soft drinks

Drinking from a Can? Think Again!

December 4th, 2019

Ever wonder if drinking from a can, a glass, or using straw could make a difference to your teeth? We all know that foods and drinks can play a role on the health of your teeth, but many would not have thought that the way you consume your drink can also be an important factor. Well, as it turns out, your drinking method does matter when consuming sugary beverages!

Sugary drinks can cause a lot of damage to your teeth, and your body too. According to a study published in the Academy of General Dentistry people in the United States consume about one and a half cans of soda a day, and a total of 576 each year! The study found that people who drink soft drinks straight from the can are more likely to get tooth decay on their back molar teeth. Consuming sugary drinks like sodas and energy drinks increase your risk of weight gain, and developing several medical conditions including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and gout -and kids are not exempt! Children are 60% more likely to become obese with each sugary beverage consumed per day and are 2 times more susceptible to tooth decay.

Sugar as we know is what bacteria love to eat, and as a result the bacteria within your mouth produce acids that ultimately lead to tooth decay and breakdown your tooth enamel. But, we all have that craving for a soda every once and a while. That's why it is important to learn about preventative measures to take when consuming sugary beverages. Research shows that holding a drink in your mouth and taking long sips is detrimental to your teeth because it increases the acidity within your mouth. A smaller drop in the pH occurs when you drink the beverage straight down quickly and in one sitting. Sipping on a soda can throughout the day leads right to decay due to the constant exposure of your teeth to the sugars. The American Dental Association (ADA) also recommends using a straw positioned towards the back of your mouth when consuming beverages to avoid contact of the drink with your teeth. This of course does not prevent you from developing cavities, but it will help reduce your risk.

Not to mention, when you consume your sugary beverages also matters. It is best to do so during mealtime as opposed to by itself. Rinsing with water is also important to help wash away the sugars. In addition, avoid brushing immediately after consuming sugary drinks, because your tooth enamel is in a weakened state and can be harmed from brushing.

Remember, everything in moderation is key. Always try to be mindful of what drinks you are consuming and how you are consuming them.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.bphc.org/whatwedo/healthy-eating-active-living/sugar-smarts/be-sugar-smart/Pages/Health-Effects-of-Sugary-Drinks.aspx

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2005/06/050616060426.htm

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/does-drinking-out-of-cans-affect-your-risk-for-tooth-decay

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Sipping Soft Drinks Associated with Obesity and Tooth Wear

November 17th, 2019

We all have certain food and drink cravings. For many, sodas may be one of them. We all know soda isn't the healthiest drink choice, however, you may not have known that sodas have been associated with both tooth decay and obesity, according to new research. According to the study published in ‘Clinical Oral Investigations,’ researchers found a direct link between the amount of sugary soft drinks and the breakdown of tooth enamel. In adult study participants who had tooth wear, researchers found that the number of surfaces affected was 1.4 times higher for each additional sugary/acidic beverage per day. They also found that the number of surfaces with moderate-to-severe tooth wear was 17% lower for each additional non-sugar/non-acidic beverage the adult drank each day.

Carbonated and acidic drinks can lead to enamel erosion, or tooth wear, which can have a negative impact on your oral health. Once the tooth enamel becomes worn down, the shape and appearance of the teeth can begin to change. The layer beneath tooth enamel, known as dentin, also begins to show and you may begin experiencing tooth sensitivity to  cold or hot foods and beverages. This can lead to many extra costly dental procedures down the road. Plus, acidic beverages are also known to increase the risk of gastric reflux disease in people who are overweight. So, not only are these drinks causing harm to your teeth, they are also damaging your body. The good news is, tooth wear can be preventable!

Diet is important for your overall health and pearly whites. Be sure to choose healthier drink alternatives. If you are to indulge in soda, do so in moderation and be sure to drink plenty of water afterwards to dilute the acid and sugar. Using a straw when consuming acidic beverages is also helpful to keep the sugar away from sitting on your teeth. Not to mention, ever heard of the slogan, "sip all day, get decay?" The statement is true! Sipping on soda throughout the day for long p periods of time can quickly breakdown your teeth, as the acid attacks your enamel with each sip of soda you take. Be sure to engage in physical activity each day and keep up with good oral hygiene practices.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/10/191028075946.htm

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Sugar-Free Doesn't Mean Tooth-Friendly!

December 7th, 2015

We often believe that beverages or treats labeled as "sugar-free" are safe for our teeth.  However, this is a misconception. According to researchers at the University of Melbourne's Oral Health Cooperative Research Centre (Oral Health CRC), sugar-free soft drinks and candies can harm tooth enamel as much as those that contain sugar.

These scientists claim that reducing sugar intake does not always result in a lower risk of tooth decay. Instead, the chemicals in drinks with artificially sweetening can cause tooth decay.  The chief executive of the Oral Health CRC claims that although a decreased intake of sugar can reduce some risk of dental decay, the acids in the treats and beverages can still lead to erosion of teeth. Also, acid can dissolve tooth enamel and even expose the soft pulp in the tooth's interior if the erosion progresses further.

Researchers analyzed the impacts of drinks and treats labeled as sugar-free on dental health by studying a mix of 23 different sugar-free sports drinks, soft drinks, and candies. They observed that they contain acidic additives and low pH levels, which are extremely harmful to tooth enamel. The researchers also discovered that most of the sugar-free beverages softened the enamel by around 30 to 50 percent, and even sugar-free candies labeled as "tooth-friendly" caused damage to the enamel.

One of the main concerns is the high rate of dental decay among children. He affirms that one in three children experience tooth erosion, and that this rate could increase now that there are more and more sugar-free products. Try avoiding buying sugar-free products that contain ingredients such as acidic additives citric acid and phosphoric acid.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.healthnewsline.net/even-tooth-friendly-drinks-can-cause-dental-erosion-study/2533972/

http://www.thegoodshoppingguide.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/soft-drinks.jpe

High Calorie Drinks Reduced In Schools

September 6th, 2012

A while ago, we blogged about a possible sugar tax being implemented on foods with added sugar and sweeteners, such as soft drinks. It was designed to discourage both adults and children from purchasing unhealthy food and drink. Now it seems that the next step has been taken by reducing the availability of these items in schools, helping to further combat obesity.

There has been a huge reduction in drink calorie content available in schools (90%) between 2004-10. These numbers reflect the partnership between the William J. Clinton Foundation and the American Heart Association with major drink companies to lessen these drinks' availability.

Vending machines in schools now look much different than in previous years. An assortment of water, milk, juice and sports drinks is what's typically available versus an assortment of sodas before. An assessment of the foods offered in school cafeterias will be underway soon as well.

As the obesity rate climbed, officials began to take notice and search for the cause. Christopher Ashley, supervisor of food and nutrition for Springfield City Schools, said:

“Nine years ago I came into this segment of food service, and you’d see a Honey Buns and two Mountain Dews for breakfast. Now kids are going through the line and getting a better breakfast. That’s just the start.”

The alliance between the William J. Clinton Foundation and beverage companies should continue to make a difference. As stated above, obesity rates have dropped significantly in the past few years. With an emphasis placed on health and wellness not just in schools, but in the media, it is believed that the rate will continue to drop. Once the school menus reflect the nutrition of the drinks, students will be at a major advantage for better overall health.

It's important to note that reducing the consumption of soft drinks will improve your smile! Drs. Ali & Ali are committed to spreading oral health awareness and urge you to opt for healthier drinks that don't damage teeth. Feel free to contact us with any questions at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

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