smoking

World No Tobacco Day!

May 31st, 2021

Today, May 31st marks World No Tobacco Day, which is an annual celebration that aims to educate the world about the harmful consequences of using tobacco. The World Health Organization (WHO) created this observance dating back to 1987 in hopes to fight the tobacco epidemic to help protect individuals and future generations against preventable death and diseases caused by tobacco. This year the theme is ‘Quit tobacco to be a winner.'  Lots of social media campaigns and programs across the world are happening now to help promote quitting smoking.

Quitting smoking can be very hard and you are not alone, but the benefits of doing so are extremely powerful. Now in particular with the presence of COVID-19 and its link to respiratory diseases, it's a perfect time to quit smoking. The WHO reported, "When the news came out that smokers were more likely to develop severe disease with COVID-19 compared to non-smokers, it triggered millions of smokers to want to quit tobacco.”

Take a look at the health benefits of quitting from the WHO:

Tobacco use also plays a significant negative role on ones oral health. Tobacco use can increase the risk of developing oral cancer compared to non-smokers, and can lead to bad breath and stain teeth. Tobacco use is also associated with an increased risk of gum disease. In addition, the FDA reports that smoking can make your body heal slower following procedures such as dental surgery, as it causes carbon monoxide to enter your blood and depletes your body of the oxygen it needs. This can lead to greater risk of having post-operative complications. The damaging effects of using tobacco can be both permanent and life-threatening.

After time away from smoking, study's report that your brain will begin to get used to not smoking, and it will become easier to break the cycle of addiction. Here's some tips to help you quit as soon as possible:

  1. Schedule check-up appointments with your health professionals. See your primary physician and dental professional to help you start fresh and make goals toward quitting. They can provide resources and guide you through your process of quitting. There are also helplines available, such as 1-800-QUIT-NOW.
  2. Start eliminating things tied to your smoking life. Trash your cigarettes, ashtrays, and lighters to help make it easier to not indulge. Also, try to eliminate any triggers that can create cravings.
  3. Switch smoking with healthier oral habits. Chewing sugar-free gum or having nutritious snack items around can help keep you distracted from smoking and be good for your teeth. When you have the desire to smoke, head to brush your teeth instead, which will freshen your breath and help remove smoking stains.
  4. Keep the air fresh. Try to eliminate the aroma of cigarettes to rid the reminder of smoking.

Whether you smoke tobacco or e-cigarettes or chew tobacco, your oral health and overall health are harmed. Plan to quit smoking today! Your dental professional can help you take the necessary steps to get your started on your journey to quitting smoking.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.who.int/news-room/q-a-detail/tobacco-health-benefits-of-smoking-cessation

https://www.who.int/campaigns/world-no-tobacco-day

https://www.firstpost.com/india/world-no-tobacco-day-2021-theme-this-year-is-quit-tobacco-to-be-a-winner-9664371.html

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/threats-to-dental-health/how-to-quit-smoking-and-protect-your-oral-health

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.cadca.org%2Fblog%2Fmay-31st-marks-annual-world-no-tobacco-day&psig=AOvVaw1nzL9Ehq7Cp0QCqfgg7kUa&ust=1622296530918000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCNig3NXD7PACFQAAAAAdAAAAABAI

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.who.int%2Fmediacentre%2Fevents%2F2018%2Fworld-no-tobacco-day%2Fen%2F&psig=AOvVaw1nzL9Ehq7Cp0QCqfgg7kUa&ust=1622296530918000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCNig3NXD7PACFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

Spotlight: Women’s Health!

May 14th, 2021

woman sitting on floor exercisingJoin us in honoring the special observance, National Women’s Health Week (NWHW), which highlights the necessity of maintaining good health for all women. Organized by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH), this awareness week begins on Mother's Day each year. Staying healthy is especially important throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and there are lot s of ways to safely stay physically active and healthy.Check out some tips to gain better health according to the OWH:

  • Be sure you are making regular check-ups with your physicians and dentists. Check-ups are necessary to ensure there is no disease or issues present. Taking preventative measures to stay healthy can help lower the risk of developing health issues or help identify issues early on when treatment is often more manageable.
  • If you are pregnant or planning a pregnancy, be sure to be in contact with your health care professionals.
  • Staying physically active is important. The CDC recommends adults aged 18–65 years  should exercise for a minimum of 30 min on five days per week. Physical activity can lower the risk of developing several conditions, including heart disease, which is one of the leading causes of death for women.
  • Eat a healthy well-balanced diet, which plays a significant role in keeping your body healthy. Getting all of the right nutrients is essential to stay healthy. For instance, folic acid is particularly important for women who are pregnant. Also, consuming tooth-friendly foods, such as fruits and vegetables, and limiting the amount of high-sugar foods and drinks can help keep your body and pearly whites strong and healthy. Vitamin D and calcium intake are important in particular for strong bones and teeth. Avoid heavy alcohol consumption, and remember everything in  moderation is key.
  • Put your mental health at the forefront. Having a positive mental state has been shown to improve overall health. Stress, on the other hand, can take a toll on your body and has been linked to poorer health and well-being. Find healthy behaviors that make you happy to help manage stress. If you find that stress is getting in the way of your daily activities, it is important to seek professional help as soon as possible.
  • Make sure you are getting the appropriate amount of sleep each day. The CDC recommends adults rest for at least 7 hours per night. While children and adolescents should have 8-12 hours of sleep each night.
  • Avoid harmful behaviors such as smoking, which can have a significant negative impact on your overall health.

Making changes to better your health isn't always a walk in the park, but luckily there are a lot of tools and resources available to give you a jump start on achieving your goals. The OWH encourages everyone to learn more about the COVID Vaccine and how schedule your appointment. Not only does the vaccine provided the best protection against COVID-19 as recommended by the CDC, but also fully vaccinated individuals are able to enjoy greater freedoms than during the start of the pandemic. The OWH offers an online tool customized to help you create your plan for improving your health.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

Multiple Sclerosis & Maintaining a Healthy Mouth

March 14th, 2021

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disorder which effects the myelin sheath, altering the communication between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body. During March, MS Awareness week is held to shed light on the progress and stories of people across the world who manage & bravely fight this disease despite the challenges. MS is a progressive disease and is also considered an autoimmune disease. The exact cause of is currently still unknown. Many factors may play a role in the condition, including genetics, environmental factors, presence of immune system disorders, infection, vitamin deficiencies, smoking, and systemic inflammation. Researchers are also investigating the potential of the gut microbiome and chronic stress in relation to MS. MS can cause CNS changes in motor, sensory and cognitive functions, but the symptoms can vary between each individual.

In addition, World MS Day, created by the  Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (MSIF), will be celebrated on May 30, 2021, which aims to unite people and organizations from across the world to help learn more about the condition and help us all move to elimination of MS. Worldwide more than 2.3 million people live with multiple sclerosis. During this time loads of information and research is highlighted to help everyone understand this complex and unpredictable disease. Explore powerful stories of people with MS.
There are different types of MS, the most common being relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), which 85% of people with MS have. This is characterized by symptom flare-ups, then times of improvement. The flare-ups may last for days to weeks, and then start to resolve overtime. It has been reported that approximately half of the relapses can cause permanent damage to the CNS. Overtime, the disease can progress to secondary progressive MS, which consists of consistent worsening of symptoms.

Another type of MS is called Primary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PPMS), in which individuals (10-15% of people diagnosed with MS) experience progressive worsening symptoms with few or no recovery periods. This type is often more severe and disabling,  and nerve damage is often found more in the spinal cord than in the brain.

Some symptoms of MS can include pain, vision issues, motor impairment and fatigue. MS may also have a negative effect on bladder and bowel problems, sexual dysfunction, trouble focusing and memory problems, and depression. Facial pain including partial facial paralysis or muscle spasms, and trouble speaking and chewing may also occur. 

Individuals with MS may also experience challenges with their oral health. Individuals are at a higher risk of developing dental caries and gum disease, for instance due to physical complications of MS and the lowered immune response. Systemic inflammation has been linked as a potential trigger for MS as well as periodontal disease, a severe form of gum disease. Plus, manual dexterity may be compromised in some individuals, making it hard for them to brush and floss adequately. In these cases, modified toothbrushes and/or electric toothbrushes may be more helpful. In more severe cases, caregivers may need to help provide help with oral care. Patients with MS may also need to be seen by the dentist more frequently for visits and cleanings. Your dentist may even recommend fluoride treatment or prescription fluoride toothpaste as an added protective treatment.

There is currently no cure for MS, but numerous medications and treatment methods have been found to help manage/slow the progression of the disease and relapse occurrences. However, MS medications may also produce negative effects on oral health, including dry mouth (also known as xerostomia), inflamed gingival tissues, altered taste, and fungal infections including oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis, for instance. Immunosuppressants may increase the risk of developing infections and cancers as well. Be sure to inform your health care providers of all of the current medications you are taking.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Get-Involved/Raise-Awareness

https://decisionsindentistry.com/article/oral-health-risks-multiple-sclerosis/

https://www.everydayhealth.com/multiple-sclerosis/living-with/how-ms-affect-oral-health/

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/NationalMSSociety/media/MSNationalFiles/Brochures/Brochure-Dental-Health.pdf

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fhealthykcmag.com%2Fmultiple-sclerosis-awareness-month%2F&psig=AOvVaw1pEiJpXj4ePew6y5snrUFR&ust=1615644189477000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLD5pYz2qu8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAK

Could Oral Bacteria be a Cause of Migraines?

February 26th, 2021

Migraines can be a nuisance! If you've ever suffered a migraine, you know how significant an attack can feel. Could your dentist help relieve your migraines? In some cases, yes! A study published by the American Society for Microbiology suggests that certain oral bacteria known to increase nitric oxide in the bloodstream can cause the blood vessels in the brain to widen, which consequently can trigger the onset of a migraine.

As you may know, there are many factors that could be the cause of your headaches or migraine, and treatment requires a correct diagnosis. Migraines are commonly known to be triggered by foods high in nitrates and nitrites, which are often found in processed meats like hot dogs, ham and bacon, alcohol, and even chocolate.

In addition, migraines may be triggered by other certain factors, including:

  • Stress
  • Anxiety
  • Female hormonal changes
  • Bright or flashing lights
  • Loud noises
  • Strong smells
  • Medications
  • Excess or lack of sleep
  • Sudden changes in weather or environment
  • Increased physical activity
  • Tobacco
  • Caffeine or caffeine withdrawal
  • Skipped meals
  • Medication overuse

What exactly does a migraine entail?

A migraine often presents with severe throbbing or pulsating pain that typically occurs on one side of the head. According to MedlinePlus, approximately 12% of Americans experience migraines. Females, individuals with a family history of migraines, and individuals with certain medical conditions including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, sleep disorders, and epilepsy, are at an increased risk of having migraines.

Migraines often involve 4 different stages:

  • Stage 1: Prodrome

This stage is the first stage that occurs before you actually experience the migraine. Early signs may be food cravings, unexplained mood swings, fluid retention, frequent urination, and uncontrollable yawning.

  • Stage 2: Aura

During the aura phase which occurs often right before the start of a migraine, individuals may see bright lights or zig-zag lines. Individuals may also experience muscle weakness.

  • Stage 3: Headache

The severity of migraines often occurs gradually. Some individuals may experience a migraine without a headache, but instead experience sensitivity to light, sound, and smell, nausea and vomiting, and pain when moving.

  • Stage 4: Postdrome

The final stage of a migraine is the postdrome stage, in which individuals often experience fatigue, weakness, and potential confusion lasting sometimes around 1 day after the migraine.

Our body's are full of bacteria that naturally and harmlessly live within us. However, some bacteria can be harmful and lead to cavities, gum disease, and even migraines. This is one of the many reasons why regular dental visits and proper oral care at home is essential. It is important to brush at least twice a day for two minutes each time to help remove dental plaque and prevent it from causing tooth decay. Flossing is also necessary to remove dental plaque that is stuck in hard-to-reach places like in-between teeth, which is where cavities commonly are initiated. Rinsing with an anti-microbial and fluoride containing mouth rinse can also help kill bacteria and strengthen your teeth.

Your dentist can check to see if your headaches or migraines are caused by other oral conditions such as temporomandibular joint disorders (TMD) or oral habits such as clenching/bruxism. Toothaches from dental infection by oral bacteria can also cause significant pain in the head and jaw area.

Speak with your doctor and dentist if you feel that you are experiencing chronic migraines.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.deltadentalins.com/oral_health/migraines-oral-bacteria.html

https://drania.com/why-your-migraines-might-be-caused-by-oral-bacteria/

https://blog.themigrainereliefcenter.com/connection-between-migraines-and-tooth-pain

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.infinitydentalfoxlake.com%2Fdental-concerns%2Ffrequent-headaches%2F&psig=AOvVaw37hxjRFQJvc6UPujGNOF7b&ust=1613951004832000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCIjc9f_S-e4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAm

https://medlineplus.gov/migraine.html

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fgenesisresearchservices.com%2Fmigraine-symptoms-treatment-clinical-trials%2F&psig=AOvVaw2YMfuEAnZGCULPV5PlPlxP&ust=1613957134912000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCND76oDp-e4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAJ

Preparing your Smile for Valentine's Day!

February 12th, 2021

Love is in the air! With Valentine's Day approaching there will be lots of kisses, roses, hearts, candy, chocolates, kind words, and lovely memories exchanged by many as people across the United States celebrate the occasion. As you begin to make plans for this special day, there is one important thing that you won't want to neglect: oral hygiene! Take a look at these tips and facts to get you ready to have a happy Valentine's Day:

Are cavities contagious?

When sharing your love with a kiss or even with a fork while indulging in tasty treats, you can also be passing harmful bacteria that can cause dental cavities. Be sure to brush your teeth at least twice a day and don't forget about flossing to help stay cavity-free! In addition, sharing items such as toothbrushes should be avoided.

Fighting bad breath

Everybody dislikes bad breath, but it can be fought! Bad breath can be caused by a number of factors, including poor oral hygiene, certain food, dental decay from bacteria, alcohol, smoking, or other health problems. For healthy fresh smelling breath you'll want to make sure that you have a superb daily oral hygiene routine. This includes brushing not just your teeth, but also your tongue which houses bacteria and food particles. Alcohol-free antibacterial mouth rinses can also help fight oral bacteria and gum disease, while also adding a minty fresh flavor. Other items such as sugarless chewing gum and sugar-free breath mints are also great options when you're on the run. If it's date night, you may want to stay away from pungent foods such as onions and garlic. If bad breath has been a persistent problem where nothing seems to help, there may be an underlying oral health problem going on s including tooth decay or gum disease, which your dental professional will help diagnose.

Want a brighter smile?

Teeth whitening treatments can help give you a confident bright smile. Teeth can become stained for many reasons, including tobacco use, certain medications, red winecoffee, teasoda, and age. There are several products and techniques available for patients who want to whiten their teeth. Come schedule an appointment and talk to the Smile Ambassadors at Wellesley Dental Group about the differences between in-office professional whitening and at-home whitening. Check out the in-office professional whitening we offer, here.

Teeth whitening in Fallston MD

Try to quit smoking

Smoking is not only bad for your overall health, but also can damage your oral health, cause bad breath, stain teeth, and increase your risk of developing gum disease and oral cancer.

Be mindful of Valentine's sweets

Just like Halloween, Valentine's Day can involve many delicious sweets that unfortunately can cause damage to your teeth. Try to avoid sticky candies like caramel and sweets high in sugar. If consuming sugary treats be sure to brush, floss, and consume water. Remember, everything in moderation is key.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/adults-under-40/healthy-habits/valentines-day

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fbenefitsbridge.unitedconcordia.com%2Fprepping-your-mouth-for-valentines-day%2F&psig=AOvVaw2R5qQFym3CZhppDr2-_Dpa&ust=1613095480988000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCOjG2JDf4O4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAl

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.harfordcountydentistry.com%2Fdental-services%2Fteeth-whitening-fallston-md%2F&psig=AOvVaw0I-oJ_6i1FrU__AcMi7zbU&ust=1613099032360000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCPiQta3s4O4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.googleadservices.com/pagead/aclk?sa=L&ai=DChcSEwjI4Pzi7ODuAhUOlYYKHSnbDdkYABAEGgJ2dQ&ohost=www.google.com&cid=CAESQOD2ADCi7YHbjslc6Pqo6DvBT_-f5xBf0SybDnuVhmKJBx9ZQPruemVTiOr-_qgaYQQS9t_wNoNUBTxnkoCRiW4&sig=AOD64_0rs9Jtchsiym5SLpQWkgVpkf4Mvw&ctype=5&q=&ved=2ahUKEwi1lPPi7ODuAhWMwVkKHb5mDPEQ9aACegQIFxB7&adurl=

February Calls for a Heart to Heart

February 6th, 2021

February is a month that is near and dear to many of our hearts as it marks American Heart Month, which sheds light on the dangers of heart disease. This year marks the 57th consecutive American Heart Month. Heart disease, also known as cardiovascular disease, is the #1 cause of death in the United States causing about 1 in 4 deaths, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Heart disease encompasses many types of heart problems. Coronary artery disease (CAD), which can cause a heart attack, is the most common type of heart disease in America.

Heart disease is often referred to as the "silent killer" because it often goes undiagnosed until a person experiences chest pain, chest palpitations, or shortness of breath for instance and the person experiences a heart attack, heart arrhythmias, or heart failure.

Take a look at some of the symptoms, according to the AHA:

Heart disease can impact anyone. According to the AHA's Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics – 2021, approximately 18.6 million people across the globe died of heart disease in 2019, which is a 17.1% increase over the past 10 years. In addition, approximately 523.2 million cases of cardiovascular disease were reported in 2019, which also represents an increase of 26.6% over 10 years.

Dating back to history, President Lyndon B. Johnson, who had himself experienced heart attacks, was the first to issue a proclamation in 1964 that declared February as American Heart Month. Since then, U.S. President's continue this legacy. Check out this year's Proclamation on American Heart Month issued by President Joseph R. Biden Jr., here.

All month the American Heart Association (AHA) will be hosting exciting virtual experiences on relevant topics relating to heart disease each week. For example, the video "Heart to Heart: Why Losing One Woman Is Too Many" campaign will discuss how 1 in 3 women are diagnosed with heart disease each year. During this important month the AHA and other organizations emphasize the importance of heart health and continued research and efforts to help end this tremendous health threat!

Heart health is even more important as we battle against the COVID-19 pandemic, as the virus can have a negative impact on the heart and vascular system, as recent research shows according to the AHA. The AHA has also created the motto, "Don't Die of Doubt," which is a national awareness campaign reminding individuals that even as we conquer COVID-19 and there are concerns about visiting hospitals due to the presence of patients with coronavirus, hospitals are the safest place to go when you are experiencing symptoms. We also need to be conscious of our lifestyle decisions during this time of staying at home, as risk factors for heart disease include unhealthy behaviors including poor dietary habits, excessive alcohol consumption, and limited physical activity for example.

All in all, heart disease in many instances can be prevented with healthy lifestyle choices. According to the CDC, high blood pressure, high blood cholesterol, and smoking are top risk factors for heart disease. Shockingly, 47% of Americans according to the CDC have at least one of these risk factors. Other risk factors can include diabetes and obesity.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.heart.org/en/about-us/heart-attack-and-stroke-symptoms

https://www.cdc.gov/heartdisease/about.htm

https://www.heart.org/en/around-the-aha/february-is-american-heart-month

https://www.heart.org/

https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/presidential-actions/2021/02/03/proclamation-on-american-heart-month-2021/#:~:text=NOW%2C%20THEREFORE%2C%20I%2C%20JOSEPH,Day%20on%20February%205%2C%202021.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fagrilifetoday.tamu.edu%2F2021%2F02%2F01%2Ffebruary-ideal-month-to-focus-on-the-heart%2F&psig=AOvVaw3k1yOhgjxMumS-DAp6K0KY&ust=1612713316611000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCOji3b3P1e4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAE

Got Chapped Lips?

January 21st, 2021

Dry or chapped lips can be a true mood killer, especially when you’re trying to speak, eat, or smile! Chapped lips are extremely uncomfortable, and when they begin to peel it can be a real pain, both literally and figuratively.  Even so, dry lips also look painful. It’s important to know how to care for your lips and keep them healthy and protected.

But what causes dry lips to occur? According to the Cleveland Clinic, the skin that makes up the lips are thin and can dry out 10 times quicker than the skin on other areas of the face. People may experience dry lips as a result of an allergic reaction, trauma, cold weather, frequent licking of the lips, smoking, mouth breathing, dehydration, certain medications, medical conditions (i.e. lupus) , ultraviolet rays from sun exposure, and nutritional deficiencies, for instance.

With dry lips also may come cracking at the corners of the mouth, known as angular cheilitis. The corners of the mouth can also become infected by bacteria. Individuals who suck their thumbs or those who wear poorly fitted dentures have an increased risk of developing angular cheilitis.

Signs of angular cheilitis can include:

  • Bleeding
  • Blisters
  • Cracks
  • Crust
  • Itchy
  • Painful
  • Red
  • Scaly
  • Swollen

Another form of cheilitis is actinic cheilitis, which is dry lips caused by excessive sun exposure.

Luckily, dry lips can be managed! Be sure to keep your lips protected in both cold and hot environments, as both cool windy weather and sun exposure on a hot summer day can be harsh on your lips. Try using a lip balm with sunscreen to help keep your lips moist. The American Academy of Dermatology also recommends using lip balms containing petroleum jelly to help keep the lips moist. Plus, if you notice the air in your home is dry, a humidifier can help add moisture to the air and help manage dry lips. Not to mention, staying hydrated with water is particularly necessary to keep your skin healthy. If you notice any lip dryness or irritation after using a new lip balm or face moisture, be cautious with use as it may be a sign of an allergic reaction.

Avoid licking your lips when they feel chapped at all costs, as this makes them drier than before. It's also important not to peel or bite your lips when they feel dry and flaky. If these tips and tricks don’t seem to help, or if you notice your condition is severe, be sure to check with a dermatologist or doctor to help manage dry lips.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/angular-cheilitis#1

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/dry-mouth/waking-up-with-dry-mouth

https://health.clevelandclinic.org/6-tips-to-protect-your-lips-from-the-cold/

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.goodhousekeeping.com%2Fbeauty%2Fanti-aging%2Ftips%2Fa16642%2Fdry-skin-relief%2F&psig=AOvVaw2q6L4bDOs8a569C9nqWpYX&ust=1611288398240000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKDjt5yTrO4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAK

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.wikihow.health%2FHelp-Chapped-Lips&psig=AOvVaw2q6L4bDOs8a569C9nqWpYX&ust=1611288398240000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCKDjt5yTrO4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAQ

 

New Year, New You: Dental Resolutions

January 5th, 2021

It’s a new year, which for many means starting the year off with a clean slate and resolutions to achieve throughout the year. 2021 is here, and like many individuals, improving health typically tops the list for New Year’s resolutions, as people often place exercising more and eating healthier as a high priority. What about your dental health? Improving your dental health can be another great resolution to incorporate on your list. Preventing tooth decay, gum disease, and other oral health issues is key to improving your overall wellness. Sometimes, we make New Year’s resolutions that don’t always stick after the holidays, however, making small strides to achieve your goals can be a perfect start.

Check out these resolutions that can help improve your dental health this New Year:

Improve your Oral Hygiene Routine

As you know, brushing and flossing each day are key to helping fight against cavities and a long list of oral health issues. It is important to brush at least twice a day for two minutes each time, particularly after eating and before bedtime. For proper brushing, an ADA-approved soft bristled toothbrush and fluoridated toothpaste are recommended. Your toothbrush should be angled toward your gum line when brushing and use gentle and short strokes to help remove the food particles and oral bacteria. You also don’t want to forget to brush your tongue! According to the American Dental Association (ADA), you should replace your toothbrush approximately every 3 to 4 months, or sooner if you have been sick or you notice the bristles are frayed. But, the fun shouldn’t stop there, flossing is equally important. It’s necessary to floss at least once a day to help remove food particles in hard-to-reach areas in between teeth where most cavities begin. Flossing is also important to help reduce your risk of gum disease. Flossing can be easy to forget sometimes, but try putting a reminder in your phone or calendar, or place a box of floss in your purse or out on the counter so that it is visible. Not to mention, flossing and brushing properly will help keep your breath fresh. Plus, using an antimicrobial and fluoride mouth rinse daily can be a great addition to improve your oral health.

Limit Sugary and Acidic Foods

Your diet plays a huge role in your oral health, too. Cavity-causing bacteria love to eat sugar and starches. If food particles are left on the surfaces of teeth, the bacteria can produce acids from the dental plaque which damages your tooth enamel and can lead to decay. In addition, acidic foods can lead to enamel erosion and weaken your teeth. Try checking food and beverage labels to see the sugar content and do your best to only consume these items in moderation. Instead of sugary treats, try adding more tooth-friendly healthy foods to your diet. This can include foods like dairy products, which are high in calcium. In addition, foods high in fiber often stimulate saliva and can help naturally remove dental plaque. If consuming sugary or acidic beverages, grab a straw to help limit the beverages contact with your teeth and be sure to drink water afterwards to help rinse your mouth.

Drink Lots of Water

Water not only will improve your overall health, but also your dental health, too. Staying hydrated with water is necessary to helping prevent cavities by diluting acids within the mouth and rinsing away food particles.

Quit Using Tobacco Products

This year, say no to tobacco use to help improve your oral and overall health. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), smoking has been found to double your risk for gum disease, and is related to many other health problems. Try checking out the Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program, which offers information and resources that can help individuals quit. Also, check out a list of resources and other helpful information on our WDG blog here.

Schedule your Dental Visit

Be sure to schedule your dental check-up to help maintain your oral health. Dental visits are necessary to ensure the health of your mouth and to catch any disease or oral health problem early so that it can be managed appropriately. The New Year is also the perfect time to finish or begin any dental work, for instance dental crowns, implants, or fillings. If you are interested in brightening your smile, talk with your dentist about whitening options. The New Year may also be a great time to correct an abnormal bite or straighten your teeth with orthodontic treatment.

So, what’s on your resolution list this year?

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.drappolon.com%2Fyour-2020-dental-health-resolutions%2F&psig=AOvVaw3UdZWSibfwUM2X_3HyhT0K&ust=1609698909190000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJC3mPjx_e0CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAc

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/adult-oral-care/a-new-years-you-dental-health-resolutions

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/brushing-and-flossing/looking-after-your-teeth-five-new-years-resolutions-for-a-healthier-mouth

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/cavities/how-to-prevent-cavities-healthy-new-years-dental-resolutions

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwonderopolis.org%2Fwonder%2Fwhat-is-junk-food&psig=AOvVaw0NVDd4oVZg4fLnskBzTH3R&ust=1609821743313000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCOjFgMC7ge4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAJ

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fmoffitt.org%2Fendeavor%2Farchive%2Fmoffitt-continues-the-countdown-to-quit-smoking%2F&psig=AOvVaw0dt7Ai5sWirDPFidYASb3k&ust=1609821820530000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJDrnOS7ge4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.timesofisrael.com%2Fis-this-water-safe-to-drink-israeli-startup-lets-you-know%2F&psig=AOvVaw2gYJQF0YbHsHoiNPTP6iZm&ust=1609821869743000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMjmkPm7ge4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dentalcare.com%2Fen-us%2Fpatient-education%2Fpatient-materials%2Fmanual-brushing-and-flossing&psig=AOvVaw1wmUVWNn4IE_X2w9yl2-W2&ust=1609821923248000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLCU45G8ge4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

Using Your Heart for you and your Loved Ones

September 29th, 2020

World Heart Day 2020 is here, and has a particularly impactful significance during these uncertain times. As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to influence our current daily lives, heart health is important now more than ever as we all try to stay healthy and safe. Individuals with heart disease are at an increased of developing severe infection from COVID-19. Every year September 29th marks World Heart Day, which aims to spread awareness about heart disease and stroke prevention. The #1 cause of death in the world is cardiovascular disease (CVD). It results in the deaths of approximately 17.1 million people every year. Some of the most common causes of the disease include smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure and obesity, just to name a few.

This year’s message is to:

This powerful campaign reminds us to strive for living longer and healthier lives. The organization notes that using your heart is also about using your head to learn more about how to take care of your heart, using your influence to make positive behavioral choices to set good examples for loved ones, and acting in ways that support those who are vulnerable in society especially during this pandemic. In addition, the campaign encourages the government to implement policies to help improve heart health, as well as encouraging healthcare professionals and organizations to help individuals make positive health changes.

The positive thing is that heart problems can be prevented! Heart health is an extremely important topic as obesity, unhealthy diets, and decreased physical activity are becoming increasingly common in society. Treating our hearts better can include improving our diets, avoiding tobacco use, limiting alcohol intake, increasing our daily exercise, and making sure to attend your regular medical check-ups. It is necessary to routinely have your cholesterol, blood pressure, and heart examined to ensure that you are healthy.

It is also necessary for us to mention the important heart-mouth connection. Both heart disease and oral disease, like gum disease have been linked in many research studies. Moderate to severe gum disease has been associated with a greater risk for developing heart disease than when compared to someone with healthy gums. Since the mouth is the window to the rest of the body, oral bacteria and other germs from your mouth can travel through the bloodstream into other part of your body and cause damage to important organs like the heart. Brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing daily, along with having a well-balanced diet and regular dental check-ups will not only go a long way for your oral health, but also for your overall health. According to the America Heart Association (AHA), other cardiovascular conditions such as atherosclerosis (or clogged arteries) and stroke have also been linked to inflammation due to oral bacteria.

According to the American Association of Periodontology (AAP), some signs of gum disease include:

  • Red, swollen and sore gums
  • Bleeding gums when you eat, brush or floss.
  • Visible pus or other signs of infection around the gums and teeth.
  • Gum recession
  • Frequent bad breath/bad taste in the mouth
  • Loose teeth

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.world-heart-federation.org/world-heart-day/world-heart-day-2020/

https://www.daysoftheyear.com/days/heart-day/

https://www.fdiworlddental.org/news/20160929/fdi-celebrates-world-heart-day

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/h/heart-disease-and-oral-health

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/heart-disease/how-oral-health-and-heart-disease-are-connected-0115

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/sites/default/files/styles/16x9_crop/public/2020-01/NWRD%202019_edit.jpg?itok=Xy9SdP4M

Risky Behavior: Vaping, Cigarette Use, and COVID-19

September 14th, 2020

We have all been impacted in some way by the COVID-19 pandemic, which makes us all in this fight together. Even though the virus still persists, great strides and global participation in social distancing, wearing face coverings, and following safety protocols are helping to stop the spread of the coronavirus. Scientists and researchers across the world are continuously uncovering important research and highlighting factors that increase the risk of battling coronavirus. From the beginning of the pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has emphasized, based on research and clinical expertise, that individuals with weakened immune systems, including older adults, and those with underlying medical conditions (examples: lung disease, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disease, and hypertension, just to name a few) are at an increased risk of severe COVID-19 illness. More recently a new study, published in the Journal of Adolescent Health and conducted by researchers at Stanford University School of Medicine, suggests teens and young adults who vape or smoke cigarettes are at an increased risk of COVID-19 infection.

Along with the COVID-19 pandemic (currently 29,182,627 worldwide cases and a disheartening 928,281 deaths reported), the devastating health crisis in many young adults: tobacco and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes)/vaping product use, has still been an extensive public health issue across the nation. Back on September 24, 2019, the Governor of Massachusetts, Charles D. Baker, declared e-cigarette use a public health emergency following the significant link between e-cigarette products and severe lung disease leading to many deaths across the United States. Unfortunately, e-cigarettes have routinely been marketed as “safer” alternatives to cigarette smoking, although in reality they carry many of the same risks as well as new risks. The inhaled liquids are often composed of nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, along with other substances. Each product, however, can have a variation of other ingredients and concentrations, which may be toxic to the body.

The study, entitled, Association Between Youth Smoking, Electronic Cigarette Use, and Coronavirus Disease 2019, consisted of an online survey conducted in May completed by 4,351 individuals across the United States ranging in age from 13 to 24 years old. The study participants were asked if they had ever used vaping products or cigarettes, and if they had vaped or smoked in the past 30 days. The participants were then divided between those who used nicotine products in comparison to those who reported never using nicotine products. The groups were asked if they had experienced COVID-19 symptoms, received a test for COVID-19, or tested positive for the virus. Taking into consideration reported medical conditions and sociodemographic factors, the researchers found that individuals who used both cigarettes and e-cigarettes in the last 30 days were approximately 5 times more likely to experience COVID-19 symptoms than those who never used nicotine products. Of the individuals who received a COVID test, those who had used e-cigarettes were 5 times more likely to be diagnosed with COVID-19 than those who never vaped. Plus, individuals who used both e-cigarettes and regular cigarettes within the last 30 days were approximately 7 times more likely to test positive for COVID-19. The study authors believe that the link between nicotine products and lung damage is thought to be the reason behind the resulting increased risk of coronavirus infection. "This study tells us pretty clearly that youth who are using vapes or are dual-using are at elevated risk, and it's not just a small increase in risk, it's a big one," Dr. Shivani Mathur Gaiha, one of the study's authors, warned.

Knowing the dangers about vaping and cigarette smoking is key. The Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program offers information and resources that can help individuals quit. Also, check out a list of resources and other helpful information on our WDG blog here.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://decisionsindentistry.com/2020/08/vaping-raise-risk-covid-among-teenagers-young-adults/

http://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2020/08/vaping-linked-to-covid-19-risk-in-teens-and-young-adults.html

https://www.news-medical.net/news/20200811/Smoking-and-vaping-significantly-increase-risk-of-COVID-19-in-teens-and-young-adults.aspx

https://www.tecc.org/tobacco-and-covid-19/

https://discoveries.childrenshospital.org/vaping-and-covid-19/

COVID-19 and Gum Disease: A Link?

August 16th, 2020

As more research is being done on COVID-19, there has been a new link to gum disease and severe complications from this worrisome virus. Gum disease is caused by bacteria that causes persistent inflammation of the gums and surrounding structures. Gum disease includes an early stage, gingivitis, and a later stage with progression called periodontitis, which is more severe.

COVID-19 is a disease that is caused by the novel coronavirus named SARS-COV-2. This virus causes damage to the lungs and other organs. The Journal of  the California Dental Association has associated inflammation in the gums with the release of inflammatory markers such as IL-6 protein. These proteins cause systemic inflammation as they travel throughout the body. This occurs when fibroblasts within inflamed gingiva produce IL-6, causing an elevation in levels. The elevated levels of IL-6 then leads to bone loss and tissue destruction. Additionally, high levels of IL-6 within the body can hinder oxygen exchange between the blood and lungs.  This can cause severe breathing problems. The latest study from The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology found that high levels of IL-6 are predictors for respiratory failure. Patients with high levels of IL-6 h are 22 times higher risk for respiratory complications.

So, you’re probably wondering what does this mean for you? Risk factors associated with gum disease include: smoking, diabetes, poor oral hygiene, medication, age, and obesity.

According to the American Dental Association (ADA) warning signs of gum disease are as follows:

  • Gums that are red a bleed easily
  • Gums that have pulled away from teeth
  • Loose teeth
  • Consistent bad breath or bad taste in mouth

How to prevent gum disease:

  • Brush twice a day
  • Floss daily
  • Visit your dentist for regular checkups and cleanings
  • Avoid smoking and or using tobacco products

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.dentalproductsreport.com/view/cdc-updates-infection-control-guidelines-for-dental-practices

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7303044/

https://ca.crest.com/en-ca/oral-care-topics/general-oral-hygiene/gum-disease-symptoms-causes-treatments

https://www.jacionline.org/article/S0091-6749(20)30685-0/fulltext

https://www.ada.org/~/media/ADA/Publications/Files/for_the_dental_patient_jan_2011.pdf

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-8600401/Could-gum-disease-make-coronavirus-deadly.html

Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness & Prevention

July 12th, 2020

Each year, cleft and craniofacial conditions impact thousands of infants in the United States. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 1 in every 1,600 infants are born with both cleft lip with cleft palate in the United States. While approximately 1 in every 2,800 infants are born with only cleft lip, and about 1 in every 1,700 babies are born with only cleft palate. These phenomenons occur when an infant's upper lip or roof of the mouth does not completely fuse together during pregnancy. The month of July marks National Cleft and Craniofacial Awareness and Prevention Month, which is the perfect time to spread awareness and learn more about orofacial clefts and complex craniofacial conditions. The American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association (ACPA) aims to increase knowledge and create situations catered to help individuals with these conditions thrive.

What is Cleft Lip?

During the amazing development of an infant during pregnancy, body tissue from each side of the head grow toward the center of the face and come together to create the face. A cleft lip occurs if the tissue that creates the lip does not join completely. This creates an opening in the lip in the middle or on either side of the lip, and can sometimes extend to the nose. Lip formation normally occurs between the fourth and seventh weeks of pregnancy.

Baby wih a cleft lip

What is Cleft Palate?

A cleft palate results if the tissue of the roof of the mouth, also known as the palate, does not come together completely during pregnancy. This can occur in the front, back, or spanning across the entire palate. The formation of the roof of the mouth naturally occurs between the sixth and ninth weeks of pregnancy.

Baby with Cleft Palate

What Is Cleft Lip and Palate?

The most common cleft condition of the face is both cleft lip and palate combined. This occurs when there is both a separation in the upper lip and in the roof of the mouth.

What is Craniosynostosis?

Craniosynostosis occurs when the skull sutures fuse together during development. This can be noticeable at birth or during growth and development after birth.

What Is Plagiocephaly?

Plagiocephaly, also known as positional plagiocephaly, causes an infant's head to have a flattened appearance due to external pressure.

Orofacial clefts can cause children to experience other problems, including problems with their teeth, feeding, speaking, and hearing. Research is continuously being conducted to help become more knowledgeable of these conditions in hopes for prevention. Cleft and craniofacial conditions typically require long and challenging treatment methods, and require a multi-professional team approach consisting of medical, surgical, dental and other health professionals.

The causes of orofacial clefts are not completely known. Some may be due to genetics or other factors, according to the CDC. The CDC reports that women who smoke during pregnancy have an increased risk of having a baby with an orofacial cleft. In addition, women with a diagnosis of diabetes before pregnancy, and women who take certain medications during their first trimester, such as anticonvulsants, have an increased risk of having a baby with cleft lip/palate. It is important to talk with your medical professionals during your pregnancy about ways to increase your chances of having a healthy baby.

Orofacial clefts are normally diagnosed during pregnancy with routine ultrasounds or after the baby is born. Certain types of cleft palate, such as a submucous cleft palate and bifid uvula may not be diagnosed until later in life.

Treatment can vary depending on the severity of the condition, in addition to the child's age and presence of other birth defects. Cleft lip surgery normally occurs within the first year of life as recommended. It is recommended to repair cleft palate within the first 18 months of life or earlier. It is common for many children to need additional surgeries later on in life to help improve not only appearance, but breathing, hearing, and speech development. Children with orofacial clefts may also need special dental or orthodontic care. Treatment of orofacial clefts have been proven effective and most children lead a healthy life.

Join us in spreading the word!

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://acpa-cpf.org/2018/07/10/july-is-national-cleft-and-craniofacial-awareness-month-2/

https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6425a5.htm?s_cid=mm6425a5_w

https://www.gillettechildrens.org/get-involved/cleft-and-craniofacial-awareness-month

https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/birthdefects/cleftlip.html

Mouth-Problems-722x406.jpg

http://www.nccapm.org

Plagiocephaly.jpg

images

Celebrating Men's Health Month

June 26th, 2020

There’s often a lot of celebration in the month of June with many holidays and the fresh start of summer. But, you may not have known that June also represents Men’s Health Month! Promoted by the Congressional Health Education Program, Men’s Health Month is often celebrated across the United States with health screenings, and the promotion of health education through the media and fun activities. The goal of this national campaign is to highlight health issues that many men face and to promote healthy lifestyle choices to help prevent diseases early on.

With greater awareness, we hope that many of the health statistics for men will change. Research has found that compared to women, men are more likely to make risky health choices, including greater consumption of alcohol and smoking tobacco. In addition, men are less likely than women to seek care from health professionals. Major mental health problems that also impact men at high rates include depression, bipolar disorder, eating disorders, and schizophrenia.

There are also health conditions that only impact men, such as prostate cancer. Fortunately, some major health problems that men may encounter can be detected and treated early on, for instance colon cancer or heart disease. This is one of the many reasons why regular check-ups with your health professionals are significantly important. Sadly, According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the leading causes of death for men include heart disease and cancer.

Here are some health guidelines to promote in celebration of #MensHealthMonth:

Get your regular physical.

We all know the saying, “prevention is key.” It’s true. By regularly visiting your primary care physician, your provider will be able to establish baselines for many health parameters like blood pressure, weight, and cholesterol. Plus, they will screen for cancers, and catch potentially harmful health issues early on.

 

Don’t skip your dental visit: Gum disease & prostate health linked

Attending your regular scheduled dental visits is important for your dental and general health. Missing appointments can cause untreated problems to get worse, and lead to bigger and sometimes more expensive treatment. Your dentist can also diagnose conditions such as oral cancer and gum disease early when treatment is usually less invasive. Compared to women, men are two times more likely to develop oral cancer. Also, according to the American Academy of Periodontology, periodontal disease is present in approximately 56% of men in the U.S. as compared to about 38% of women. Gum disease unfortunately is not only tied to your oral cavity. It has also been linked to increased risks of heart disease, cancer, and even prostate health in men. According to research at Case Western Reserve University School of Dental Medicine and the Departments of Urology and Pathology at University Hospitals Case Medical Center, prostate inflammation improved in research participants with treatment of gum disease, and vice versa. It was found that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were higher in those individuals with both periodontal disease and prostatitis (inflammation of the prostate gland).

Stay hydrated and active

Dry mouth can also be pretty common in men, which can be damaging to oral health. When less saliva is around, your teeth are more at risk of tooth decay and acid breakdown from oral bacteria. Saliva helps neutralize acids and wash away leftover food particles and harmful bacteria to help keep your enamel strong. Be sure that you are drinking plenty of water and staying physically active.

Remind yourself and your loved ones that making healthy lifestyle choices can help enhance your life in the long run!

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Our office follows the recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

http://www.menshealthmonth.org

https://health.gov/news-archive/blog-bayw/2018/06/june-is-mens-health-month/index.html

http://www.menshealthmonth.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/MHM-Poster-2015-v1.pdf

https://medlineplus.gov/menshealth.html

https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/fastats/mens-health.htm

https://www.mhanational.org/infographic-mental-health-men

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/05/150505102437.htm

Proper Oral Hygiene Can Boost Your Immune System

June 22nd, 2020

Being sick...none of us have time for that. Luckily, our body's immune system is our defense mechanism against harmful bacteria, germs, allergens, and foreign particles that enter our body. That’s why keeping a strong and healthy immune system is key to fighting infectious diseases like COVID-19. Your immune system is a complex system made up of many cells, organs, and tissues that span throughout your entire body, including your oral cavity. In fact, your mouth is generally the first entry point to the rest of your body. Therefore, it’s important to maintain good oral health to help keep your immune system and overall health strong, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

When your immune system is functioning properly, normal oral bacteria and your natural microbiome aren’t typically a dangerous threat. However, when your oral health is not being maintained, bacteria can breakdown your pearly whites and lead to gum disease and inflammation, which can ultimately weaken your immune system. The early stages of gum disease is also known as gingivitis, which can be reversed with proper oral hygiene habits such as brushing twice a day, flossing daily, healthy diet and stress maintenance, and regular dental visits for comprehensive care. Some signs of gingivitis include inflamed gums, presenting with swelling, redness, and possible bleeding. A more severe form of gum disease is known as periodontitis, and the damage is typically irreversible. In periodontal disease, the inflammatory response triggered by bacteria not only impacts your teeth and gums, but also attacks your surrounding oral tissues and bone that hold your teeth in place. If untreated, periodontal disease can lead to both bone and tooth loss. Consequently, your immune system begins to work extra hard to help fight gum disease, and may promote inflammation within other parts of your body. Sadly, an unhealthy mouth has been linked to many systemic health conditions and inflammatory diseases, including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, preterm birth, and more! The case for having good oral hygiene undeniably keeps getting stronger. It’s important to keep your mouth healthy to help allow your immune system to be strong for taking care of the rest of your body!

During a pandemic, it’s important to do everything you can to strengthen your immune system. Here are some ways you can help your body stay healthy during these unprecedented times:

  • Minimize stress: Some research suggests that stress can exacerbate inflammatory disease such as gum disease. Try to stay active and keep a healthy diet to help relieve stress.
  • Exercise regularly and stay hydrated
  • Get adequate sleep: It is recommended that most adults need between 7 to 9 hours of sleep per night to function at their best. Children and teens might need more sleep for their growing bodies.
  • Brush your teeth daily
  • Floss daily to remove bacteria between your teeth
  • Wash hands regularly
  • Disinfect high-touch surfaces including bathroom surfaces, toilets, faucets, sinks, tables, doorknobs, light switches, countertops, handles, desks, phones and keyboards
  • Wear a mask and practice social distancing
  • Eat a healthy diet heavy with fruits, vegetables, lean meats and healthy fat
  • Visit your dentist regularly for check-ups/professional cleanings/outstanding treatments

It's also important to avoid practices that are harmful to your teeth and body:

  • Avoid smoking
  • Avoid high sugar diets
  • Avoid acidic drinks like soda and energy drinks
  • Drink alcohol in moderation
  • Avoid nail biting, chewing on ice, and using your teeth to open bottles or objects

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19.  Our office follows the recommendations made by the American Dental Association (ADA), the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group. We look forward to welcoming back our patients, neighbors, and friends.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.guardiandirect.com/resources/articles/how-good-oral-health-may-help-you-keep-your-immune-system-strong

https://www.colgateprofessional.com/education/patient-education/topics/systemic/why-a-healthy-mouth-is-good-for-your-body

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Snap, Crackle, Pop! How Rheumatoid Arthritis & Gum Disease are Related

June 15th, 2020

Snap, crackle, pop! Creaky joints can be a real pain, but who would have thought that it would have any connection to your mouth? Surprisingly, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and periodontitis have a lot in common, as they both are chronic inflammatory diseases that involve the breakdown of bone and soft tissue.

What is rheumatoid arthritis (RA)? 

RA is both a chronic inflammatory and an autoimmune disease, and is often characterized by pain and stiffness. RA typically affects the joints, but can also affect the body's organs.

Periodontitis...What's that?

On the other hand, periodontitis is an advanced form of gum disease. Without  treatment, periodontitis can lead to loss of tooth-supporting bone, tissue, and even your actual teeth!  Periodontitis can impact anyone at any age, but can be preventable. Unfortunately, 47.2% of adults over the age of 30 have periodontitis in the United States. A major cause of periodontal disease is poor oral hygiene, which leads to bacterial plaque attacking your tooth enamel. Other risk factors of periodontitis include tobacco use, diabetes, certain medications, older age, genetics, poor nutrition and obesity, tooth grinding, and misaligned teeth, just to name a few.

Gum disease can be harder to recognize because of its typical pain-free nature. However, there are some common signs and symptoms of periodontitis to look for:

  • Gums that bleed easily
  • Red, swollen, tender gums
  • Pus between your gums and teeth
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste
  • Loose permanent teeth/tooth loss
  • Changes in your bite
  • Receding gums
  • Changes in the fit of oral appliances (ex: partial dentures)

Yet, It is still possible to experience no signs or symptoms of gum disease. That's just one of many reasons why visiting your dentist regularly is essential to your oral and overall health, in addition to eating healthy, brushing at least twice a day, flossing daily, and practicing good oral hygiene habits at home. It is important to catch gum disease in the early stages to avoid irreversible damage to your pearly whites. Remember, prevention is key!

How are the two diseases linked?

Recent studies have supported the link between RA and periodontal disease. According to the Arthritis Foundation, researchers found that tooth loss, a common indicator of periodontal disease, may predict rheumatoid arthritis and its severity. Within the study, they found that the more teeth lost due to periodontal disease, the higher the risk of developing RA. Other research has also suggested that the bacteria commonly associated with periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), may play a role in onsetting RA.

Treating one disease may help improve the other!

Researchers at Case Western University found that individuals with both severe rheumatoid arthritis and gum disease experienced an improvement in their RA symptoms after successfully treating their gum disease.

Individuals with rheumatoid arthritis may face certain challenges in taking care of their oral health. It is important to inform your health care providers, who will help provide recommendations that will work best for you. To make brushing and flossing a little easier,  American Dental Association (ADA) recommendations include:

  • Make your toothbrush unique: To get a better grip of your toothbrush, add a tennis ball or bicycle grip to the handle.

  • Try different types of floss: Try floss holders, floss picks, or threaders.

  • Pump out your toothpaste: Toothpaste in a pump may be more comfortable than squeezing out of the tube.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.everydayhealth.com/rheumatoid-arthritis/living-with/the-link-between-gum-disease-and-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.hopkinsrheumatology.org/2017/01/gum-disease-linked-to-rheumatoid-arthritis/

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/g/gum-disease

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How Does My Mouth Change as I Age?

May 13th, 2020

With age comes many changes, and that includes changes within our health. The month of May is celebrated nationally as Older Americans Month, and we have some tips on how to keep your teeth healthy throughout each decade!

Because we only get one set of permanent teeth for our entire life, it's important that we do our best to keep them healthy. Many older adults suffer from gum disease, and often show signs of swollen and red gums that likely may bleed. In fact, the Washington Dental Service Foundation (WDSF) reported that severe gum disease impacts about 23% of individuals aged between 65 to 74, which can significantly impact the survival of natural teeth. Not to mention, the development of many systemic diseases have been linked with older age, in addition to poor oral health. So, its extremely necessary to continue to schedule your regular dental visits and practice good oral hygiene habits at home, especially to prevent tooth loss later on in life.

There are many factors impacting oral health that can be at play as we age. For instance, dry mouth is a common culprit of tooth decay, which often increases with medication use. Dry mouth has been noted to be a common side effect in over 500 medications, such as antidepressants, anxiolytics, antihypertensives, and antipsychotics just to name a few. It is important to inform your dentist about any medications that you are taking. To help alleviate dry mouth and lower your risk of developing cavities, your dentist may recommend avoiding certain acidic foods and beverages that can irritate dry mouths, in addition to over the counter mouth rinses, or saliva stimulants such as sugar-free gum or lozenges. Depending on the severity, your dentist may consult with your physician. Also remember, it is important to stay hydrated too!

Sometimes it can be harder to brush and floss as individuals age due to certain impairments. Individuals with Alzheimer’s disease or osteoporosis, for instance, often may need extra assistance taking care of their teeth and making regular dental visits. If your loved on has trouble brushing or flossing, speak with your dentist who can add helpful recommendations.

In addition, if recession has occurred overtime, it is important for older adults to properly clean exposed root surfaces of dental plaque and leftover food particles to help prevent decay on the root surfaces.

Most of us have experienced tooth sensitivity at some point in their lives, and age can be one of the many factors that can increase your risk of tooth sensitivity. Your dentist may recommend using a desensitizing toothpaste, or review toothbrushing techniques.

The rate of oral cancer also has been noted to increase with age. According to the American Cancer Society, the average age of most people diagnosed with oral cancer is 62. Often, your dentist is the first to detect oral cancer, which is another reason why keeping up with regular dental visits is important.

Here a few important tips to keep your pearly whites strong and help them last a lifetime:

  • Keep up with regular dental visits, even if you wear dentures, having your gums and surrounding oral tissues checked is necessary for your overall health.
  • Be sure to clean dentures or retainer daily to remove bacteria, using only cleaners made specifically for your oral appliance to avoid damaging. Make sure you remove your denture at night time to keep your oral tissues healthy.
  • Remember to brush at least twice each day for approximately two minutes, and use toothpaste containing fluoride.
  • It is important to floss once daily to remove leftover food debris and plaque in the areas in-between your teeth that the toothbrush cannot reach.
  • Try your best to avoid high intakes of sugar from items such as candy and soda to help lower your risk of tooth decay and improve your overall health.
  • Avoid using tobacco, which has been linked to oral cancer, gum disease, heart disease, and many other health problems. Talk to your dentist or physician for resources and help with quitting, it's never too late!
  • Add an antibacterial mouthwash to your oral hygiene routine to help reduce plaque buildup.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/oral-care-age-55-up

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/adults-over-60?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhtopstories&utm_content=older-americans-month

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Let's End Oral Cancer!

April 3rd, 2020

Many may not know much about oral cancer, but not to worry, we've got you covered! April is Oral Cancer Awareness month throughout the United States, and we are excited to join the Oral Cancer Foundation's (OCF) fight to end oral cancer by spreading awareness. Spreading information on oral cancer can help lead to earlier detection and thus save lives! According to the OCF, about 53,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with oral cancer each year. It's estimated to be about 132 new people each day. Sadly, one person will die from oral cancer every hour of every day of the year. In fact, oral and pharyngeal cancers have a high death rate which is highly attributed due to late detection of the cancer. Surprisingly, oral cancer is becoming widely seen in young, healthy, nonsmoking people possibly because of the increased risk of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16). However, individuals who smoke tobacco are also still high risk. The majority of oral cancers are classified as oral squamous cell carcinomas.

Let's dive in to some of the risk factors of oral cancer:

  • Men are two times more likely to have oral cancer than women.
  • Approximately 25% have no known risk factors.
  • Infection with the sexually transmitted HPV16 virus
  • Alcohol and tobacco, including vaping, smokeless tobacco, pipe smoking, etc. (Individuals who use both in combination are 15 times more at risk)
  • Prolonged sun exposure increases risk of developing lip cancer
  • Poor oral hygiene
  • Poor nutrition
  • Infectious diseases
  • Chronic physical trauma

Potential Signs and Symptoms:

  • A sore or lump on the lip or in the mouth that does not heal (monitored by dental professional, typically for 2 weeks)
  • A white or red patch on the gums, tongue, tonsils or lining of the mouth
  • Bleeding, pain or numbness in the lip or mouth
  • Change in voice
  • Loose teeth or dentures that no longer fit well
  • Trouble chewing, swallowing, or moving the tongue or jaw
  • Jaw swelling
  • Sore throat

Some individuals may not experience any symptoms at all. Early Detection is key! It is important to check your oral cavity regularly to identify any changes. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends performing these self-exams monthly. It is also necessary to keep up with your regular dental appointments and to notify your dentist if you notice anything unusual.

If a definitive diagnosis of oral cancer is determined and staged, treatment will involve multiple disciplines likely including surgeons, oncologists, dentists, nutritionists, and rehabilitation and restorative specialists.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.aaoms.org/media/raise-oral-cancer-awareness/posters-and-infographics

https://www.aaoms.org/docs/media/oral_cancer/2017_oral_cancer_fact_sheet.pdf

https://oralcancerfoundation.org/events/oral-head-neck-cancer-awareness-month/

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Reminder: Take Good Care of your Heart!

February 12th, 2020

It's hearts all over the world each month of February, especially with Valentine's Day right around the corner. But, this month isn't just about the cards and candy, it's also American Heart Month, where the importance of heart health is advocated by communities across the world. Heart disease is sadly the number 1 killer of Americans, killing more people than all forms of cancer! Both heart disease and stroke are the cause of approximately 2,300 deaths each day. This year, it is the 56th consecutive American Heart Month, which was first implemented by President Lyndon B. Johnson in February 1964. Organizations such as the American Heart Association promote the importance of heart disease awareness.

Over the years, rising obesity rates in children and adults have contributed to the progression of heart disease in America. Luckily, heart disease can be prevented with the right healthy life-style choices. From being more physically active, to eating healthier diets, and tracking your heart health by regularly checking your blood pressure and weight. Most people also don't realize that managing your stress and sleep schedule plays a role in your heart health. Lack of sleep can increase your risk for developing chronic health problems because your body needs the rest in order to keep your mental and physical health regulated.

Coronary heart disease is the most common type of heart disease and can lead to heart attacks. People are at a higher risk of developing heart disease if they have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, preeclampsia during pregnancy, or prediabetes or diabetes. In addition, people who smoke cigarettes, are over age of 55 for women or 45 for men, or people with a family history of heart disease are also at a higher risk for having heart disease. Although some risk factors cannot be change, most others are modifiable! It is important to make conscious choices to eat healthy and stay active.

Take a look at this list of food groups that should regularly be included in your diet:

  • Vegetables such as leafy greens (spinach, collard greens, kale, cabbage), broccoli, and carrots
  • Fruits such as apples, bananas, oranges, pears, grapes, and prunes
  • Whole grains such as plain oatmeal, brown rice, and whole-grain bread or tortillas
  • Fat-free or low-fat dairy foods such as milk, cheese, or yogurt
  • Protein-rich foods:
    • Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids (salmon, tuna, and trout)
    • Lean meats such as 95% lean ground beef or pork tenderloin or skinless chicken or turkey
    • Eggs
    • Nuts, seeds, and soy products (tofu)
    • Legumes such as kidney beans, lentils, chickpeas, black-eyed peas, and lima beans
  • Oils and foods high in monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats:
    • Canola, corn, olive, safflower, sesame, sunflower, and soybean oils (not coconut or palm oil)
    • Nuts such as walnuts, almonds, and pine nuts
    • Nut and seed butters
    • Salmon and trout
    • Seeds (sesame, sunflower, pumpkin, or flax)
    • Avocados
    • Tofu

It is important to limit sodium (salt), saturated and trans fats, added sugars, and alcohol. Reading food labels can be tedious but could also save your life! Sweetened drinks and desserts have a lot of added sugars which can not only impact your oral health but also your heart health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.heart.org/en/around-the-aha/february-marks-56th-consecutive-american-heart-month

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/education-and-awareness/heart-month

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Gain Wisdom on your 3rd Molars

January 25th, 2020

Many people seek to gain wisdom throughout life, but some may not realize that they might already have some towards the back of their mouth...their wisdom teeth! Wisdom teeth, also called third molars, are typically the last teeth in the mouth to erupt, and are the last molars present on the upper and lower jaw. Since they are the last permanent teeth to erupt (usually between the ages of 17 and 25), sometimes there is not enough space for them, which can lead to impacted wisdom teeth. If your dentist tells you that you have an impacted wisdom tooth, this means that your tooth may have only partially erupted, or stayed buried underneath the gum tissue.

When this occurs, symptoms including swelling, infection, pain, or tenderness may develop. Some people however, may not experience any problems with their wisdom teeth. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends that people between ages 16 and 19 be evaluated by their dentist to see if they need to be removed. This age range is preferred by dentists because the roots of the wisdom teeth are usually not fully formed yet and are easier to remove than in older patients. Also, the risk of developing greater problems is lowered the earlier they are removed, including damage to the major nerve on the lower jaw, the inferior alveolar nerve. People receiving braces may also be recommended to remove their wisdom teeth to avoid their eruption altering the alignment of their teeth.

If it is determined by your dentist or dental specialist that your wisdom teeth need to be extracted, they will recommend either local anesthesia, IV sedation, or general anesthesia depending on the multiple factors of each case. After the extraction, you may be asked to bite softly on a piece of gauze for approximately 30 minutes to limit any bleeding. Bleeding, swelling and tenderness post-extraction are common and may last normally for a few days. However, if it is to continue past a few days, it is important to contact your dentist.

It is recommended not to brush, rinse, or spit within the first 24 hours after the extraction to allow proper healing of the extraction site. Staying hydrated and eating is important following the extraction for your recovery. It is important not to drink through a straw however, as this can lead to dry socket. Dry socket is a possible complication of wisdom tooth removal, which can occur during the first five days after extraction. This happens when the blood clot that formed a seal after the extraction begins to break down and exposes the bone and nerves of the tooth. Only approximately 2 to 5% of people will develop a dry socket. According to a study published in the Journal of Oral Health and Dental Management, dry socket was more common in people who smoke and more likely to occur in the lower jaw. Dry socket can be very painful and may present with an unpleasant smell or taste, but can be treated by your dentist. The site will be cleaned of all debris and covered with a medication until it heals.

If your wisdom teeth are still present and healthy within your mouth, be sure that you are still brushing and flossing them, as these teeth can still develop tooth decay.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth/what-is-a-wisdom-tooth-0415

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/wisdom-teeth/5-possible-wisdom-teeth-removal-complications

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2020 Resolutions for a Healthy Smile!

January 1st, 2020

Can you believe it's 2020 already? This year is a great one to establish healthy habits and improve our overall fitness. Each year is a perfect time to set new resolutions for ourselves. If you are wanting to keep your teeth healthy in the new year, take a look at these easy tips  to help you achieve your goals. And remember, whether a big or small goal, it can be rewarding to accomplish even with baby steps to achieve them!

Perfect your Oral Home Care

Preventing gum disease will help lower your risk of developing many other systemic health problems, for instance diabetes. By proper brushing at least two time a day and flossing at least once a day, these are excellent steps to healthy teeth and gums. The habit of flossing can sometimes be hard to commit too, but it is necessary because floss accesses areas that your toothbrush cannot reach, helping to prevent breakdown of your tooth enamel. It is important to position your teeth angled toward your gum line (about 45 degrees) and make a circular motion across each tooth. Your toothbrush should be replaced approximately every 3-4 months according to the American Dental Association. And don't forget your fluoride toothpaste, which helps remineralize tooth enamel and protect against cavities.

Keep in Touch with your Dentist

Be sure to schedule your dental appointments in the new year. Dental cleanings are often each 6 months, but your dentist may recommend every 3-4 months depending on your oral status. The new year is also the perfect time to finish any remaining dental treatment such as fillings, implants, or crowns.

Preserve Teeth

If you notice you grind your teeth, talk to your dentist so that the proper treatment can be provided. You may experience headaches, jaw pain, sore teeth, or even fractured tooth surfaces. A night guard may be suggested to help prevent damage to your pearly whites.

Kick Bad Habits

If you have a habit that you're looking to stop, it's never the wrong time to quit! For instance, smoking doubles your risk for gum disease and is also connected with many other health problems such as cancer. Contact your dentist if you're looking to quit smoking for recommendations and resources.

Choose Healthy Foods

Try cutting back on sugar, which is directly associated with tooth decay. Choose tooth-friendly foods like cheese and other dairy products high in calcium. In addition, high fibrous foods that help stimulate saliva to help wipe away plaque and help protect your tooth enamel.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adult-oral-care/looking-after-your-teeth-five-new-years-resolutions-for-a-healthier-mouth-1214

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Take a Deep Breath: Vaping Effects On Your Lungs

October 20th, 2019

Many of us have been following the devastating news of young adult deaths related to vaping across the country. Vaping has recently become an epidemic and major public health issue. With Respiratory Care Week beginning today, October 20th-26th, and  Healthy Lung Month the entire month of October, we would like to highlight all of the necessary information needed to keep our lungs breathing well to last us an entire lifetime!

The statistics on lung disease are disheartening, with greater than 35 million Americans living with a chronic lung disease such as asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Not to mention, lung cancer is the #1 cause of death related to cancer for both women and men in the U.S. Many lung diseases have been a result of cigarette smoking. Cigarette use has decreased in comparison to the past, however the rise of e-cigarettes/vaping has drastically made its way into society, particularly with young adults. The use of e-cigarettes has been reported by approximately 20% of high school students in the U.S. within the last month. Surprisingly even 5% of middle school students in the U.S. have reported using e-cigarettes within the last month. In Massachusetts, the numbers are even higher: 40% of high school students and 10% of middle school students have used e-cigarettes within the past month. According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), over 1000 people have become affected with respiratory issues as a result of vaping. As of today, the CDC reports that there have been 33 deaths in 24 states.

The use of e-cigarettes not only damages lungs and brain development, but also one’s oral health, and it is important to our caring team here at WDG to keep you in the loop and ensure your safety and health. Sadly, vaping has been marketed as a “healthy” alternative to smoking tobacco cigarettes. With research still ongoing, vaping can contain the addictive substance nicotine, and chemical particles within the vapor, including volatile organic compounds, flavoring agents, cancer-causing chemicals, and heavy metals which can all negatively impact your health. Plus, e-cigarettes can cause dry mouth, gum inflammation, and increase the amount of cavity-causing bacteria. Long-term effects of vaping are still being researched.

It is important to spread the word about the dangers of vaping and provide individuals who are vaping with the information and resources needed to quit, which can be found below:

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://nationaltoday.com/respiratory-care-week/

https://www.lung.org/about-us/mission-impact-and-history/our-impact.html

http://www.deltadentalma.com/The-Brush-Up/Blog/What-Dentists-Need-to-Know-About-the-Teen-Vaping-E

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Vaping: A Public Health Emergency

September 28th, 2019

You may have heard about the recent devastating health crisis in young adults: electronic cigarettes (e-cigarette) and vaping products causing severe lung disease. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and state health departments, are looking into the link between e-cigarette products and lung disease. As of September 24, 2019, Governor of Massachusetts, Charles D. Baker, declared a public health emergency on this issue and initiated a temporary four-month statewide ban on the sale of vaping products, including tobacco and marijuana, in stores and online until January 25, 2020. The latest news reports 805 cases of lung damage from 46 states in America, with 12 current deaths. According to the CDC, 67% of cases are aged 18 to 34 years old, 38% are under the age of 21 years old, 17 % are over 35 years old, and 16% are under the age of 18. A majority of the individuals reported using e-cigarette products with THC and nicotine. The direct cause of the lung problems is still being investigated.

E-cigarette use is also known as vaping, and works by warming up a liquid which becomes inhaled into the lungs. E-cigarettes have become increasingly advertised over the past few years. So much so that Juul, an electronic cigarette company, increased their sales by almost 800% from 2017 to 2018. Sadly, they have been marketed as “safer” alternatives to cigarette smoking, although in reality they carry many of the same risks as well as new risks.The inhaled liquids are often made up of nicotine, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabinoid (CBD) oils, along with other substances. Each product, however, may contain a variation of other ingredients and concentrations, which may be toxic to the body.

Both cigarettes and vaping products are not only damaging for your lungs and body, but also are not good for your oral health. Nicotine has been found to prevent healthy blood flow within the gums, which can increase your risk of developing gingivitis and periodontitis. In addition, one of the ingredients found in vaping products, propylene glycol, has been found to cause dry mouth. Dry mouth plays a detrimental role in oral health because it can lead to tooth decay and oral thrush. Not to mention, e-cigarettes can contribute to DNA damage and result in oral cancer.

For your health and safety, avoid smoking all e-cigarettes/vaping products and use of tobacco cigarettes. The Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program offers information and resources that can help individuals quit. Massachusetts also partners with national resources for teens interested in quitting smoking or vaping via My Life, My QuitTM and This is Quitting powered by Truth® program.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.foxnews.com/health/vaping-harming-teeth-study

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/severe-lung-disease.html

https://www.bostonglobe.com/news/marijuana/2019/09/24/governor-baker-make-vaping-announcement-amid-spate-lung-illnesses/o8sO6mf3GOmX4mOpLLtcEL/story.html

https://www.mass.gov/guides/vaping-public-health-emergency#-information-for-providers-

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Robbed of a Good Night's Rest?

August 10th, 2019

Sleep is an important part of each day, so much so that the effects of a restless night can change the entire productivity of our next day! Unfortunately, many people suffer from sleeping disorders. In fact, nearly 70 million adults in the United States have a sleeping disorder, the most common of which is sleep apnea. According to the National Sleep Foundation, a whopping 18 million adults in America have sleep apnea. So, what exactly is sleep apnea? There are two main types to know about:

  • The most common form, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), is a condition involving involuntary temporary interruptions in breaths for at least ten seconds at a time due to upper airway blockage. This causes a disrupted sleeping pattern and low blood oxygen levels, which can contribute to several health issues.
  • Central sleep apnea is much less common and is characterized by failure of the brain to signal the necessary muscles involved in breathing.

As a result of the interrupted breathing pattern, individuals with sleep apnea often produce snoring and choking sounds throughout the night. You may be wondering, what’s the big deal about having sleep apnea? Sleep apnea does not only just interrupt your night’s rest, it can also put you at a higher risk of developing many conditions, including high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease, diabetes, depression, and worsening of ADHD.

Who does sleep apnea affect?

Obstructive sleep apnea can impact people of all ages and any gender, however, there are some factors that can place some people at higher risk. This includes people 40 years of age and older, smokers, heavy alcohol users, males, African Americans, those who have a family history of sleep apnea, and individuals suffering from obesity, sinus problems, or allergies. Your anatomy also plays a role in your risk of developing sleep apnea. People with nasal septum deviations, a thicker neck, narrow throat, large tongue, small jaw, or enlarged tonsils are at higher risk of sleep apnea.

If you think you have sleep apnea or have been told that you may have sleep apnea by your doctor, don’t worry! Sleep apnea can be treated, and Wellesley Dental Group’s very own Dr. Emad Abdallah can help you conquer sleep-disordered breathing!  Dr. Emad Abdallah received his doctorate, certificate in orthodontics, and Master of Science in temporomandibular joint disorders (TMJ) and orofacial pain from Tufts University School of Dental Medicine. Don't be robbed of a good night's sleep, contact us today!

Stay tuned to our social media accounts including FacebookLinkedIn, Pinterest, and Twitter for more sleep-related posts!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sleepfoundation.org/sleep-apnea

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/s/sleep-apnea-and-snoring

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/is-sleep-apnea-or-snoring-robbing-you-from-your-sleep-0713

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Why is my Tongue White?

August 6th, 2019

 

The human body is amazing in so many ways. Our bodies often try to tell us things about our health through triggering certain signs and signals. The oral cavity can be an easy spot to indicate signs of specific health conditions developing. For instance, the color and texture of your tongue could be a clue that something is going on within your body.

The normal anatomy of the tongue is comprised of tiny nodules known as papilla. The color is typically a shade of pink, although food debris may temporarily stain the tongue. An indicator of poor oral health or possibly an underlying health condition is the presence of a white tongue that remains for a prolonged period of time. A white tongue has been associated with mouth breathing, smoking, oral thrush (fungal candidiasis infection), infections, excessive alcohol use, medication side effects, and congenital heart disease.

Most frequently it is linked with dry mouth and dehydration, which increases the risk of developing tooth decay and infections. Saliva is crucial for helping us breakdown food and protecting our teeth due to the proteins and minerals found within it. Without it, the dry environment promotes bacteria and fungi growth and typically produces an odor.

Other conditions that have been known to cause white tongue include oral lichen planus, geographic tongue, oral cancer, and HIV/AIDs.

Although white tongue is typically harmless, if you notice any pain or persistence of white tongue for a prolonged time that does not respond to oral care, be sure to contact your dentist.

It is important to remember to brush your tongue with either a toothbrush or tongue scraper each day to remove all of the plaque and leftover food particles that become trapped between the papilla on the surface of the tongue. Also, staying hydrated is important, especially during these hot summer days!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319814.php

https://www.mayoclinic.org/symptoms/white-tongue/basics/causes/sym-20050676

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Lowering Liver Cancer Risk with Good Oral Hygiene

August 3rd, 2019

Why is it important to take care of your teeth? Some people may be wondering how their oral hygiene habits affect their overall well-being. There’s increasing awareness that poor oral health is linked to more than just issues found within the mouth. Research has consistently shown us that poor oral health can be linked to heart disease, diabetes, and stroke, just to name a few associations. Now, a recent study conducted at Queen's University Belfast in the United Kingdom has found another possible link between oral health and gastrointestinal cancers, for instance, liver, colon, rectum and pancreatic cancer.

Just about 60,000 people each year in the European Union are killed by liver cancer. This is ranked as the 6thmost common cancer related death, with only an 11% five-year survival rate! The study looked at the oral health of about 469,000 people in the United Kingdom, noting conditions such as loose teeth, gingival and periodontal diseases, missing teeth, and tooth decay. Although the study did not find significant evidence between gastrointestinal cancers and poor oral hygiene, people with poor oral health may have a 75% increase in developing liver cancer according to the study. However, more research is needed to better establish the mechanisms behind this connection. Researchers are interested in investigating the role certain microbes found originally within the mouth, including Fusobacterium nucleatum, may have in liver cancer.

The good news is, with healthy lifestyle habits including diet, exercise, oral hygiene, and avoidance of behaviors including smoking and excessive alcohol consumption, you can lower this risk!

It is important to schedule regular dental visits, and keep up with brushing at least twice a day, and flossing at least once a day to keep your mouth healthy. Keeping your oral health and liver in check also includes eating well and maintaining a nutritious and balanced diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/06/190617125124.htm

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/2050640619858043

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Is there a Genetic Component to my Kid's Tooth Decay?

May 4th, 2019

Our genes make us who we are and seem to play a significant role in many conditions in our lives. However, according to a recent study (“Genetic and Early Life Environmental Influences on Dental Caries Risk: A Twin Study), tooth decay may not be one of the conditions influenced by genetics. But what about your lifestyle habits? Recent research shows that environmental factors rather than genetics could be the main culprit influencing the development of tooth decay.



The study done at Murdoch Children’s Research Institute in Australia drew several interesting conclusions. By analyzing 173 sets of identical and non-identical twins from pregnancy up to age six, they found that genes did not impact the prevalence of tooth decay. Identical twins with the same genetic makeup were not found to have the same amount of tooth decay. Instead, outside factors such as fluoride availability, diet, and oral hygiene habits may be playing the most important role in the onset of dental cavities. 

In addition, the study recorded and observed the mother's weight, health conditions, medication use, vitamin D levels, stress, alcohol intake and smoking habits during pregnancy through a questionnaire. The researchers discovered a link between the mother’s health and habits during pregnancy with the susceptibility of dental caries. Obesity in pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of tooth decay in children. Unfortunately, in the United States, tooth decay is the #1 most common childhood disease. Even in Australia the researchers found that one in every three children have tooth decay as early as their first day starting school. But, the good news is, tooth decay is highly preventable! It is important to start practicing good oral hygiene habits and live a healthy lifestyle from an early age to help protect your smile and body. This way the risk of developing other systemic issues such as diabetes and cardiovascular problems can be minimized.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/04/190430091838.htm

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/~/media/MouthHealthy/Images/Articles/article_dentist_parent_advice.jpg?h=307&la=en&w=460&hash=BCB9195CABCD8F1B1C8D9281D1EEBAD1DAEFE429

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Stop Oral Cancer- Be Aware!

April 24th, 2019

You may have noticed that your dentist checks for more than just cavities during your dental exam. This includes an oral cancer screening. In 2019, about 53,000 people in America will be diagnosed with oral or oropharyngeal cancer. Sadly, approximately one person every hour each day dies due to these cancers, and 40% of the individuals newly diagnosed with oral and oropharyngeal cancer do not survive longer than 5 years.  This notably high death rate is is mainly caused by late diagnoses of these cancer! Fortunately, when these cancers are found and treated early, the death rate and other health complications become less common.That's why this Oral Cancer Awareness month we are spreading the word that early detection saves lives! Luckily, maintaining your regular dental visits can help inform you of any harmful developments and cancers early, and keep your oral and overall health in check. Take a look at the common risk factors of oral and oropharyngeal factors and how you can lower your risk:

There are several factors that may influence the development of oral cancer. There has been a lot of research showing that heavy alcohol and tobacco users who are middle aged often present with oral cancers, but there is a current shift to younger individuals who are developing oral cancers due to the rise of the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus 16 (HPV).

Human Papilloma Virus (HPV)

The CDC reports that there have been approximately 9,000 cases of head and neck cancer associated with HPV each year in America. Most of the cancers associated with this sexually transmitted disease occur at the back of the tongue or around the tonsils, with a majority of the cases being found in younger nonsmoking individuals. The death rate and chance of it reoccuring is often low, but detection is often late.

The signs of HPV-realted cancers often present as a painless swelling in the neck area, sore throat, trouble or pain when swallowing, ulcerations, and/or swelling in the tonsillar area that last for longer than 2-3 weeks.

Gender

Oral cancers are two times more prevalent in men than women.

Age

HPV related oral and oropharyngeal cancers are often seen in younger individuals, while a majority of cancers associated with other factors tend to be found in individuals aged 50 years or older.

Smoking

Tobacco in any form creates a higher risk for developing oral cancers, in addition to cancers found throughout the body. Individuals who use a pipe to smoke often develop cancer of the lips. Chewing tobacco can cause several problems in the oral cavity even in addition to cancer.

Alcohol

Alcohol is a significant risk factor for the development of oral cancer. The American Cancer Society states that 7 out of 10 oral cancer patients are heavy drinkers (An average of two drinks a day for men, and more than one drink a day for women). Smoking in combination with drinking also increases your risk significantly higher.

Be attentive to any signs or symptoms that appear abnormal to you and make sure you are regularly visiting your dentist and health care professional. 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.aaom.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=140:april-is-oral-cancer-awareness-month

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/Oral-Cancer-Slideshow?utm_source=mouthhealthyorg&utm_medium=mhrotator&utm_content=oral-cancer-awareness

https://oralcancerfoundation.org/events/oral-head-neck-cancer-awareness-month/

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Oral Cancer
Awareness

Is Your Body Trying to ask for Vitamins and Minerals?

April 8th, 2019

It's been ingrained in us that a healthy and well-balanced diet is necessary for normal daily functioning and growth. However, it may not be that simple to realize when we're deficient in certain vitamins and minerals, even when we're eating healthy! Vitamins and minerals play a major role in carrying out the normal functions of our bodies, including synthesizing  tissues, removing waste products, and being necessary precursors for enzymes. Therefore, deficiencies can result in several health problems, so it is important to know what signs to look for in order to meet the body's needs! For instance, oral signs such as burning tongue and mouth sores, feeling tired after a good night's rest, having a pale appearance, or brittle fingernails can all be signs of particular nutrient deficiencies. In fact, it has been reported that when the proper nutrients are not consumed in adequate amounts, both physical and mental issues such as skin problems, bone abnormalities, and even dementia could be negative consequences.

Take a look at the signs of various vitamin deficiencies and how to make these symptoms improve or be gone altogether:

Severe hair loss

If you notice that you are losing more than the typical 100 strands of hair a day, this could be a sign of a deficiency in the minerals iron and zinc, in addition to the fatty acids linoleum acid and alpha-linolenic acid, and vitamins such as biotin (Vitamin B7) and Niacin (Vitamin B3):

  • Iron is necessary for the production of DNA, which is present in hair follicles.
  • Zinc is needed for the synthesis of proteins necessary for hair growth.
    • A deficiency in both iron and zinc can lead to hair loss or cause the hair to stop growing. A diet rich in meat, fish, eggs, legumes, dark leafy greens, nuts, seeds and whole grains can help manage a deficiency in iron and zinc.
  • Linoleic acid (LA) and alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) are integral to hair growth.
    • A diet comprising leafy vegetables, nuts, whole grains, and vegetable oils all offer a source of LA. ALA can be found in chia seeds and soy nuts.
  • Niacin (vitamin B3): Niacin is needed for keeping healthy strong hair.
  • Biotin (vitamin B7): Biotin helps form thick hair and stimulates hair growth.
    • Meat, fish, dairy, whole grains, legumes, nuts, seeds and leafy greens are rich in both niacin and biotin.

You may notice that there are also a lot of supplements advertised for hair loss prevention that include these nutrients. These supplements should be taken at the discretion of your health care provider, as there is limited research on their effects.

Brittle nails

A sign of brittle or splitting nails could be your body telling you that it is in need of iron or biotin.

  • Iron: In addition to brittle nails, a deficiency in iron can include fatigue, pale skin, chest pain, constant sensation of cold, inflamed or sore tongue, and dizziness just to name a few.
    • Iron-rich foods include in meat, poultry, seafood, and spinach.
  • Biotin: biotin deficiencies are rare, but can present as brittle hair or nails, in addition to fatigue, and muscle pain. Risk factors of a biotin deficiency include pregnancy, smoking, alcoholism, Crohn's disease, and individuals on some anti-seizure medications or prolonged antibiotic use. Consumption of raw egg whites can also lead to a deficiency in biotin because  the protein avidin within raw egg whites reduces the absorption of biotin.
    •  Egg yolks, organ meats, fish, meat, dairy, nuts, seeds, spinach, broccoli, cauliflower, sweet potatoes, yeast, whole grains and bananas are good sources of biotin.

Mouth ulcers or cracks in the corners of the mouth

Mouth ulcers, also known as canker sores, and cracking around the corners of the mouth have been linked to deficiencies including iron, B1, B2, B6 and B12.

  • Iron
  • Thiamin (Vitamin B1) plays a role in maintining the nervous system and the release of energy from food.
  • Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) helps keep the skin, eyes and nervous system healthy, and helps the body release energy from food.
  • Pyridoxine (Vitamin B6) is responsible for the storage of protein and carbohydrates absorbed from food, and the formation of hemoglobin in red blood cells. A deficiency in B6 is typically rare.
    • Thiamin, riboflavin and pyridoxine can all be found in whole grains, poultry, meat, fish, eggs, dairy, organ meats, legumes, green vegetables, starchy vegetables, nuts and seeds.

In addition, cracking at the corners of the mouth could be caused by angular cheilitis (inflammation and an accumulation of microorganisms, particularly Candida albicans, at the corners of the mouth).

Bleeding Gums

Bleeding gums could be a result of several things, including gingivitis due to bacterial plaque, medications, brushing technique, and poor diet or oral hygiene habits. In addition, it could be due to a lack of vitamin C in your diet.

  • Vitamin C: Vitamin C plays a role in healing wounds, your immunity, and also helps prevent cell damage. If the deficiency is severe, the condition known as scurvy could develop. Symptoms of scurvy include tooth loss, weakness, fatigue, and muscle soreness.
    • Citrus fruit, guava, kiwi, broccoli, dark green leafy vegetables (broccoli, spinach, lettuce, kale), berries, tomatoes, cabbage, and brussel sprouts all are sources of Vitamin C.

Burning tongue

The sensation of a burning tongue or feet could be a result of a deficiency in Vitamin B12.

  • Vitamin B12: B12 is known to help produce hemoglobin in red blood cells, and is also needed for the proper function of the digestive system. Vegans are at an increased risk of B12 deficiency because meats and dairy products are common sources of good amounts of B12. Signs of a deficiency in vitamin B12 often include damage to your nervous system, memory changes, and can sometimes mimic anemia.
    • Vitamin B12 an be found in meats, shellfish, poultry, fish, dairy, almond milk, nutritional yeast, and fortified soy and coconut milk.

Muscle cramps

If you notice that you begin having muscle cramps, your body could be craving potassium. A deficiency in potassium is typically caused by loss of fluid (excessive sweat, vomit, diarrhea).

  • Potassium: Potassium is known to help build muscle and protein.
    • A good source of potassium can be found in sweet potatoes, bananas, avocados, and coconut water.

 

So, you may be wondering, "will dietary supplements help get me all of the nutrients I need?" The best way to ensure that you are getting adequate amounts of vitamins and minerals is to make sure your diet includes each major food group, rather than relying only on dietary supplements. Some individuals may be lacking certain vitamins or minerals due to an underlying medical condition. Be sure to have your regular check-ups with your primary care physician so that the proper diagnoses and treatment can be made.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/1101051/vitamin-deficiency-symptoms-B12-D-signs-tiredness-hair-loss-mouth-ulcers

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/vitamin-deficiency#section1

https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/08/22/the-common-signs-of-vitamin-and-mineral-deficiencies_a_21456849/

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The Perfect Smile for Valentine's Day

February 14th, 2019

Today on Valentine's Day we are reminded of all of the love that surrounds us. Pink and red flowers, cards, and treats may also make an appearance on this holiday. As we celebrate, make sure you're showing your smile some love too! Here's some tips on how you can keep your pearly whites glistening on your special date or day with loved ones:

Cavities and Kissing:

Did you know cavities can be contagious? Bacteria that cause tooth decay can transmit from one mouth to another through kissing or sharing utensils. The good news is, kissing helps stimulate saliva, which is necessary to wash away leftover foods and fight cavities. But, to prevent swapping germs, it is important to brush your teeth 2x a day for at least 2 minutes and floss for a healthy and cavity-free smile.

Bad Breath Be Gone!

Bad breath can be a burden, but there are a lot of things that can be done to help prevent it.  Bad breath is often a result of bacteria, so good hygiene habits like brushing and flossing are the easiest things to do to keep your breath smelling fresh. A lot of plaque and bacteria are hiding between teeth and on the surface of your tongue so don't forget these areas! There are also a variety of mouth rinses available in the store that are anti-microbial and help get rid of bacteria and bad breath. Not to mention, chewing xylitol gum can help stimulate saliva and keep your breath fresh.

Brighten Smiles with Whitening

Looking to get rid of stains or not as confident with the color of your teeth? If you'd like to brighten your smile, our in-office ZOOM! Whitening is the way to go, and also could be a great gift to surprise your loved one with.

Avoid Smoking

Smoking is not only bad for your lungs, it also has a negative impact on your mouth. It can cause oral cancer, bad breath, and stain your pearly whites.

Sweet Treats

One of the fun aspects of Valentine's Day is the sweet treats and desserts that you may indulge in. If you happen to have some goodies, just be sure to keep your teeth in mind. Avoid hard candies, or candies that are sticky such as caramels or gummies as they can be damaging to your enamel. Also be sure to rinse with water and try eating the sweets with a meal so that your saliva flow can help wash away the sugars that cause tooth decay.

We wish you a Happy Valentine's Day!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/adults-under-40/healthy-habits/valentines-day

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Love your Heart: American Heart Month

February 5th, 2019

The heart is an amazing muscle, beating up to about 100,000 times a day and keeping us alive to spread love to those we encounter! That's why it's extremely important to keep your heart healthy and to be informed about heart disease. Each February, awareness about heart health is spread nationally in celebration of American Heart Month. What many may not know is that heart disease isn't just a disease that affects older adults. It can happen at any age, and there are many factors that can put you at risk. Here's what you need to know:

To start off on a positive note, heart disease can be prevented with healthy lifestyle choices. Sadly, about 1 in 4 deaths in the United States are a result of heart disease in both men and women. Many individuals may experience at least one of the top 3 risks for heart disease, which include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and smoking.

So, what exactly is heart disease? Coronary heart disease (CHD) occurs when plaque accumulates overtime inside of the coronary arteries that normally help supply oxygenated blood to the heart. This buildup of plaque is also known as atherosclerosis. The plaque buildup is dangerous because they can eventually harden or even burst. If the plaque hardens, the blood flow to the heart is consequently reduced as the coronary artery walls narrow. If the plaque bursts, this can result in a blood clot that can also block blood flow from reaching the heart. Once there is less blood flow to the heart, a stroke or heart attack can happen. Pain in the chest, shoulders, jaw, arms, and neck can be a common sign of a heart attack. Your heart eventually becomes weaker over time with CHD, and could result in heart failure or irregular heart rhythms.

Here are some common risk factors of heart disease, which can be prevented:

Be sure to spread the word so that our community can help put a stop to heart disease! Start with these positive goals to lead a healthy life.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. DerekDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Stephens would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/education-and-awareness/heart-month/learn-more-about-heart-disease

https://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/index.html

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Festive Stress Taking a Toll on Your Mouth?

December 15th, 2018

As we approach the holidays, it can be an exciting, yet stressful time as we prepare to decorate, shop, and entertain for our loved ones. Even traveling, finances, or just having a large to-do list can add stress to your body and oral health. Sometimes you may not notice the negative impact that stress is causing to your teeth. Take a look at these common stressors and how they could be harmful to your smile:

Snoring

Snoring does not only cause loud noises at night time-It could also be causing issues with your oral health! Snoring occurs when there is not enough air moving through the throat and nose while sleeping. Snoring could be a result of many conditions, and some risk factors include being male, 40 years of age or older, family history of snoring, and pregnancy. A main complication of snoring is dry mouth. Dry mouth occurs when there is a lack of saliva, which is necessary for neutralizing acids made by bacteria within the mouth, and for moistening your gums and teeth. When there is a lack of saliva you may develop oral problems such as bad breath (halitosis), burning mouth syndrome, cavities, gingivitis, or mouth sores. Depending on the cause, interventions can include an oral appliance, weight loss, or a reduction in alcohol or smoking.

Tooth Grinding

A commonly known issue impacting your teeth is called bruxism, also known as tooth grinding. This often occurs during your sleep which can make it hard for you not to notice. In addition, jaw clenching can also cause similar effects including wearing your enamel down, gum recession, and weakening the supporting structures in your mouth that keep your teeth in place. Not to mention, it can also break or chip existing fillings in your mouth. Grinding and clenching are often due to anxiety or stress, but can also be caused by an abnormal bite. Some of the signs that can clue you in that you may be clenching or grinding include a sore jaw when you wake up in the morning, or your partner may notice clicking sounds during your sleep. Not to worry though, there are treatment options that can fix this. A night guard may be suggested, or relaxation methods including exercise or other stress management interventions may be advised by your dentist to prevent damaging your pearly whites.

Depression

Depression is a common condition for many individuals, and it can come and go in spurts during a person's life. It is important to talk with a Doctor or someone who can help if it begins to interfere with daily life including with the care of your oral and overall health.

Holiday stressors are real! Stay stress-free this holiday and be sure to keep up on health. Brushing, flossing, and making sure your scheduling your regular dental check-ups is particularly important during the holidays when lots of sweets are involved!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Aliand their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emadis happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghaziwould be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Groupwill be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.comto set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

getty_134936674_2000133320009280167_75133.jpg

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/respiratory-conditions/what-causes-snoring-its-effect-on-oral-health-0713

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/stress-teeth#1

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/bruxism

Brush Your Teeth, Your Heart Will Thank You

November 11th, 2018

Who would have thought that your dentist would be telling you how to help prevent heart disease? It’s commonly known that smoking, a poor diet, lack of exercise, and an uncontrolled weight can impact your heart. However, did you know that brushing your teeth is linked with maintaining a healthy heart? Research published in Scotland revealed that brushing your teeth can lower your risk of experiencing a heart attack or other issues impacting your heart.

Heart disease is a serious problem that unfortunately impacts a lot of people. According to the American Heart Association, about 2,600 people in the United States die each day from a heart attack, heart failure, or stroke. The study looked at approximately 12,000 women and men and observed their oral health habits, daily exercise, and smoking habits. About 60% of the individuals reported seeing a dentist every 6 months, and approximately 70% reported brushing their teeth two times each day. Those who stated brushing their teeth less often were found to have a 70% increased risk of heart disease and had increased amounts of C-reactive protein and fibrinogen, which are found in the blood indicating inflammation. Inflammation is a significant finding related to poor oral hygiene and atherosclerosis (accumulation of fat substances around artery walls). Periodontal disease, which is a chronic condition impacting the gums and tissues around teeth, is a result of poor oral hygiene and adds to the inflammatory response. Some signs of periodontal disease include red and swollen gums, bleeding gums when eating or brushing and flossing, pus or infection around gums, poor taste in your mouth, and loose teeth.

The American Heart Association also conducted a recent study analyzing brushing frequency in 682 participants and the link to heart disease risk. Those who stated brushing their teeth less than two times a day for less than two minutes had a 3 times higher risk of developing heart disease than those brushing for the recommended two times a day for 2 minutes or more. More research is needed to determine whether or not the link is a cause and effect relationship.

Practicing good oral hygiene habits and scheduling regular dental visits can help not only keep your smile healthy but also help keep your heart and overall health in check.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/conditions/heart-disease/ada-06-consumer-news-heart-disease-tooth-brushing

https://www.cdapress.com/article/20181107/AP/311079959

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20050207/brush-your-teeth-help-your-heart#2

https://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20100527/brushing-teeth-may-keep-heart-disease-away

https://www.cigna.com/static/www-cigna-com/images/individuals-families/health-wellness/brush-teeth/brush-teeth-1-16x9-lg.jpg

https://www.medindia.net/patients/patientinfo/atherosclerosis.htm

Is Your Mouth Feeling Sizzling Hot?

October 20th, 2018

Being in pain is one of the worst feelings, especially when you don't know the cause. Thanks to new research, knowledge is increasing about chronic oral pain, also called Burning Mouth Syndrome. This condition commonly impacts middle-aged women and can be very debilitating for most people. In past years this condition has been quite ambiguous, but new discoveries are currently being made.

People experiencing Burning Mouth Syndrome often report a sensation of stinging on their tongue, palate, lips and/or gums. This condition can also cause dry mouth, and bitter or metallic taste sensation in the oral cavity. These symptoms can occur gradually overtime or appear suddenly. For many people, it can lead to difficulty eating, sleeping, and cause anxiety or depression.

A dissertation at Sahlgrenska Academy reported that when 56 women with Burning Mouth Syndrome were asked to rate the condition from 0 (not difficult at all) to 100 (unbearable), the average response was 66. It was also found that 45% of the patients experienced altered taste, and 73% had a burning, stinging, numbness, or combination of the three sensations. Burning Mouth Syndrome was strongly correlated with self reports of teeth grinding, multiple medication use, allergies, and skin diseases. Not to mention, mucin proteins detected in the patients were altered and contained less carbohydrate structures that normally impact the immune system. These patients were found to have higher inflammatory levels than the control group of individuals without Burning Mouth Syndrome. With this information, researchers are looking for methods to help with diagnosis and treatment options.

If you're experiencing some of the symptoms mentioned, this can be evaluated during your dental visit. Burning Mouth Syndrome can be secondary to dry mouth from several factors including multiple medications, fungal infections such as oral thrush, nutritional deficiencies (B1, B2, B6, B9, B12, Iron, Zinc), ill-fitting dentures, stomach acid reflux (GERD), diabetes, or consumption acidic beverages.

In the meantime, to help ease the pain, avoid irritants such as tobacco smoking, hot spicy foods, alcoholic beverages or mouth rinses with alcohol, and acidic foods and beverages.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/09/180921151427.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/burning-mouth-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20350911

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Is Vaping Really a Safer Alternative to Smoking?

August 26th, 2018

Electronic cigarettes are becoming increasingly popular, especially as they are constantly being advertised as a “safer alternative” to traditional cigarettes. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that the use of e-cigarettes has increased from 1.5% in 2011 to over 16% in 2015 among high-school aged students. When it comes to oral health, however, new research suggests E-cigarettes could be just as bad as smoking.

E-cigarettes have a battery inside with a heating device that vaporizes a liquid that gets inhaled. Although this liquid does not contain tobacco, it does have nicotine and flavoring chemicals that are harmful to your body.  Nicotine in particular is a highly addictive component that can have a negative impact on  adolescent brain development. Not to mention, E-cigarettes can produce many oral health problems, such as oral cancer, tooth loss, and gum disease.

A study was conducted in South Korea involving a representative sample of middle-school and high-school aged students. 65,528 students were asked if during the past year they had experienced gingival pain, bleeding, tongue pain, inside cheek pain, a cracked tooth, or a combination of any of the above asked. They were also asked if they had ever used an E-Cigarette. The researchers found that 297 students (0.5%) used E-cigarettes daily, 1,259 (1.9%) used ECs 1 to 29 days in the past month, 3,848 (5.9%) were former EC users, and 60,124 (91.8%) never used E-cigarettes.

The study revealed that there were significantly higher chances of having experienced a cracked tooth, tongue pain, inside-cheek pain, or both among daily, within 1-29 days in the past month, and former E-cigarette users.

Another study looked at vapor-exposed epithelial cells under a microscope and discovered that there was a significant increase in epithelial cell death. They found that E-cigarette vapor destroyed 53% of cells within the mouth after 3 days. This suggests that the death of protective cells may lead to a higher risk of infection, gum disease, inflammation, and even possibly cancer.

Talk to your kids about the harms of E-cigarettes and smoking products, as well as the importance of maintaining your oral health to ensure overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Van. Dr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:

http://pages.ada.org/jada-specialty-scan/oral-pathology/oral-pathology-august-24-2018?utm_campaign=JADA%20Specialty%20Scan&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=65440658&_hsenc=p2ANqtz-8yc_SI07OAU_XhoSEngQA1QYRsc_1bMXptS802Wpvje1MWrzTPC7hgwm8P3TJs2uVJJQX4lCf7gQpm5oawtYGYfFPqZQ&_hsmi=65440658#article1

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/314190.php

https://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/basic_information/e-cigarettes/Quick-Facts-on-the-Risks-of-E-cigarettes-for-Kids-Teens-and-Young-Adults.html

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February is American Heart Month!

February 26th, 2017

february-heart-month

Did you know that heart disease is the MAIN cause of death of both women and men in the United States? Heart disease is the reason behind 25% of deaths each year,  which is why the American Heart Association is working so hard to increase awareness during February, American Heart Month.

Although these statistics may seem scary, it's easy to prevent heart disease if you make healthy choices! For instance, use spices instead of salt to add flavor to your food, and prioritize physical exercise. Other health tips include scheduling regular visits with your doctor, eating healthy foods, avoiding smoking, and taking medication if needed. If you are obese or have diabetes, your risk for heart disease could increase.

Preventing heart disease involves taking care of your entire body, which includes your teeth! Excellent oral health is connected to a healthy heart, as proven by the link between bacteria from periodontal disease and heart disease.

So this month, make sure to not only prioritize your cardiovascular health, but also your dental health!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

https://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth/

https://healthfinder.gov/NHO/FebruaryToolkit.aspx

http://www.colgate.com/en/us/oc/oral-health/conditions/heart-disease/article/heart-disease-and-gum-disease

http://www.demmerlibrary.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/february-heart-month.jpg

Avoid Marijuana To Prevent Periodontal Disease

October 20th, 2016

Your oral health isn't only determined by your brushing habits and diets - it's also affected by your everyday habits. You've probably heard that smoking cigarettes is an unhealthy habit that can harm more than just your mouth. But did you know that smoking marijuana, an illicit drug used by over 22 million Americans in the past month and particularly common among adolescents, (based on a survey from the National Institute on Drug Abuse conducted in 2014) also leads to oral and overall health problems?

According to a study published in JAMA Psychiatry, researchers from Arizona State University showed that periodontal disease, which is caused by infection and inflammation of the gums and bone mass, is directly linked to cannabis usage. Those who persistently smoked marijuana for up to 20 years had a great risk for periodontal disease later in life at 38 years old. In addition, marijuana users are more likely to have poor oral hygiene habits and depend on alcohol, which can also lead to periodontal disease.

Other problems caused by marijuana use include short-term fear, anxiety, psychosis, delusions, or hallucinations. Additionally, cannabis may be linked to increased risk of accidents, injuries, bronchitis, heart problems, cancer, and mental health issues.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://420day.org/sites/default/files/anti-marijuana%20symbol.png

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/310667.php

 

Smoking Equals More Germs!

September 6th, 2016

quitting-smoking

We've all heard that our bodies are home to millions of germs. But, new research has found that smoking increases the risk of certain bacteria like Porphyromonas gingivalis from invading the mouth and battling the immune system.

Researcher David A. Scott, Ph.D., at the University of Louisville School of Dentistry  recently investigated how cigarettes promotes bacteria colonization and disrupts the immune system.

Also, research published in Tobacco Induced Diseases indicated that cigarette smoke and its chemical components increase biofilm formation by bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus mutans, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These biofilms contain several microbial communities and can stick to most surfaces like teeth, heart valves, and the respiratory tract. Biofilms make it hard for your body's immune system to function properly. Not to mention, biofilms can promote antibiotic resistance and infection. A common biofilm is dental plaque, which can result in gingivitis, or even periodontitis.

 

It is never too late to quit smoking! Each year there are approximately  6 million worldwide death related to tobacco use. Eliminating tobacco products can truly lead to a healthier mouth and body.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2016/05/160531082619.htm

http://images.medicaldaily.com/sites/medicaldaily.com/files/styles/full/public/2015/06/22/quitting-smoking.jpg

Gum Disease and Asthma

August 27th, 2016

Did you know that asthma is one of the many health problems you could develop if you have gum disease?

According to a new study published in the Journal of Periodontology, those with gum disease are five times more likely to develop asthma!

Therefore, by trying your best to avoid gum disease, you're also actively protecting your body from other illnesses or diseases.

Proper oral health care is especially important for middle-aged men who don't exercise regularly: they have a higher risk of developing gum disease.

Want to prevent gum disease? Follow these tips:

1. Brush your teeth (and tongue) two times a day

2. Floss at least once a day

3. Use a mouthwash to reduce plaque

4. Avoid smoking

5. Exercise regularly

6. Maintain a healthy diet

A healthy diet, BMI, and lifestyle, combined with a regular exercise routine, can reduce the risk for gum disease by forty percent!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://az616578.vo.msecnd.net/files/2016/04/02/635951642805742415114442452_Asthma.jpg

http://dentistrytoday.com/todays-dental-news/9856-gum-disease-may-cause-higher-risk-of-asthma

https://www.perio.org/consumer/prevent-gum-disease

http://dentistrytoday.com/todays-dental-news/9878-middle-aged-men-may-have-higher-risk-of-gum-disease

Do you wake up breathless?

July 13th, 2016

sleep-apnea

Do you often feel sleepy or fatigued throughout the day for no reason? Or snore loudly and wake up short of breath in the middle of the night? Then you may experience sleep apnea, a condition that stops your breathing periodically while you sleep (up to 20-30 times per hour).

When you stop breathing, your brain wakes you up due to the lack of oxygen in order to restart your breathing. Many people don't remember waking up in the middle of the night, so they think they're getting enough sleep but end up feeling drowsy during the day.

Sleep apnea, a serious medical problem, can lead to high blood pressure, which increases the risk for heart failure and stroke. The drowsiness during the day can be dangerous for driving or cause complications with medications or surgery.

Some symptoms of sleep apnea include:

  • insomnia (difficulty sleeping)
  • loud snoring
  • waking up breathless
  • snorting or choking sounds
  • headaches when waking up
  • falling asleep unintentionally during the day
  •  extreme drowsiness throughout the day

The three types of sleep apnea are:

  1. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) (due to collapsing of soft tissue in the back of the throat)
  2. Central sleep apnea (CSA) (muscles don't receive proper brain signal)
  3. "Mixed" or "complex" sleep apnea (combination of obstructive and central)

Risk factors include:

  • OSA is more common in males and in older adults (40+)
  • obesity
  • smoking
  • drinking
  • using tranquilizers/sedatives
  • family history
  • heart disorders
  • neuromuscular disorders
  • strokes
  • brain tumors

Treatment options:

  • losing weight
  • stop smoking
  • sleep on side instead of on back
  • oral devices
  • surgery (if severe)

Please contact our office so we can refer you to a sleep apnea specialist if you suspect that someone you know suffers from this medical problem.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.wellesleydentalgroup.com/sleep-apnea

Save Your Heart: American Heart Month

February 5th, 2016

American-Heart-Month

All throughout February we're celebrating American Heart Month! This national awareness month provides WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease, and the American Heart Association the opportunity to make others across the world aware about cardiovascular disease. These organizations help organize, educate, and fund medical research on cardiovascular disease and its prevention.

Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease, stroke, and high blood pressure, is the NUMBER ONE killer of both women and men in the United States. So much so that it's responsible for one out of every three deaths each year. Over 6 million American women are impacted by heart disease, while another 37 million women are at risk of developing heart disease.

This annual campaign was initiated in 1964 by the American Heart Association and has continued to heighten awareness across the nation. However, the number of individuals impacted by cardiovascular disease is predicted to grow more than 23.6 million by the year 2030. Unfortunately, nearly half of all Americans have at least one major risk factor, but are unaware of it. It's important to also know the warning signs, including chest discomfort, shortness of breath, or sudden lack of responsiveness. To spot a stroke, think F.A.S.T: Face drooping, arm weakness, speech difficulty, time to call the police.

Becoming aware of the risk factors of cardiovascular disease, for instance obesity and diabetes, is key to understanding what needs to be done to lower your risk. Eating a healthy diet, not smoking, exercising, and picking up other positive health habits will help keep your heart pumping!

President Obama wrote, “We have lost devoted mothers and fathers, loved siblings, and cherished friends to this devastating epidemic. During American Heart Month, as we honor their memories, let us recommit to improving our heart health and continuing the fight against this deadly disease, for ourselves and our families.”

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://newsroom.heart.org/events/happy-heart-month-2830575

http://www.cchdmt.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/American-Heart-Month.jpg

http://www.womenheart.org/?programs_heartmo2016

The Effect of Birth Control on Oral Health

January 26th, 2016

blog

Birth control pills have many benefits and are a popular contraceptive method which increases estrogen/progesterone levels. However, they can also negatively affect your oral health.

According to The American Academy of Periodontology, many factors such as smoking, poor nutritiongenetics, and medications (including oral contraceptives, antidepressants, and heart medications) can impact gum health. These factors may increase risk for gum disease, which 75 percent of Americans, and especially periodontal disease, an advanced type of gum disease linked to osteoporosis, stroke, diabetes, heart disease, and low-birth-weight babies that 50% of Americans have.

Many studies have demonstrated the clear connection between dental health and sex hormones. The risk for periodontitis is especially high during puberty and pregnancy due to increased estrogen levels, which promote the flow of blood in the mouth and forces gums become red, swollen, and more susceptible to bacteria. Furthermore, women have a greater chance of having dental problems because of their hormones.

There is also evidence that those who use oral contraceptives had more bleeding sites, tooth attachment loss, gum gaps, inflammation, and gum destruction. If you are our patient, please let us know your history and habits so we can effectively treat and prevent gum disease. Certain medications can impact the effectiveness of antibiotics. To prevent and resolve gum disease, make sure to use an antimicrobial mouthwash, floss, and avoid smoking, stress, and sugar.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/caroline-beaton/birth-control-pills-may-cause-bad-breath----and-worse_b_8513492.html

https://www.perio.org/consumer/types-gum-disease.html

http://myfancytips.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/03/All-About-The-Serious-Side-Effects-Of-The-Birth-Control-Pill-3.jpg

Healthy Teeth, Healthy Aging

October 1st, 2015

National Healthy Aging Month emphasizes the importance of practicing good health habits as age increases. In the United States, the current life expectancy for men and women is nearly 85 years. With continuing advances in public health, medical technology, and greater access to health insurance, people are living healthier and longer than preceding generations. With that said, oral health, regardless of age, plays a significant role in the overall health of your body! Especially as you get older, ignoring the health of your teeth and mouth can lead to more serious consequences than just a cavity.

As your age changes, your mouth also changes and it is even more vital to take care of your teeth. It is commonly believed that losing your teeth when you get older is inevitable. However, this is a misconception! If teeth are properly taken care of, they can last a lifetime!

Help your teeth age elegantly with you by keeping these few tips in mind:

Brush at least twice a day

Brushing your teeth is an essential oral health habit that applies in all stages of life. Brushing helps eliminate plaque, which contributes to tooth decay.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately one-third of older adults have untreated tooth decay. When brushing, remember to brush along the gumline and tongue. With age, gums may begin to wear away or recede, leaving the root of the tooth exposed. Tooth decay is more likely to develop around the softer root or old filling.

Floss daily

Taking care of your gums is just as important as taking care of your teeth! Flossing helps prevent plaque from building up between teeth and below the gum line, where decay and periodontal (gum) disease often develop. Many adults in the United States show mild or severe signs of gum disease. It is this disease, and not the progression of aging, that is the leading cause of tooth loss in adults. Unfortunately, periodontal disease affects about 23 percent of adults aged 65 to 74, according to the CDC. Recent studies have concluded that the health of your gums may correlate to some chronic disease, including  Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease and diabetes.

Establish a balanced and nutritious diet

What you eat can not only help improve the health your body, but also keep your teeth healthy. Vitamins and other nutrients found in certain fruits and vegetables can improve your body’s ability to destroy bacteria and protect your teeth and gums.

Schedule regular dental visits

Regular dental check-ups and cleanings are an essential part of maintaining good oral health as you age. With age, the risk of developing chronic diseases increases. The dentist can diagnose and watch for oral problems that may point to other health problems.

Avoid smoking

Not only does smoking increase your risk for lung cancer, it also increases your risk for periodontal disease, mouth pain, gum recession, tooth decay, tooth loss and other oral health problems. According to two 30-year studies at Tufts University, smokers are approximately twice as likely to lose their teeth as non-smokers.  Also, a study conducted by the Journal of Dental Research shows that smokers are nearly twice as likely as non-smokers to need a root canal.

The use of medications also increases with age, many of which can negatively impact oral health. Some medications may cause dry mouth, which will lead to a decrease in saliva production and possibly lead to tooth decay. Saliva is critical for oral health, as it helps wash away bacteria and food particles. Also, if you wear full or partial dentures, remember to clean them daily! Food can become stuck between teeth, causing gum problems or halitosis (bad breath). By keeping your teeth healthy and strong, you might be surprised at what a difference a healthy mouth makes!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://healthyaging.net/september-is-healthy-aging-month/

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/a/aging-and-dental-health

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/oral-care/problems/5-oral-care-need-to-knows-aging.htm#page=0

http://www.ssa.gov/planners/lifeexpectancy.htm

http://www.worldwidehealth.com/images/article/smallest/3680.jpg

 

Tooth Loss May Increase Your Risk for Heart Disease

September 3rd, 2015

Portrait Of Smiling Senior Woman

Loosing teeth as an adult is already a pain, but tooth loss is also found to be linked to various health diseases, including cardiovascular disease. Unfortunately, heart disease is the number 1 cause of death in the United States, and diabetes is the 7th most common cause of death.In a recent study conducted at the University of Helsinki in Finland with the help of The National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL) , it was found that tooth loss could be an additional indicator of diabetes, heart disease, and even death. Not to mention, having diabetes makes having heart disease more likely. Approximately 8,500 individuals aged 25 to 75 were evaluated and participated in clinical examinations. According to the research, individuals with more than five missing teeth had an increased risk for heart disease and heart attacks by up to 140%! Individuals with more than nine missing teeth were at an increased risk for cardiovascular diseases by 51%, diabetes by 31%, and death by 37 %.

Researchers are finding more and more associations between these diseases and common inflammatory oral diseases, including periodontitis. Periodontitis may lead to a loss of teeth if left untreated, which is found to be common in middle aged and elderly men and women.

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It is important to note that smoking also has a strong association with both tooth loss and heart disease, and should be avoided for your oral and overall health.

Tooth loss should not only be dreaded for its appearance, but also for the many diseases that are linked to missing teeth. Practice good oral health habits and your entire body with thank you for it!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/06/150605081609.htm

http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/

http://positivelyold.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/10/iStock_000010097783Small.jpg

http://www.dentistmarshall.com/uploads/4/0/4/3/40439637/1412815885.png

Connection Between Periodontitis and Rheumatoid Arthritis

June 27th, 2015

 

It's no doubt that oral health is a window to overall health. There is a significant amount of research linking common oral problems to heart disease, diabetes, pneumoniaAlzheimer’s disease, and now rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease affecting the joints, which typically causes pain and stiffness. There is increasing interest in the relationship between oral health and inflammatory diseases. A recent study conducted in March of 2015 suggests that periodontitis, a type of inflammatory disease affecting the supportive structures of the teeth (such as bones and tissues), along with rheumatoid arthritis are associated with Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) and may trigger the development of rheumatoid arthritis.The study titled "Inflammation in the Mouth and Joints in Rheumatoid Arthritis," was presented at the 93rd General Session and Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research. The study examined 8 chronic RA patients, 15 onset RA patients, and 20 individuals with neither periodontitis nor RA. Of the total 23 RA patients, 10 had gingivitis and 9 had periodontitis. In addition, 6 of the individuals with both periodontitis and RA also had P. gingivalis, a strain of bacterium in the oral cavity that is typically associated with the cause of periodontal disease.

Researchers also found that regardless of dental care, all RA patients showed oral inflammation. They suggest that P. gingivalis antibodies may help rheumatologists in distinguishing RA patients who may benefit from periodontal treatment.

Both RA and periodontal disease are similar in many ways. Smoking is a common risk factor of RA and periodontal disease and should be avoided. individuals with RA have a higher risk of developing periodontal disease and may experience more severe symptoms.

It is clear that inflammation and oral bacteria may go hand-in-hand. Take good care of your teeth, it can ultimately save your joints!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150312123526.htm

http://www.cadentalgroup.com/wp-content/themes/custom-theme/img/slider/dentist-1.jpg

The Negative Effects of Tooth Loss on Your Mind and Body

June 11th, 2015

elder-2

Aging can be a beautiful process. As we grow older, we will be able to see new technology take over, watch little ones mature, and enjoy many memorable moments with family and friends. However, with age can also come health issues. Now the real question is, how does your oral health play a role in the aging process?

A recent study suggests that maintaining your oral health may influence your ability to walk and think as you get older in age.

Research published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Societyconducted by the University College London, studied 3,166 adults aged 60 or over. Their aim was to examine a link between tooth loss and the health of the mind and body as it ages. They tested and compared the participant's memory and walking speed. The researchers found that the memory and walking speeds of individuals with none of their own teeth declined quicker than in those who still have many of their own teeth. In fact, their study showed that those without most of their own teeth performed nearly 10% worse in both memory and walking speed tests than the individuals with teeth. The evidence was particularly more clear in adults aging from 60 to 74 years old, rather than those 75 years of age and older. These results were shown even after taking into account existing health problems, behavior patterns including smoking and drinking, and other factors such as socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic status is often associated with common causes of oral and health issues.

It is now believed that tooth loss can serve as an indicator of ones mental and physical ability in those over 60 years of age.

Make the process of aging a graceful one! Avoid poor lifestyle habits that can be detrimental for your mouth, mind, and body, such as smoking. It is important to take care of your teeth throughout your entire life, to ensure a long and healthy one.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/12/141218210023.htm

http://www.qualityservices.sg/wp-content/uploads/elder-2.jpg

Secondhand Smoke Is No Joke To Oral Health

May 29th, 2015

As you may have heard before, "secondhand smoke kills." It sure does. Nearly 54,000 people die each year from secondhand smoke. A combined total of more than 480,000 deaths a year are caused from smoking and secondhand smoke. It can sometimes be easy to forget that even non-smokers are in danger of health problems as a result of cigarette smoke. Not to mention, children are at a high risk of developing several chronic diseases and health issues because of secondhand smoke.

There are many reasons to avoid smoking, and in this article, we'll offer you yet another reason. Believe it or not, secondhand smoke can negatively impact your oral health. Although more research is needed in the area, it is believed that children are at risk of developing tooth decay from secondhand smoke.

15 studies were conducted and reviewed in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health by researchers in Japan about the possible correlation between secondhand smoke and the development of cavities in children. The studies reported weak to moderate evidence that secondhand smoke causes cavities in primary teeth, yet, more information is needed to make a conclusive argument.

Further, Researchers now have concluded that smoking is one of the causes of periodontal disease because tobacco can damage gums and leave teeth susceptible to infection. This makes smokers more at risk for developing periodontal disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), approximately 47% of adults have either mild, moderate or severe periodontitis in the United States. The early stages of periodontal disease is gingivitis, which can eventually lead to periodontitis if untreated.

In a recent study funded by the National Institutes of Health-National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, researchers investigated the link between serum cotinine, a metabolite of nicotine, and periodontitis in U.S. non-smokers. The study found that non-smokers exposed to Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) had 1.45 times the odds of moderate/severe periodontitis as unexposed non-smokers.

In addition, smokers and non-smokers exposed to secondhand smoke are more prone to significant amounts of oral bone loss. For example, research in the Journal of Periodontology showed the correlation between secondhand smoke and oral bone loss in rats. The study concluded that rats with periodontitis that were exposed to secondhand smoke were at greater risk of experiencing oral bone loss and ultimately tooth loss.

Along with serious oral issues, secondhand smoke has caused oral cancer, breast cancer, middle ear infections in children, pregnancy problems, asthma, lung disease, heart disease, among many other health problems.

If you are a smoker, quitting is the best option to keep yourself and those around you healthy. Whether being exposed in homes, cars, offices, or other public places, secondhand smoke is severely detrimental to oral and overall health.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.no-smoke.org/getthefacts.php?id=13

http://now.tufts.edu/articles/secondhand-smoke-and-cavities

http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/health_effects/tobacco_related_mortality/

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150313083627.htm

http://helpforsmoking.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/SecondHandSmoke-43321674.jpg

Can Yoga Improve Your Oral Health?

April 30th, 2015

 

 

Stressed out? Your dentist can usually tell! Stress can have a significant impact on your oral health.  In fact, dentists can detect oral symptoms of stress, including canker sores, teeth grinding (bruxism), gum diseasetemporomandibular disorders (TMD), burning mouth syndrome, and dry mouth, just to name a few. Luckily, many studies have shown that yoga can help people relieve stress, anxiety, and believe it or not, dental troubles!

Many studies have revealed that individuals who are stressed are more likely to neglect their oral care. As mentioned above, the tension in jaw muscles can lead to jaw clenching and teeth grinding. The good news is that along with alleviating stress, yoga improves posture. Poor posture not only affects your body, but also your mouth. It can cause the jaw to shift and affect the alignment of teeth. This can lead to Temporo-Mandibular Joint disorders (TMJ), which can cause pain chewing, nerve inflammation, headaches, and more!

Stress can also lead to dry mouth, which occurs due to low amounts of saliva production. Saliva flow is essential in helping get rid of germs in the mouth. Dry mouth leads to bad breath (halitosis), and can eventually develop into tooth decay and periodontal disease. Further, stress has been shown to increase inflammation in the mouth and  body. Bacteria in your mouth can cause gum inflammation, which plays a huge part in gingivitis and periodontal disease.

Although yoga may not fight cavities, it can improve the condition of your mouth and the health of your body by eliminating tension and stress. Yoga is a popular form of exercise that dates years and years back from India. Yoga incorporates both physical and mental disciplines for the purpose of achieving a peaceful balance between body and mind.  It promotes relaxation and can boost your mood, which can help you live longer and age-well. It also can reduce your blood pressure.

Another great thing about yoga is that it encourages a healthy lifestyle. It typically prompts people to practice better oral hygiene habits, implement healthier diets, and to get rid of poor oral health habits, including smoking.

So why not enjoy the many health benefits of yoga? There are plenty more, including:

  • Improving flexibility
  • Increasing muscle strength 
  • Preventing cartilage and joint breakdown 
  • Boosting immunity
  • Lowering blood sugar
  • Helping you focus
  • Improving your balance
  • Helping you sleep better
  • Increasing your self-esteem 
  • Benefiting your relationships

Yoga may not have been the first thing that you thought of when discussing how to maintain a healthy mouth. However, few methods of stress relief compare to that of yoga! Eliminating stress through practicing yoga may be a great option for preventing pain and oral health problems.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://lacunaloft.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/Kids-Yoga-Portrait.jpg

http://awomanshealth.com/stress-and-oral-health/

http://yoganonymous.com/practice-for-the-teeth-3-ways-yoga-improves-dental-health

http://www.medicinenet.com/temporomandibular_joint_syndrome_tmj/article.htm

http://www.yogajournal.com/article/health/count-yoga-38-ways-yoga-keeps-fit/

Tongue Health is No Tongue-Twister!

March 9th, 2015

Girl Sticking Out TongueNever forget to brush your tongue! It's often referred to as the "strongest muscle in the body," yet it needs care. In this article, we will describe how you can care for your tongue, and then we will explain common health problems related to the tongue and what you should do if you see any symptoms of them. Armed with these facts, you can maintain a healthy mouth!Did you know that some toothbrushes are made specifically for your tongue? It’s true, but regular toothbrushes can get the job done too!  Place toothpaste on your brush and gently stroke your tongue from back to front to remove plaque and bacteria. Another option for brushing your tongue is to use a tongue scraper. Pull it across your tongue to clean it and improve your breath. Following these steps and practicing good oral hygiene, you can keep your tongue healthy!

Some people do develop tongue soreness or discoloration. Fortunately, these are often caused by easily treatable problems. One problem that people sometimes have is that their tongue develops a white coating or white spots. While there are a number of different conditions that can cause a tongue to have these symptoms, three of the most common causes of a "white tongue" include leukoplakia, oral thrush, and oral lichen planus. Leukoplakia occurs when too many cells grow in your mouth. The excessive amount of cells can cause white patches to form.  Although leukoplakia is usually not dangerous, it can sometimes be a precursor to cancer. A dentist can diagnose whether you have leukoplakia and inform you on how to treat it.

Oral thrush, also known as candidiasis, is another reason why some people have “white tongue.” Oral thrush is a yeast infection that can produce white patches on your mouth, including the tongue. It is especially common for infants and the elderly, individuals who use inhaled steroids to treat asthma or lung disease, and for those who have diabetes. It can also occur after a person uses antibiotics. See a dentist who can diagnose this infection and even provide you with medications to help cure it.

Oral lichen planus causes raised white lines to form on your tongue. Usually, doctors cannot diagnose the cause. Most of the time, this problem resolves on its own with time. Still, you can do your part to help your body get better by practicing proper dental hygiene and avoiding foods that irritate your mouth.

Other factors can cause a pink tongue to turn red. Vitamin deficiencies, geographic tongue (harmless condition causing red spots), scarlet fever, and kawasaki syndrome are frequent causes. If your tongue is an unhealthy red color, you may have vitamin deficiencies of B-12 or folic acid. You can simply take supplements in this situation. Kawasaki syndrome is an illness that affects the tongue's blood vessels and is usually seen in children less than five years of age. Children may develop a red tongue, a high fever, and redness in the hands and feet. Be sure to bring the child to the doctor immediately.

Some people have a black, hairy tongue. Fortunately, this is almost always benign. Your tongue has small bumps called papillae, which grow throughout your lifetime. For most people, daily activities wear down their papillae. However, for others, these bumps can continue to grow long. When papillae are long, more bacteria can live on them and create a dark, hairy appearance. Usually, this condition is seen in people who aren't practicing healthy dental hygiene or who are using chemotherapy or antibiotics. People with diabetes can also have this problem. Fortunately, a black, hairy tongue is usually not dangerous to your overall health.

 

Another common tongue condition involves painful, bumpy tongues. Causes include biting your tongue, canker sores, burning mouth syndrome, enlarged papillae, smoking, and other medical conditions.

Finally, be careful if you or someone has a swollen tongue. If the person also has trouble breathing, the person may have a severe allergic reaction and need emergency medical care. In rare cases, tongue problems can be symptoms of serious conditions, such as diabetes, anemia, and oral cancer can also cause tongue pain. Be sure to see a dentist and get a diagnosis if your pain is lasting for a significant amount of time. Follow these ideas to maintain a healthy tongue. Nobody wants a strawberry tongue!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/tc/basic-dental-care-home-treatment

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/tongue-problem-basics-sore-or-discolored-tongue-and-tongue-bumps

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/t/tongue-scrapers

http://www.everydayhealth.com/allergies/swollen-tongue.aspx

https://badabingbadabambadaboom.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/attitude.jpg

A Dazzling White Smile is Worthwhile

March 5th, 2015

Teeth-Whitening-Slider-1

 

Everyone wants that sparkling smile that stands out in a crowd, right? According to a survey conducted by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, the most common response to the question, “What would you like to improve most about your smile?” was whiter and brighter teeth! Your smile is one of the first facial features one sees when looking at you. There are many benefits to having a whiter smile, including a greater confidence, and an impression of youth, success, warmth, and happiness. 

Sometimes teeth don't look as white as we'd like them to look. There are many culprits to teeth staining, from your favorite foods and drinks to smoking to even aging! Genes also play a role in the color of your teeth, depending on the thickness and smoothness of your enamel. The thinner your enamel is, the more the color of dentin is visible. If you notice staining in your child's teeth, it could be a result of too much fluoride as their teeth are still developing.

Tooth discoloration can happen to anyone, but don't let that discourage you from brightening your smile! Teeth whitening is a relatively inexpensive and won't affect existing dental appliances in the mouth. Although there are several natural home-remedies and over-the-counter whiteners, the most safe and reliable whitening techniques are provided by the dentist. A single visit to the dentist for whitening can brighten your teeth up to 10 shades within a short time. Teeth whitening is not permanent, but when repeated from time to time, your smile will remain brighter.
If you choose to use over-the-counter whitening products, be aware that you may experience tooth sensitivity and gum irritation if the whitening trays don't properly fit. Also, check with your dentist to make sure that your gums and teeth are healthy before beginning the whitening process to ensure the best results without side-effects.
Don't forget, good oral hygiene, including regular brushing, flossing, and office visits, can help you avoid many stains. Teeth whitening is a great option for a whiter and attention-grabbing smile!
Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.aacd.com/whitening

http://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/az-topics/w/whitening

http://www.gloteethwhitening.com/wp-content/uploads/Teeth-Whitening-Slider-1.jpg

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/Cosmetic-Dentistry/Tooth-Whitening/Tooth-Whitening-Basics/article/Tooth-Whitening.cvsp

E-cigarettes are Under FDA's Supression

June 17th, 2014

electronic_vs_classicE-cigarettes are gaining popularity among smokers and have attracted the attention of FDA who recently updated the regulation requirements for tobacco products.

"On April 24, the agency proposed rules that call for strict regulation of electronic cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, nicotine gels, water pipe tobacco and hookahs", CNN reports. The new rule updates will include health warning requirements, vending sale prohibition,  age limitations (at least 18 years old) and mandatory ingredients listing. Until recently, only cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and roll-your-own tobacco fell under the FDA's regulatory authority.

Being unregulated by FDA, e-cigarettes are estimated to be used by 4 millions of Americans and are believed not to deliver the carcinogens that raise health concerns. But since they haven't been studied properly it's unknown what health risks they pose, how much nicotine or other chemicals are actually being inhaled, or whether there is any benefit to using them.

E-cigarette is a battery operated nicotine inhaler stimulating  tobacco smoking by producing a vapor resembling smoke. While some research show that e-cigarettes have a thousand times less contaminates than a tobacco and due to the lack of tobacco can reduce discoloration of teeth and risk of cavities, other scientists say it's always harmful to inhale anything other than fresh air. "As for long-term effects, we don't know what happens when you breathe the vapor into the lungs regularly," Thomas Glynn, the director of science and trends at the American Cancer Society, says.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Resources:

http://www.cnn.com/2014/04/24/health/fda-e-cigarette-regulations/index.html

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/fda-regulates-ecigarettes/story?id=23445234#

http://joyetech.by/p89-polza_perehoda_na_elektronnye_sigarety.html

Smokers' Taste Buds Lose Sensitivity

May 23rd, 2014

stock-footage-woman-smoking-a-cigarette-and-drinking-coffee-from-her-cup-unhealthy-conceptA significant amount of research has shown the correlation between cigarette smoking and life-threatening diseases like cancer, respiratory diseases, and heart disease.  Recent research has shown that smoking could also lead you to alter your experience with food by essentially dulling your taste buds.

Nelly Jacob and a team of researchers at the Pitié-Salpêtrière Hospital APHP in France wanted to see the exact extent in which smoking can alter the ability to taste.  Previous research has already shown that smoking leads to structural changes to the areas of the tongue where taste buds are found.  Taste buds are the reason we can experience sweet, sour, bitter, salty, and metallic tastes when we eat.  Other than the pleasurable experience of being able to taste delicious foods, taste buds have many survival functions.  For instance, our taste buds can trigger the start of our digestive systems through saliva secretion.  Furthermore, our taste buds enable us to differentiate between yummy foods and potentially poisonous foods.

The results of the study showed that the ability for smokers to detect salty, sweet, or sour tastes was not influenced by frequent smoking.  Instead, the smokers could not fully taste the bitterness of black coffee.  About one out of five of the smokers could not exactly pinpoint a bitter taste which was a significantly higher proportion than nonsmokers.  Jacob was quoted as saying, “"We consider that the perception of bitter taste should be examined more closely, both as a tool for smoking cessation or for preventing smoking initiation. More generally, it should be worthwhile to consider the role of chemosensory perceptions in smoking behavior.”

This new research gives us yet another reason to either quit smoking or steer clear of the habit.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. Kim or Dr.PradhanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Sources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/274698.php

http://dentistrytoday.com/todays-dental-news/10015-effectiveness-of-taste-buds-hampered-by-smoking

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/Healthday/story?id=8427779

Image credit: http://ak2.picdn.net/shutterstock/videos/4902155/preview/stock-footage-woman-smoking-a-cigarette-and-drinking-coffee-from-her-cup-unhealthy-concept.jpg

Children Skipping Breakfast Are at a Higher Risk of Cavities

February 3rd, 2014

smiling girl

The late morning rush to school many families experience and/or lack of food due to insufficient funds that often results in children not eating breakfast is detrimental to their oral health. When children, particularly preschoolers, miss out on breakfast their chances of having tooth decay rises, according to a study in a journal issue in Journal of the American Dental Association conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The study focused on the association between healthy eating habits, including eating breakfast and having healthy balanced meals, as well as cavities in the primary teeth of more than 4,000 preschoolers among the age of two to five years old.

Researchers who conducted the study determined that children in this age group who skip breakfast are about four times more likely to develop cavities.  Also, children who do not eat the recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables per day are three times as likely to get cavities.

Young children will have a reduced risk of getting cavities if healthy eating practices are established. Emphasizing the importance of eating breakfast daily will not only promote oral health, but also reduce tooth decay in children.

It is also important to be careful about the foods you choose to consume for breakfast. There are many beneficial snacks and breakfast foods that can help stimulate a healthy atmosphere in your mouth. Healthy teeth are a result of consuming healthy foods and drinks such as milk, green tea, yogurt, raisins, cheese, and crunchy fruits and vegetables. Also, drinks with calcium not only strengthen bones, but also ensure healthy teeth.

Drs. Ali & Ali and their team at Wellesley Dental Group will be more than happy to answer your questions, thoughts, or concerns about oral health or the significance of a healthy breakfast. Feel free to contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

References:

http://www.webmd.com/parenting/news/20040116/eating-breakfast-may-prevent-cavities

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2004/01/040115080612.htm

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/01/11/food-for-teeth_n_1200301.html

Maternal Smoking Can Cause Cleft-Lip in Babies

January 29th, 2014

pregnant womanIn the United States alone, there is a 1/750 chance that a baby is born with isolated, also called non-syndromic, cleft lip and/or palate. While this condition can be corrected through various surgeries, families of the child with this condition can be inundated both emotionally and economically. Throughout the world, there are about 12 million women each year who smoke through pregnancies. About one in every 600 U.S. babies is born with a cleft lip and/or palate. The American Journal of Human Genetics published results from a study done at the University of Iowa demonstrating that if a pregnant woman smokes 16 cigarettes or more per day, the chances of her GSTT1-lacking fetus developing a cleft increase 20 fold.

Researchers at the University of Iowa have found through an international study that some babies are predisposed to cleft lip and/or palate because of their inability to detoxify and process cigarette smoke. The study showed that the fetuses lacking both copies of a gene used to thwart the smoke and have mothers who smoked during pregnancy had a greater risk of developing cleft lip. These scientists have compiled a last of 16 genes that are directly related in cigarette smoke toxicity and determined whether variations of these genes would influence a baby’s ability to remove the toxins. The researchers found that the GSTT1 gene made a significant contribution to clefting; this gene is responsible for 20 different enzymes in the body, specifically essential for common detoxification processes. The study also found that 60 percent of babies with Asian ancestry and 25 percent of babies of European ancestry do not possess copies of the gene called GSTT1. Without this gene, the baby is unable to eliminate the toxins from the smoke that has been spread across the placenta.

During any stage of life, it is always important to make healthy choices. A poor health decision is not always specific to one location in the body, but can very well affect many different areas of the body. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions!

Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Ref: http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2007/article/ADA-03-Mom-Smoking-Cleft-Lip.cvsp

http://www.nih.gov/news/pr/jan2007/nidcr-03.htm

How Exactly Does Smoking Affect Oral Health?

January 28th, 2014

While smoking has been found to lead to various unhealthy consequences, it also has been linked with resulting in poor oral health.

Smoking and tobacco-based products have been shown to result in gum disease. It damages bone and soft tissue of teeth and interferes with the functioning of gum tissue cells. This leaves smokers more susceptible to infections, including periodontal disease, and also tends to lessen blood flow to the gums, which would hinder wound healing.

The Journal of the American Dental Association published results showing that cigar smokers have experienced tooth loss and alveolar bone loss, which is the bone within the jawbone responsible for anchoring teeth. The rate at which bone and tooth are loss for cigar smokers are very similar to cigarette smokers. Pipe smokers also are in danger of tooth loss; moreover, they are also at risk for oral and pharyngeal (throat) cancer, even if the smoke is not inhaled. Other oral health consequences included halitosis, stained teeth, and gum disease.

While some smokers believe that using smokeless tobacco products tend to be safer, that is not the case. Similar to cigars and cigarettes, smokeless tobacco products, including chewing tobacco, contain at least 28 chemicals that have shown to increase the risk of oral cancer, along with cancer of the throat and esophagus. Smokeless tobacco can also irritate gum tissue, leading to the receding and pulling away of teeth. When gum tissue recedes, teeth roots are left more exposed, which increases the chance for tooth decay to occur. The Journal of the American Dental Association also showed that chewing tobacco users were four times more likely than nonusers to have tooth decay. Smokeless tobacco also contains sand and grit, which can easily wear down teeth.

Even though you may be a tobacco product user, it is never too late to quit. Studies have shown that 11 years after quitting, former smokers were found to have risks of developing gum disease that were not too different from those who had never smoked. Cutting out tobacco products can truly lead to healthier oral health. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

http://www.dentalplans.com/dentalhealtharticles/53837/smoking-tobacco-may-affect-oral-health.html

Quick Tips from the Tooth Fairy

August 28th, 2013

As a parent with a busy schedule, it can get tough monitoring and helping with the care of a child’s oral health. However, a child’s maintenance of good oral hygiene is extremely important, not just for their oral health but also for their overall health. On top of this week’s grocery list and the errands that need to be completed, we’ll throw in just a few more reminders and tips on the care of a child’s teeth.

 

  • Although work schedules can get overwhelming, a great and healthy way to spend time with the kids is to join them while they brush and floss. Children learn by example, and a great way for them to pick up good oral hygiene is if their parents show them great brushing and flossing techniques.

 

  • Keep track of times when your child demonstrates good oral hygiene. A fun way to get children to stick to good oral care is to create a calendar that can track their oral health. Hang the calendar in the bathroom and post a gold star or a fun sticker on days when they did a great job brushing and flossing their teeth. This is can get children excited about maintain good oral health and is a wonderful way to let their dentist know how they are doing!

 

  • There have been recent studies showing that bacteria responsible for tooth decay can be transferred when parents clean their child’s pacifier or bottle nipple. It’s best to clean these items in warm, soapy water and to avoid sharing food and drinks and children.

 

  • It is no secret that children love to get their hands on sweets. However, sugar-heavy foods can end up creating an environment that is optimal for the growth of tooth decay-causing bacteria. Try to opt for products containing xylitol, which is a tooth-friendly, nonfermentable sugar alcohol that does not get converted in the mouth to acids like regular sugars. It can reduce the levels of bacteria in saliva and can also act against some of the bacteria responsible for ear infections!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

References:

 

http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-996-XYLITOL.aspx?activeIngredientId=996&activeIngredientName=XYLITOL

 

http://www.ncohf.org/resources/parents-corner

 

http://www.ada.org/news/8582.aspx

 

Chronic Rhinosinusitis Linked to Secondhand Smoking

August 23rd, 2013

Patients often come in during a dentist appointment mentioning sinus pain coupled with congestion and toothache. This pain can either be quite severe or even chronic, and can be hassle to deal with. Patients experiencing these symptoms have been found to be suffering from rhinosinusitis, which can arise due to allergies or infection. However, the Archives of Otolaryngology-Head & Surgery published a study that showed a link between secondhand smoke and chronic rhinosinusitis.

In their study, interviewers from the Henry Ford Health System were trained to hold telephone interviewed with 306 patients who have been suffering from rhinosinusitis between January 2000 and May 2004, along with 306 matched control patients. The researchers were able to collect data on age, ethnicity, sex, diet, and contact with possible air pollutants and chemicals. The main data that was examined were the secondhand smoke exposure that the patients were exposed to; the exposure could have been from home, work, public places, and private function, including parties and weddings.

This study revealed that there is a dose-response relationship found between chronic rhinosinusitis and the number of environments that individuals were susceptible to secondhand smoke. Amanda Holm, a study coauthor and project manager at the Center for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention explained that their findings “reaffirm the health hazards of secondhand smoke.” She notes that the irritants found in secondhand smoke are harmful to the sinus and nasal passages and are the main cause to the progression of rhinosinusitis.

Secondhand smoke has also been shown to increase risk of respiratory ailments, lung cancer, and heart disease in nonsmokers. Although there have been antismoking laws established in the United States, 60% of nonsmokers continue to be exposed the toxic chemicals found in cigarette smoke. While many tend to shrug this issue off and may label this as unimportant, researchers urge individuals to be wary of secondhand smoke, highlighting that consequences are real and truly harmful. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

References:
http://jada.ada.org/content/141/6/632.1.full

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12931083

http://www.cnn.com/2010/HEALTH/04/19/secondhand.smoke.sinus/index.html

Limited Knowledge of Cancers Caused by Smoking

July 16th, 2012

A study conducted in the UK found that more than 80% of people are ignorant to the types of cancers caused by smoking. The survey examined over 4,000 people.

Most people knew of the obvious cancers caused by smoking, such as oral, lung and esophageal, but a large number didn't know it is linked to cancers of the kidney, stomach, and bladder. Cigarette smoke itself contains numerous chemicals that are distributed throughout the bloodstream when inhaled.

What's alarming is that people know smoking is dangerous but still continue to do it for whatever reason. Nearly half of all smokers who smoke for a long period of time will die from either cancer or other illnesses brought on by this habit. You can read the article in full here.

Drs. Ali and Ali urge all of their patients who are smokers to consider quitting. Smoking increases the risk of oral cancer and many other related problems dramatically. Contact us today to learn more about how smoking impacts your oral health at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

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