systemic inflammation

Gum Disease could be Threatening your Life During COVID-19

March 28th, 2021

We all know how important taking care of our teeth are, but did you know that in doing so you could be lowering your risk of having severe complications from COVID-19? The human body is fascinating, and throughout the years research has been continuously proving the relationship between our oral conditions and the conditions that can develop throughout the entire body, particularly as a result of systemic inflammation. A recent study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology reported that individuals with a severe form of gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, are 9 times more likely to die from infection with COVID-19. 

Periodontal disease has been found to be linked as a culprit of many detrimental health conditions, including diabetes, respiratory disease, chronic kidney disease, rheumatoid arthritis, Alzheimer's disease, obesity, and metabolic syndrome, just to name a few. In addition, periodontal disease can lead to oral problems such as bad breath, bone loss, and ultimately result in loss of teeth.

The Surprising Link Between Gum Disease and Systemic Disease - Millennium Dental Technologies, Inc.

More recently, it has been suggested that controlling periodontal gum inflammation could possibly help lower the chance of experiencing severe COVID-19 symptoms

Another study published in the Journal of Clinical Periodontology also found that individuals with gum disease who become infected with COVID-19 are 3.5 times more likely to be in the intensive care unit (ICU) and 4.5 times more likely to require use of a ventilator. They found that the blood inflammatory markers were significantly higher in patient with gum disease.

Not to mention, a California Dental Association (CDA) Journal study looking at inflammatory markers and their relationship to COVID-19 complications found that pneumonia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and other pulmonary complications linked to COVID-19 could result form the aspiration of oral bacteria. This is also supported by previous research that has found an association between periodontal disease and other common lung conditions such as asthma.

This is why many research authors and health professionals are highlighting the importance of prevention and avoiding the promotion of systemic inflammation to help decrease the chance of developing severe complications from the virus.

On a positive note, periodontal disease can be prevented and managed! Regular dental visits and proper oral hygiene practices are necessary to help prevent the disease from progressing. Your dentist may recommend non-surgical and/or surgical treatments.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://nypost.com/2021/02/08/covid-19-patients-with-gum-disease-more-likely-to-die-study/

https://www.beckersdental.com/clinical-leadership-infection-control/36224-routine-dental-care-may-prevent-severe-covid-19-complications-study-finds.html

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jcpe.13435

https://www.beckersdental.com/clinical-leadership-infection-control/36458-covid-19-patients-with-gum-disease-9-times-more-likely-to-die-from-the-virus-study-finds.html?origin=DentalE&utm_source=DentalE&utm_medium=email&utm_content=newsletter&oly_enc_id=7754I6987723B8B

https://www.cda.org/Home/News-and-Events/Newsroom/Article-Details/routine-dental-care-may-protect-against-severe-covid-19-related-complications#:~:text=Oral%20bacteria%20can%20be%20aspirated,to%20dentistry%20and%20COVID%2D19.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fleemingdental.com.au%2Fnew-studies-show-gum-disease-may-increase-severity-of-covid-19%2F&psig=AOvVaw2eU7rvXv9h5qjRprOqk-Bv&ust=1617025137826000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMDBpqeO0-8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAD

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.lanap.com%2F2016%2F09%2F22%2Fsurprising-link-between-gum-disease-and-systemic-disease%2F&psig=AOvVaw2yP2PqAwAjz0-Wnp8RPUO8&ust=1617028498531000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCJjskN-a0-8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAI

Multiple Sclerosis & Maintaining a Healthy Mouth

March 14th, 2021

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a neurodegenerative disorder which effects the myelin sheath, altering the communication between the central nervous system (CNS) and the rest of the body. During March, MS Awareness week is held to shed light on the progress and stories of people across the world who manage & bravely fight this disease despite the challenges. MS is a progressive disease and is also considered an autoimmune disease. The exact cause of is currently still unknown. Many factors may play a role in the condition, including genetics, environmental factors, presence of immune system disorders, infection, vitamin deficiencies, smoking, and systemic inflammation. Researchers are also investigating the potential of the gut microbiome and chronic stress in relation to MS. MS can cause CNS changes in motor, sensory and cognitive functions, but the symptoms can vary between each individual.

In addition, World MS Day, created by the  Multiple Sclerosis International Federation (MSIF), will be celebrated on May 30, 2021, which aims to unite people and organizations from across the world to help learn more about the condition and help us all move to elimination of MS. Worldwide more than 2.3 million people live with multiple sclerosis. During this time loads of information and research is highlighted to help everyone understand this complex and unpredictable disease. Explore powerful stories of people with MS.
There are different types of MS, the most common being relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS), which 85% of people with MS have. This is characterized by symptom flare-ups, then times of improvement. The flare-ups may last for days to weeks, and then start to resolve overtime. It has been reported that approximately half of the relapses can cause permanent damage to the CNS. Overtime, the disease can progress to secondary progressive MS, which consists of consistent worsening of symptoms.

Another type of MS is called Primary-Progressive Multiple Sclerosis (PPMS), in which individuals (10-15% of people diagnosed with MS) experience progressive worsening symptoms with few or no recovery periods. This type is often more severe and disabling,  and nerve damage is often found more in the spinal cord than in the brain.

Some symptoms of MS can include pain, vision issues, motor impairment and fatigue. MS may also have a negative effect on bladder and bowel problems, sexual dysfunction, trouble focusing and memory problems, and depression. Facial pain including partial facial paralysis or muscle spasms, and trouble speaking and chewing may also occur. 

Individuals with MS may also experience challenges with their oral health. Individuals are at a higher risk of developing dental caries and gum disease, for instance due to physical complications of MS and the lowered immune response. Systemic inflammation has been linked as a potential trigger for MS as well as periodontal disease, a severe form of gum disease. Plus, manual dexterity may be compromised in some individuals, making it hard for them to brush and floss adequately. In these cases, modified toothbrushes and/or electric toothbrushes may be more helpful. In more severe cases, caregivers may need to help provide help with oral care. Patients with MS may also need to be seen by the dentist more frequently for visits and cleanings. Your dentist may even recommend fluoride treatment or prescription fluoride toothpaste as an added protective treatment.

There is currently no cure for MS, but numerous medications and treatment methods have been found to help manage/slow the progression of the disease and relapse occurrences. However, MS medications may also produce negative effects on oral health, including dry mouth (also known as xerostomia), inflamed gingival tissues, altered taste, and fungal infections including oral candidiasis and angular cheilitis, for instance. Immunosuppressants may increase the risk of developing infections and cancers as well. Be sure to inform your health care providers of all of the current medications you are taking.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Bahar Houshman and Dr. Marisa Reason is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Reisman would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/Get-Involved/Raise-Awareness

https://decisionsindentistry.com/article/oral-health-risks-multiple-sclerosis/

https://www.everydayhealth.com/multiple-sclerosis/living-with/how-ms-affect-oral-health/

https://www.nationalmssociety.org/NationalMSSociety/media/MSNationalFiles/Brochures/Brochure-Dental-Health.pdf

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fhealthykcmag.com%2Fmultiple-sclerosis-awareness-month%2F&psig=AOvVaw1pEiJpXj4ePew6y5snrUFR&ust=1615644189477000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLD5pYz2qu8CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAK

Could Poor Oral Health be Related to Metabolic Syndrome? 

January 11th, 2021

Having swollen or bleeding gums? No one likes that. Gum disease can involve pesky symptoms such as swollen inflamed gums, gums that bleed easily, bad breath, and painful chewing, for instance. A main cause of gum disease is dental plaque, which with good oral health practices can be managed and prevented! When dental plaque adheres to the surfaces of your teeth and is not removed, this can lead to gum inflammation. Gingivitis can progress into periodontal disease, in which irreversible bone loss and tissue damage begins to occur. Unfortunately, gum disease can lead to permanent tooth loss. But, that's not all! Periodontal disease has also been found in many research studies to be linked with several other systemic diseases, such as heart disease, diabetes, and now also metabolic syndrome, according to a new study.

Researchers at Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) found that a common bacteria known to cause periodontal disease, Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis), also has the capability to cause skeletal muscle metabolic dysfunction through changing an individual's gut microbiome.The purpose of their study, according to the study's author Kazuki Watanabe, was to determine how infection with periodontal bacteria may lead to metabolic changes in skeletal muscle and ultimately lead to metabolic syndrome. However, the study reports that a direct link between the periodontal bacteria and the metabolic function of skeletal muscle has not been proven yet.

The oral cavitiy is a true window into the rest of the body. Oral inflammation caused by periodontal bacteria can influence inflammation within other parts of the body, and the study reports that it can lead to increases in body weight and increased insulin resistance. The body's resistance to insulin is a huge part of type 2 diabetes, in addition to the development of metabolic syndrome.

What's Metabolic syndrome?

Metabolic syndrome consists of multiple conditions in association with each other, including high blood pressure, high blood sugar levels, obesity, abnormal fat metabolism, and systemic inflammation.

The researchers studied individuals with metabolic syndrome and discovered that these individuals had high antibody titers against P. gingivalis, meaning they had likely been infected with the bacteria. In addition, they found a positive correlation between the antibody titers and increased insulin resistance. The researchers then observed mice given both a high fat diet, a common risk factor for developing metabolic syndrome, and P. gingivalis injected orally. As a result, they discovered that the mice developed an increased insulin resistance, fat infiltration, and lower uptake of sugar into the skeletal muscle creating metabolic dysfunction when compared to mice not infected with the bacteria. The researchers noted a significant difference in the gut microorganisms in the mice infected with P. gingivalis versus the mice that were not infected.

So, one important thing that the researchers noted in their study is how periodontal disease can impact other parts of the body, and not just the mouth. More research is needed to investigate the link between periodontal disease and metabolic syndrome.

This pandemic has impacted us all, but our community is indeed all stronger together. Our team at WDG always has your safety and health as our top priority, and we have implemented additional safety measures and equipment to help prevent the transmission of all infections, including COVID-19. Wellesley Dental Group has completely reopened since June 8th, 2020 for all dental procedures and cleanings! Thank you for entrusting your health and dental care to us at Wellesley Dental Group.

Feel free to contact Drs. Ali & Ali and the caring team at Wellesley Dental Group if you have any thoughts or concerns; they will be happy to answer your questions! Contact us today at 781-237-9071 or smile@wellesleydentalgroup.com to set up an appointment.

Your little ones and teens are welcome to visit our pediatric dentist, Dr. Derek, and Dr. Emad is happy to help with your TMJ and orthodontic needs. For wisdom teeth extractions or any other oral surgery needs, Dr. Stephens would love to help, and our gum-specialist Dr. Singh can help with your gum-related concerns.

References:

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/12/201208111428.htm

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/metabolic-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20351916

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fflairzhealth.com%2Fwhat-is-the-metabolic-syndrome%2F&psig=AOvVaw2Cz9QHTUqmTqo55YxjB1dP&ust=1610405890584000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCMiIksu7ku4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABA3

https://www.google.com/url?sa=i&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dockeodental.com%2Fgum-disease%2F&psig=AOvVaw1fQ3ks6wQZmJ_Jv-DJufGS&ust=1610406249444000&source=images&cd=vfe&ved=0CAIQjRxqFwoTCLi0-vm8ku4CFQAAAAAdAAAAABAp

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