from 1 pm- 9 pm enjoy OPEN AIR MARKET & AMUSEMENT RIDES: Handmade and International Crafts, Food Vendors, Children's Activities, Amusement Rides. There will also be live entertainment at the Gazebo!

12:00 pm Maestro Muscians, String Quartet
2:00 pm The Kapps - Classic Rock & Roll
3:00 pm The Circuit Theatre Company
4:30 pm Kevin McNamara - Troubador

Lastly, don't forget a Spectacular display of Fireworks at 9 pm!!!

WALTHAM - At Leary Field from 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. They will have pony rides, music, food and drinks. Profile will perform at 5:30 p.m. with fireworks starting at 9:30 p.m!!!

 

GREATER BOSTON

Boston Harborfest – June 28-July 4: Festival includes more than 220 events: walking tours, concerts, Revolutionary-era historical reenactments, the famous Chowdafest, visits from U.S. and foreign naval ships; harbor cruises; State House tours; guided walking tours of the North End, Boston’s underground and the Harbor Islands; treasure hunt; tour of Coast Guard ships; whale watch and dinner cruises; chowder fest; USS Constitution Turnaround Cruise; Boston Pops concert and fireworks. Check out the MBTA’s special schedules during Harborfest.

Boston Harborfest Children’s Day – Boston June 29: Kids can join organizations like The USS Constitution Museum, Historic New England and the New England Aquarium to learn something new and exciting about Boston and its history; with a live juggling act, children’s musical performers, balloon presentations, live dancers, and more. Location: City Hall Plaza.?10 a.m. – 3 p.m.? Cost: free.

Boston Chowderfest – Boston July 1:  As part of Boston’s Harborfest 2010, this day-long celebration of a New England favorite features all varieties of chowder from chefs and restaurants throughout New England. At City Hall Plaza.

Boston Pops Fireworks Spectacular – July 4:  Free outdoor concert in the Hatch Shell aside the Charles River is a glittering, unforgettable Independence Day tradition. This Fourth of July musical celebration includes performances of patriotic favorites like “Yankee Doodle Dandy,” “America,” and “Stars and Stripes Forever”; thunderous rendition of Tchaikovsky”s “1812 Overture” followed by fireworks display over Charles River

Bicentennial of the War of 1812 – June 28-July 5:  Join the celebration of the USS Constitution, affectionately known as Old Ironsides, as she celebrates the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812, 200 years of peace between the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, the creation of our national anthem, The Star Spangled Banner and her historic role in defending the country.?Highlights include:?*The Star Spangled Sail – USS Constitution Turnaround Cruise with sister ship the USCG Eagle and visiting navy and tall ships.?*21 Gun Salute?*Blue Angels Flyover and aerial demonstration?*USN Leap Frogs Jump?*All visiting ships will be open for public tours

Boston Navy Week – June 29-July 6: This is the sixth year in a row that Boston has been chosen to host a Navy Week celebration, which recognizes the Sailors who serve our country and the communities that support them. Through a series of events ranging from ship visits to Navy band musical performances and meet and greet events with local Sailors, the U.S. Navy will come together with the members of the greater Boston community to honor the history of the Navy and cultivate new connections between the city and the world’s greatest maritime fighting force. It will run in conjunction with the 29th annual Boston Harborfest.

Reading of the Declaration of Independence – Boston July 4: – Only once a year, Boston residents and visitors get to hear the famous speech read from the balcony as it was on July 18, 1776. Location: Old State House, State and Division Streets.?10 – 10:30 a.m.? Cost: free

Sky High Fourth of July Dinner – Boston July 4 – Celebrate the 4th of July 52 floors above the back bay at Top of the Hub, featuring an evening of cocktails, dinner, a simulcast of the Boston Pops concert, and an ideal vantage point from which to enjoy the holiday fireworks spectacular over the Charles River. Reservations are required.? Prudential Building, 800 Boylston Street ?7 p.m.? Reservations: 617-536-1775

Liberty Fleet of Tall Ships – Boston June 28 – July 4:  Lots of great tall ship events during Harborfest.

Black Bostonians of the Revolution – Boston: This is a guided walking tour about early African American leaders and the roots of the abolition movement in American. ?Location: tour starts at Sam Adams Statue, Faneuil Hall? 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Wrentham Village Premium Outlets – July 4th Summer Sale? Don’t miss the July 4th Summer Sale at Wrentham Village Premium Outlets®. Enjoy extra savings on top of already low outlet prices. Featuring 170 stores including Banana Republic Factory Store, Elie Tahari, Juicy Couture, Salvatore Ferragamo and many more. Visit the Sales & Events page for a sample of in-store promotions.

 

NORTH OF BOSTON & GREATER MERRIMACK VALLEY

Sudbury’s Annual Fourth of July Parade – Sudbury July 4: All are welcome to come and watch one of the area’s best parades! (With a zip code like 1776, Sudbury’s patriotic spirit is one to be reckoned with…) The parade forms on Union Avenue between Station Road and Codjer Lane. Step off time is 1 p.m.

Acton Celebrates Independence Day – Acton July 4:  Celebrate Independence Day at NARA Park in Acton, MA. The day starts off with family fun activities from 3-7 PM, followed by a free concert featuring the Rolling Stones Tribute Band, The Blushing Brides at 7:30 PM and fireworks at 9:30 PM. Food vendors will be onsite. No alcoholic beverages permitted. Free Admission – some activities may have a small fee.

Picnic in the Park – Concord July 4: A program of favorite patriotic tunes by this 50-year-old concert band. Location: Emerson Field, Stow Street. The concert will be in the Concord Armory if it rains. Time: 10 a.m.-4 p.m., with band performance at 3 p.m.

Pepperell Fourth of July – Pepperell July 7: Parade at 12:30 p.m.; Rockin Rib Fest at the Community Center fields; fireworks at dusk. Location: Parade starts at Pepperell Town Hall, travels on Main Street East around the rotary, follows Hollis Street North past town field, turns left onto and marching up Tucker Avenue, and ends at the large parking lot between Nissitissit Middle School and the field where the fireworks are displayed.

Salisbury Beach 4th of July – Salisbury July 4:  Enjoy the sea and surf, ice cream and cotton candy, beach pizza and fried dough, arcades and more. Dine over the ocean, listen to reggae on a giant oceanfront deck. Get your palm read. Play games on the Broadway Mall. Visit the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation’s Sea Life Discovery Center where you can come face-to-face with marine creatures at their new touch tank! Or take a surf lesson with Zapstix at their second, new oceanfront location. There’s something for everyone at Salisbury Beach!

Rockport Independence Day Celebration – July 3-4: Rockport Firemen’s Parade at 6 p.m., followed by a Legion Band Concert and bonfire on Back Beach at about 8:30 p.m

Gloucester Independence Day Horribles Parade and Fireworks – July 4 – ?Gloucester Horribles Parade begins at 6 p.m. and circles through downtown Gloucester. Fireworks begin at 10 p.m. Favorite viewing locations: Stacy Boulevard, Stage Fort Park, Western Avenue.

Danvers Family Festival – Danvers June 3 – July 4:  Festivities leading up to the Danvers Fireworks on July 4 start about a month prior with themed nights, concerts, games and festivals. The Fireworks Festival itself takes place at Plains Park from 4 – 9 pm. The main stage hosts musical performances while various concession stands sell delicious food. The Just for Fun areas features games and rides for kids. Throughout the early evening there is a stunt plane show, along with parachuting and a military fly over. The famed fireworks show begins at 9:30 pm.

Beverly Farms Independence Day Celebration – Beverly Farms July 4: The featured events are the always unique morning Horribles Parade and a spectacular evening shoreline illumination and aerial fireworks display held at West Beach. Rounding out the holiday events, the Committee also sponsors the House Decorating Contest, the Family & Friends Cookout, the youngsters Scavenger Hunt, the post Parade “Old Timers” adult softball game at Dix Park, races and games at West Beach on the afternoon of the 4th, and musical entertainment at the Beach leading up to the fireworks.

Marblehead Fireworks & Harbor Illumination – Marblehead – July 4 – Monday, July 4th, 2011 approximately 9:00 p.m. The Harbor Illumination will begin at 8:45 p.m. and immediately following we will LIGHT THE FUSE ON THIS YEAR’S EDITION OF FIREWORKS FOREVER!

Harvard Town Fireworks at Fruitlands – Fruitlands Museum, Harvard July 3: The pastoral site of Fruitlands Museum in Harvard, Massachusetts will be home to an all-American Independence Day celebration on Friday, July 1st with bands, food, and fireworks. Music is slated to start at 5 P.M. Hot dogs, hamburger, and drinks will be available for purchase; local Girl Scouts will be on hand selling desserts. Visitors are also allowed to bring picnics to the event.

PARADES

Fireman’s Parade, Rockport, July 4, 6 pm.  Independence Day Parade, Manchester, July 4, 12 noon.  Highlands Horribles Parade, Danvers, July 4, 9 am. Back Bay Parade, Danvers, July 4, 11 am.

 

SOUTH OF BOSTON

Plymouth’s Fourth of July Festivities – July 4 – Always a great time to be in America’s Home Town! Parade route begins at Cordage Park Marketplace on Court Street in North Plymouth and winds its way down Court Street through downtown Plymouth and Main Street, continuing onto Main St. Ext and, turning left onto Water Street to the reviewing stand next to the Plymouth Rock. The Legion Bud Band starts at 7pm and ends just before the fireworks begin, with the playing of the 1812 Overture (508)747-7174

New Bedford Summerfest – July 6-8 – New Bedford’s annual old-fashioned, family oriented international folk music/arts festival. This fine summertime event is hosted by the City of New Bedford and The Standard-Times held throughout New Bedford’s beautiful National Park. Featuring an array of super musical performers, artisan’s marketplace, juried crafts, international bazaar showcasing a diverse selection of imported goods, variety of delectable food vendors, whale boat races and harbor tours.

138th Brockton Fair – June 28-July 8 Lively and exciting entertainment for all ages! In addition to the always-thrilling midway full of rides, other featured entertainment includes a surprise-filled magic show, exciting demolition derby, horse racing, amateur boxing, figure 8 racing, stock car football, big bear show, magician, petting zoo, puppet shows, livestock shows and spectacular fireworks displays!

Hingham Celebrates the 4th – June 30-July 7,  June 30: Fireworks over Hingham Harbor, July 4: Hingham Road Race & 4th of July Parade. July 7: Vintage Baseball Game  (781)749-1312

38th Braintree Independence Celebration

 

For more go to http://www.massvacation.com/explore/holidays/4th-of-july/http://www.july4th.org/

 

 

 

Make Teeth Shine with Fruits and Vegetables!

June 26th, 2013

While coffee and red wine may have shown to be beneficial for health, they are drinks that can easily darken those pearly whites. Here are some healthy foods that are both great for the body and can leave teeth whiter. According to the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry (AACD), these are a couple fruits and vegetables that can naturally make teeth brighter and whiter.

 

 

Pineapples: research has shown that these tangy fruits contain the enzyme bromelain, which acts as a natural stain remover. Bromelain helps fight plaque from forming, which can wear down the enamel of teeth and lead to cavities.

Apples: like that saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away”, apples can help keep bacteria away. Munching on this particular fruit can generate saliva, which can help neutralize the acid from other foods, keeping teeth free from decay

Carrots: these stringy vegetables are a reservoir of vitamin, which keep tooth enamel in tip-top shape. Eating these veggies raw can help the mouth replenish saliva, which is responsible for keeping the mouth clean. Chewing on crunchy vegetables (count celery in!) will help keep teeth clean.

Broccoli: these mighty greens are chock-full of iron, which helps keep acid that is developed in the mouth from damaging the enamel of teeth. A Brazilian study found that broccoli can prevent erosion of enamel due to acid found in sodas.

Onions: although this vegetable is usually the culprit of leaving bad breath after a delicious sandwich, onions contain sulfur compounds, including thiosulfinates and thiosulfonates, which can reduce bacteria in mouth that cause decay. Researchers suggest to eat onions raw, for cooking them will destroy these sulfur compounds. If you are not a fan of onions, garlic also can supply you with these sulfur compounds.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1601-5037.2010.00473.x/abstract

http://www.aacd.com/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20922161

http://www.3dwhite.com/teeth-whitening/teeth-whitening-kits/make-teeth-whiter.aspx

http://modestyplusglamour.wordpress.com/2012/10/07/pineapple-for-acne-scars/ (picture credit) Also, did you know that pineapples are good for acne scars?

Sweet (But-Teeth Friendly) Desserts

June 18th, 2013

It’s summer time! The school year is finally winding down, and we are excited to make are way down to the beach and enjoy some time out in the sun. Summer also brings ice cream, popsicles, cotton candy, and a whole bunch of food that may be delicious, but are also definitely not doing your teeth a favor.

Every grocery store is bound to have a section of an aisle dedicated to frozen desserts, which can range from strawberry ice cream to jolly rancher-flavored popsicles. Your taste buds may think it’s an excellent idea to grab a few on the go, but your teeth will beg to differ. Popsicles tend to have high sugar content, which will leave teeth susceptible to cavities and tooth decay. These frozen sweets also contain artificial coloring dye, which has been shown to contain carcinogens and maybe contribute Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Instead of getting a pack of popsicles from the grocery store, here are some healthy and enjoyable alternatives.

Smoothies: Milk shakes tend to be a summer favorite after a long soccer practice. While they do contain dairy, which is wonderful for teeth, they also contain lots of sugar, which is wonderful for bacteria in the mouth, not so much for teeth. Bacteria love feeding on sugary residue left in the mouth, and definitely won’t hold back when they are offered a ton from milk shakes. Instead of making a trip to the local diner, start the blender and add in some low-fat milk, yogurt, bananas, strawberries, and blueberries. A yummy smoothie will result, chock full of calcium, antioxidants, and vitamins. Homemade smoothies will allow you to control the amount of sugar that goes into the drink, and sweet and healthy fruit will do just the trick! Here’s a quick and easy recipe (link: http://bit.ly/16upE68) that will satisfy sweet-tooths but will keep teeth happy.

Yogurt Pops: Yogurt, cheese, milk and other dairy products are great saliva generators, protecting teeth from tooth decay. Calcium and phosphates found in milk and other dairy products can put minerals back in teeth, making them healthy and stronger. Here’s ( http://bit.ly/112tASF ) a great recipe for these delicious pops that will make the kids wanting more!

Remember: Desserts can be delicious and healthy at the same time; there’s always great foods out there that are also a treat for teeth as well. Here’s to a summer of healthy choices and yummy eats! If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://online.wsj.com/article/PR-CO-20130605-908423.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/rachelhennessey/2012/08/27/living-in-color-the-potential-dangers-of-artificial-dyes/

The Link Between Periodontal Disease and Diabetes

June 13th, 2013

26 million adults are known to be affected by diabetes. Statistics show that 1 out of 10 healthcare dollars are spent on diabetes. The link between periodontal disease and diabetes has been extensively studied over the past 50 years. There is strong evidence that diabetes is a risk factor for periodontitis and gingivitis. A study dating back to more than 30 years ago has already shown that children suffering from type 1 diabetes had a higher prevalence of gingival inflammation. Ervasti et al. examined patients with gingival bleeding and determined that there was greater amount of bleeding in patients with poorly controlled diabetes when compared to subjects that do not have diabetes and subjects with well-controlled diabetes. Research has also shown that types with type 2 diabetes also tend to have more gingival inflammation than the control group in the study.

Studies also show that the risk of developing periodontitis is increased when one has diabetes. Teenagers with type 1 diabetes have been found to be five times more likely to develop periodontitis. Research also supports the idea that there may be more bone loss linked to adults with diabetes. Subjects suffering from type 2 diabetes are three times more likely to develop periodontitis compared to subjects without diabetes.

Doctors were able to pinpoint the root cause of this relationship between diabetes and periodontal disease. There is a protein known as the c-reactive protein (CRP), which is found in the blood stream. CRP levels rise with inflammation of blood vessels, which has been linked to type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Researchers have also shown that CRP is continuously produced in the presence of periodontal diseases. It is important to note that an individual cannot keep diabetes under control if he or she is also suffering from periodontal disease. It is absolutely crucial that diabetic patients maintain good oral health to keep CRP at bay.

Periodontal disease can affect your general health; read more here.

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! They can assess the risk of periodontal disease and if need be our periodontist, Dr. Ghazwan Ghazi, can help.Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

Cianciola L, Park B, Bruck E, Mosovich L, Genco R. Prevalence of periodontal disease
in insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (juvenile diabetes). JADA
1982;104(5):653-60.

Ervasti L, Knuuttila M, Pohjamo L, Haukipuro K. Relation between control of
diabetes and gingival bleeding. J Periodontol 1985;56(3):154-7.

http://www.diabetes.org/news-research/research/access-diabetes-research/greenfield-protein.html

http://www.ada.org/sections/professionalResources/pdfs/Perio_diabetes.pdf

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/diabetes-statistics/

Can playing a musical instrument effect oral health?

June 11th, 2013

It has been widely accepted that playing a musical instrument can increase and nourish intelligence in children, but playing a used instrument can be a health risk as well.

General Dentistry published a clinical study that revealed that woodwind and brass instruments that have been previously used were found to be ridden with various bacteria and fungi some that have been linked to serious infectious and allergic diseases, which can further lead to conditions such as mouth breathing. Click here to read more about mouth breathing. Children who are involved with their school band or orchestra typically rent their instrument for over the course of the year. These instruments have already been played by other students and without proper cleaning, bacteria an fungi have been indubitably thriving in the instrument. The same growth has been seen in dentures, athletic mouth guards, and tooth brushes.

In the clinical study, 117 instrumental pieces, including mouthpieces, internal chambers, and cases were tested on 13 previously used instruments. There were 442 different bacteria found on the instruments, along with 58 molds and 19 yeasts. Mold can lead to the increased likelihood of developing asthma, while yeasts found on the instruments can lead to skin infections around the mouth and lips. These bacteria, fungi, mold, and yeast that are presence on these instruments are highly resistant to the antibiotics that are normally prescribed, which highlights the importance of sterilizing instruments that have been previously played. It is essential to wipe areas that come in contact with the skin and mouth frequently. Instruments should be cleaned on a regular basis with cleaning cloths and solution.

If you have any concerns, Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be very happy to answer your questions. Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com!

References:

http://jada.ada.org/content/142/5/490.3.fullv

The Importance for Teens to Balance a Fast-Paced Life and Oral Health

June 10th, 2013

Once that alarm starts going off in the morning, teens are on a jam-packed schedule, shuffling through classes, extracurricular activities, and sometimes even part-time jobs. In order to keep up with the pace, teens often make a grab for quick meals in form of carbonated beverages and “nutrition bars” to keep them on edge and alert for all of their obligations; however, this kind of lifestyle may leave teens with permanent damage to oral and overall health.

In a 2003 issue of General Dentistry, studies have shown that teens that constantly indulge in sugary drinks can result in premature loss of tooth enamel and the weakening of overall tooth structure. While research has deemed carbonated beverages and energy drinks detrimental for oral health, these sugary drinks can also affect overall bone growth in teens. Read more here. Adolescence is the known time period of optimal bone growth, when more nutrient-packed calories are necessary to fuel growing bodies and to strengthen teeth and bones. These calories tend to be counteracted when teens continue to take in high-carbohydrate foods, which are instead replacing healthy foods such as milk, vegetables, and fruits.

Reports have shown that these beverages are the main causes of increases cavities and obesity in teens today. Unfortunately, researchers expect obesity to remain a major issue as more pre-school-aged children continue to become more addicted to caffeine and sugar. The various acids found in sodas and energy drinks breakdown tooth enamel around cavity sealants and previously done restorations, which leads to more necessary dental treatment to prevent tooth loss.

Phosphoric acid in many carbonated drinks limits calcium absorption, influencing body density. By age 16, girls have acquired 90-96% of their bone mass, making adequate calcium intake extremely important. However, national statistics indicate that only 19% of girls ages 9-19 are receiving the recommended 1,3000 mg of calcium per day. The lack of calcium intake indubitably affects bone structure of the mouth, which can lead to complications such as periodontal bone loss.

While it is important for teens to work hard and strive to do their best, it is just as essential for them to watch what they consume and maintain a healthy lifestyle. If you have more questions, be sure to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.knowyourteeth.com/infobites/abc/article/?abc=T&iid=333&aid=1335
http://www.healthywomen.org/condition/oral-health

Pacifiers:Do They Boost or Weaken Your Child’s Health?

June 7th, 2013

Many parents have been taught that sharing utensils or sucking on pacifiers to clean them can help a child build immunity. The journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics has even published a study detailing the immunological benefits of adult saliva. However there has been much debate about whether parents should follow this rule of thumb.

The American Dental Association (ADA) was quick to follow up this study with their respond, explaining that this may not be a good idea. ADA noted that the adult saliva contains a whole host of microorganisms that may be harmful to a child health. The transfer of saliva may end up increasing a baby’s chance of developing tooth decay in the future. Dr. Jonathan Shenkin, who is a spokesperson for the ADA, points to Streptococcus mutans as a bacteria present in adult saliva that my end up doing some serious damage to teeth.

However, there are others that continue to support the American Academy of Pediatrics. While they understand the risks of being more susceptible to bacteria, proponents of adult saliva transfer believe that should not be the main concern at hand. It has been argued that certain adults may not even have these harmful microorganisms present in their oral cavity. What should be priority is parents’ responsibility to provide good oral hygiene for their child. These dentists argue that no matter what, babies will continue to be exposed to different harmful microorganisms, whether it Is from what they consume or touch throughout the day. The key to limiting the progression of child tooth decay is to keep up with proper oral care. Parents need to be reminded of the importance of proper brushing, rinsing, and flossing for their child. Dentists believe that this aspect of oral health takes precedent over staying away from microorganisms that can harm the child.

Our pediatric Dentist, Dr. Pradhan, will more than willing to take care of your child's dental needs. Also, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts, questions,or concerns; they will be happy to answer them! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ada.org/news/8582.aspx

http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2013/04/30/peds.2012-3345

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/260144.php

Five Green Foods That Can Bring About Good Oral Health

June 4th, 2013

Have you been looking to get healthier and searching for how to change up your current diet? Here are a couple green healthy foods that can get you started on spicing up what you eat and also can be beneficial for your oral health!

Green tea: get ready to cut out sugary and carbonated beverages and look into a lighter and calming alternative. While green tea has been proven to reduce the risk of both stroke and oral cancer, it contains catechins, which are a type of antioxidants that also prevents cavities and gingivitis. Green tea also prevents halitosis by hindering bacterial growth. Make sure to read our blog to find out more about green tea health benefits!

Celery: these crunchy greens can help produce saliva, freshening up the mouth while neutralizing bacteria that results in cavities. Celery is also known to stimulate and massage gums during chewing and also cleanses areas between teeth.

Wasabi: the spicy Japanese horseradish not only adds flavor to sushi and sashimi, but can also be front line defense for teeth. What makes wasabi taste hot is a substance known as isothiocyanates, which also prevents the growth of bacteria in the mouth. Eating green paste can keep cavities away!

Parsley: these leaves can add flavor to a variety of dishes but can also help freshen up the mouth after a meal. These greens contain monoterpenes, which are substances that travel through the lungs and bloodstream; their odor ends up being released through one’s breath.

Kiwi: most fruits contain an assortment of vitamins, but kiwis are known to be jam-packed with Vitamin C, which allow maintains the collagen in gums, preventing tenderness and vulnerability to bacteria. Snacking on these sweet green fruits is another way to prevent cavities.

If you have any more questions, thoughts, or concerns feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm

http://www.nytimes.com/2000/12/26/health/it-works-on-sushi-it-could-help-teeth-too.html

http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/getting-your-vitamin-c-from-kiwi-fruit.html#b

Green Tea May Prevent the Onset of Oral Cancer

June 3rd, 2013

Green tea has been shown to a soothing drink that has the ability maintain healthy teeth and gums. Research also reveals that green tea extract can be used as a chemopreventative agent to fight oral cancer. The Daily Meal also reports that "Green tea has also been proven helpful to people who suffer from diabetes, heart disease, high cholesterol and blood pressure, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, as well as even skincare and tooth decay."

Cancer Prevention Research published online that out of the oral leukoplakia patients who took the green tea extra, more than half of them experienced a clinical response. Their preclinical models indicated that green tea is filled with polyphenols, which can prevent the progression of cancer. Researchers have noted that while these clinical trials may not show definitive proof that green tea can be used to prevent cancer, these results can lead to more studies focusing on patients who are at risk for oral cancer. Green tea has shown to be promising because of its nontoxic nature, which is essential to prevent further harm in individuals battling cancer.

In phase 2 of their study, oral leukoplakia patients were given either the green tea extract or a placebo at one of three dosage amounts. Participants ingested the tea or the extract for three times a day for three months. After these three months, the patients underwent oral tissue biopsies. These biopsies were able to reveal that green tea extract were beneficial to the patients but also lead the researchers to believe that antiangiogenetic effects (growth and development of tissue) were the mechanism of action.

Out of the patients that took the two highest doses ended up, 58.8% of the patients had a clinical response, compared to the 36.4% of patients that took the lowest dose of green tea extract. Although these results were not statistically significant, researchers noted that the extract was well received by the patients and only a few of the patients that took the highest extra dosage showed signs of insomnia and nervousness.

The researchers note that there were only a few patients that participated in their clinical trials and that more research needs to be done to see if green tea can conclusive prevent oral or other types of cancer. Green tea needs to be looked at to determine whether it can provide long-term prevention for patients. However, this research proves to be a promising stepping-stone for further studies.

Green tea is stimulatory in nature as it contains some caffeine, which will naturally boost your metabolism. Green tea is also an antioxidant that, like wine, cranberries, and dark chocolate, will target and scavenge for toxins that could lead to cancer, blood clots, and even atherosclerosis.

We recommend an oral cancer screening annually and this can be done at your next preventative visit. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12004708
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/11/091105084848.htm
Photo Credit to http://www.thedailymeal.com/health-benefits-green-tea-could-save-your-life

Myth Proven: Thumb Sucking Can Lead to Buck Teeth

May 30th, 2013

It is a precious sight for parents when they see their newborn baby playfully giggling and sucking their thumb. Some often worry about bacteria and germs that that babies may be placing in their mouth but others also hold the belief that thumb sucking can lead to buck teeth. David Horwitz, a pediatrician at the New York University School of Medicine, was able to show that this is in fact not a myth.

It has been shown that about 80% of infants and children tend to suck on their thumbs, which is a behavior that has been considered rather normal during the first few years after birth. However, thumb sucking can start causing problems down the line. The American Dental Association predicts that by age 6, a child’s permanent teeth start to come in and it is very likely that misalignment of teeth, also know as malocclusion, can occur. If a child continues to suck his or her thumb, the thumb slowly pushes the top teeth out, changing the relationship between a child’s upper and lower jaw. This movement may go unnoticed to parents, but can be identified by the orthodontist.

Dr. Horwitz explains that this thumb sucking habit can be noticed early on in child development. Ultrasounds of mothers often show babies that seem to be sucking their thumbs even in the womb. Dr. Horwitz believes that some babies may be thumb suckers since the time there are born. It has been recommended that parents can put socks or gloves on babies’ hands before they sleep at night. There are also dental devices that can be placed on the roofs of babies’ mouths to make thumb sucking more difficult.

We have a great pediatric dentist that would be happy to evaluate your child. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.nytimes.com/2005/09/27/health/27real.html?_r=0

http://www.uamshealth.com/?id=5256&sid=1

Detecting Breast Cancer Through Saliva Analysis

May 29th, 2013

In 2006, the America Cancer Society predicts that there would be 212,920 new cases of invasive breast cancer, and in that year, 40,970 women would die from it. While breast cancer is the second leading cause of death for women in the United States, many lives can also be saved if a diagnosis was given earlier. Studies recently show that salivary tests can now be used to make early diagnoses for breast cancer.

In General Dentistry, researchers explain that there are proteins levels in saliva that can play a role in forming a diagnosis, treatment plan, and potential follow-up care for a patient with breast cancer. That would put general dentists in a position to assist with diagnosis samples. Because patients tend to make more frequent dental visits than physician visits, it would make sense for dentists to easily take saliva samples from patients’ mouths during checkups.

Salivary tests have also shown to have advantages over blood testing. Researchers have compared saliva and blood samples and explained that while saliva is clear and colorless, blood can change in color, which may affect test results. Saliva collection is also safe and non-invasive, and can be taken without causing the patient any pain.

This method of diagnosis is still pending and under the consideration of the Food and Drug Administration. If salivary testing does get approved, dentists and physicians can work together to help catch the onset of breast cancer early on. However, this does not mean that women should not go in for mammogram screenings or blood analysis; they are still considered the first line of defense. Even if breast cancer was detected via a salivary sample, a mammogram or imaging test is still needed to find the location of the cancer.

The possibility of detecting breast cancer early on through something as non-invasive as salivary analysis is truly promising. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/01/080110123921.htm

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