sugar free gum

What's in Your Candy Bowl?

October 31st, 2019

Here at WDG, we wish you a happy, safe, and tooth-friendly Halloween! It's hard not to love candy, especially when there's so much of it around like during Halloween. Most of us have a "sweet-tooth," but we all know sometimes this can come at a cost to our dental health. Tooth decay can develop as the sugars from candy breakdown your tooth enamel.
Today lots of candy will be collected from house to house, and most of the time children will have a collection of all types of candy within their bags. But, did you know that all candies are not created equal? There are some candies that are worse for your oral health than others. Take a look at what candies should be avoided:

Sour Patch Kids

Sour Patch Kids are loaded with sugar. In fact, it's ingredients all contain sugar and acids that are harmful to your teeth, including corn syrup, tartaric acid, citric acid, modified corn starch, and artificial flavoring. In just a 2 ounce bag, there is about 36 grams fo sugar! Sour candies also contribute to enamel erosion due to their high acidic content.

Tootsie Rolls

As you may know, sticky candies like tootsie rolls have a hard time being removed from the pits and grooves on your teeth. This allows bacteria to make themselves at home and produce acids that contribute to tooth decay. Not to mention, even though they're small, they're packed with sugar. In 6 tootsie rolls there is about 20 grams of sugar.

Caramel

Caramel can be another sticky issue. Its ingredients include glucose syrup, sugar and cane sugar syrup for a total of 16 grams of sugar for 6 tiny pieces.

Candy corn

Candy corn is a Halloween staple. However, it can contain more sugar than ice-cream and is another sticky culprit that your teeth will benefit from not having.

Jawbreakers

The name itself is terrifying, and true. Hard candies, such as jawbreakers can cause extreme jaw pain and even lead to cracked teeth. They also last a long period of time within the mouth which exposes your teeth to harmful sugars for the lengthy periods.

Fun Dip

The assortment of colors and sweet taste of fun dip can be cool, but it is essentially made up of 100% sugar and can be detrimental to your pearly-whites.

Snickers

The chocolate and caramel goodness can be not so sweet for your teeth despite the high sugar content. It's another sticky treat, and contains 27 grams of sugar, and contains 266 calories.

But not to worry, once done sorting from the huge candy pile collected today, our Annual Candy Drive is a great way to share extra Halloween candy for a great cause. We will send all donations and caring messages to our U.S. troops overseas to express our gratitude for their service. Any school, organization, or individual is welcome to participate. We also award a grand prize of $1000 to the school PTO that donated the most candy, taking into account the number of students per school and amount of pounds of candy collected per student. Please join us for the upcoming grand celebration this year:

Candy Collection: 1st-7th November 2019Press Event: 8th November, 2019 @ 10 AMLocation: 5 Seaward Rd, Wellesley, MA 02481

If you have questions or queries about how you can join hands with us for this great cause, send us an email at candydrive@wellesleydentalgroup.com, or call us at 781-237-9071. This year you can also register online!

RSVP: https://forms.gle/WdvFhU9UoM6RU2fR7

Be sure to follow us on Twitter,  LinkedIn, and Facebook, and look for updates on our Facebook Event Page.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

http://www.dentalproductsreport.com/dental/article/8-candies-make-dental-professionals-scream?page=0,8

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Halloween Do's and Don'ts!

October 26th, 2019

Halloween is quickly approaching, and the last thing anyone wants to be haunted by is cavities! Halloween can be a great time to promote good oral health habits for life, even with the temptation of sweet treats around for the occasion. What many people may not know is that the frequency of snacking on foods high in sugar, like candy, is more harmful to your teeth than the actual amount of sugar present in the snack. The amount of time the sugar is present on your teeth leads to a greater number of acid attacks on your teeth, eventually resulting in tooth decay. So, to prevent being spooked by cavities, here's a few suggestions to keep your teeth strong and healthy this Halloween:

Pass out sugar-free treats

A great way to promote healthy teeth to your little ones is to pass out tooth-friendly Halloween treats during this trick-or-treat season. Passing out glow-in-the dark stick bracelets and necklaces are fun and nice for trick-or-treaters so that they can shine as they walk through neighborhoods collecting treats. Small water bottles are also useful for the kids to drink after they consume their candy treats while going from house to house. Also, sugar-free gum with xylitol, stickers, and even toothbrushes make for great gifts that can be passed out during Halloween!

 

Timing is Everything!

Halloween candy is best eaten with meals or not too long after mealtime when saliva production is at its highest. Saliva helps wash away the acids made by bacteria as well as any leftover food particles within the mouth. Water also is important to swish with after indulging in sweets. 

Donate some of your treats to WDG's 12th Annual Candy Drive:

Our Annual Candy Drive is a great way to share extra Halloween candy for a great cause. We will send all donations and caring messages to our U.S. troops overseas to express our gratitude for their service. Any school, organization, or individual is welcome to participate. We also award a grand prize of $1000 to the school PTO that donated the most candy, taking into account the number of students per school and amount of pounds of candy collected per student. Please join us for the upcoming grand celebration this year:
Candy Collection: 1st-7th November 2019Press Event: 8th November, 2019 @ 10 AMLocation: 5 Seaward Rd, Wellesley, MA 02481

If you have questions or queries about how you can join hands with us for this great cause, send us an email at candydrive@wellesleydentalgroup.com, or call us at 781-237-9071. This year you can also register online!

RSVP: https://forms.gle/WdvFhU9UoM6RU2fR7

Be sure to follow us on Twitter,  LinkedIn, and Facebook, and look for updates on our Facebook Event Page.

Avoid sticky situations:

Sticky and sour candies can do a number on your teeth more than other candies. Sticky candies can get stuck in the grooves of teeth and remain their for long periods of time and increase your risk of developing cavities. Also, sour candies often are more acidic and can break down your tooth enamel. 

We wish you all a happy, safe, and cavity-free Halloween!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/non-candy-halloween-treats

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4 Easy Steps to a Healthy Mouth

October 5th, 2019

The work dental hygienists do is tremendously valuable, and worth celebrating every day! In fact, the month of October represents Dental Hygiene Month across the nation. Each October we are all reminded to promote healthy smiles. Practicing good oral health is necessary to keep strong teeth, healthy gums, and even a healthy overall body. The connections between periodontal disease (gum disease) and systemic diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes is real. Unfortunately, the American Dental Hygienists' Association (ADHA) reports that approximately 75% of people in America have some form of periodontal disease, which is the most common cause of tooth loss in adults. This, however, is preventable with good oral hygiene practices.

With early starts to your day and a big to-do list, it can sometimes be easy to skip some of your oral hygiene routine. But, not to worry! The American Dental Hygienists Association and American Dental Association offer four essential , quick, and easy tips on how to keep a healthy and clean mouth, even when you're on-the-move: Brush. Floss. Rinse. Chew. Check it out:

Brushing:

Brushing your teeth is necessary twice daily for two minutes each time. Brushing is key to help eliminate the accumulation of food particles and plaque that oral bacteria feed off of leading to gum disease and tooth decay.

 

Flossing:

Flossing may seem tedious, but your oral health depends on it. Flossing is recommended once daily to help remove plaque and food in hard to reach areas between the teeth that the toothbrush cannot remove.

 

Rinsing:

Mouth rinses are not only good to help freshen breath, but also offer an antibacterial component that helps fight and prevent cavities. Be sure to purchase a  non-alcohol based mouthwash with the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Mouthwash will help eliminate plaque and keep your gums healthy.

 

Chewing:

Sugar-free gum has been found to help improve your oral health by stimulating saliva to wash away remaining food particles. It also can help strengthen enamel by neutralizing the acids produced by oral bacteria and is recommended to chew for about 20 minutes after consuming meals.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/life-stages/adult-oral-care/ada-october-is-national-dental-hygiene-month

https://nationaltoday.com/national-dental-hygiene-month/

Dental-Hygiene-Infographic-01.jpg

family-of-three-brushing-their-teeth-in-front-of-royalty-free-image-769730993-1566842159.jpg

Healthy Start to the School Year

August 21st, 2019

Sometimes we often forget just how important our food choices are for our bodies. Especially when we are craving that most-delicious sweet that we all cannot resist! Things like candy and soda both typically fill our hearts desires, but as we all know they’re not on our good side. But, we truly do need to be more careful about what we eat, not only for your health but also for your pearly whites. Now that summer is soon coming to an end and school is approaching, it’s important to review what should be included on you and your child’s plate. Take a look at these healthy foods that can help satisfy your taste, and keep your mind, body, and teeth in good shape!

Dairy

Dairy products like cheese, milk, and yogurt make great tooth-friendly snacks. Cheese can help lower the risk of tooth decay by raising the pH, making the mouth less acidic. Not to mention, dairy is often full of protein and nutrients that help keep your enamel strong, like calcium. Yogurt contains healthy bacteria, also known as probiotics, which are known to help with digestion and fight off bad bacteria. Dairy is also typically low in sugar, making it a great pick for your lunch.

Nuts

 

Nuts are low in sugar, and are full of protein and minerals that are great for your overall health. Plus, chewing nuts helps trigger saliva production, which can lower your risk for tooth decay. Try tossing them in salads, or grab a bag of them to add to your lunchbox.

 

Hight Fiber Foods/Vegetables

Foods high in fiber such as leafy greens are the way to go when looking for something healthy! It aids digestion, promotes good cholesterol levels, and enhances saliva production necessary for protecting your teeth. Not only are they low in calories, but they're also loaded with vitamins and minerals.

Water

Staying hydrated with water, particularly fluoridated water, is key for keeping your body healthy. Fluoride is an important component as it helps remineralize tooth enamel and makes teeth more resistant to decay.

Apples

An apple a day can actually be good for your health and smile! Apples contain a great amount of fiber and water, and help act similarly to a toothbrush by helping to remove food particles from your teeth.

Carrots

Crunchy carrots also help stimulate saliva production and are a great source of fiber and vitamin A. They make a great snack by themselves or added to salad.

Cranberries

Cranberries have been found to protect your smile by helping keep plaque from sticking to teeth with the help of polyphenols.

Sugarless gum

For all of the gum lovers, sugar-free gum is the best option for your pearly whites. Chewing sugarless gum helps increase saliva production and helps wash away leftover food particles that bacteria feed on.

Prevention is the best way to keep your body and smile in tip-top shape. One method of prevention is to carefully choose healthy foods full of essential nutrients.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.colgate.com/en-us/oral-health/basics/nutrition-and-oral-health/healthy-foods-list-seven-best-foods-for-your-teeth-0214

https://www.livescience.com/44111-foods-healthy-teeth-bad-breath.html

Images:

nutrition_In_LR_practice_iStock_000047508612_Large.jpeg25932213_mtiny-e1502879079770.jpg, Dairy Industry 500w.jpg, Mix_Nuts-1-min.jpg, splash.jpg, 0000000004129, 6133tP0T3gL.jpg31kRRLGy68L.jpgCIN_IndTrends_0616_slideshow01.jpg

Oral Health Is Still Important After 50!

October 1st, 2016

senior-couple-brushing-teeth

Unlike wine, teeth don't always get finer with age! However, with all the advanced technology we have today, it's not uncommon for older adults to keep their natural teeth by maintaining their oral health with a proper hygiene routine and a healthy diet.

Here are some tips you can follow to ensure a healthy smile:

  • Brush with a fluoride toothpaste at least two times a day to decrease your risk for cavities
  • Use a soft toothbrush to prevent wearing down gum tissue and sensitive areas
  • Floss and use interdental cleaners regularly to clean areas your toothbrush can't reach
  • Keep making appointments with your dentist

If you suffer from xerostomia (dry mouth), a side effect of some medications, make sure to drink plenty of water, chew sugar-free gum, or use oral moisturizers so you're less likely to get cavities or gum disease.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.senior1care.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/senior-couple-brushing-teeth.jpg

http://www.caledonianrecord.com/features/health/dental-health-after/article_1d46046d-d02f-5e38-bf1b-331ca73bafa7.html

http://seniorsoralhealth.org/?doing_wp_cron=1473121507.1317451000213623046875

Dental Pains on Airplanes

August 25th, 2016

people-planes

Flying to a new location, or home to visit family is typically always exciting. Nevertheless, some fliers may experience  dental pain and problems as a result of changes in atmospheric pressure. Because the atmospheric pressure is often too low for humans the higher the plane reaches, fliers may be impacted by some of the following oral issues:

Barodontalgia:

When one experiences tooth pain due to high or low atmospheric pressures, this is referred to as barodontalgia. This can affect people on airplanes or people who scuba dive, for instance. The pain one may feel is typically a sharp tooth ache feeling due to stimulation of nerve endings.

Odontocrexis:

Odontocrexis is also referred to as barometric tooth explosion. Individuals who have faulty tooth restorations, dislodged crowns, or cavities may experience pain when subject to changes in atmospheric pressure. Make sure to visit your dentist if you think you may have any of these dental issues.

Barotitis:

If you've ever experienced ear pain on a plan, it is probably due to Barotitis, in which a vacuum is created in the ear when the air pressure is changing during landing.

Barosinusitis:

Also during flight you may experience sinus issues due to the change in pressure. This can cause barodontalgia.

Peri-orbital headache:

When a vacuum is created inside the frontal sinus, you may experience a headache due to the pressure changes.

 

No need to worry though, these problems can be  prevented! You can avoid barotrauma or barosinusitis by postponing flights when having the common cold. Also decongestants, chewing on sugar-free gum, or using ear plugs may help prevent these problems while traveling.

If you are traveling this summer, take these tips into consideration and have a safe flight!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and their newest addition to the team, Dr. Zarah Ali, if you have any thoughts or concerns. The caring team at Wellesley Dental Group will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other periodontal or oral surgery needs, Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.asdablog.com/category/dental-news/page/2/

http://journalthis.danoah.com/wp-content/uploads/people-planes.jpg

The Fantastic Four of Dental Hygiene

December 12th, 2015

Want to become a dental hygiene superhero? Make sure to follow these four steps of fun recommended by the American Dental Hygienists' Association and the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program!

1. Brush twice daily!

Brushing your teeth properly for a full two minutes twice a day is the key to excellent oral health. It can prevent both gum disease and tooth decay, which are the two most common causes of loosing teeth. Brushing is effective in limiting oral bacterial growth.

However, in order to ensure that your brushing is as optimal as it can be, make sure to switch to a new toothbrush every few months and to use a toothpaste that has fluoride in it (to prevent cavities).

2. Floss, floss, floss!

Flossing is crucial for cleaning those spots in your mouth that your toothbrush can't reach, such as spaces between teeth and gum pockets. In order to maintain healthy teeth, floss at least once daily.

Proper flossing technique includes digging deep into the pockets between your gums and teeth and refraining from snapping floss against your gums, which could lead to bleeding and irritation. Furthermore, use plenty of floss to ensure that there is a clean piece for every space between your teeth.

3. Use an antimicrobial mouthwash!

Mouthwashes can do a lot more than simply making your breath smell more pleasant. Their property of killing germs associated with gum disease, tooth decay, and bad breath is essential to having good oral health. However, make sure you pick out a mouthwash that is alcohol-free, because alcohol tends to dry out the mouth. According to the American  Dental Hygienists' Association, you should rinse once per day.

4. Chew sugar-free gum!

Chewing sugar-free gum is a fun and effective way to help decrease your risk of getting cavities. The act of chewing and the gum's flavor help produce saliva, which can wash away debris and bacteria that could cause cavities. Increased saliva flow also helps minerals that strengthen and rebuild enamel travel to the teeth.

Finally, make sure to schedule regular dental checkups!

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

Resources:

http://www.wrigleyoralhealth.com/

https://healthycompanyalliance.com/library/assets/Toothpaste-Toothbrushes-and-Mouthwash.jpg

 

Fall in Love with These Healthy Fall Foods!

October 15th, 2015

fall-foodFall is finally here! From the beautiful leaves to the abundance of pumpkin spice products, there are so many reasons to love fall. And here’s another one: your favorite fall foods can also be super beneficial for your oral health!

Here are some delicious foods that may lead to better results at your next dental appointment!

  1. Apples

You’ve probably heard the saying, “an apple a day keeps the doctor away.” This saying is so well-known for a reason: this delicious fruit that comes in so many varieties has many health benefits. They have antioxidants, which can help prevent slow aging and chronic illnesses.  Furthermore, quercetin, a compound that is found in the skin of apples, can reduce risks of cancer, heart attacks, and asthma attacks. Apples have plenty of water in them, which does wonders for your teeth because water stimulates production of saliva. They also help wash food and neutralize acids from the surfaces of your teeth. The crunch in apples even helps remove dental plaque by loosening particles of food between teeth.

 

  1. Bone Broth

Everybody loves a good soup full of vegetables, broth, herbs, and spices. Bone broth is great for your immune system and digestive system. It’s also packed with calcium, phosphorous, and magnesium, which all do wonders for your teeth.

 

  1. Fish

If you love eating fish, you’re in luck. According to the Journal of Dietetic Association, fish oil can help fight gum disease. Salmon is especially beneficial for your teeth, because it can treat and prevent periodontitis.

 

  1. Cranberries

Best enjoyed October through November, cranberries not only ward off urinary tract infections, but they also restrain cancer growth and prevent oral diseases. 

 

  1. Pumpkins and Squash

Nutritionists at the National Institute of Health claim that foods rich in carotenoids, such as pumpkins and squash, can lower the risk of certain types of cancer. Pumpkins can also lead to healthy vision and cell growth, because they are great sources of alpha- and beta-carotene . Their seeds contain alpha-linolenic acid, which controls heart disease, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

If you’re craving dessert, try pumpkin pie (without the crust, which is high in fat and cholesterol). This classic fall treat contains a ton of vitamin A, vitamin C, fiber, and iron. The boost of iron will keep you away from tooth decay and tongue inflammation. Pumpkin spice, a combination of cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, allspice, and cloves, is also especially beneficial for your health. These spices all have phytonutrients, which are anti-inflammatory plant compounds that promote healing in cancer, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Cloves fight cancer and blood clots, but they are also used for oral health. They have anaesthetic and antibacterial properties, which can relieve toothache and infections.

 

  1. Raw Dairy

Raw dairy (raw milk, cheese, butter, yogurt) that isn’t pasteurized or homogenized is a great source of calcium, which prevents tooth decay and gum disease.

 

  1. Green Tea

Containing natural catechins, green tea reduces plaque and by destroying plaque-causing bacteria. Enjoy a cup, but don’t forget to chew sugar-free gum afterwards to avoid teeth staining.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/oral-care-tips-and-advice/best-nutritious-fall-foods-20798/

http://greatist.com/health/healthiest-fruits-and-vegetables-fall

http://www.myprimetimenews.com/spice-it-up-for-fall/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17296290

http://naturallysavvy.com/care/dental-care-the-benefits-of-cloves

http://realfoodreallocalinstitute.org/huntington-wva/wp-content/uploads/sites/9/2013/10/fall-food.jpg

October Marks National Dental Hygiene Month

October 11th, 2015

teNot only does October represent the beginning of new season, colorful leaves, and plenty of pumpkins, it also marks National Dental Hygiene Month. The American Dental Hygienists’ Association (ADHA) and the Wrigley Oral Healthcare Program (WOHP) are teaming together for the sixth year to highlight the importance of practicing good oral health habits and maintaining a healthy smile.

It is important to note that a healthy daily dental routine not only benefits your oral health, but also improves your overall health! Being aware of this can help prevent diseases such as diabetes, cancers, and cardiovascular diseases, which are commonly linked to condition of your oral health.

National Dental Hygiene Month was created in order to spread awareness on the necessities of brushing teeth at least twice daily, flossing every day, rinsing with antimicrobial mouthwashes, and chewing sugar-free gum. Take a look at how these essential habits can keep your teeth and body healthy for a lifetime:

Follow the 2 x 2 rule!

Brushing your teeth for 2 minutes, twice a day is one of the most important ways to get rid of plaque and prevent tooth decay, gum disease, and other oral health issues. Also, don't forget about your tongue! Many bacteria hide out on the surface of your tongue, which often produces a smelly aroma contributing to bad breath. Stay tuned on our social media for our weekly #ToothbrushingTipTuesday to help you find out more about how to brush your way to a healthier smile.

Make flossing a daily habit

Sometimes, remembering to floss can be hard. However, flossing is very important for removing plaque and food particles that are located in hard-to-reach areas that your toothbrush skips over.

Use mouthwash to improve oral health

Using a anti-microbial mouth rinse is an additional healthy step that you can take to prevent common oral health problems. There are many mouth rinses available that you can choose from to tailor to your needs, including those specialized for whitening, tooth sensitivity, and more!

Chewing sugar-free gum may be beneficial to your oral health

Chewing sugar-free gum after meals may help protect your teeth and stimulate saliva production to help wash away leftover food particles. Saliva production can also help neutralize plaque acids on teeth, reducing your risk of developing tooth decay.

Keep these tips in mind as you celebrate National Dental Hygiene Month, and don't forget to spread the word!

hygFeel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.adha.org/national-dental-hygiene-month

http://tranquilityparkdental.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/1391667_643421852344598_1516155769_n-332x332.jpg

http://www.tnstate.edu/dentalhygiene/documents/dental-hygienist-lv-350x260.jpg

 

Listen up, Kids: Dental Care for Children

October 9th, 2015

kidBelieve it or not, a third of children today have tooth decay before even starting school. According to statistics published by the Health & Social Care Information Centre, tooth decay is one of the main causes of hospital visits for children in elementary school. Surprisingly, 25,812 children ranging from ages 5 to 9 went to the hospital for tooth extractions in the last year alone.

Here are some tips below on how to protect your child’s teeth to make sure that your child doesn’t become part of these statistics!

  1. Drink less fruit juice!

Just because fruit juice is nutritious and often rich in vitamin C does not mean that it’s also beneficial for your teeth! Many juices have around the same amount of sugar as that in sodas, or even more. For instance, NPR states that apple juice contains 65.8 grams of sugar per liter, while cola contains 62.5 grams of sugar per liter. This copious amount of sugar leads to tooth decay. Furthermore, the acid from the juice destroys the enamel of teeth, which can cause teeth to deteriorate. Even the British Dental Association claims that 50% of children ranging from four to 18 years old show these signs.

Because of these harmful effects of fruit juice, dentists recommend water and milk as healthy beverage alternatives for children. If your child is still craving fruit juice, try to dilute it as much as possible and make sure that your child has a meal with it. Also, try your best to avoid letting your child have too much contact time with the cup and his or her teeth and instead opt for using a straw.

 

  1. Avoid dried fruit !

Dried fruit isn’t a good replacement for candy it has a great deal of sugar, and even worse, its sticky texture clings onto your child’s teeth. Due to these unhealthy properties, dried fruit can ruin enamel and rot your little one’s molars. Although chocolate isn’t a great option, dark chocolate is known to  be rich in antioxidants that help prevent the spread of tooth-decay causing bacteria.

Whole fruit can be a better option than dried fruit and fruit juice because it contains water and fibers that help wash away sugar from teeth. However, try not to feed your child more than one or two low-sugar fruit pieces (strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, kiwis, peaches, and pears) instead of high-sugar fruit pieces (grapes or pineapple) per day. Incorporate fruit into meals rather than simply having them as snacksBreadsticks, toast, cheese, nuts, or seeds are some healthier snack alternatives.

 

  1. Baby teeth matter!

It's important not to presume that just because baby teeth are not permanent, that they should not be taken care of! Your child’s permanent teeth are at a higher risk of decay and other dental problems when primary teeth decay. Baby tooth decay could lead children to experience dental anxiety, which could make them less likely to visit the dentist later on.

 

  1. Help your child brush his/her teeth!

Depending on how mature your child is, you should help brush your child’s teeth until at least age seven to ensure that they are using proper brushing techniques. 

 

  1. Proper brushing techniques!
  • Don’t let your child brush his/her teeth right after eating, particularly after eating or drinking something acidic. Doing so will brush the enamel away! Your child should either brush before eating breakfast or wait an hour after the meal. Chewing sugar-free gum can also be an effective way to clean teeth, because it produces saliva, which defends against decay, and brings mouths back to a neutral pH level.
  • It doesn’t matter if your child uses a manual or electric toothbrush. What’s important is that the brushing lasts for at least two minutes! Electric toothbrushes often have built-in timers, so this feature can be effective.
  • Don’t let your child rinse the toothpaste away right after brushing! The fluoride in the toothpaste can keep protecting his or her teeth for 30 minutes. Children under three should use toothpaste with 1,000 fluoride parts per million, while children over three should use adult toothpaste that contains 1,450 fluoride parts per million.

For many parents, the first time they took their children to the dentist was when their children were at least one year old. However, parents should set their first appointment for when their children’s teeth begin to come out, which is around five to six months old. Further oral health tips for children can be found here.

This past spring, we welcomed Dr. Van, our Pediatric Dentist, onto our caring team at the Wellesley Dental Group! Dr. Van strongly believes in the importance of creating a fun and welcoming atmosphere for patients as well as parents. One of his goals is to introduce good dental habits to our youth, preventing dental diseases later on in life.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://mouafaqbtc.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/06/b4054a_0d4b9e685762e624649fbf8898f77c87.jpg

http://www.express.co.uk/life-style/health/609471/Children-dental-care-truths-myths

http://www.thedentistar.com/images/import/images/glenview-kids-dentist.jpg

http://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2014/06/09/319230765/fruit-juice-vs-soda-both-beverages-pack-in-sugar-and-health-risk

When Life Gives You Lemons, Protect Your Enamel

August 30th, 2015

lemon water

Lemon water has recently been all the rage for several celebrities, and health and fitness lovers. Many individuals reportedly start their morning off with a glass of hot lemon water to cleanse their systems.

It's true, lemon water does have its own perks, including its ability to help with digestion, the immune system, and even with weight loss. Also, lemons are loaded with important nutrients, including vitamin C, calcium, iron, magnesium, potassium, and fiber. However, as refreshing as it may sound, drinking lemon water daily could cause enamel erosionUnfortunately, lemons are highly acidic, containing a pH between 2 and 3, which ultimately can lead to wear and tear on your enamel and eventually result in tooth decay. When the enamel erodes, the underlying dentin becomes exposed, which may result in painful sensitivity to hot and cold foods. Enamel erosion also makes the teeth appear hollowed and yellow. Although diluted, a daily habit of drinking lemon water can cause enamel erosion just like many other acidic foods and beverages.

Sipping on acidic beverages throughout the day should be avoided at all costs. If you do happen to find yourself drinking an acidic beverage, using a straw can help lower the chance of the liquid coming in contact with your teeth. In addition to brushing, rinsing, and flossing, chewing a piece of sugarless gum can also help get rid of the acidic residue from your teeth. Consuming dairy products and drinking water throughout the day can also help wash away acid and prevent dry mouth.

It is important not to brush your teeth immediately after drinking wine, lemon juice, or other acidic beverages due to the harmful combination of the acid and toothpaste that can soften enamel. It is recommended to rinse your mouth with water after consuming acidic liquids and to wait approximately one hour before brushing your teeth.

While hot water with lemon may be a fashionable way to start the day, dentists are warning it can ruin teeth

Individuals who suffer from bulimia or acid reflux are also at a high risk of developing enamel erosion. When the stomach acid travels to the mouth, it is powerful enough to wear down the enamel on your teeth. It is necessary to get help right away.

Take your dental health into consideration when choosing what foods and beverages to include in your diet. Remember, once enamel is gone, you can't get it back! Make sure that you follow good oral health habits in order to preserve your enamel for a lifetime of healthy teeth.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.foodworldnews.com/articles/33583/20150824/drinking-a-glass-of-water-with-lemon-every-morning-could-ruin-teeth.htm

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/11-benefits-lemon-water-you-didnt-know-about.html

http://healthnbodytips.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Benefits-of-drinking-hot-water-with-lemons.png?b0bc0c

Summertime in the City: What's Healthy and What's Not

June 2nd, 2015

Screen Shot 2015-06-01 at 12.31.25 PM

June is finally here and it will be hard for many of us to resist a cold drink on a hot summer day. With the many family barbecues and outings, you're sure to be in for a treat this summer. During the warmer months, there are many tasty foods and drinks at our convenience. However, some of these items aren’t so tooth-friendly. As we all know, it is important to limit the amount of sugary foods and drinks we intake to ensure a healthy smile. For the health of your mouth, which links to your overall health, try adding these healthy options to your plate and glass this summer:

Drink, Drink, and Drink more water:

A nice glass of water can be a refreshing drink as you relax by the poolside. Water is important for staying hydrated, especially when your active and the sun is shining. Your smile will also thank you if you rinse your mouth with water after meals. Water, particularly tap water, even has the benefit of containing fluoride.

Watermelon:

Watermelon, made of 92% water, is another tasty  and healthy snack that will keep you hydrated this summer. It contains  lycopene, which helps keep skin protected. Also, many foods that are mainly composed of water have fewer calories. Your kids may even enjoy making watermelon popsicles!

Milk:

Milk is a great alternative to sugary drinks because it has been found to reduce levels of acid produced by plaque bacteria. Milk helps remineralize teeth by providing calcium to keep your teeth strong.

Sugar-Free Gum:

Chewing sugar-free gum can help to stimulate saliva flow and ultimately help to wash away left behind foods. However, it is not clear whether or not xylitol, commonly found in sugar-free gum, actually lowers the risk of developing dental cavities.

Strawberries:

Strawberries are in season and packed with healthy ingredients. Strawberries contain malic acid, which is known to whiten enamel. They also contain many antioxidants and vitamin C, which can help to regulate blood pressure and cholesterol, and promote eye health.

Cheese:

Cheese is full of calcium, the protein casein, and vitamin D, all good for the health of your teeth. Researchers have discovered that cheese helps increases the pH levels of dental plaque, helping to reduce tooth decay.

Pears:

Pears contain a wealth of fiber that will benefit your teeth. They help to produce saliva and lower plaque levels in the mouth.

Apples:

Crispy apples are full of vitamins and nutrients. Full of water and lots of fiber, apples help to scrub and clean the surface of your teeth.

Vegetables:

Veggies ranging from carrots rich in Vitamin A to dark leafy greens rich in iron, can make a great snack to chew on. Including vegetables in your diet is essential for the health of your teeth and body.

Cranberries:

Research has suggested that cranberries help lower the risk of cavities by helping to keep plaque from sticking to teeth. But, you may want to pay attention to the labels on cranberry products, as many of them can contain added sugars to compensate for their naturally tart flavor.

 

Some foods and drinks that are hard-to-resist, but should be avoided to keep strong and healthy teeth, include:

 

Soft Drinks, Sports Drinks, Sweet Tea, and Juice: Drinking a cold soda may sound refreshing, but it is damaging to tooth enamel. It can also dehydrate your body and make you feel more thirsty. Even sports drinks, artificially sweetened drinks, and concentrated fruit juice contain sugars for the bacteria in dental plaque to feed on and produce harmful acids. The acid then tears away at tooth enamel and can eventually lead to tooth decay. Highly acidic drinks can even cause heartburn and stomach pain. Sipping on these drinks throughout the day rather than at meal times should also be avoided because saliva production is not at its peak. Saliva is important for washing away bacteria and food particles.

Ice Cream:

The many flavors of ice cream are delicious, but unfortunately is full of sugar. Some individuals may also experience tooth sensitivity. Sensitive teeth results when the dentin underneath tooth enamel becomes exposed. This can cause pain, but can be treated. If you do have a taste for ice cream, try and select ice cream with less sugar.

Citrus Fruits:

As we all know, limes, lemons, oranges, and grapefruits are very acidic. These fruits contain citric acid and can be damaging to teeth if consumed frequently.

Vinegar:

A common practice, but an unhealthy one, is to mix vegetables with vinegar. This acidic combination can erode tooth enamel. Pickles are also very acidic.

Granola and Energy Bars:

These items may appear to be good for teeth, but often the dried fruit and other ingredients can be sticky, chewy, and hard to get off of teeth.

Candy: 

We all know that candy contains a lot of sugar, and should be avoided for the protection of your smile.

 

It is important to remember that if you do choose some of the not-so-healthy foods and beverages, consume them in moderation. Also, avoid snacking between meals, as acids can stick around for up to 20 minutes after eating. Not to mention, be mindful of the dyes used in many foods and beverages that can cause tooth discoloration. Practice good oral health habits and lean more towards a tooth-friendly diet.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.therabreath.com/articles/blog/fresh-breath-happenings/teeth-friendly-summer-food-ideas-34659.asp

http://greatist.com/health/healthy-teeth-foods

http://www.thekitchn.com/recipe-watermelon-popsicles-10713

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-dwBqWs6_udQ/UBYvQhjW5TI/AAAAAAAACBY/YdNg1weBEVk/s1600/watermelon+popsicles.JPG

Xylitol's Not as Sweet as You Think

March 29th, 2015

Popular among the vast array of sugar substitutes, xylitol is one of the more popular natural sweeteners commonly found in sugar-free gum, toothpaste, cosmetic gels, and sweets.

Although xylitol is not dangerous and is found to cause less damage to teeth than sugar, it isn't exactly perfect. Previously, xylitol was suggested  to reduce tooth decay by preventing the growth of acid-producing bacteria. Yet, according to the Cochrane Library,  researchers suggests that there is little evidence that xylitol is actually beneficial in reducing the prevalence of tooth decay.Many individuals turn to sugar substitutes to satisfy a "sweet tooth," even in processed foods, which can worsen the risk of heart disease, stroke, or diabetes. While it is true that Xylitol is found in nature in many plants, xylitol is also manufactured for commercial use by the process of sugar hydrogenation, which involves the compound Raney nickel. The long term effects of are not currently known.

On the negative side, xylitol is only partially broken down in the stomach, and instead remains relatively intact in the intestines. The undigested portion ferments, and can lead to stomach cramps, acid reflux, or diarrhea. No need to worry, xylitol is FDA approved and is not considered hazardous.

Researchers in a study using 5,903 participants over ten different studies were unable to prove any benefit in the natural sweetener for preventing tooth decay in children and adults. For xylitol-containing products, including sugar-free gum, researchers did not find any significant evidence. According to two Costa Rican studies involving 4,216 school children, there was low quality evidence that levels of tooth decay were 13% lower in children who used a fluoride toothpaste with xylitol for three years versus those who used a fluoride-only toothpaste.

Philip Riley, a head researcher at the School of Dentistry at The University of Manchester, said, "Several of the studies included in the Cochrane review did not report sufficient information on the side effects of xylitol, which can include bloating, diarrhea and laxative effects. Sugar-free gums, sweets, mints and other products are well-known for their gastrointestinal effects and these should be clearly reported in future studies."

So, maybe xylitol isn't all it has cracked up to be! It is important to practice good oral health habits, and only chew sugar-free gum in moderation.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist Dr. VanDr. Emad is happy to help with your orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs Dr. Ghazi would be more than willing to help.

References:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2015/03/150325210320.htm

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/xylitol-not-as-sweet-as-its-cracked-up-to-be/

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-ImYmiIEwXgA/U-KUWNlaxtI/AAAAAAAARMU/uKF08QOF0kQ/s1600/chewing+gum.png

Sugar Alcohols

July 19th, 2012

The next time you pop a stick of sugar-free gum into your mouth, take a look at the package. There is probably one or more ingredients listed that end in -ol. One of the most popular ones is xylitol.

These ingredients are sugar alcohols and there's some things you should know about them.

- They contain two calories per gram versus sugar's four calories per gram.

- They are a type of carbohydrate. The structure of sugar alcohols looks like a hybrid between a sugar and alcohol molecule.

A good thing about the sugar alcohol, xylitol, is that it benefits your teeth! It protects a sugar attack from your food on your teeth after you eat. Chewing a stick of sugar-free gum with xylitol will do thr trick! You can learn more about sugar alcohols from the Joslin Diabetes Center or by contacting us at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

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