Sugar intake

5 Ways to Get an A in Oral Health

August 27th, 2014

happy_male_elementary_school_student_holding_a_tro_by_macinivnw-d68c9ty

With the school season around the corner oral health has to be at the top of your list! During the summer it’s easy to become more lenient with kids about what they eat, so dentists recommend that now is a good time to check in with the dentist and do a cleaning. Research shows that 60% of children fail to visit the dentist once a year. Now is a good time to check for cavities, for untreated tooth decay - all of this can keep a child from eating, speaking, sleeping, and even learning to their fullest potential. Parents should also be mindful of the snacks and lunches they pack. Some schools offering enticing sugary snacks for kids, but it is a good idea to pack healthy foods, keeping a child’s sugar intake at bay.

We challenge you do beat these statistics and start the school year off with healthy teeth! Request an appointment with Dr. Kim, our excellent pediatric dentist, or call 781-237-9071 with questions.

1891176_10151970757410913_476601832_n1. Consistent brushing. As always it is important to instill the habit of brushing twice a day. Getting back to school, children have to be reminded of the morning and evening routine. It is helpful to set up a time for brushing after breakfast and before going to bed. Dentists also recommend that brushing after every meal can be beneficial.  There are many fun toothbrushes that have been coming out, and along with buying new folders and notebooks, parents can look into buying themed travel toothbrush and toothpaste that children can bring to school in their lunchbox. Just make sure that the toothpaste contains fluoride and that the travel toothbrush has soft bristles!

2. Flossing before brushing. To get an A vs. a B in oral care, you have to make sure to remember flossing.  For small children, convenient pre-strung floss picks can make it easier to reach between teeth in little mouths. Put a floss pick on your child’s plate so they remember that right after they eat, they need to floss. By making these actions routine, your child will develop good habits they can lean on for the rest of their life.

3. Fluoride rinses. Once you are sure your child can swish mouthwash without swallowing it, add a rinse to their routine. Not only is it fun and leaves the cleanest feeling, but it also helps remineralise teeth and protect them from the effects sweets and soda have on gentle enamel. This step will put the parent's mind at ease!

4. Help make dentist their friend. Dentist visits are necessary and although many young students are afraid of them, parents can help put their mind at ease. Research shows, that if the parents show anxiety about the dental check-ups, it's far more likely that the children will, as well. Dentist are working to help you have the best quality of life, besides dentistry has come a long way in terms of comfort and amenities. A kid's visit often includes playing in the waiting area, watching cartoons for distraction, drawing and getting fun prizes and stickers. Be sure to prepare your child for their dental visits by explaining how the staff will take a picture of their teeth during X-rays, clean their teeth and examine the teeth. Eliminate the unknowns and your child will walk into the dentist office with more confidence and a better understanding.

At our office in Wellesley, two friends will greet your children upon their visit - dinosaurs Christoper and Kiki. They will help your kids practice their brushing skills!

5. See the dentist every 6 months.  It is recommended that school-age children visit the dentist twice a year. It is important to make sure all transitions that a child’s teeth goes through are happening in a timely manner, whether is it is losing baby teeth or expecting permanent ones to come in. Staying on a regular six month schedule will keep your visits timely and give you an early alert if a child needs extra help with their brushing and flossing or has issues that need to be treated.

Now that everyone is getting back to school, let’s make it important to keep up with good oral health this school year! Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

Request a check-up with Dr. Kim, our pediatric dentist, or call 781-237-9071.

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References:

http://fatcatwebproductions.com/ThePaper_2014/md-thenews/content/complete-your-healthy-back-school-routine-dental-care

http://islandgazette.net/news-server5/index.php/local-business-news/business-news/health-and-wellness/20333-back-to-school-time-to-get-back-to-dental-routine-9-11-2013

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2010/article/ADA-08-Consumer-News-Back-to-School.cvsp

http://www.astdd.org/docs/schoolbased-ohp-ma-oh-coalition-whitepaper-nov-2011.pdf

http://thegazette.com/2012/10/31/halloween-a-dentists-dilemma/

 Image credit: http://th05.deviantart.net/fs70/PRE/i/2013/161/a/e/happy_male_elementary_school_student_holding_a_tro_by_macinivnw-d68c9ty.jpg

Long-Term Benefits of Cuting Down on Sugar

January 8th, 2014

 

candy sweetsIt has been a little over 20 years since the World Health Organization (WHO) came out with the statistic that the amount of free sugars taken in by the body should be less than 10% of the total caloric intake, with free sugars defined as sugars that have been added to foods by the one preparing the food or it can be sugars that are naturally present in foods, including in honey, syrups, and fruit juices.

WHO decided to put this statistic to the test and commissioned Newcastle University to do research on whether cutting down on these free sugars to only 10% of total calories can result in lower levels of tooth decay. Newcastle University’s results were published in the Journal of Dental Research, revealing that... when individuals kept their free sugar intake less than 10% of their total caloric intake, there were indeed much fewer instances of tooth decay. What’s more is that the research findings also suggest that when individuals cut down sugar intake to only holding 5% of caloric intake, individuals would reap further benefits, decreasing risk of cavities throughout their life.

Researchers at Newcastle University explain that much of the research done in the past to determine recommended level of free sugars were primarily based on levels related to decayed teeth in 12 year olds. However, it is no secret that tooth decay is a progressive disease, which cannot be accurately determined based solely on the state of teeth during a specific time period of an individual’s life. When patterns of tooth decay in populations over time were analyzed, research shows that children that had less than three cavities at the age of 12 can actually go on to develop high number of cavities as adults.

This increase of tooth decay can be attributed to the increase in the amount of sugar intake in industrialized countries. Sugar in the past may have only been an occasional treat, but now this is simply not the case. Sugary foods and beverages are now considered staples in many people’s diet. Professor Moynihan, the professor of nutrition and oral health at Newcastle University, explain that while fluoride is can act as a protectant against tooth decay, it can not completely eliminate tooth decay. With increased sugar intake, teeth still remain susceptible to cavities even with the help fluoride in water and toothpaste.

Join WHO’s global initiative in cutting down sweets. Limiting sugar intake not only reaps dental benefits but it indubitably is beneficial for overall health. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questionsContact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation. 

 

References:

http://www.ncl.ac.uk/dental/research/publication/195320
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131209204040.htm
http://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2013/sep/07/sugar-diet-who-uk-experts
http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/tc/tooth-decay-topic-overview

The Upcoming ‘Great American Smokeout'

November 19th, 2013

smokeoutWhile most people are aware of the dangers that smoking results in, it is surprising to most that dentists can have the ability to not only inform others on smoking effects on overall health, but also the damaging effects of smoking on oral health. Smoking and other tobacco products have been linked to periodontal, or gum, disease through affecting the attachment of bone and soft tissue to teeth. Along with increasing the risk of periodontal disease, smoking has been linked to specific cancers. There are toxins and carcinogens present in tobacco products, including cigars, cigarettes, pipe tobacco, and chewing tobacco. The American Lung Association has found that cigarettes cause 90% of all lung cancer deaths. Smokers of cigars and pipes have an increased risk of cancer of the oral cavity as well as the overall body. Also, don’t be swayed into thinking that tobacco products are harmless; while they are “smokeless” options including chewing tobacco, there are still more than 28 cancer-causing chemicals found in this form of tobacco. Chewing tobacco can cause cancer in the cheek, gums and lips, and this cancer usually developed where the tobacco is held in the mouth. Regardless of what form of smoking, there is no doubt that smoking is harmful to the oral cavity and the overall health of the body.

 

The American Cancer Society is holds an event called Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November to encourage current smokers to use that day to make a solid plan to quit, or to start making plans prior to the event and to quit on the day of. The American Cancer Society explains that smokers are most successful in stopping the habit is to have access to smoking-cessation hotlines, stop-smoking groups, counseling, nicotine replacement products, online quit groups, and encourage and support from friends and family members. When smokers implement two or more of these sources, they have a better chance of quitting.

 

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment and consultation.

 

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2013/article/ADA-10-Great-American-Smokeout-Is-Nov-21.cvsp

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/smoking-oral-health

 

http://medicalcenter.osu.edu/patientcare/healthcare_services/dental_care/oral_cancer_and_tobacco/Pages/index.aspx

 

Spirit of Patriotism at Our Candy Drive!

November 11th, 2013

[caption id="attachment_5854" align="aligncenter" width="1000"]National Guards at the Candy Drive National Guards at the Candy Drive[/caption]

 

We did it again! This year’s Candy Drive was a great success, and we are proud to say we have collected even more candy than last year: over 7340 pounds so far—and the candy is still pouring in!  This weighs more than a Humvee! The candy will be sent as care packages with carepacks.org to the troops overseas as a sweet reminder of home.

Here are some highlights from the Candy Drive!

We were joined by so many wonderful people and organizations! We had the National Guards come out, along with a Humvee! We were also joined by some Veterans, who served as an amazing reminder for everything our troops do for us. We also had Chief Cunningham and the Wellesley Police Department, along with Chief DeLorie and the Wellesley Fire Department—everyone who keeps us safe! All the local public schools were represented, and a lot of children and school principals came personally as well. Even local businesses and organizations came to drop off candy and show their support!

[caption id="attachment_5841" align="alignleft" width="300"]Community getting together! Community getting together![/caption]

 

The spirit of patriotism was running high, just in time for Veteran’s Day! Two of our children sang the National Anthem, and we had a moment of silence for those overseas. Everyone was waving around handheld flags with big smiles on their faces.

[caption id="attachment_5842" align="alignright" width="300"]Julia and Aidan Bandte from Hardy School singing the national anthem. Julia and Aidan Bandte from Hardy School singing the national anthem.[/caption]

 

 

 

 

 

The Wellesley Public Schools had a little contest to see which school could collect the most candy. The winner was Upham, whose PTO was awarded with a $500 check, and second and third place went to Hardy and Sprague, respectively.

 

[caption id="attachment_5845" align="alignleft" width="300"]Chief Cunnigham presenting a check to the PTO Contest Winner Chief Cunnigham of the Wellesley Police Department presenting a check to Wellesley Public School PTO Contest Winner[/caption]

 

 

[caption id="attachment_5874" align="alignright" width="300"]Veterans Lindsay Ellms and Pete Jones and Carl Nelson from the Wellesley Celebrations Committee. Veterans Lindsay Ellms and Pete Jones and Carl Nelson from the Wellesley Celebrations Committee.[/caption]

Our World War II Veterans Lindsay Ellms and Pete Jones were honored. Wellesley Celebration Committee was also represented by Carl Nelson and Pete Jones. Thank you to Roy Switzler for your help and support.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It is heart warming to see the whole town come together in the spirit of giving. The Wellesley Fire Department and Wellesley Police Department, along with the National guards supporting the town-wide initiative to support the troops. All Wellesley Public Schools participated with many private and neighboring town schools.

 

[caption id="attachment_5878" align="alignleft" width="300"]Wellesley Fire Chief DeLorie and Police Chief Cunningham with the Wellesley School Principals and Drs. Ali & Ali Wellesley Fire Chief DeLorie and Police Chief Cunningham with the Wellesley School Principals and Drs. Ali & Ali[/caption]

 

At the letter writing table, kids and adults both had an opportunity to write a personal note or card to send along with the candy to our troops. We imagine that these kind words of love and support will be even sweeter than the candy!

 

[caption id="attachment_5860" align="alignright" width="300"]Dear Troops... Dear Troops...[/caption]

 

 

 

 

It has been so touching to see the message of health and giving being spread across our community. We really could not have done it without everyone’s help, and we want to thank everyone who participated! And lastly, a big thank you to the Wellesley Dental Group team that put in the hard work to make our Candy Drive such a success!

Making Big News and A Bigger Impact!

 

[caption id="attachment_5894" align="alignleft" width="300"]Tufts Jumbos Making a Difference! Tufts Jumbos Making a Difference![/caption]

Boston.com

Boston.com

Wellesley Weston Magazine

Wellesley Weston Magazine

Patch 

Patch

swellesley

bostonglobe.com

WickedLocal

InAgist

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 Together We Can Do So Much!

Our Candy Brigade!

 A Note Sweeter Than Candy!

Candy Pouring In!

Candy Drive Flyer

Candy Drive Kick-Off

 

Thank you Maura Wayman Photography for taking beautiful pictures and to Haynes Management for being such great neighbors!

Together We Can Do So Much!

November 9th, 2013

Together we can do so much! It was wonderful to see the Wellesley and Metrowest community united through the spirit of philanthropy. The candy drive is not only a wonderful way to promote oral health but it is also a way to give back. Our mission of being smile ambassadors is two-fold: promoting healthier teeth for our children and  also bringing smiles to the troops overseas. Seeing all of the kids give up their extra candy and writing beautiful heart-warming letters to send to the troops is incredibly touching, and shows just how much our community cherishes our troops.

Special thanks to all the Wellesley Public School Principals, Chief Rick DeLorie of the Wellesley Fire Department, Chief Terrence Cunningham of the Wellesley Police Department, and Joanna Bandte for her tireless efforts in making this a huge success!

 

[caption id="attachment_5814" align="alignleft" width="202"]Zarah Ali trying to contain the candy. Zarah Ali trying to contain the candy.[/caption]

Wellesley Schools:

Bates  School

Fiske  School

Hardy  School

Hunnewell School

Schofield School

Sprague School

Tenacre School

Upham School

Wellesley High School 

Bright Horizons at Wellesley

Babson College

Other Town Schools:

[caption id="attachment_5817" align="alignright" width="300"]The whole town getting together! The whole town getting together![/caption]

Charles River School- Dover

Cabot School- Newton

Downey School- Westwood

Field School- Weston

High Rock School- Needham

Needham ECC- Needham

Newman School- Needham

Peirce School- West Newton

Saint Jude School- Waltham

 

[caption id="attachment_5830" align="alignleft" width="300"]Everyone getting together and sending the candy and handwritten notes off to the troops! Everyone getting together and sending the candy and handwritten notes off to the troops![/caption]

Organizations

Wellesley Mother's Forum

Wellesley Department of Veteran's Services

Wellesley Celebrations Committee

National Guard Family Program of Massachusetts

Wellesley Fire Department

Wellesley Police Department

 

[caption id="attachment_5832" align="alignright" width="199"]Overflowing candy! Overflowing candy![/caption]

 

Local Businesses

 

Magic Beans  

Au Pair USA

Boston Sports Club

BellaSante- Wellesley

Roche Bros- Wellesley

Metrowest Academy of Jiu Jitsu

AccuRev

 

Our Candy Drive Brigade!

November 7th, 2013

[gallery ids="5793,5799,5800,5801,5802,5803,5805,5806,5807,5808,5809,5810"]

 

It’s the day before we wrap up this year’s Candy Drive and the action never stops. Our Candy Brigade at work! We've been filling boxes upon boxes of candy to tomorrow's festivities. Our friend, Joanna Bandte, and our dental assistant, Helio,  has been so busy driving around town in a Uhaul to collect notes and candy from the community. So far we have collected from Sprague, Bates, Fiske, Schofield, Upham, Hardy, Magic Beans, Cabot, Downey, and the list is still growing! We can't wait to see how much we have in store this year.  Our Uhaul is filling up nicely and our office is already full of candy. We will have to bring our drive outside.

Mike , from Magic Beans came over, dropping off even more candy.  Magic Beans has been so incredibly generous again this year with their donation – a true symbol of the generosity of the Boston community.

We can hardly wait to see all the excited faces tomorrow as students, principals, parents, volunteers, national guard, veterans, and the media from all over the Metrowest area join together in the spirit of giving. We have children that will be singing the national anthem. It is amazing for us to see the community come together centering around the drive. We can’t imagine how happy the soldiers will be to receive all this candy and those beautiful letters.  It warms our hearts amidst this rainy day to know how much good we all are doing through this remarkable event. Keep up the wonderful work!

Generous contributors have been coming in and out of the office this week. If you haven’t already, pay us a visit! It’s not too late for you to join in on the fun and donate your candy and hand-written notes to the troops.  Stop by tomorrow morning and you’ll be able to see our ever-growing gargantuan and multi-colored candy display.

Donations to the Candy Drive will be happily accepted up until Friday, November 8 at Wellesley Dental Group on 5 Seaward Rd in Wellesley. We request that  donations be dropped off between 8 am to 11 am. All the candy and letters will be shipped overseas to the soldiers via CarePacks, a non-profit organization.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at (781) 237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com.

 

Make sure to check us out on Boston.comWellesley Weston, and Patch!!

A Note Sweeter Than Candy

November 6th, 2013

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One of the sweetest notes from J. B. Our 10 year old smile ambassador :)

"Dear Troops,

As a thanks for supporting our country we hope you enjoy the candy that a lot of families bring for you every year. Thank you!"

Thanks to the Wellesley and surrounding communities our piles of notes and candy are expanding. It is not too late to donate any leftover candy or write a sweet note to send to the troops overseas. Especially the notes, they can perhaps be even sweeter than the candy. If you would like to participate or make a donation please email smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com or call (781)237-9071.

 

 

Find us on Boston.comWellesley Weston, and Patch!

 

 

Candy Pouring In!

November 5th, 2013

kids with candy 2013

We are happy to report that schools from Newton, Needham, Dover, Westwood, and beyond will be participating this year. This upcoming week we will be working closely with these schools, as well as daycares and community organizations, like the Wellesley Mother’s Forum. Also, we are happy to report that Magic Beans has joined hands and will be bringing all of their collected candy to us. Children and adults are encouraged not only to donate extra candy but to bring handwritten letters and cards for the troops overseas. Help us beat last year’s record of 5260 pounds and bring smiles to countless soldiers!

 

If your school or organization would like to participate, please let us know. Donations for the Candy Drive will be happily accepted from now until Friday, November 8th at the Wellesley Dental Group on 5 Seaward Rd in Wellesley. We request that all donations be dropped off during business hours: Monday through Thursday from 8am to 5pm. From our office in Wellesley, all the candy and letters will be shipped overseas to the soldiers via CarePacks, a non-profit organization - Get more info here.

 

Also, check us out on Boston.com, Wellesley Weston, and Patch!

Candy Drive Flyer

November 1st, 2013

wellesleycommunitydrive

Candy Drive Kick-Off Halloween Party!

November 1st, 2013

[gallery ids="5749,5743,5744,5745,5746,5747,5748,5750,5751,5752,5753,5755,5756,5757,5758,5759,5760,5761,5765"]

 

Thank you everyone who joined us for our Halloween Costume Party to kick-off our 6th Annual Candy Drive.

The Day After Halloween: What To Do With the Candy?

November 1st, 2013

candy

 

After a night of trick-or-treating, children are more than excited to dig in and eat their hard-earned treats. Parents may think that the days following Halloween is when they have to be more lenient about the amount of candy their children eat, but pediatric dentists urge parents to pay closer attention to their teeth and the candy they are consuming.

 

Children are receiving a variety of different candies, and dentists recommend avoiding sticky or liquid candies, which tend to stick onto children’s teeth. Individuals may ask whether there is a better alternative than these candies, but it is hard to give a solid answer. Candies are high in sugar content, providing the bacteria in the oral cavity with plenty of food. This ultimately increases the production of acid via bacteria, which leads to a higher risk of tooth decay and cavities. When looking through children’s basket of candy, here are a few candies that tend to be less harmful for teeth:

 

1. Sugar-free candy and gum with xylitol: these candies do not continue sugar, which is the primary source of food for bacteria; gum and candy has the potential to prevent tooth decay by increasing saliva and rinsing sugars and acids in the oral cavity

 

2. Even though powdery candy is packed with sugar, powder tends to dissolve quickly and is less likely to stick to teeth

 

3. Chocolate: chocolate also dissolves relatively quickly in the mouth; however, try to stay away from chocolate containing caramel and nuts, which are substances that can easily stick to teeth

 

Halloween can be a treacherous time for teeth, but there are also many ways to help children prevent tooth decay. Be sure to monitor the amount of candy that a child is consuming. After eating the candy, it is important to enforce proper brushing. Make sure that sticky candies have been brushed off and removed for tooth surfaces. A toothpaste containing fluoride can also keep teeth strong, protecting them from cavities. 30 seconds of brushing should be allotted to each quadrant, with a total of 2 minutes of brushing. Going in the small crevices between teeth is just as important, ensuring that there is no sugary residue for bacteria to consume and produce acid.

 

Holidays are always a fun time, but be sure to help your child practice good oral hygiene! If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

Please donate all excess Halloween candy and handwritten notes to be sent to the troops overseas in their care packages along with oral hygiene supplies.

To get more information click here.

 

 

References:

 

http://www.alligator.org/news/campus/article_b5a3d2f6-3b99-11e3-a7f2-0019bb2963f4.html

 

http://kidshealth.org/kid/stay_healthy/body/teeth_care.html

 

http://www.dentistryiq.com/articles/2013/10/halloween-candy-eating-tips-from-dentists.html

 

Is the Future of Dental Implants Found In Diamonds or Titanium?

October 25th, 2013

 

 

diamond

 

It may be strange to think that a precious jewel can aid in the field of dentistry. Researchers at UCLA have been looking into diamonds and if they do have a place in creating better dental implants for patients. These researchers are focusing on nanodiamonds, which are made through conventional mining and refining operations and are definitely called “nano” for a reason; they come out to be approximately four to five nanometers in diameters, resembling miniature soccer balls. The UCLA researchers enlisted the help of the UCLA School of Dentistry, the UCLA Department of Bioengineering, Northwestern University, and even the NanoCarbon Research Institute in Japan to help come up with innovative ways to implement these nanodiamonds in dentistry. Their research has led them to believe that these nanodiamonds can improve bone growth and has the potential to counteract osteonecrosis, a disease marked by bone breakdown due to reduce blood flow.

 

Osteonecrosis can affect various parts of the body, but when this disease affects the joints in the jaw, it can keep people from eating and speaking properly, even restricting or impeding movement. What makes matters worse is that when osteonecrosis occurs near implants, including teeth or prosthetic joints, these implants loosen and can eventually fall out. These dental implant failures lead to additional procedures, which can not only be painful, but can also become very expensive.

 

These issues surrounding dental implants led the team at UCLA to conduct a study that would reveal whether nanodiamonds would be a viable solution. Conducted by Dr. Dean Ho, a professor of oral biology and medicine at the UCLA School of Dentistry, and his team used the nonadiamonds to deliver proteins responsible for bone growth. Their results indicated that nanodiamonds have the uncanny ability to bind rapidly the essential proteins and growth factors. The surface properties of these diamonds allow for a slower delivery of these proteins, which researchers believe contribute to a longer period of treatment of the affected area in the oral cavity. What’s more is that these nanodiamonds can be inserted in to patients in a non-invasive way, through either an injection or an oral rinsing.

 

Nanodiamonds are not only the technology that researchers are pursuing to improve. On the other side of the world, researchers in Japan and China have been revisiting the essential components of titanium, which contains alloys that are very commonly used in orthopedic implants. Because of its reliable mechanical and chemical properties, along with its biocompatible and corrosion resistant nature, titanium has been the go-to product to use in dental implant procedures. However, one of the drawbacks that titanium faces is its lack of ability to bond directly to living bone. Researchers have found that calcium phosphate (CaP) and collagen are main components of natural bone; these scientists believe that a composite of both of these components can be used to effectively coat titanium implants. The study they published in the journal of Science and Technology of Advanced Material showed that when titanium implants were coated with CaP gel and inserted into the thigh bone of rabbit, within four and eight weeks, the authors noticed that there was significantly more new bone on the surface of the titanium implants that had been covered with the CaP gel. These coated implants were also able to bond directly to the bone, without needing an intervening soft tissue layer. The researchers believe that this innovative CaP and collagen composite can play an important role in improving dental implants.

 

Both results found for nanodiamonds and titanium prove to be exciting news in field of Periodonistry and even in the medical world as a whole. These nanodiamonds may possibly revolutionize dental implants, allowing them to be longer lasting and effective, while this the new CaP and collagen coating and greatly improve the use of titanium. Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/09/130918102002.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/10/131003142214.htm

http://newsroom.ucla.edu/portal/ucla/nanodiamond-encrusted-teeth-248066.aspx

http://news.sciencemag.org/health/2011/03/nanodiamonds-could-be-cancer-patients-best-friend

http://www.abcnetspace.com/2013/08/how-diamonds-are-shaping-technology.html to read more about Diamond Technology!

 

 

 

 

Can Having Asthma Give You More Cavities?

October 4th, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Video on Asthma and Dry Mouth

Tooth decay and asthma are two of the most common health problems that plaque children, adolescents, and many young adults. Asthma stands to affect 20 million Americans, 6.3 million of which are children. There has been research detailing a possible link between these two seemingly different health issues. The a dental hygienist and researcher out of Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg looked at patients of varying age ranges, consisting of 3, 6, 12 to 16 and 18 to 24 year olds. Her results demonstrated that 3-year olds with asthma were more prone to cavities than 3-year olds without respiratory issues. When looking at patients in older age ranges, the children and young adults with asthma developed more cavities and even more gum disease than their asthma-free counterparts. Within the asthma group, only 1 out of 20 patients was caries-free, while 13 out of 20 patients were caries free in the asthma-free group.

 

A possible theory that has been posed of this correlation hints at asthma medications being the culprit to the increase in cavities. Because these inhaler formulas are often comprise of powders, they live a dry residue that sticks to teeth. These medications may inhibit the production of saliva, which would lead to an individual getting more cavities. Not only do these medications limit saliva secretion, these drugs, including inhalers, syrups, and even sugar-coated steroids, are taken throughout the day, leaving users’ teeth exposed to a lot of sugar. Children with asthma also have more of a tendency to breathe through their mouth. This would then lead to the case of dry mouth, which would have also contributed to the higher cavities prevalence.

 

Patients should be in communications with dentists about the medication they use and their oral hygiene habits. It is important for dentists to know enough to effectively help keep cavities at bay. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2011/article/ADA-08-Youngsters-with-asthma-have-higher-risk-of-cavities.cvsp

 

http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2004-05-30/features/0405300364_1_inhalers-asthma-drugs-decay

 

 

 

 

http://madisonkidsdentist.com/ for pic credit

Fighting Tooth Decay with Licorice!

October 2nd, 2013

Herb Licorice or Liquorice Roots

Licorice is often thought of as a nice, sweet treat, usually found as a main ingredient in candies, but who would of thought that it would keep teeth and gums healthy?

The Journal of Natural Products published a study done by Dr. Stefan Gafner, a researcher for a division of Colgate-Palmolive found two compounds present in dried licorice that were beneficial as antibacterial substances, preventing the growth of major bacteria that have been linked to cavities and periodontal disease. The study demonstrated that licroicidin and licorisoflavan A, which are two main components to licorice, prevented bacteria from introducing tooth decay.

 

Nowadays licorice root has been implemented into many oral health care products, including being used as a breath freshening ingredient in some natural toothpastes. Researchers have also delved in to the possibility of adding licorice root in various food products to cut down on tooth decay. A researcher, Dr. Wenyuan Shi, from University of California, Los Angeles have been working with Alaska Native and American Indian children, a group of individuals that are at high risk of early childhood caries. His research showed positive results, demonstrating that when licorice plant extract was added to lollipops, there was a reduction in the amount of caries found in children.

 

Aside from its contribution to oral health, the health benefits of licorice roots have been known for quite some time. It is a main component in Chinese traditional medicine and is often used in conjunction with other herbs to enhance their effectiveness. Outside of the US, the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) showed that licorice roots have also been used to counteract the adverse effects of Hepatitis C.  Dried licorice root is also often used to relieve sore throats, digestive and respiratory problems.

 

If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:

 

http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ADA/2012/article/ADA-01-Licorice-root-fights-oral-bacteria.cvsp

 

http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/news/20120105/licorice-root-may-cut-cavities-gum-disease

 

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/01/120104115106.htm

 

http://www.methowvalleyherbs.com/2013/04/brush-your-teeth-with-roots.html

 

 

 

Keeping Cavities Away: Protecting a Child’s Oral Health

September 20th, 2013

After making it to the dentist’s for your child’s biannual checkup, the dentist reveals that a cavity has been spotted. Don’t panic! It is important to monitor and keep up with a child’s oral health, it is definitely something that can occur. However, it is now a great way to brush up on tips to prevent future cavities from forming, which is especially important for children who have permanent teeth coming in.

One of the most effective ways to get a child on board with good oral health is to demonstrate it as a parent. If will make a world of a different if tooth brushing is done together. Emphasizing the steps of brushing, including holding the toothbrush, squeezing out a pea-sized amount of toothpaste, and even brushing the gum line can allow children to carefully learn the process in its entirety. Don’t be forgetting to floss! It is easy to forgo the floss and head straight to bed, but make take it a daily habit, making sure that the child understands that oral health should be a part of everyday life, and it should not be something to do only when it is remembered.

Because tooth brushing may start out seeming rather mundane to children, making the process fun can encourage them to maintain good oral health. Allowing a child to pick a colorful and fun toothbrush may just keep them excited about brushing teeth. Try to obtain child-friendly flossers that make flossing less of an ordeal and yummy tasting toothpaste to help them brush longer. If a child loses track of how long the should be brushing for, invest in an electric toothbrush with a self-timer; there are great brushes that beeps every 30 seconds, allowing the brusher to cover the four quadrants in the mouth in 2 minutes!

For course, it is just as important to keep track of what a child is eating. Cavities may easily arise when improper oral hygiene is coupled with a sugary diet. Try to limit children’s sugar intake and, instead, load their plate with foods from each food group. Look for healthy snacks that can add to their vitamin and mineral intake. If you have any more questions, feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com

 

References:
http://www.colgate.com/app/CP/US/EN/OC/Information/Articles/ColgateNewandNow/Community/2013/January/article/SW-281474979047288.cvsp

 

http://www.orajel.com/articles/9-ways-to-make-brushing-fun.aspx

 

http://www.parenting.com/article/ask-dr-sears-toothbrushing-resistance

 

http://www.meetadentist.com/dentalcare/dental-care-for-children/

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